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  • dlmca
    , contributor
    Comments (358) | Send Message
     
    One of the catalysts to positive company and stock performance is a change at the top

     

    Not only is there a fresh look at things - but some of the sacred people and ideas are reevaluated as a stronger team is developed

     

    A significant advantage too that he has TG to work with and is not having to go thru a learning curve to understand what needs to be executed

     

    I expect great things from DD as he has a chance to place his feet on the ground
    10 Jul, 05:46 AM Reply Like
  • Noahfreak
    , contributor
    Comments (41) | Send Message
     
    Agreed. Looking forward to see what he can do.
    10 Jul, 07:27 AM Reply Like
  • dlmca
    , contributor
    Comments (358) | Send Message
     
    Indie thanks on search

     

    What if the commentator has not posted in awhile - is there an alphabetic sort or some such function available
    10 Jul, 05:50 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30231) | Send Message
     
    If you know a commenter's screen name, you can go to the SA homepage and type the name in the search block. The resulting links should take you right to the commenter's profile and archive.
    10 Jul, 06:49 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    I love that loco pic up in the header! Thanks APH!
    10 Jul, 08:04 AM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (879) | Send Message
     
    REPOST:
    The new lead-carbon batteries have been installed in NS 999 today.
    Specific Tweet: http://bit.ly/1mLaUHv
    -- wtblanchard

     

    The light at the end of the tunnel IS a train. ;)
    10 Jul, 08:12 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    ARCA in on both side pre-market with bid 11K $0.1311, down from $0.148 by NITE earlier, and offering 31K at $0.16, matching CANT's $0.16 from earlier.

     

    HardToLove
    10 Jul, 09:27 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    ARCA disappears from *both* sides at the open.

     

    B/a goes to a more reasonable starting $0.145/$0.148.

     

    HardToLove
    10 Jul, 09:34 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    07/09/2014: EOD stuff partially copied from the blog (up now).
    # Trds: 50, MinTrSz: 100, MaxTrSz: 40000, Vol: 336501, AvTrSz: 6730
    Min. Pr: 0.1401, Max Pr: 0.1488, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.1456
    # Buys, Shares: 27 121700, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.1461
    # Sells, Shares: 23 214801, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.1454
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 1:1.77 (36.17% "buys"), DlyShts 110951 (32.97%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 51.65%

     

    The company announcement of a new CEO and board chairman appointment seems to still be affecting the action today as we had some more VWAP price improvement even though the high was way down. Volume was improved from yesterday's too, but it's still low. The buy percentage dropped from 47.1% to 36.2% though, reinforcing my concern about the volume.

     

    Yesterday and Tuesday I forgot to note that the $0.135 support I expected apparently came into play on Monday, 7/7, as we “bounced” off it and back into the mid-$0.14 range. Because of the PR regarding the new CEO appointment appeared we can't make a fair judgment on it though. I'll note only that the four days before the touch occurred we had bottoms near $0.14, which failed to hold. The touch of $0.135 occurred on ...

     

    There were no “outliers” today as both the low and the high were both close to other prices and ...

     

    We've had a break, significance unknown yet, in the 5, 10, 25 and 50-day VWAP averages, which were all descending. Today they ...

     

    The larger trades (>= 15K) occurred on 7 of the 50 trades, 14.00%. These 156,850 shares were 46.61% of day's volume, and traded at a VWAP of $0.1461. 2 of the larger trades, 28.57% ...

     

    The other 43 trades, 86.00% of the day's trades, traded 179,651 shares, 53.39% of the days volume. The VWAP was $0.1453. 25 trades, 58.14% ...

     

    All the oscillators I watch, again except for ADX related, again ticked up today. I'm still waiting another day or so before trying to assess anything.

     

    The price action continued pushing the lower Bollinger limit but the lower limit ...

     

    Today's low, high, VWAP, trade volume, and daily short sales moved 1.74%, -7.00%, 1.80%, 53.16% and 18.38% respectively. Price spread today was 6.21% vs. 16.19%, 18.52%, 7.07%, 5.08%, 14.29%, 7.78%, 1.67%, 6.60% and 6.67% on prior days.

     

    The usual is in the blog here.
    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    HardToLove
    10 Jul, 10:43 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    CDEL offers 354K @ $0.145 @ 11:06.

     

    It's BAAAACK!

     

    HardToLove
    10 Jul, 11:12 AM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1841) | Send Message
     
    Real or not? It had plenty of chances to dump.
    10 Jul, 11:14 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    Ranma: Not really. Insufficient volume. Even after I thought the strings of 100 share trades I documented were done, and I thought it was to enable this sale, price and volume never came together in such a way as to support a sale of that size at that price.

     

    Not everyone that wants to sell just dumps right away. Lots of patient folks will try and wait it out, sometimes successfully and sometimes not - then dump occurs.

     

    Keep in mind this started out as a larger order, +20K? - I'd have to go check - and some shares *apparently* were taken.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    10 Jul, 11:31 AM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1841) | Send Message
     
    Last afternoon an 80k bid sat for half the day at .146, which had already purchased another 50k or so. Eventually the bids chased up to .148+.

     

    And even if this guy thought prices were heading higher and took off his ask, wouldn't he want to post his ask today slightly better than before now?
    10 Jul, 11:35 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    Ranma: he didn't not appear in the market yesterday or since 7/3.

     

    May have been away or just wanted to wait or ...

     

    I don't know, of course, but I'm thinking one of our larger holders wanting to lighten the load a bit.

     

    HardToLove
    10 Jul, 12:12 PM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (787) | Send Message
     
    HTL,

     

    FYI, A friend of mine took those $20k shares. I was watching level 2 when he placed his order.
    10 Jul, 01:31 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    RBrun, Ask him if he wants about 350k more. ;-o
    10 Jul, 01:46 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1841) | Send Message
     
    If it's a real ask, I'd propose to the seller to break it off to smaller chunks, hit large bids, and/or "iceberg" his order (hide the ask size, some brokers allow this). That would help him get better prices, as buyers won't be timid, even if there is a bit more commission cost.
    10 Jul, 02:04 PM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (787) | Send Message
     
    ii,

     

    I think he is regretting buying the 20k now! ;-((
    10 Jul, 04:30 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    RBrun, Sometimes we regret moves until we don't. The key being sometimes. Good luck to him on his entry point.

     

    God bless us every one.

     

    http://bit.ly/1rZp4Xy
    10 Jul, 04:56 PM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (787) | Send Message
     
    ii,

     

    Perfect! ;-))
    10 Jul, 05:41 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3450) | Send Message
     
    This is hilarious:

     

    http://yhoo.it/1lUQ6as

     

    The headline and reality have yet to make an acquaintance...
    10 Jul, 11:24 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    and then there's these .... truth somewhere in the middle I suppose

     

    1. Solar experts say Australian renewable energy investment being stifled by Government policy

     

    http://ab.co/TV6IrJ

     

    SolarReserve CSP project cancelled ...

     

    "It's pretty clear that the policy in Australia is now being centered around big coal. The coal industry clearly has rallied to move policy away from renewable energies because they view renewable energy as a threat and want to move back to convention coal."

     

    2. Australia risks 'going the way of the dodo'

     

    Australian businessman Danny Kennedy co-founded a rooftop solar company, Sungevity, in 2006 – locating the company in Oakland, California, because of the availability of venture capital and the policy support for renewable energy in California.

     

    Sungevity now has more than 500 employees and operates worldwide.

     

    Mr Kennedy says Australia risks "going the way of the dodo" and missing out on "the biggest economic opportunity of the 21st century" if it continues to favour coal over renewable power.

     

    "We get stuck in quarry Australia mentality from the 20th century while the rest of the world is phasing out coal and trying to move towards these new industries and creating whole new ways of doing business and jobs which Australians may never benefit from," he said.
    10 Jul, 11:39 AM Reply Like
  • ARGE
    , contributor
    Comments (722) | Send Message
     
    Interesting in the comment section:

     

    "Coal’s comeback has been made possible by the massive drop in carbon prices in the European Union’s cap-and-trade system throughout the year. This has made burning natural gas less lucrative for power companies.

     

    "“Coal prices recently fell to their lowest price for over four years in October and carbon prices are half what they were two years ago, making coal-burn extremely attractive to generators in terms of profitability,” Gary Hornby, an energy analyst at Inenco Group Ltd., told Bloomberg.

     

    "Data shows that the burning coal earns companies 9.16 euros per megawatt hour, while burning natural gas nets companies a loss of 19.31 megawatts per hour. As more natural gas plants are taken offline, they have to be replaced by coal."
    10 Jul, 12:11 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    Even further OT

     

    Rhymes, repeats, whatever ...

     

    not looking for, will not participate in, a page sucking debate ... just some data ... do with as y'all will ...

     

    The Chicken Littles Are Wrong: Environmental Regulations Always Spur Innovation

     

    Every time the government raises environmental standards, industry leaders whine that the cost will be prohibitive. But they’ve been wrong every single time.

     

    http://thebea.st/TVcbPf

     

    " ...
    And so on. In the 1970s and 1980s, appliance makers resisted national standards on efficiency for refrigerators, washers and dryers, arguing it would harm choice, and make their products more expensive. In 1987, Ronald Reagan—of all people—set up new standards. In the years since, there has been enormous innovation, expansion of choice, and improvement in efficiency of appliances, all without costs going up much.

