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  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30170) | Send Message
     
    Yesterday I posted a copy of Jay Bowman's latest update as an Instablog.

     

    http://bit.ly/1y9fou3

     

    The Instablog includes an extremely informative graph that integrates road elevation, tractor speed, battery string voltage, battery string amperage and instantaneous fuel economy on a single sheet and shows how the engine and the batteries respond to minute-to-minute changes in road elevation.

     

    Nobody has seen this kind of detail on what the PbC does in the real world.

     

    The engineering and technology types in this group should spend some time studying the graph and considering both the brutality of the duty cycle and the responsiveness of the PbC.

     

    I knew we worked the batteries hard, but I never imagined we worked them this hard. I'd be willing to bet that NS is looking at similar duty cycles and fuel saving opportunities for the OTR locomotive.
    13 Jul, 07:42 AM Reply Like
  • JohnM121
    , contributor
    Comments (396) | Send Message
     
    The problem with sales is that the product development by the battery customers did not begin in earnest until the second generation production line was available. It took Axion years to get to that point, and it is taking time for applications to be developed around it. NS and EPower are both second generation applications whose first attempt failed at the the battery level. Now that the battery works, there is all of the other aspects of developing the entire application. The frequency regulation and solar storage markets are just getting going too, but they need to be installed and collecting data for a while before the value can be quantified properly. And even then, the payback depends greatly on regional groups, such as PJM, to have the infrastructure to recognize it value.
    13 Jul, 11:21 AM Reply Like
  • obieephyhm
    , contributor
    Comments (1590) | Send Message
     
    third!
    13 Jul, 01:15 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    Heavy Trucks Vehicle Technologies Marketing Report with all kinds of info for those having a lazy Sunday.

     

    http://1.usa.gov/14dXla6
    13 Jul, 02:11 PM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2127) | Send Message
     
    Hi all,
    A link to Omnitracs. This is near realtime sat communications to monitor a truck for GPS, fuel use, driver input, fault codes and much more. This system was in use at 2 of the companies I worked for and provides an amazing amount of data to the dispatch and maintenance centers. http://bit.ly/1tETIqJ
    13 Jul, 03:29 PM Reply Like
  • Axion Power Host
    , contributor
    Comments (464) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Added a (NEW!) link to JP's latest update on ePower progress in the "Trucking Related" section of the header, which was overlooked when the new concentrator was installed.

     

    .
    14 Jul, 04:33 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    This APC is suffering from "failure to thrive".

     

    Some selfies of the APH in the header would do wonders for it, I'd bet.
    14 Jul, 08:40 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4597) | Send Message
     
    >Edmund Metcalfe ... Your "failure to thrive" is a direct reflection of the product & company followed.
    14 Jul, 09:18 AM Reply Like
  • Axion Power Host
    , contributor
    Comments (464) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » (UPDATED!) Some of JP's charts in the header.
    14 Jul, 09:04 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    CDEL offers 100K @ $0.15 on the sell side at the open.

     

    HardToLove
    14 Jul, 09:36 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13507) | Send Message
     
    And so, it begins...
    14 Jul, 09:39 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2639) | Send Message
     
    TB - I don't think it ever ended.
    14 Jul, 10:07 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    CDEL moves 50K to offer @ $0.14 @ 10:31 and it's snapped up in ~ 1 minute. 100K is still there at $0.15 though.

     

    HardToLove
    14 Jul, 10:34 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    Path to significant sales.

     

    ☑ 9.7.3
    ☐ 8.3.2

     

    http://bit.ly/1kVmjyT
    14 Jul, 10:42 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    HTL, are they the mm that has been most prevalent in presenting the larger blocks on the ask at times over the last couple of weeks?
    14 Jul, 10:56 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    Iindelco: Yes. CDEL is the one.

     

    HardToLove
    14 Jul, 11:06 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13507) | Send Message
     
    LOL. Reminds me of the reaction when I tell an audience full of prospective young illustrators that the classes they really need to take in school are business management, accounting, and sales management.