     

    Part of this is the expected behavior of people who don’t like change, or who find the status quo profitable, or don’t believe the government should be in the business of demanding that industry and consumers set their sights higher. Reactionaries gonna react. But it betrays a stunning lack of historical awareness and an unseemly lack of faith. Time and again, American businesspeople and engineers have figured out new and improved ways of doing things. More often than not, higher standards, far from being punishments, are a spur to innovation."
    10 Jul, 12:31 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3450) | Send Message
     
    wtb, I think great vigilance is required that it always be done as smartly as possible, laws of unintended consequences and all that, but I certainly agree that imposed requirements can often be catalysts for great positive change... picking winners is IMHO, largely suboptimal, and can sometimes have perverse effects (see ethanol, corn, insanity...) but once identified through decent consensus, picking losers and targeting them for elimination (ie tetraethyl lead, Freon, pcbs, mercury etc etc) and then letting industry/ the market adapt and sort it out is often a smart and reasonable path to improved QOL... Taxes on emissions of the offending substances also seem to me like generally a good (or at minimum, least bad) leveraging of the great principle of incentives...
    10 Jul, 12:49 PM Reply Like
  • ARGE
    , contributor
    Comments (722) | Send Message
     
    Setting standard can, but often time the innovation is really just a work around...moved into a house that had the original dishwasher, vintage 1979, it had a 15 minute cycle and got the dishes clean, when it gave up the ghost the energy star(ed) replacement took more than 3 times to do a load and it was 50/50 if they would get clean, but hey it used less energy per minute so it was green.
    The other problem is that the government often time names the winner and kills better technology, like when Honda had a car that burned the exhaust to add power and it was cleaner than using a catalytic converter, or the low flush toilet that used the line water pressure using just one gallon of water, but the government standard choose the 1.5 gallon that you had to flush 3 or 4 time to get it down.
    10 Jul, 03:04 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1841) | Send Message
     
    What really grinds my gears are the jerks who install those faucets in sinks that give you a trickle of water. It's not going to make me use less water to wash my hands!
    10 Jul, 03:16 PM Reply Like
  • Noahfreak
    , contributor
    Comments (41) | Send Message
     
    I thought the majority of Australia's coal was going to the Chinese, which is why the coal miners are doing so well there.
    11 Jul, 05:38 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Australian coal exports by year.

     

    http://bit.ly/1qQieSe

     

    Chinese coal imports by year.

     

    http://bit.ly/1qQihxl
    11 Jul, 07:45 AM Reply Like
  • Billion003
    , contributor
    Comments (210) | Send Message
     
    Lest we forget Solyndra and so many other (not just a few) companies that had no business getting government money providing an excellent opportunity for those in the energy fashion business to waste hundreds of billions of dollars.
    And, of course, this is only the most recent debacle. Wasn't it California during the 80s that mandated the development of and implementation of electric automobiles to a certain percentage of personal overall use there.
    These are just a few of the myriad misuse of "regulation" and the resulting bonfire of tax money. There are so, so many more examples.
    And the usual response is, "Oh well." ...or just convenient memory lapses.
    11 Jul, 11:30 AM Reply Like
  • Billion003
    , contributor
    Comments (210) | Send Message
     
    481, But you're supposed to be kneeling and thanking those that are doing that thinking for you. Its not your place to question.
    11 Jul, 11:33 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Oh the benefits.

     

    I worked on the program. Try getting anyone in purchasing or the supply based to give you the time of day on a program like this. And GM was going lean and only wanted to issue parts orders to suppliers for 1 month of releases. Try hitting unit cost targets when you are ordering things like stampings that require 250 USD set-up charges to load a stamping die into a press and you only want a few parts. I spent more time kissing ass to change rules than engineering the program. Very gratifying work.

     

    Oh, And I also had the GMT-800 truck program at the same time. Not near as important. Only their largest platform. Spent more time launching the EV-1 than the truck app. But hey, the other 40 to 60 hours a week of my time was free.

     

    Gov-mint! You know I'm a big fan.

     

    From Wiki.

     

    "GM based the lease payments for the EV1 on an initial vehicle price of US$33,995.[1] Lease payments ranged from around $299 to $574 per month, depending on the availability of state rebates.[citation needed] Since GM did not offer consumers the option to purchase at the end of the lease, the car's residual value was never established, making it impossible to determine the actual full purchase price or replacement value. One industry official said that each EV1 cost the company about US$80,000, including research, development and other associated costs;[62] other estimates placed the vehicle's actual cost as high as $100,000.[1] Bob Lutz, GM Vice Chairman responsible for the Chevrolet Volt, in November 2011 stated the EV1 cost $250,000 each and leased for just $300 per month.[63] GM stated the cost of the EV1 program at slightly less than $500 million before marketing and sales costs, and over $1 billion in total, although a portion of this cost was defrayed by the Clinton Administration's $1.25 billion Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program.[64][65][66]"
    11 Jul, 11:59 AM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    @Billion003, Solyndra was doing fine until many Chinese solar panel co's dumped their heavily Chinese Gov subsidized panels into our markets. You can talk about the failures but at the same time you should also mention the successes.

     

    " Federal support for renewable energy provides jobs across all 50 states when we need them most and enhances our national security.

     

    Your article does not fully describe a successful energy program with a remarkable return on investment to the public, the Treasury Department’s 1603 grant program. After two years, it has already leveraged over $21.5 billion in private sector investment to jump-start more than 22,000 projects across a wide range of energy technologies. This has created tens of thousands of new American jobs. The 1603 program allows a dozen energy industries, not just solar, to use more effectively already-paid-for tax credits supported by both Democrats and Republicans in Congress. An independent analysis by EuPD Research shows that a one-year extension of this program will add 37,000 jobs next year alone, while leveraging significant private investment across America."

     

    RHONE RESCH
    President and Chief Executive
    Solar Energy Industries Association
    Washington, Nov. 12, 2011
    http://nyti.ms/1qR2sqd

     

    To your point, here is a 2012 complete list of faltering or bankrupt green-energy companies:
    "So far, 34 companies that were offered federal support from taxpayers are faltering — either having gone bankrupt or laying off workers or heading for bankruptcy. This list includes only those companies that received federal money from the Obama Administration’s Department of Energy"
    http://dailysign.al/1q...

     

    If you check the list, you will see that some of companies that were reported as failing have come back quite nicely, such as first Solar. Even 34 co's failing out of 1600 is a very good record. Don't get me wrong, Solyndra's $535 mil is big money but against the $80 biln in tax subsidies and grants for green and other energy it is a small %. Free trade doesn't equate to fair trade. Our trade agreements almost always screw Americans. Such as the dumping of Chinese solar panels and right now the dumping of cheap inferior steel from Vietnam.
    11 Jul, 12:52 PM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    Another co Johnson Controls is also on that list and they are doing well now. Nevada Geothermal Power Inc has also come back it is a subsidy of Alternative Earth Resources. On another note, SolarCity (not on list) has received $66 mil and they are doing phenomenal .
    11 Jul, 03:38 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Billionoo3, re': ..resulting bonfire of tax money.

     

    A good image of a bad situation. Thanks.
    12 Jul, 07:25 AM Reply Like
  • Billion003
    , contributor
    Comments (210) | Send Message
     
    Edmund,
    It was understatement on my part, but thanks you.
    12 Jul, 10:18 AM Reply Like
  • ARGE
    , contributor
    Comments (722) | Send Message
     
    Oh the joy of exploding batteries:

     

    http://bit.ly/1rY1tq8
    10 Jul, 11:25 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1532) | Send Message
     
    The light from the explosion appears white hot. I imagine proper visual safety would require at least sunglasses if not a welding mask.
    10 Jul, 12:53 PM Reply Like
  • JohnM121
    , contributor
    Comments (409) | Send Message
     
    So, a burning battery is as hot as the a vehicle re-entering the atmosphere. The consumer safety groups need to demand that the passenger compartment be enclosed with the ablative tiles similar to the space shuttle.
    10 Jul, 01:30 PM Reply Like
  • Articula
    , contributor
    Comments (253) | Send Message
     
    Interesting article on the takeoff of Green Bonds.

     

    http://econ.st/1spmKGH
    10 Jul, 01:16 PM Reply Like
  • ARGE
    , contributor
    Comments (722) | Send Message
     
    Weren't that what got so many German's broke?
    http://bit.ly/1ftOS62
    10 Jul, 07:13 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Never mined.

     

    Forget lead and lithium. How about grid-scale batteries based on... water?

     

    http://bit.ly/1rYC6EK
    10 Jul, 01:45 PM Reply Like
  • ARGE
    , contributor
    Comments (722) | Send Message
     
    "energy-starring compounds found in plants, animals and bacteria."
    Has Been done:
    http://bit.ly/1rZ24rH
    10 Jul, 03:23 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Seeking Consensus on the Internalized Costs of Energy Storage via Batteries

     

    http://bit.ly/TVkYRd
    10 Jul, 01:57 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1532) | Send Message
     
    Anyone have an idea when the next CC will be?
    10 Jul, 02:09 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Last year it was August 15th.

     

    http://bit.ly/1rYRhgU
    10 Jul, 02:40 PM Reply Like
  • abcd9876
    , contributor
    Comments (69) | Send Message
     
    Bloomberg estimated date is 8/15 but that looks like a placeholder. Someone here mentioned that DDG has 5 weeks to make an impression, which leads to mid-August as well.
    10 Jul, 02:42 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30231) | Send Message
     
    The Form 10-Q filing deadline is August 14th, so the morning of the 15th is the latest possible date for a conference call on a timely report. Earlier is possible, but more than a day or two seems unlikely.
    10 Jul, 02:47 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (1040) | Send Message
     
    Has there been an announcement of an annual meeting date yet?
    10 Jul, 03:20 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Last year the annual meeting was Sept. 26th. :-I

     

    http://bit.ly/1rZ2SwE
    10 Jul, 03:27 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Mr Holty, perhaps the annual can be scheduled the day after the reverse split if there are no significant events beforehand and it's not coupled with a market upgrade. New Castle is known as the "Fireworks Capital of America".
    10 Jul, 03:53 PM Reply Like
  • RuggedDC
    , contributor
    Comments (327) | Send Message
     
    From Wikipedia's New Castle entry:

     

    "New Castle is known both as the "hot dog capital of the world" and the "fireworks capital of America." Its chili dogs are the product of Greek immigrants who came to New Castle in the early 20th century and established restaurants along with their homes. The notoriety for fireworks is credited to two local fireworks companies of international stature, S.Vitale Pyrotechnic Industries, Inc. (Pyrotecnico) and Zambelli Internationale."