     

    It never seems to occur to them (or their instructors, who also seem to be about 30 years behind the curve) that most of them are going to end up self-employed, and if they are not very careful, simultaneously working for an ignorant jerk.
    14 Jul, 11:14 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1777) | Send Message
     
    Hi all.
    Soooo...I've been on vacation for the last week and 1/2. Anything interesting happen while I was gone?? Anyone....?
    ;-)
    Any bets on whether we will see NS999 moving, under its own power, around Altoona this week?
    14 Jul, 11:10 AM Reply Like
  • jveal
    , contributor
    Comments (657) | Send Message
     
    Axion has a new CEO and a twitter report says batteries have been installed in newly painted NS 999.
    14 Jul, 11:23 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    Labtech: NS-999 exited the paint shop, WTB got a tweeted pic of it, APH put a cropped vearsion in the header so now we know the light at the end of the tunnel is an oncoming train! ;-))

     

    HardToLove
    14 Jul, 11:23 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    Labtech, I'd place the odds as high as grout on bricks where you don't want it IF we had a full time feed on the thing. Problem is we might have some lag between the event and when we are advantaged by a rail fan with a video device and the time/inclination to post. Maybe Edmund is right and we'll have a formal showing. That would be nice.
    14 Jul, 11:26 AM Reply Like
  • jveal
    , contributor
    Comments (657) | Send Message
     
    Lab Tech,

     

    JP also gave Jay's update on ePower over the weekend in case you haven't seen it.
    14 Jul, 11:45 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    iindelco,

     

    I am not predicting a "formal" showing anytime soon. I think there will be an intense period of assessment, during which I expect someone will grab a video from the sky or the fenceline.

     

    They already "launched" the NS999. If it rolls over now, it's the 666, and they'll put it 6 feet deep, and make Barbee dig the hole.

     

    If the roll-out is a success, OTOH, then I predict there will be some sort of "major" NS announcement that will include a vision statement; I expect any "formal fanfare" from this point forward would be reserved for the roll-out of the 1728-battery OTR unit, if then.
    14 Jul, 12:29 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    This week should be the Axion-NSC review meeting. I am hoping for a NS999 video before the meeting ends.
    14 Jul, 11:18 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4135) | Send Message
     
    "This week should be the Axion-NSC review meeting. "

     

    First week of August -- maybe.
    14 Jul, 11:51 AM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (853) | Send Message
     
    Truck and Train neck to neck in the race to headlines.
    14 Jul, 12:31 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    Supercaps.

     

    A new sort of storage device gives lithium-ion batteries a run for their money

     

    http://econ.st/1kVNg5n
    14 Jul, 12:35 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (1025) | Send Message
     
    Can anyone send me a copy of the old investor presentation from Oct 2013 that was on the Axion website until recently?
    14 Jul, 01:00 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    Mr Holty: post an e-mail in a private message to me or ... I can put it in my dropbox temporarily.

     

    Let me know.

     

    HardToLove
    14 Jul, 01:06 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (1025) | Send Message
     
    I want to publicly thank HTL for this. This is what makes this group great. I thought I had an old version saved on my Kindle Fire at home but I didn't. This wasn't greatly important to me but in comparing the two has caused me to look at stuff again with a new eye.

     

    Again, thanks to everyone on here that answers others questions and provides help when others need it.
    14 Jul, 05:58 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    Posted something on these guys awhile back.

     

    TransPower Places Ninth in San Diego’s Fastest 100 Growing Private Companies

     

    http://bit.ly/1zC0EFF

     

    This is what caught my eye then.

     

    Locomotive Electrification

     

    http://bit.ly/YdXT7I
    14 Jul, 01:28 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    Iindelco: ISTM that some patent overlap with what (NYSE:NSC) has filed must be occurring. I not they allow both plug-in charging and re-generative brake charging.

     

    Hm?