     

    It was fascinating reading the entirety of the entry: New Castle is a far more interesting town than I had given it credit.
    10 Jul, 04:27 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Interesting indeed Rugged. Hot dogs as well. What goes good with Green Weenies? Not positive but I'd bet bio-carbon would spice them up.
    10 Jul, 05:12 PM Reply Like
  • Noahfreak
    , contributor
    Comments (41) | Send Message
     
    Maybe with Axion they'll be able to add the feather "battery manufacturing capital of North America" to their collective cap.
    11 Jul, 05:41 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30231) | Send Message
     
    Since battery manufacturing can be a dirty business, I'd prefer the "Carbon Electrode Assembly Capital of North America."
    11 Jul, 06:36 AM Reply Like
  • WayneinOregon
    , contributor
    Comments (1027) | Send Message
     
    This was an interesting article in our local newspaper.
    --
    AGRICULTURAL INNOVATION
    Research: Solar panels benefit crops

     

    http://bit.ly/TVmN0F

     

    "Recent Southern Oregon University graduate Sai Weiss has shown solar panels and crops can co-exist on the same land — and that the combination can even boost the productivity of shade-loving plants such as lettuce.

     

    The results could have far-reaching implications for the emerging practice of solar double-cropping, in which farmers raise plants amid solar panels that allow some sunlight to reach the ground. ... solar panels are mounted high enough above the ground to allow tractors and other equipment to travel below."
    10 Jul, 02:12 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Might require special panels to support rainwater dispersion plus access for maintenance will be an issue.

     

    Worth while and probably will yield some good results with a little more study.

     

    Hey solar looking for multiple revenue streams like shading for plants and cars. Sounds like battery storage system tactics.
    10 Jul, 03:22 PM Reply Like
  • ARGE
    , contributor
    Comments (722) | Send Message
     
    Solar Updraft Towers could also be used as green houses:
    http://bit.ly/1rZ5DOu
    10 Jul, 03:37 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2797) | Send Message
     
    How about thermal solar in the desert, for crops that don't like 110 degree temps.

     

    Or transparent solar, for no good at all, lol.
    10 Jul, 03:47 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Eat More Lettus!

     

    I just had this strange image of free range rabbits. And now HasenPfeffer.
    10 Jul, 04:35 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    "Letus" pray for more lettuce! ;-))

     

    HardToLove
    10 Jul, 05:05 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    HTL, Good one!

     

    I was wondering as well. Edmund could have meant, see link, as it relates to Axion.

     

    http://linkd.in/1rZvciu
    10 Jul, 05:22 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Squirrel does quite well in the place of rabbit, by the way. I had a woman in Arkansas that loved to prepare it. Spent many a Sunday as a fat lazy fox.
    10 Jul, 07:02 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1532) | Send Message
     
    This is about as relevant as anything else at this moment: http://bit.ly/1rYM4FS
    10 Jul, 02:21 PM Reply Like
  • ARGE
    , contributor
    Comments (722) | Send Message
     
    Cute little matrix storage devices;-)
    10 Jul, 04:34 PM Reply Like
  • JohnM121
    , contributor
    Comments (409) | Send Message
     
    Be careful with those things. They kill billions of birds a year.
    http://bit.ly/1nd0j2r
    10 Jul, 11:13 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2434) | Send Message
     
    At this moment of Axion's transition I offer

     

    http://bit.ly/1rYXD02

     

    This is the final 6 minute wrap of the series Sports Night which ended much too quickly after 2 years and which has been repeating daily on FXX, so don't watch this clip if you really don't want the series Spoiler!

     

    Although you're likely to forget exactly what happened before too long :-)
    10 Jul, 03:06 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Hydrostor update.

     

    Hydrostor Wants to Stash Energy in Underwater Bags

     

    http://bit.ly/1rZAfiO
    10 Jul, 05:41 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4672) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... A clear and simple concept. The only part that causes me to scratch my head is the heat exchange. The little animation just blithely says they add it back in when needed, but I'd think when it was needed is the same time that the excess renewable energy is not available. I guess they could build thermos bottles large enough to store a hot water equivalent to the air in storage. Then there is the age old question of duration.
    10 Jul, 06:05 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    DRich, This seems to be one of the areas that all of the compressed air storage guys I've read about are struggling with.

     

    This is one of the other companies that is looking at compressed air storage and claims to have made progress in this area. I know there have been posts in this forum in the past on Lightsail.

     

    http://www.lightsail.com
    10 Jul, 06:33 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4672) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... Lightsail is even more sketchy about the reverse flow problem but at least they say that they intend to use heat for processes immediately at other locations. That makes the economics at least seem possible with the proper application of imagination. Still as the air cools in those containerized tanks the pressure will drop so one has to wonder if the price they can get from the immediate sale of excess heat will offset the cost of reheating the compressed air and maintaining the heat in the storage.

     

    Now the pumping into underground structures sounds good but is a tricky thing to do. Rock strata are not solid and salt domes might hold many types of molecules but is air one of them? If a proper geologic structure and be found some of the pressure & heat of storage can be recovered by the deformation of earth being used as a container ... I guess. Is it enough? I don't know.

     

    Compressed air is a simple idea with some really tough questions that need answers that I know I don't have answers for. Hydrogen as a renewable has many of the same or similar problems I don't think anyone has worked out yet with good economic returns.
    10 Jul, 06:58 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    DRich, There are perhaps some abandoned old mines where the depth would actually heat the air being pumped into them. Then, as you suggest, will they hold the air based on the geology? Also are they close enough to population centers to matter? Anyway, here again we are getting into specific site location only opportunities like with hydro. But hey, most often solutions are not "One size fits all". But then again, if solutions don't scale costs often don't drop enough unless, as they mention, you can find subsystems that are "Off the shelf".
    10 Jul, 07:10 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4672) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... I like the idea CAS but, like you said, it seems to be applicable to specific site locations. That will work where it can. It is also not the storage solution the market is looking for. Mr. Market is looking for that "One size fits all". That is what the past several years of Li-on frenzy has shown me and whatever works at a lower capital outlay and/or better safety perception will be the next darling. Sadly, I think Mr. Market will continue the hunt for the one magic solution. We've also got 2 to 3 years more of Li-on everything mania along with seeing installations bought in the past several years to endure. Then I believe the real & mixed market will emerge.
    10 Jul, 10:38 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Anyone else come across odd stuff like this when they are searching for Axion related stuff on the net?

     

    "So what needs to occur. 1) Jack port runescape 2007 gold Shindle, Vani Dantam, On the other hand? Needs to get hold of Dr. Barnhart of Stanford to be aggressive in opening the Axion doors to his follow study for the PowerCube stats. You should only keep going if you truly desire the account. Be prepared to waste a lot of time on appealing it. The lists above can cause many difficulties during your search for information, As they come up Often on alot of internet...."

     

    http://bit.ly/TVRYJ6
    -
    Jack Shindle @ Axion

     

    http://linkd.in/1fvam2z
    10 Jul, 07:25 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1841) | Send Message
     
    Probably just webscraping sites hoping some keywords would land them search traffic, and get paid out in ads.
    10 Jul, 08:19 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Thanks Ranma! I've seen this a few times and it was a real head scratcher for me.
    10 Jul, 08:22 PM Reply Like
  • RuggedDC
    , contributor
    Comments (327) | Send Message
     
    I thought I would publicly share some comments I made in private correspondence with another Axionista…

     

    I still believe that the Axion share price will soar when we get new investors interested in Axion seeking multi-hundreds of thousands or millions of shares.

     

    I don't think there's any large overhang of sellers who would stifle such an advance.

     

    ====We just have to get the company to a point where folks smell success and want to buy in.====

     

    I buy the notion that Axion is continually making progress, but am frustrated that whatever progress made is so publicly invisible. I also fret why sales don't take off: is Axion technology/product poorly competitive? Does Vani and our seemingly MIA never-heard-of Sales Manager wear offensive cologne??

     

    I really hate that Axion has only "new" initiatives and "active" initiatives and we never candidly hear what has REALLY become of all the countless touts we've heard over the years. Even "dead" initiatives seem to be regarded as "active" in the Axion lexicon, as if there's hope that zombies WILL rise. Why did negotiations with the two other battery makers dip back below the horizon?

     

    I am not a technical person despite many years on track as a physics major (I wound up with an advanced degree in computer science and an undergraduate minor in economics, having had to curtail a nearly full-time focus on investing when under the gun regarding my thesis); I BELIEVE the PbC battery story. As you probably know, I went to the annual meeting last fall and felt most definitely Axion was NOT a Potemkin village.

     

    I am waaay over a 'sensible' position size in Axion and I really don't anticipate further buying. My average cost is around 22 cents. I'd already had my "full" position when the price started nosediving last year WRT the PIPE. Smelling starkly better value, I bought what turned out to be about 400,000 shares in the 13 cent area (including one lot post-bottoming) and a further 400,000 shares around 9.6 cents -- at least those increments are in the green!~

     

    I appreciate your good regard. Time WILL tell whether I'm a fox or a fool…
    11 Jul, 02:09 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    RuggedDC,
    If you are a fool, unfortunately so am I.
    11 Jul, 05:29 AM Reply Like
  • Noahfreak
    , contributor
    Comments (41) | Send Message
     
    Well, if you believe in a stock and nothing has changed to indicate to you that you should stop believing in it, you've made the right move. I've only been investing for about 7 years, but the scaling in technique has never failed me as I watch a fundamentally good stock turn south. This has saved me from losses several times and has even turned into a multi-bagger on two occasions.
    The only time I didn't opt for this was when news was revealed about a bank stock I owned that was completely counter to the reasons it appealed to me in the first place. That turned out to be a great move because it didn't reverse its slow motion fall for a couple of years after that.
    The thing that attracts me to Axion right now is that it got beat up for so long that something's got to give in the other direction. All the alarms went off in my head when I was first put onto AXPW, but with a very thorough amount of research I've come to the conclusion that it's a legitimate business with a fantastic product that has uber levels of potential.
    Other than that terrible round of PIPE financing it went through, I can't for the life of me explain why it's been beaten down for so long. I do however intend to benefit when that frown turns upside down. Any further moves to the downside will be seen as buying opportunities to me.
    11 Jul, 09:28 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4200) | Send Message
     
    "Other than that terrible round of PIPE financing it went through, I can't for the life of me explain why it's been beaten down for so long. "

     

    Corporate marketing policies pursued by a CEO that proved excessively optimistic or failed to understand the markets targeted.
    11 Jul, 09:35 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Alternate explanation:
    1. Battery business is conservative
    2. SuperCabattery is revolutionary, a bit too young to displace a 100-yr-old proven technology. Too far past a battery to be disrupting to the current market.
    3. Infrastructure / market not developed - all the market potential was based on future products. You can't sell futures in supercabatteries.
    4. Prolonged product development - Many of the applications this battery will find itself in require extreme durability and dependability under many conditions. The number of variables are far greater than the number of parts. Simple product? Not really.Product and manufacturing have to be mature.
    5. Went public too soon
    They didn't have a product. They didn't have a market. They had a lot of issues to begin with.
    Today AXPW as an investment is significantly de-risked because Axion has now largely solved the issues.
    Today the opportunity to make money is very close to what legacy holders might have thought they were buying into, not because they now have a better salesmen, but because they have perfected the product and developed the market. Thanks to Tom Granville and many others.
    11 Jul, 10:42 AM Reply Like
  • topcat1906
    , contributor
    Comments (74) | Send Message
     
    In the end, the customer is always right. The market will decide the merit of this science fair project.
    11 Jul, 12:41 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    07/10/2014: EOD stuff partially copied from blog (up now).
    # Trds: 10, MinTrSz: 500, MaxTrSz: 30000, Vol: 75100, AvTrSz: 7510
    Min. Pr: 0.1391, Max Pr: 0.1500, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.1426
    # Buys, Shares: 3 12600, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.1448
    # Sells, Shares: 7 62500, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.1421
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 1:4.96 (16.78% "buys"), DlyShts 600 (00.80%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 0.96%

     

    The effects of the announcement of a new CEO and board chairman appointment seems to abating. Volume tanked to about 75K and 10 trades, totaling $10,708.55, and buy percentage dropped further to 16.78% from 36.2% yesterday and 47.1% before that.

     

    The large offer at $0.145 of 354K shares from CDEL returned again today.

     

    An oddity seen today was ARCA appearing pre-market on both sides, bidding $0.1311 for 11K and offering 16K at $0.16. At the open both disappeared.

     

    The aggressive vying for best offer between NITE and ATDF seen the prior two days was not present today.

     

    There were two “outliers” today but with only ten trades and 75K shares traded and $10,708.55 in trades, we really can't give the usual jaundiced eye to them. Anyway, the low of $0.1391 was a single 7.5K sell, the second trade of the day, and the high was a single 5K sell at $0.1500 at 9:30, the first trade of the day.

     

    Yesterday I noted we had a break, significance unknown yet, in the 5, 10, 25 and 50-day VWAP averages, which had been all descending. ... Today the prior trend of all weakening returned. Today they ...

     

    There was only one larger trade, a 30K buy for $0.1430. It was 39.95% of the day's volume.

     

    Of the traditional TA oscillators I watch, all but ADX related reversed course, going from up-ticks to weakening. With my thinking ...

     

    With all the above behavior over a string of days and the new CEO PR effects apparently abating I believe this is bearish regardless of the very low volumes. Only the very low volume keeps the confidence level of this assessment down.

     

    The usual, minus trading breakdowns, is in the blog here.
    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    HardToLove
    11 Jul, 07:37 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    ARCA pre-market bid $0.1352x5K, offer 31.9K $0.147 along with NITE 5k.

     

    Let's see if they go away at the open again.

     

    No sign of big offer from CDEL yet.

     

    HardToLove
    11 Jul, 09:26 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4200) | Send Message
     
    New DC-DC converter (developed for automotive app)

     

    http://bit.ly/1qQDKq6
    11 Jul, 10:16 AM Reply Like
  • Mark Sapsford
    , contributor
    Comment (1) | Send Message
     
    Recently had to get a Jump start on my Ford C-Max. While waiting for the road assistance guy to show up, was reading up on the electrical system and found out that it uses a DC-DC converter to recharge the 12V battery from the Li-Ion hybrid pack; there is no alternator charging the 12V battery directly.
    11 Jul, 03:52 PM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    Nice find D-inv. That is pretty spectacular. I know it is a prototype developed by a couple of business entities but just how much would one of those things cost? $1,000....$2,000....more? It's almost like a separate brain. It reminds me of a flying insects nervous system. Where they have a brain but the part of their system (equivalent to our spinal cord) that controls their legs and wings is much larger and almost independent from the brain. That DC-DC converter is separate from the cars computer but controls many functions.
    11 Jul, 09:28 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2427) | Send Message
     
    A Prius is similar. There is a very small 12 v starter battery, but no 12 v alternator. The engine alternator only charges the NiMH batteries, which then keeps the starter battery fully charged. That is how even with the frequent start/stop of the engine the starter battery is kept charged.
    12 Jul, 10:57 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    I hope we hear a lot more about this converter.

     

    The supercapacitor bank could be replaced by a PbC SuperCabattery bank.

     

    In this case the input is from "two 200 kJ super capacitor banks, which operate at 75-150 V."
    That's 400 kJ or about 400 BTU, or the equivalent of 0.4 fluid ounces of diesel.

     

    To replace those on a drop-in basis, I want to use a similar voltage swing. If 150V is 80% SOC, I need a PbC bank of 150/.8 = 187.5V at 100% SOC, or using 14V as 100%, 187.5/14 = 13.4 PbCs.
    If I consider the SOC swing on the PbCs is best centered around 8.5V, you would need 100V/8.5 = ~11.76 PbCs in series.
    So for purposes of the comparison, let's make it an even dozen. That makes a 25%-75% SOC voltage output of 12*14*.25 = 42V - 126V.

     

    Those dozen PbCs hold the equivalent of about 6 kwh, using 0.5 kWh/PbC, which is the equivalent of 6 kwh * 3412 BTU/kwh = 20472 BTUs or 18.7 ounces.

     

    That's fifty times as much as the supercap bank. Of course 12 PbCs do weigh 876 pounds.
    12 Jul, 11:16 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    Early indications are NITE and ATDF fighting for "King of the Hill" on the offer again.

     

    On a Friday though, with anticipate low volume again, the battle may fizzle out or not become as heated.

     

    Current offer $0.1457x10Kx31.9K ATDF NITE

     

    HardToLove
    11 Jul, 10:44 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Below are a few quotes from the May 8 2014 Axion patent with Jay Dandrea as inventor. It's a fun read. Lots of machine details and the like.
    from: Process for the Manufacture of Carbon Sheet for an Electrode US 20140127570 A1
    https://http://bit.ly/...
    "...electrodes made byExample 2 were assembled into single cell batterieswith 7 positive electrodes and 6 negative electrodes"
    "Rolls were typically operated between 2-4 rpm(corresponding to linear speeds of 3-6 feet perminute) without detectable differences in sheetquality."
    "Sheets as long as 3 meters were demonstrated."
    TABLE 2
    Test Data for Six Cell Batteries
    Battery Process mΩ (1 kHz) Amp-hours Watt-hours
    1 Comparative 7.0 61.9 465.5
    2 Example 6.8 63.4 477.6
    3 Example 3 5.6 77.7 591.1
    4 4.9 77.7 590.9

     

    I tried spacing the numbers - Example 3 & 4 are the PbC 30HT.
    11 Jul, 10:52 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Or as I like to say, ...the 30HT PbC SuperCabattery with built-in StrongString technology.

     

    That makes me smile. :)
    11 Jul, 11:01 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Guess I should have caught this earlier. Anyhow, here is a picture of the NS 999 battery box in DropBox's 2013 EOY newletter. In the picture you can see the addition of the external skin where before the picture they shared was only of the welded structural frame. Maybe slides also being loaded but I haven't quite gotten it blown up successfully yet to get that detail.

     

    I like the fact that NSC has outsourced this. Generally so much more time/cost efficient as it's more their specialty vs Altoona.

     

    http://bit.ly/1y42pcW
    11 Jul, 12:44 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    Iindelco: just right-click, copy location, open a new tab, past in url and go. The ctrl-+ works.

     

    I've blown it up and now looking to see if I can tell.

     

    OH! Here's the url.
    http://bit.ly/1qR2QVM

     

    HardToLove
    11 Jul, 12:53 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    Iindlco: Best I can tell, the open section closest to the right *seems* to have tracks for what I would guess to be roller racks.

     

    Hard to tell for sure when I blow it up - pixelation starts obliterating details.

     

    HardToLove
    11 Jul, 01:01 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Thanks HTL! How did I know I'd get an answer on how to blow it up correctly? I was having screen format problems during my first attempt! :-(

     

    From my perspective it looks like the slides are loaded to the frame and also Dropbox did much or the wiring. I'm guessing that is why Axion sent someone to DropBox to approve this. I sure as heck would have done that as well since it's very critical.
    11 Jul, 01:29 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    How about that solid partition in middle? I thought air would flow through end to end.

     

    Good find.
    11 Jul, 02:53 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    It looks like some sort of prewiring is happening here. What gauge/s are they using? Looks smaller than your typical battery cables, I think, so something else probably.
    11 Jul, 02:55 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Edmund, Good catch. Maybe they found that directing air all the way through from end to end left inefficient hot spots? As we saw with East Penn heat was an issue that needed to be managed based on their own learning curve. I suspect NSC/Penn State/Axion also learned a thing or two in their simulations.
    11 Jul, 03:05 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    Edmund: does it also look like there's some trays with partitions, front-to-back in one of those sections?

     

    I thought I saw some, as if some sliding racks might be in place and they might be partitioned to hold a battery or two in each section.

     

    Could be just gussets on the racks though.

     

    HardToLove
    11 Jul, 03:10 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    I have 864*12.76"*6.77"/144 =518.3 square feet of battery to situate.
    That's 86.4 square feet per shelf covered.
    Using my eye and the four foot ladder as a measure it appears to indicate that each bay is short 4 foot wide, and it looks to be a good 6 foot "deep", so that's 24 square feet per bay times 6 bays you got 144 square feet available to for your batteries. 86/144 = 0.597, or 60% coverage of each shelf. That's a lot of shelf space empty.

     

    Using the ten-foot ladder as a guage, I'd say the thing is 12 foot high.
    Since a PbC is 1 foot high, I also have 518.3 cu ft
    And a total contined air volume of 12*6*24=1728 cubic feet.
    518.3/1728 = 518.3/1728 = 0.29994, so thats about 70% free air inside.