     

    HardToLove
    14 Jul, 01:42 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1803) | Send Message
     
    Who are these guys? They seem to dabble in everything - even hybrid thorium nuclear reactors. It looks like they are systems integrators, like ePower except for all the markets Axion is hoping for. Too good to be true?
    14 Jul, 01:45 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    I ran some rough figures awhile back, based on some internet fuel mileage figures of locomotives, trying to figure out how far 1,000 PbC batteries would power a freight train. The 150 mile figure must be a really short train, downhill, and without any stops or slowdowns.
    14 Jul, 01:48 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    HTL, We saw how cautious the rails are in testing. I doubt they are getting any bites but if they are it will be years. My primary point was to show that this small private company is getting sales and they are growing. Profitably? Don't know. Axion has to get more aggressive IMO.
    -
    Ranma, I haven't followed them that closely but they do seem to be getting bites on their numerous line casts.
    14 Jul, 01:50 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4597) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... Notice that word "tender". The idea is a dud. I can't believe they are getting any interest from the rails. A railcar full of Li-on batteries doesn't make sense. Railroads have enough hazardous cargo to tote around & keep track of already. This is basically the idea of stacking PowerCubes in a well car but with a high capital cost & fire hazard built in.
    14 Jul, 02:35 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    Thanks DRich. I've also thought that they would be cautious about using lithium ion batteries for rail. Especially in large metropolitan areas. I know we've talked about this in the past.

     

    Don't have the background you have to talk about why the rails don't want to use tender vehicles. I'll follow your lead on that point for sure.
    14 Jul, 02:39 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    DRich, Totally agree, my idea was MUCH better. :)
    14 Jul, 02:45 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4597) | Send Message
     
    >Edmund Metcalfe ... Your idea was much better. Sadly, it was one that was discussed several years back so I can't award points for originality ... just for somewhat reasonable thought.
    14 Jul, 02:53 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    I'll take what I can get. :)
    14 Jul, 03:12 PM Reply Like
  • Articula
    , contributor
    Comments (250) | Send Message
     
    I'll repost this since I didn't see we moved concentrators.

     

    Caterpillar having trouble meeting 2017 EPA emissions standards for locomotives.

     

    http://on.wsj.com/1kV0qQd
    14 Jul, 01:31 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    That's troubling. GE is a HUGE Obama supporter through the years and has been handsomely rewarded, I'm sure. Perhaps these new limits were recommended by GE.
    14 Jul, 01:56 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4597) | Send Message
     
    >Edmund Metcalfe ... What utter nonsense.
    14 Jul, 02:36 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    DRich,
    Quite the opposite.

     

    First sentence: I think it is troubling if we have only one major locomotive builder capable of meeting the regulations.

     

    Second sentence: Utterly indisputable, so you must be talking about the third.

     

    Third sentence: I am 100% certain that there is industry input into the regulatory framework, including what can be done, what are reasonable requirements and on what schedule should such regulatory milestones be met.

     

    GE suggests a number they can meet and they know EMD cannot. Simple take-out order.

     

    Crony capitalism, picking winners, regulatory taking: You cannot seriously be disputing the veritable rash of such behaviors that have occurred during this administration and thoughout the history of governments of all sorts everywhere.
    14 Jul, 02:59 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2169) | Send Message
     
    Articula: seems Cat has an excellent reason for working with companies experimenting with hybrid trucks, as well as locomotives. Using battery power to reduce locomotive emissions while traveling thru urban areas could combine with improved fuel economy to good advantage. Trucks are just smaller "trains" that run on roads, after all :-)
    14 Jul, 03:11 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (1025) | Send Message
     
    While I don't think Edmund is right in this instance he has enough of it right nowadays (and probably have been that way forever). DRich is right.

     

    Bills, laws whatever you want to call them are generally written by experts, special interest groups and provided for a vote. We see it in all industries.

     

    CAT bought these guys and has never gotten around to spending the engineering capital to build next generation diesels. As the article states EMD has a simple, elegant diesel that is 50 years old. Its great for what it does and is simple to manage and repair and why it sold so well. EMD sold to CAT as they couldn't provide the financial packages that GE was using back in the day. Sell a worse Diesel but price it at cost and make some money on the financing arm. Their size allowed them to. CAT should have been able to match financial packages but instead of investing didn't and instead harvested cash from the business.