     

    My guess at this point is that a center "aisle" of the unit is empty and air is forced up from underneath to exit out both front and back. The large underbelly vented enclosure could easily house some serious fans and drier air.
    11 Jul, 03:50 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Maybe two trays with an opening in between, HTL?
    11 Jul, 03:51 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    Also, starting from the right, in the 1st, 3rd and 5th columns and on the fourth shelf down there appears to be some kind of electronic gizmo - probably not the industry term for it.

     

    Thanks HTL for the hint on expanding/diminishing size of pictures.
    11 Jul, 04:08 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    EM: Went into GIMP and "sharpened" it. I suspect you are right - it does look like two side-by-side trays per bay level.

     

    I ought to fire up my old CTX monitor - 0.25 dot pitch CRT display. Back when I bought, $700, but it was really worth it.

     

    HardToLove
    11 Jul, 04:12 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Essentially you open the double door of each bay and you have to put 864/6/6= 24 on each shelf in front of you. Four wide the long way and 3 deep from each side looks like a good "solution", but that would be too wide since a PbC is over a foot long. // Six wide end-on would be 42 inches wide. So six by two deep. Two deep would be two feet from each side, leaving a 2 foot aisle down the center. Sounds like a plan for good air movement. More than enough, so likely some of that is used for HTL's gussets.
    11 Jul, 04:13 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    metro, are you talking about something on the "short shelf" in the center?

     

    I see three battery shelves below and three above that skinny one - more wiring and another air movement passage. Lots of unidentified wired gizmos.
    11 Jul, 04:17 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    At 24 foot long, that racking unit would be 48 foot long on a 1728-PbC slug loco. Enough room between for air exit from both units, for a total 50 feet.
    11 Jul, 04:43 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    EM: "... Looks smaller than your typical battery cables".

     

    I would guess instrumentation and control. Just needs to carry signals?

     

    HardToLove
    11 Jul, 06:07 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    HTL, I agree. Sensing leads for instrumentation. One can imagine they are going to go overboard on this prototype to gather every bit of data they can to understand how the loco is functioning and gathering performance data to track battery life vs operating metrics.
    11 Jul, 06:17 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    This analysis makes each 1/2-bay 3ft wide by 2ft deep tray holding 6 PbC = like 500 pounds with the rack.

     

    Or 3000 pounds for the vertical 1/2 bay set.

     

    I guess if you can put 4000 pounds on standard pallet, the weight is no problem.

     

    Maybe they used something like this:
    http://bit.ly/1y5HhDk

     

    I figure from the side the rails are in the way.
    11 Jul, 07:47 PM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    "some kind of electronic gizmo" Works for me.
    11 Jul, 09:45 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2427) | Send Message
     
    EM - The PC at Axion has a 3rd voltage monitoring wire to each battery. Perhaps the light wiring is the voltage measuring (and possible temp measurement) for the batteries, not the current carrying cables.
    12 Jul, 11:02 AM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2140) | Send Message
     
    Watching paint dry. http://bit.ly/1jA3DDZ
    11 Jul, 12:55 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1532) | Send Message
     
    Good article on the use of batteries for solar peak shifting: http://bit.ly/TVkYRd

     

    "As discussed in the previous article, the most important factors influencing the economics of specialized energy storage technologies are the capital costs and the capacity utilization. Capacity utilization is an especially important issue in energy storage because of a trade-off between capacity utilization and the spread between the price at which the storage facility can buy and sell electricity. At higher capacity utilizations, the initial capital investment will be better utilized, but the spread between the buying and selling price will also reduce. An important feature distinguishing batteries from other energy storage technologies is that storage capacity (kWh) is generally the economically limiting factor instead of output capacity (kW). This implies that a limited battery storage capacity must be utilized at as high a frequency and discharge depth as possible, while facilities like pumped hydro where storage capacity is not such a limiting factor are free to cycle over longer timespans."
    11 Jul, 01:30 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    PY: Shades of JP articles came to mind when I read it.

     

    HardToLove
    11 Jul, 01:46 PM Reply Like
  • 23808
    , contributor
    Comments (82) | Send Message
     
    DDG
    If you are reading this APC, please send some technical data and cost to the author. In addition, please write a white paper and post it on AXPW web site. It will help potential investors to decide whether to purchase AXPW stock.
    11 Jul, 02:11 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Washington state grant programs for energy storage. Gives a few project details including cost.

     

    State pursues new smart grid projects to capture, store more solar and wind power

     

    http://1.usa.gov/1y4mTT2
    11 Jul, 01:59 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    As the Solar Industry Eyes Storage, Experts at Intersolar Talk About Key Growth Markets

     

    "Certain technologies, such as flow batteries, aqueous sodium-ion batteries, and systems that combine aspects of capacitors with electrochemical storage, are pushing that kilowatt-hour cost barrier, noted Starke."

     

    http://bit.ly/1y4tT2j
    11 Jul, 02:26 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Not much solar penetration yet. Of course it's not homogeneous.

     

    Hawaiian Electric gets 86% of energy from oil and coal

     

    http://bit.ly/1y4vsgI
    11 Jul, 02:33 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    Well, regarding ATDF and NITE jostling on the offer, I now believe NITE is messing with ATDF's "mind".

     

    Whatever ATDF does, NITE matches within a minute or two.

     

    The ATDF moves. Then NITE matches etc.

     

    ATDF gets frustrated and drops back to a higher offer. A minute or two later, and sometimes quicker, NITE matches. NITE 31.8K vs. ATDF 10K.

     

    Anyway, then the offer walks down again.

     

    I'm sort of enjoying watching it as I've gained a real antagonism towards the ATDF behavior. Ruins their scalping efforts I suspect.

     

    HardToLove
    11 Jul, 02:41 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13542) | Send Message
     
    HTL, what are the odds we are watching dueling algorithms instead of humans?
    11 Jul, 02:43 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    TB: Possible, but this is relatively new behavior for NITE. I've suspected ATDF might be a trading algo for a while because of the speed and predictability of it's behavior. Only occasionally did we see an ATDF aberration - e.g. a 5K would start dueling with the 10K would cause me to suspect a real person running the 5K. Also occasional larger offers, but not often.

     

    I also suspect NITE is not algo *today* because it started out with 31.9K vs. the normal 5K seen from NITE. Someone got a hundred of it and it's now been 31.8K. NITE doesn't *usually* respond instantaneously today like I would think an algo would tend to do. Usually a couple minutes delay.

     

    In bliss, as usual,
    HardToLove
    11 Jul, 02:55 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    TB: BTW, through 14:53 46 sequences moves and matches, mixed in various ways, on the offer, according to the spreadsheet array sum operation.

     

    HardToLove
    11 Jul, 03:07 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    TB: Hee-hee! When a trade went at the off, took 20K of NITE's and left ATDF twisting. :-)))

     

    HardToLove
    11 Jul, 03:15 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    If we had some volume we wouldn't have to be so well entertained. News of a sale anyone?
    11 Jul, 03:44 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13542) | Send Message
     
    No sales news yet, ii, but...

     

    NEWS FLASH!

     

    Paint on the 999 appears to be dry, I say again, it MIGHT be dry!

     

    About time, too. The super glue holding my eyelids open is getting brittle from age.
    11 Jul, 04:30 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    HTL: Level 2 Zen master.
    11 Jul, 04:31 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    ii - a what? I think they show that endangered species in the wild on the NatGeo channel. Not very many out there.
    11 Jul, 04:52 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    TB, lol, I wanna see it moving on its own. Even a one second clip with a fixed reference point for proof. And I want to see both ends so I can rule out Axionista horsepower. I want to validate Axion inside not outside!

     

    Cyanoacrylate failure, ugh. On all three eyelids? ;-D
    11 Jul, 05:05 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    ii,
    Probably have a better shot of getting a one second video of the Loch Ness monster.
    11 Jul, 07:47 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Metro, Yes! I've seen the hump. :-I

     

    The things legends are made of. It's been going on long enough to assume legendary status for sure. It changes locations but it never moves. Maybe Scotty is beaming it around. No, that would be too easy to explain!

     

    http://bit.ly/1s5bRwo
    11 Jul, 08:02 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    ii,
    lol
    11 Jul, 08:05 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    The rest of the story is that if you look on the web for images of the first NS999, there are many high-quality images, which I think suggests good popularity with the public.

     

    http://bit.ly/1s5dqKy

     

    60 tubs, 18 batteries, 48 above, 12 below. The 48 tubs above the frame contain 864 batteries. So they've emptied the lower frame. The tubs would have weighed about 18*50 pounds? 900 pounds each.

     

    The footprint is exactly the same and the 24-foot number I was working with is probably correct. There is no indication of a central corridor. The blowers are above frame and are the only items in color, coincidentally.
    11 Jul, 08:11 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    But it looks like the side-to-side of the superstructure is 5 feet wide. Nobody's walking down the center, in that case.

     

    This is one of my favorites out there of the old NS999:
    http://bit.ly/1s5flii
    11 Jul, 08:20 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13542) | Send Message
     
    II: Yep. I use it to fix my shell when it cracks, too.
    12 Jul, 09:26 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Norfolk Southern Investor and Financial
    Analyst Conference
    June 8, 2011

     

    http://bit.ly/1y52ywO

     

    Lots of train info on fleet. Don't remember seeing it. 500 GP-38s in the Local/Yard fleet. That's the loco the NS999 was converted from.
    11 Jul, 04:47 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    500 GP-38s!? Yowzah! We must assume, regardless of the risk carried with that action, that they use and need most or all because they are not likely prone to just waste resources of various types.

     

    Applying the ancient art of estimation based on absolutely zero data, we could reasonably expect at least 20% to be converted to battery locos to yield JP's estimated needed 100 locos for statistically valid verification of utility, longevity and savings.

     

    Some as yard versions, some as OTR?

     

    Then as the rebuild program progresses on the genset versions, which we know already they are not pleased with, they will have a "control group" against which comparisons can be made.

     

    I like this scenario - wake me up from the dream when the reality starts to match! ;-))

     

    HardToLove
    11 Jul, 06:20 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4672) | Send Message
     
    >H.T. "VanWinkle" Love ... If the BP4 proves itself in the yard, there is a big operations question that will need answering. That is how well it can operate outside the yard, away from its plug, and whether it can do the work of switching customers without needing to dragged back by a diesel. That will be the test to pass for that fleet of GP's to be converted. It will be a slow process in the beginning.

     

    The OTR will be SD's in the beginnng and will be the smallest. I look for them to start life as helpers instead of mainline haulers. Depending on results, I don't think it too far fetched to think that mainline loco's could wind up being AC440CW's as they retire. That is even more batteries per frame.
    11 Jul, 06:40 PM Reply Like
  • alsobirdman
    , contributor
    Comments (381) | Send Message
     
    Thanks to you guys for all of this train research and information. The main reason I am so large in Axion is NSC. When they came out and publicly stated "our industry partner, Axion Power", I started buying big. There is NO WAY a company like NSC makes a public statement like that unless they have big, long-range plans. Just doesn't happen in that level of company. I don't think it will, but I don't care if it takes another year of testing, I have no doubt there will be many slugs and OTR's built. It will be a gravy train for us longs.
    11 Jul, 08:02 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    DRich, if it's in a consist with a genset, it might as well be on a plug, no? That's what I was thinking until you just made me think.
    11 Jul, 09:03 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4672) | Send Message
     
    >Edmund Metcalfe ... If an OTR slug is in a consist with enough diesel power, I can see the batteries being recharged to some degree by excess diesel power. A porta-plug. Similar to ePower's duty cycle. Look for the bulk of recharge power to come from dynamic braking.

     

    Without knowing a damn thing I see the biggest difference between the duty cycle of trucking v. rail as this. The OTR will use battery power as initial feed to the motors and when that shows reduced voltage the diesels will pick up the slack. Just backward from ePower. The reason would be that Norfolk probably wouldn't want to throttle their engines to any particular powerband. It will take some doing to get the diesels to play well with the batteries.
    11 Jul, 09:17 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    POLL of the moment!!

     

    How much activated carbon per PbC? (No, that's not the poll)

     

    6 electrodes/cell * 6 cells * 2mm activated carbon sheet thickness * 240 mm plate height * 300 mm plate width * 0.5 grams/1000 mm3 = 2592 grams. I think the Kuraray coconut carbon accounts for about 80%, or 2073 grams per 30HT.

     

    Call it 2 kg per PbC. I think AXION recieved an shipment of 18,000 kg (estimated $300,000 cost) last August, if I did the math right there.

     

    So that's enough for 9000 30HT PbC. (estimated $3,000,000 value)

     

    And that's enough for the current orders we've heard about - 8 more 56-ePower-packs (~500) and 4 more PowerCubes (~2500), with 6000 PbCs yet to be sold.

     

    Who will be ordering the most of those 6000 PbCs?
    12 Jul, 08:47 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Like for Norfolk Southern
    12 Jul, 08:47 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Like for ePower
    12 Jul, 08:47 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Like for PowerCube customers
    12 Jul, 08:47 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Like for all others combined
    12 Jul, 08:48 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Edmund, I'd be careful with your math in one area. Axion had a concentrated historic order pattern for Kuraray material that was not supported by sales. Much of this was probably caused due to the efforts to get the auto sheeting process debugged to the state that it is in today. We do not know how much of this sheeting "WIP" Work in Process made it into inventory vs the scrap pile.

     

    Has nothing to do with your voting exercise but it is worth a mention for those, like myself, looking to future Kuraray orders to get a feel for PbC activities that are ongoing at Axion. Hard to tell where they are at other than they are surely not anywhere near capacity constrained on the negative electrode line. Almost a year and no follow on orders for "The Husk".
    12 Jul, 09:22 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13542) | Send Message
     
    II: Do we know whether old/damaged/malformed carbon sheets can be recycled? Seems like it would be possible...
    12 Jul, 09:32 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    TB, All I can say is that your question is valid and I don't have the background to take even close to an educated guess. Could be anywhere from "no" to "yes at this stage if these tests verify it's OK to do so". I'm sure Axion knows or could develop this as they surely have the talent to get the answers.

     

    My uneducated wish would be that the yield on the current sheeting process is so capable and the yield from subsequent operations are as well that the incentive to even investigate this doesn't warrant the cost. Hey I can hope.
    12 Jul, 09:52 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Based on the carbon sheeting process described in the May 2014 patent, it seems unlikely that (1) there will be a significant amount of malformed sheets as they have a good handle on all of the manufacturing variables. (2) They describe the sheeting as being fairly easy to handle and that would argue against there being a lot of damaged sheet to recycle. (3) If by "old" sheet, you mean used electrodes, if they have recycle value, it would be for the copper current collector only.

     

    They only seem to want to put it through the roller once.

     

    Even though they talk about continuous feed process, it still takes place in batches.

     

    Does anyone know the width of the carbon sheet rollers?
    12 Jul, 11:49 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    The 2kg/PbC is based on a 2-mm negative electrode thickness. This is "the" tweaking point. They do describe experimenting with and using other thicknesses.

     

    I remain somewhat uncertain if the 2-mm applies to the sheet or the electrode. A PbC cell is described as having 6 negative electrodes. If the 2 mm is to be applied to the single side sheet (as I initially thought it did after reading the patent), then a fully wrapped negative electrode would be 4 mm. Six of them would be 24 mm, without copper collector or graphite foil protector (or paraffin or rosin). 24 mm without positive PbO2 electrodes. 24 mm without separators.

     

    The individual cell thickness in an 30HT would be 6.77 inches/6 or about 1.12 inches. Call it one inch to leave some room for case. 1 inch = 25.4 mm. That seemed to me to exclude the 4-mm thick electrode and hence the 2-mm thick carbon sheet.

     

    It's appropriate to note that the thickness of the activated carbon layer and the % content and the true sizes are my educated guesses not knowns.
    12 Jul, 12:13 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Lithium or Vanadium: In Energy Storage, It’s No Contest

     

    A little bit of bias. Anyway, the comments are interesting. And in the comments section, none other than Scott Sklar. He lives. He does mention other batteries exist but doesn't mention our "FAV" battery.

     

    http://bit.ly/1y5vMf5
    11 Jul, 06:53 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Speaking of Scott Sklar.

     

    Looks like he's not a fan of PbC either!

     

    Scott Sklar Receives 2014 Arlington Green Patriot Award

     

    "...and the zero-energy building at the Washington navy Yard (under NAVFAC auspices, with photovoltaics, small wind, supercapacitor battery bank, and geothermal heat pump)..."

     

    "...and has a solar/wind demo van also with a supercapacitor battery bank..."

     

    http://bit.ly/1y5CFgi
    11 Jul, 07:23 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4200) | Send Message
     
    iinde ... IINM, reference to "supercapacity battery bank" in the article about Scott Sklar refers to PbCs. The Washington Navy Yard net-zero energy building is equipped with a 36kWh mini-PowerCube and his van contains PbCs (or did a couple of years ago).
    11 Jul, 09:47 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    D-inv, Yes, I should have been clearer. Both apps are PbC batteries. I think he doesn't like them being called PbC batteries. Thus he is calling them "supercapacitor batteries". I think he is distancing them from their lead acid cousins. Axion would have been wise to do so other than in manufacturing conversations. JMO.
    11 Jul, 10:21 PM Reply Like
  • JohnM121
    , contributor
    Comments (409) | Send Message
     
    In other news, at the intersolar show,
    "But it’s the batteries, which can store the electricity produced by the solar panels, that have emerged as the real stars of this year’s Intersolar North America show."
    http://bit.ly/1s5cea4
    11 Jul, 08:04 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (879) | Send Message
     
    Sad that Axion is not on the exhibitors list.
    http://bit.ly/1ng8mva
    11 Jul, 08:23 PM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    They state there were three winners but only mention first Solar. I was curious if there were winners other than solar panels.

     

    Apply now to exhibit at Intersolar North America 2014!

     

    $43.00 per sq.ft regular rate
    $32.00 per sq.ft member rate*
    View Booth Space Calculations

     

    Click here to select a booth
    11 Jul, 10:52 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Car swapping! lol

     

    Also don't miss the link to "Where The Hell Are Tesla's Battery-Swapping Stations?".

     

    Formula E Does Its Batteries Wrong

     

    http://bit.ly/1ngic05
    11 Jul, 09:50 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    07/11/2014: EOD stuff partially copied from blog (up now).
    # Trds: 15, MinTrSz: 100, MaxTrSz: 30000, Vol: 138100, AvTrSz: 9207
    Min. Pr: 0.1390, Max Pr: 0.1444, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.1412
    # Buys, Shares: 4 29600, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.1428
    # Sells, Shares: 11 108500, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.1407
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 1:3.67 (21.43% "buys"), DlyShts 27600 (19.99%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 25.44%

     

    Volume improved from yesterday's 75K and 10 trades to 14 trades and ~138K, thanks to three larger trades. Unfortunately VWAP declined 1% even as the buy percentage improved to 21.4% from yesterday's 16.78%. Not surprising, I guess, since 21.4% buys is really no great shakes either.

     

    The large offer at $0.145 of 354K shares from CDEL was absent today.

     

    We again saw an oddity with ARCA appearing pre-market on both sides, bidding $0.1352 for 5K and offering 31.9K at $0.147. At the open the sell side disappeared. The buy side hung in all day, but had no chance.

     

    The recently seen aggressive vying for best offer between NITE and ATDF returned today. But today it looked not so much like a contest to be on top as it seemed like NITE messing with the mind of ATDF. >:} See the thread in the APC starting here for more details.

     

    The only “outlier” today was due to superlatives: the first trade, the largest trade, 30K, and lowest price of the day, $0.1390. Other than that, nothing special – next highest ...

     

    The larger trades (>= 15K) occurred on 3 of the 15 trades, 20.00%. These 66,000 shares were 47.79% of day's volume, and traded at a VWAP of $0.1406. 1 of the larger trades, 33.33%, ...

     

    The other 12 trades, 80.00% of the day's trades, traded 72,100 shares, 52.21% of the days volume. The VWAP was $0.1417. 3 trades, 25.00%, ...