     

    I am a finance dork and I have to say that CAT has been well served by its finance people but has ignored the engineers too long and they are up against the wall. Its their own fault. Earlier this year I did some financial DD on a divison of GE that they bought a few years ago as part of a bigger transaction and will spin off in 2014. I was impressed by the engineering resources they threw at it. They did the financial maneuvering to get it ready for sale but they also didn't neglect the business and actually really invested and will not get that money back. The PE firm who buys this division will be lucky and do very well.
    14 Jul, 03:11 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    There's also the possibility that CAT-EMD dropped the ball, I completely agree.

     

    But when the result of such regulations looks so clear, i.e., GE now has a monopoly, and the winner is clearly a major supporter of the regulator, both the result and the regulation should be closely reviewed and considered suspect.
    14 Jul, 03:45 PM Reply Like
  • Articula
    , contributor
    Comments (250) | Send Message
     
    I linked this article because I find it amazing our little company could beat these behemoths to the answer. Sometimes taking the high level view of what Axion is doing despite its stock performance is a beautiful thing.
    14 Jul, 03:57 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4597) | Send Message
     
    >Edmund Metcalfe ... I was referring to sentences 2 & 3. Sentence No. 2 is just plain silly and only worthy of a TV economic commenter of a certain stripe. Color not to be specified. Sentence No. 3, I'll refrain from saying it is completely wrong because I'm sure the bill had industry lobby input. but is probably in the neighborhood of being more than 50% wrong.
    14 Jul, 03:16 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    re' Sentence #2: GE was top 5 contributor to Obama, owned MSNBC of tingly-legged fame, spent millions lobbying, got huge government contracts worth much much more; Immelt was probably his top economic "adviser". Don't forget the huge GE push for electronic medical records, also not coincidental. It's all unpleasant and unseemly.
    14 Jul, 03:33 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30170) | Send Message
     
    It's probably worth observing that political commentary and personal arguments were the straws that broke our hard working camel's (NYSE:APH) back a few weeks ago. APH tries very hard to keep this Concentrator series focused on Axion issues, not DC. We all need to respect his efforts to avoid digressions that increase his work load as a volunteer.
    14 Jul, 03:21 PM Reply Like
  • WayneinOregon
    , contributor
    Comments (988) | Send Message
     
    My brother is an accomplished musician (hammered dulcimer) who successfully worked the craft show circuit for a number years selling CDs. One day I was at a show with him, a day when there were lots of people out and about, with most of them in a buying mood. As I talked with vendors, it seemed almost unanimous that they were having a “good” day.

     

    I then ran into a vendor who looked a bit glum, and upon asking him how he did, replied that he didn’t do very well. As we walked along, we came upon his booth. Prominently displayed were pictures of politicians from one of the major political parties (it was election season). It was immediately clear to me (though not to him) why he didn’t do well. He offended the political sensibilities of approx. half the people who walked by his booth.

     

    From this experience, I realized even more how important it is to not discuss politics, unless I’m with like-minded people, or I have an interest in “mixing things up” (which is not my nature). It seems clear that no matter what political comment is made within a disparate group of people, roughly half will agree, the other half will likely be rather offended. I’m a bit of a political junkie, and am sometimes tempted to make a little political commentary here and there. But the realization it’s going to be at least somewhat offensive to half the readers here makes me think the better of it.
    14 Jul, 04:34 PM Reply Like
  • nakedjaybird
    , contributor
    Comments (2778) | Send Message
     
    John et.al -

     

    Re. " We all need to respect his efforts to avoid digressions that increase his work load as a volunteer."....

     

    AND our load as readers to wade thru many useless comments to find the significant!!!!
    14 Jul, 06:07 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2639) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/1lUrkqU

     

    DiGiacinto, also a former city councilman, said he will be remaining both in Bethlehem and as city controller, which is a part-time job.

     

    "I feel comfortable that I'll be able to do both," he said.
    14 Jul, 04:10 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    I'm happy he paid attention in ethics class. A little pudding proof.

     

    Bethlehem stops business with company after finding conflict

     

    http://bit.ly/WdhwDA
    14 Jul, 04:22 PM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (1616) | Send Message
     
    I am happy for the change of CEO to be very honest, I just wish it didn't have to come in the circumstances of TG's health.

     

    A more detailed look into DiGiacinto's corporate experience tells me that his expertise lies in trying to resuscitate companies that are not doing too well. Maybe things inside Axion are worse than we thought, maybe he is just seeking his first proper tenure as a CEO of a company. We just don't know, but I certainly hope it's the latter rather than the former.
    14 Jul, 05:38 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    Details on the next generation Prius that was delayed for 6 months. Indicates they will offer NiMH or lithium ion depending on your needs and price point.

     

    Toyota ponders awd for next-gen Prius

     

    http://bit.ly/1kWGFrv
    14 Jul, 04:42 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    Bosch touting next gen SS w/ coasting.

     

    New coasting system to save fuel on Mideast roads

     

    http://bit.ly/1kWNWHV
    14 Jul, 05:25 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    Iindelco: with the temps experienced there I would guess that most Lithium batteries might be challenged to carry all the hotel loads and be brought back to ready state is up to 1/3 of trips might be engine-off. They'd probably need their own "air conditioner" too? :-))

     

    I think we know a battery that might do well there. And when coasting, added weight might extend coasting time, although the benefits could be quickly lost if a corresponding rise must be navigated.

     

    I just know that no one has looked at the Axion offerings though - not "sexy" enough.

     

    HardToLove
    14 Jul, 05:49 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    40-50 degrees in the summer. Interesting to see how that is going to work.
    15 Jul, 01:27 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    centigrade that is and five to six months per year.
    15 Jul, 06:43 AM Reply Like
  • geopark
    , contributor
    Comments (302) | Send Message
     
    Very fun revised avatar metro . . makes me smile.
    15 Jul, 10:10 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    HTL, It'll be interesting to see what chemistry Bosch goes with for their lithium ion offering. It's important, I think, to reflect back and think about some of the industry alignments that are happening in the area. Also important in light of LT's post.

     

    To me it looks like BMW gave Bosch a touch of the cold shoulder for some reason. Could be pure pricing in that it's hard for BMW to give up such a large part of the vehicle, battery pack, and make the economics work. If that's the case, Where does Bosch fit in?

     

    Bosch, GS Yuasa, Mitsubishi form JV for next-gen Li-ion battery technology; targeting a doubling of capacity

     

    http://bit.ly/1qDnTsT

     

    Ford Works With Samsung To End Lead-Acid Batteries For Good

     

    http://bit.ly/1qDnTsU

     

    Edit: From the first article.

     

    " In September 2012, Bosch and Samsung SDI disbanded their South Korea-based SB LiMotive JV for Li-ion batteries. (Earlier post.) Samsung SDI paid Bosch $95 million for Bosch’s 50% stake in the venture; in turn, Bosch acquired SB LiMotive’s US and German subsidiaries for $38 million, for a net payment to Bosch of $57 million. Bosch took over the subsidiary SB LiMotive Germany GmbH. Based in Stuttgart, it focuses on systems engineering, battery management systems, prototyping, marketing, and sales."
    15 Jul, 10:25 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    Iindelco: I guess if they try hard enough and long enough they'll discover they keys to those goals that haven't been found in the last decade and a half?

     

    HardToLove
    15 Jul, 10:37 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13507) | Send Message
     
    The automakers know full well they are playing a game of Russian roulette with the elites ruling the EU, and its only a matter of time until they lose a round.

     

    When that happens, they can only hope that they have already found the solution allowing them to dodge the bullet.

     

    Its probably a sound strategy, given their situation.

     

    In an insane world, sometimes the problem is making sure your plans are crazy enough.
    15 Jul, 11:21 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    HTL,

     

    "The truth is incontrovertible. Malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end, there it is."

     

    Sir Winston Churchill

     

    Edit: But it doesn't elude to who will be advantaged by it when it comes out! We be gaspin for air.
    15 Jul, 11:30 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    07/14/2014: EOD stuff partially copied from blog (up now).
    # Trds: 9, MinTrSz: 1000, MaxTrSz: 50000, Vol: 104900, AvTrSz: 11656
    Min. Pr: 0.1394, Max Pr: 0.1441, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.1406
    # Buys, Shares: 7 95900, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.1407
    # Sells, Shares: 2 9000, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.1396
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 10.66:1 (91.42% "buys"), DlyShts 63900 (60.92%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 710.00%

     

    Note the high buy percentage today was predominately an effect of two larger trades, detailed later, and few additional trades with an aggregate low volume. Don't be mislead by the buy percentage.