     

    Of the traditional TA oscillators I watch, we have a mixed bag. There's a few flat ... With on-going low volume and relatively high price volatility, this somewhat directionless behavior should be expected I guess.

     

    The intra-day low dropped to $0.139 from yesterday's $0.1391. Sans a catalyst, I suspect $0.14 will be breached on the close next week.

     

    Today's low, high, VWAP, trade volume, and daily short sales moved -0.07%, -3.73%, -01.00%, 83.89% and 4500.00% respectively. Price spread today was 3.88% vs. 7.84%, 6.21%, 16.19%, 18.52%, 7.07%, 5.08%, 14.29%, 7.78% and 1.67% on prior days.

     

    The usual is in the blog here.
    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    HardToLove
    12 Jul, 08:27 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    I'm little late on the draw here but pretty important article, given the conversation after the Kia 48 VDC lead-carbon battery discussions, from a 500 pound banana chomper. I should have been a little more suspicious when Bosch didn't enter the fray for the CPT prize. Or maybe they did to a certain level.

     

    Or most likely it's a good enough business to make sense for Valeo w/ their plans but not Bosch w/ differing motivations.

     

    Anyway, to keep it in perspective, a niche to Bosch could be a whale to Axion.

     

    Bosch says eboosting is only a niche technology

     

    http://bit.ly/13VwLQH
    12 Jul, 01:26 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1532) | Send Message
     
    "But Bosch will assist the powertrain at low engine speeds with mild-hybrid systems." Not sure what the difference is between e-boost and mild-hybrid.
    13 Jul, 12:54 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    I found this in Wiki: http://bit.ly/1tEqM2b
    Electrical boosting ("E-boosting") is a new technology under development. It uses an electric motor to bring the turbocharger up to operating speed quicker than possible using available exhaust gases.[24] An alternative to e-boosting is to completely separate the turbine and compressor into a turbine-generator and electric-compressor as in the hybrid turbocharger. This makes compressor speed independent of turbine speed. In 1981, a similar system that used a hydraulic drive system and overspeed clutch arrangement accelerated the turbocharger of the MV Canadian Pioneer (Doxford 76J4CR engine).[citation needed]
    13 Jul, 01:10 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Patrick, I thought the same thing: What's the difference? But that made no sense - hybridization is the exact opposite of a niche tech and Bosch knows that.

     

    That's when I found the Wiki-clip and that's when it made sense.
    13 Jul, 01:15 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    PSA Peugeot Citroën developing 48V mild hybrid solution for 2017

     

    http://bit.ly/VWJmiZ
    13 Jul, 01:25 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1841) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/PH6GCO

     

    ARRIVAL DATE
    2014-07-01
    SHIPPER
    TIANJIN MYXZ EXPORT & IMPORT TRADE
    DECLARATION OF GOODS
    DRY BATTERY(LEAD ACID BATTERY)
    12 Jul, 01:53 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    Ranma: Well, now what does *that* mean? Are we importing partially assembled batteries to chunk carbon electrodes into for use here?

     

    Was it really only the cases for batteries?

     

    <*sigh*>

     

    At least here they don't need an NDA - we can't figure it out anyway! :-((

     

    HardToLove
    P.S. Great catch regardless!
    12 Jul, 02:01 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1841) | Send Message
     
    It's a big mystery for sure, but the timing of it is gold. Signs of sales?
    12 Jul, 02:06 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Here is the shipper we talked about earlier in the year from the same source.

     

    http://bit.ly/1g2RL0o

     

    Edit: These guys might just be a broker?
    12 Jul, 02:09 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13542) | Send Message
     
    Most likely explanation: Battery cases for the toll contract. Less likely explanation: Battery cases for the PbC. Even less likely explanation: Battery cases for some new project of some kind.

     

    Meanwhile, we have to determine the key factor:

     

    IS there paint on these things to watch dry?
    12 Jul, 04:20 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    TB: The toll contract is winding down. I don't recall exactly when it ends, but it's this year?

     

    HardToLove
    12 Jul, 05:26 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9977) | Send Message
     
    HTL: Yes, TG stated in the last CC that the toll contract will be (paraphrasing) phased down come the end of the year, but AXPW will still be doing some work with East Penn.

     

    If orders don't begin coming in, I expect Axion will be forced to do some layoffs.

     

    I'm not so sure that the above shipment is for battery casings, as I spotted a shipping label on some pallets of battery casings the last time I was in New Castle. I don't recall the exact state, but the address was from somewhere in the deep south, USA, like Mississippi, or Alabama.

     

    I can't even offer up an educated guess as to what this shipment is about.
    12 Jul, 06:03 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2656) | Send Message
     
    Those shipment receipts mean nothing, when looking at historical significance ... maybe they will take on greater meaning in the rearview, but as a predictor, well, we already know.
    13 Jul, 12:09 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1532) | Send Message
     
    Does anybody have access to a weight on that shipment?
    13 Jul, 01:00 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30231) | Send Message
     
    I just published an Instablog with Jay Bowman's latest update which includes a graphic depiction of our battery duty cycle.

     

    http://bit.ly/1y9fou3

     

    It should give studious types a sense of why ePower had problems with AGM and why Jay's thrilled with the PbC.
    12 Jul, 04:15 PM Reply Like
  • JamesBBecker
    , contributor
    Comments (384) | Send Message
     
    JP :: I take it from your current graph that it is measuring current from the drive motor to and from the controller - and does not include any current from the generator flowing into the batteries.

     

    If it were the sum of all currents going to the batteries, the batteries would go to zero charge fairly quickly. At least it looks that way.
    12 Jul, 05:22 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30231) | Send Message
     
    The voltage and amperage readings are taken from the battery pack and each spike down represents a discrete discharge event followed by a discrete charge event. If you prefer, each spike up represents a discrete charge event followed by a discrete discharge event.

     

    Since each charge-discharge cycle uses 10% to 15% of the total stored energy and promptly replaces it, the batteries never fall below our minimum set point of about 450 volts. Over the course of a trip like this one, about 3X the total storage capacity of the battery pack will flow through the battery pack. The system keeps the batteries charged and in balance, but it works the hell out of them.
    12 Jul, 05:36 PM Reply Like
  • Nicu Mihalache
    , contributor
    Comments (1081) | Send Message
     
    John, this is more than brutal and an extremely important statistics. About 20x capacity cycling per hour, 10h / day, 300 days / year means the equivalent of 60k full cycles per year. If they hold up well 4-5 years until the next rebuild, we may simply call it the indestructible (or infinite) battery.

     

    If the Models S 85kWh battery could be cycled the same, one (green) driver could get about 100 million miles out of it, case closed :D

     

    Thank for sharing this info!
    13 Jul, 04:26 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30231) | Send Message
     
    I think the amount of energy delivered with each cycle is more like 5% to 10% of rated capacity, but it would take more sophistication than I have to come up with a definitive number. It takes 1.25 kWh of energy to dead lift 55,000 pounds of weight 60 feet. While it probably takes more energy to move our tractor-trailer up a 60 foot grade, the 1.25 kWh number seems like a fair guess of minimum energy throughput.

     

    The old Rosewater materials said a 70 pound 30HT battery has 500 wh of useful capacity. That suggests a useful capacity of ~350 wh for our 56.6 pound 30H batteries, assuming the top lead weight is constant. That would give our 56 battery string a total capacity of 19.6 kWh and put the average charge-discharge cycle in the 5% to 10% range.

     

    With a little luck, next week's road trip may give us something more substantial to talk about.
    13 Jul, 06:30 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2427) | Send Message
     
    JP - The Rosewater "500 Wh" was at a C1 rate, IIRC. Most batteries are measured at C/20 rate, which then gave the 30HT was about 700 Wh.

     

    For typical bio-carbon uses, the C1 rate is more appropriate than the C20 rate, but when people are comparing ratings of other batteries, the C20 is more meaningful (or least more common)l. I know you know this; this is for the benefit of other readers.
    13 Jul, 12:32 PM Reply Like
  • Nicu Mihalache
    , contributor
    Comments (1081) | Send Message
     
    I only now realize that I should have written 2x capacity per hour instead of 20x (what a brain fart!).

     

    Even with an order of magnitude less work that I have previously stated, this still means the equivalent of 20k to 30k cycles in its useful life and the equivalent of 10M miles for that 85kWh pack.

     

    PS: I thought this place is for positive criticism, not letting this kind of BS slip in the name of courtesy LOL
    29 Jul, 04:13 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9977) | Send Message
     
    Haven't seen this before.

     

    This morning, on my local Comcast sports channel, the following company (Generac) did a half hour Billy Mays-type infomercial on the benefits of a homeowner owning a generator. Lots of testimonials from happy and highly satisfied people who couldn't bare to live without their generator:

     

    http://bit.ly/1jn3jxX

     

    Of course, in about two seconds of research, I also found a link with a lengthy list of "pi$$ed off" Generac customers:

     

    http://bit.ly/1jn3lpG
    12 Jul, 04:26 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13542) | Send Message
     
    After reading about all the amazing goodies showered upon residential solar owners (it just starts with the 30% tax credit, and unwinds from there), I have been thinking I am an idiot for not doing this. Sure, I live in a river valley in a temperate rain forest with towering 200 foot trees all around, but SOME sunshine would hit the panels once in a while...

     

    LOL, just checked out the State incentives, which are often amazing.

     

    Cali, is... Nuts.

     

    Anyway, speaking as a 3/8 Cherokee Native American, the "Tribal" government benefits for solar installs are wild.

     

    Here's the plan:

     

    1. Form a Corporation with tribe members owning the bulk of the stock.

     

    2. Go into the business of building/renting multi-family units.

     

    3. Cash in the Federal Tribal Energy Grant Program (pays 100% up front of the cost of the solar installation). [Those unfortunates NOT possessed of tribal status can do this too, but will have to content themselves with lesser subsidies of about 50% or so].

     

    4. Cash the $2000 Federal Tax Credit for home builders for each unit. (Yes, this appears to be "double dipping", but hey, it might work). In the event it is disallowed, you white eyes out there can still do this.

     

    4. Sign up for State rebate programs. In California they are overlapping and extensive (ALL utilities must pay some form of rebate and buy your solar output, and most cities and counties have their own subsidies and tax credits and rebates). PV Rebate (which is paid up front even before the system generates power, funny sort of "rebate") seems to be about $.50/kw. Solar Thermal Rebates (we would be heating the swimming pool and residential hot water with the thermal solar rig, naturally) is $18.59/therm, up front.

     

    5. Sign up for State Property Tax incentives. California? 100% of the System "Value" (I don't know about you, but I would find it highly "valuable", n'est pas?).

     

    6. Keep good records of all the tax credits. Federal: 30% (no limit) Corporate Tax Credit. Add this to the $2000 allowed per unit, and voila, hard to pay Federal Corporate income taxes on the project.

     

    And the rebates, subsidies, incentives, and current sold to the utilities is all tax free.

     

    Sweet.
    12 Jul, 05:19 PM Reply Like
  • JohnM121
    , contributor
    Comments (409) | Send Message
     
    If or when a PBC's are used with some type of generator like this, a low-quality partner can ruin an otherwise good idea. My vision of distributed energy is a combination or solar, storage, and auxiliary generation. Have it turn on and feed the grid a few days a year when the spot price of electricity is above some threshold, say $2 /kwh. That won't wok if the generator keeps breaking.
    12 Jul, 05:41 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2427) | Send Message
     
    In my parent's neighborhood, 13 out of 13 Generac permanently installed generators failed during "Superstorm" Sandy in NJ.

     

    Most of the neighbors are in their "golden years" and would not complain online.
    12 Jul, 07:13 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13542) | Send Message
     
    Maya: The fellow with the generator that broke rocker arms has a telling story. 72 hours of use is nothing for such a unit, its ludicrous to have such a catastrophic failure after such a brief time (but not unknown, of course, even with major OEM auto).

     

    I am curious as to who is making those things. Rotor arms snapping in two (and its clear from the photos just how low hours the unit really was, they look otherwise new) is a real odd problem.

     

    Noteworthy that about 5 minutes after the generators are installed, the customer assumes full responsibility for all costs except for parts. LOL, why don't they just pretend to install them, leave behind an empty box, and only install actual generators if someone complains?

     

    Northern Tool sells them around here. One of the first blurbs in their ads mentions "...The OHVI engine is designed to run uninterrupted for extended periods..."

     

    Just not 72 hours total, though, huh?

     

    The 11kw item uses a 533cc overhead valve engine, using ng (power output drops to 10kw) or propane.

     

    At the art festivals the promotors have been using the same portable generators for years, running them nonstop 2 or 3 days out of every week...

     

    Looks like one would be better served just buying a nice portable generator and having a good electrician setup a hookup for use when the need arises. OR buy whoever builds a better one than Generac.

     

    I can't get over the rocker arms on a new engine snapping like kindling. I wonder if that engine was experiencing PTV (piston to valve) clearance problems (as in hitting one another). OHV tech is ancient and pretty easy to get right...
    12 Jul, 09:34 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (879) | Send Message
     
    Big Thumbs Up!
    12 Jul, 04:38 PM Reply Like
  • User 393748
    , contributor
    Comments (216) | Send Message
     
    A link provided by iindelco to an article on lead sulfation in VRLA batteries, and the management and remediation thereof, prompted me to think that it would seem timely at this point to mention that with all the research and development efforts being put into the battery space, there is also much work being done on R&D for software and hardware for battery management systems. It really is the case that alot of the present day R&D into the electrochemistry for the batteries of the future involves an exploration of the present leading boundaries of this field, and in some cases, a venturing into new areas in science will be required. In order to effectively apply this R&D, BMS needs are also being pushed forward on a concurrent basis.

     

    So, the software and hardware for the necessary Battery Management Systems are undergoing their own intensive threads of R&D, as well, as further advances are made in battery technology.
    12 Jul, 05:46 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    In case never posted, the Cummins MPG guide.

     

    http://bit.ly/1q6unVo
    12 Jul, 06:28 PM Reply Like
  • Axion Power Host
    , contributor
    Comments (469) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » New concentrator, only removed (NEW!) flag from the header.

     

    If you note comments deep into inefficiencies of gasoline or diesel engines, or folks trying to tell others how to run their company and what technology doesn't work, don't be alarmed. Since these fora are for Axion-specific topics, these side issues should /not/ occupy the majority of the space.

     

    The real resolution to such concerns will come from folks actually doing the work, not the hot air expended here.

     

    There's other blogs, or they could be created, where the discussions would be more appropriate.

     

    If you choose to reply to a deleted comment and you thread it by using "reply", your answer goes away too. I won't be trying to restore these even if they might be of interest.

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...
    13 Jul, 06:45 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1532) | Send Message
     
    JP> You say the MPG numbers were somewhat disappointing because of the challenging nature of the course but it's all relative. What is the relative for you? Do you have access to a conventional tractor to run against the ePower truck in a head-to-head comparison? You may find that the fuel savings are higher than expected. For example, if a conventional truck normally gets 6 mpg and ePower gets 10 mpg on flattish terrain, that is not as significant an improvement as if a conventional tractor gets 4mpg on hilly terrain and ePower gets 8.5mpg.
    13 Jul, 01:27 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30231) | Send Message
     
    Given the hilly terrain, I'm happy with 8.5 mpg. Since I've frequently spoken of a 9 to 10 mpg goal at 65 mph and 65,000 pounds, we thought it appropriate to acknowledge that this test came up a bit short and explain why. With any luck, the upcoming Grand Rapids trip will merit more exposure than an Instablog.
    13 Jul, 01:46 PM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2140) | Send Message
     
    Hi JP,
    Thanks for the continued updates on ePower.
    What I was impressed the most by is your OTR driver that normally drives a 550hp KW saying that he and the truck were happy at 55mph @ 55k lbs.

     

    It may not mean much to others, but when I was driving, the most powerful engine I ran was a Detroit 12.7L 425 hp on the West coast and in the Rockies. I can't tell you how many times I got my doors blown off by the guys with the big horses on the hills.
    13 Jul, 02:08 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1841) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/1klI6j9

     

    10 Things You Didn't Know About Semi Trucks - Popular ...

     

    "New fuel-economy standards that take effect beginning in 2014 will require semi trucks with a sleeper cab to get 7.2 mpg on level roads. "

     

    Would that cause many truck operators to require upgrades?
    13 Jul, 01:57 PM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1356) | Send Message
     
    "Would that cause many truck operators to require upgrades?"

     

    Most likely not. Typically that model year (2014) and beyond...
    13 Jul, 02:27 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1841) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/1q6unVo

     

    Cummins MPG Guide... general info.

     

    "Secrets of Better Fuel Economy
    The Physics of MPG"
    13 Jul, 01:58 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    John, Since the ePower story became linked more closely w/ the Axion story and you've started sharing more of the ePower information here, I've noticed general adjustments concerning where the system might find its place in the rebuild fleet. Just some gross directional aspects of the program as it matures while your team goes through its roller coaster learning curve. I've not tracked this in any fashion and have no interest in doing so. It's just interesting to think about even from a distance. I thank you for sharing some of this raw data and some of your/your teams general thoughts as you work your way through the process of pulling this program together. Quite interesting and obviously even more so if you're interested in Axion and other industries that are aligned with ePower's efforts.
    13 Jul, 02:19 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30231) | Send Message
     
    Companies and men that have met Harry Callahan both have to know their limitations. It does us no good if we develop a good system and sell it to the wrong customer. We know we can't be all things to all customers. So what were trying to do is define our target market and refine our approach to that market. It's a ton of fun and a fascinating process.
    13 Jul, 02:28 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Lots and lots to absorb from an industry standpoint as well as the technology.

     

    The great thing is that as you learn more and more about the path you are taking you don't have to worry too much about some of the limitations because the market is so huge and diverse in its needs. The key is to keep the technology moving toward a robust solution and to figure out how and where to enter the market where it will provide it's strongest returns along with identifying "the right" receptive audience. The relatively recent fuel price increases should have people looking for sure.

     

    Also like the fact that the large subsystem suppliers that you are relying on should not be threatened by your technology. It enhances and expands their opportunities as well. Very important as you've surely found out how critical it is to have their expertise to integrate the systems and to get them to play together.

     

    Oh, and let's not forget about factors like having access to end consumers w/o getting squeezed between industry behemoths and having subsystems that are already scaled at a level that will support the initial ramp. These are huge factors that are riding in your favor.
    13 Jul, 03:45 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30231) | Send Message
     
    In 1995 I swore I'd never take another corporate job. This particular opportunity was too good to resist.
    13 Jul, 04:03 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    EPA finds rail yards transfer pollutants as well as freight

     

    http://trib.in/1mZITMu
    13 Jul, 06:42 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563) | Send Message
     
    Automotive, It's hard.

     

    Tesla May Have A Huge Unfunded Warranty Problem Due To Defective Drivetrains

     

    "There are an increasing number of reports about Tesla's (TSLA) Model S drivetrains needing complete replacements, either because of unusual noise or outright failures. Perhaps most highly visible is that Edmund's test car recently received its fourth unit while Motor Trend went through two. If one reads the comments under these articles as well as numerous threads both on Tesla's own message forum (here and here are two of the latest) and that of the "Tesla Motors Club," it appears that these aren't isolated cases and that when performed out of warranty the repair costs approximately $15,000."

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...
    13 Jul, 10:21 PM Reply Like
  • Articula
    , contributor
    Comments (253) | Send Message
     
    Catepillar having trouble meeting 2017 EPA emission standards for locomotives.

     

    http://on.wsj.com/1kV0qQd
    14 Jul, 09:01 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30231) | Send Message
     
    CAT has had a lot of problems with emissions standards, which is one of the reasons they exited the OTR trucking market a few years back.

     

    http://on.mktw.net/1zB...
    14 Jul, 09:08 AM Reply Like
  • Masi
    , contributor
    Comments (479) | Send Message
     
    I grow impatient waiting for the "significant order". Does anyone think an announcement is being held back so it coincides with the RS?
    15 Jul, 12:43 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (18033) | Send Message
     
    Masi: I suspect it's the other way around ... well, assuming they can/have everything lined up except the big order.

     

    BTW: new concentrator linked above http://bit.ly/1nDX20R

     

    HardToLove
    15 Jul, 12:54 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9563)