     

    But do note the short percentage behaved at it should when the buy percentage is this high ... in spades! I suspect a large portion of those two large buys at $0.14 were a substantial portion of the short volume today. If so, as a little volume returns the short percentage should start to return, haltingly at least, towards more normal (for our situation) levels and overshoot, if past behavior is any indication. This is likely when our share price will move VWAP into the $0.13xx range and our close(s) will drop below $0.14.

     

    Volume tanked again ... The only reason buy percentage is that high is that someone dropped the offer to $0.14 at 10:31 and about 67% of the day's volume went off in two buys at $0.14. The rest of the day also stunk up the joint even though there were only two sells in our 10 trades. The offers began low and stayed low.

     

    The large offer at $0.145 of 354K shares from CDEL was absent today. But we did get a 100K offer from CDEL for $0.15.

     

    We again saw an oddity with ARCA appearing pre-market on both sides, bidding ...

     

    There were only two larger trades, both buys, one of 20K for $0.14 at 10:27 and one of 50K for $0.14 at 10:32. They accounted for 66.73% of the day's volume. They were also at the low of the day along with a 3K sell for $0.14 at 14:03, the closing trade.

     

    Of the traditional TA oscillators I watch, we have less of a mixed bag today. There's none flat now. Most are weaker ...

     

    Today's low, high, VWAP, trade volume, and daily short sales moved 0.29%, -0.21%, -00.37%, -24.04% and 131.52% respectively. Price spread today was 3.37% vs. 3.88%, 7.84%, 6.21%, 16.19%, 18.52%, 7.07%, 5.08%, 14.29% and 7.78% on prior days.

     

    Most of the usual, but less, in the blog here.
    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    HardToLove
    14 Jul, 07:12 PM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5001) | Send Message
     
    BMW to Spend Billions of Euros on Samsung SDI Batteries

     

    http://bloom.bg/1r0KVfu
    15 Jul, 05:25 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5001) | Send Message
     
    BMW is in a sharing mood
    BMW (OTCMKTS:BAMXY) says it will consider sharing battery technology with other companies if it would help drive down the cost of batteries for electric vehicles.

     

    "If Mercedes called us, we would be happy to find a way with Samsung SDI to supply them with battery cells," says BMW exec Klaus Draeger.

     

    Tesla Motors has already gone public with its support of open source technology within the EV industry.
    15 Jul, 07:41 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2639) | Send Message
     
    BMW is planning to increase its purchases of SDI battery cells for the electric i3 city car and the plug-in hybrid i8 sports car as well as for “additional hybrid models” in the coming years, the Munich-based carmaker said today in a statement.
    15 Jul, 08:56 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    Another article that gives a little more perspective into the agreement.

     

    BMW to lift electric car battery cell orders by 20-30 percent in 2016

     

    http://bit.ly/1nDqcxb
    15 Jul, 10:38 AM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (1616) | Send Message
     
    This doesn't bode very well for the PbC with BMW :( Time will tell...
    15 Jul, 04:47 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    Amouna: Keep in mind these are not the micro-hybird cars BMW is addressing in the article. For those the Lithium batteries still have some issues that must be overcome that I don't think will be addressed just by a chase for higher energy density. Temperature, re-charge rate, ... will likely still be issues.

     

    If they are abandoning the micro-hybrid, that would certainly be the death-knell for PbC with BMW.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    15 Jul, 05:07 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    CDEL offers 100K again at $0.15, 100 share trade goes at that price.

     

    ATDF and NITE were bidding $0.14, NITE withdraws to $0.136.

     

    Now, another 100 share buy at $0.15, two-minute interval.

     

    Let's see if they are starting another fishing tournament.

     

    HardToLove
    15 Jul, 09:50 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2639) | Send Message
     
    For whatever it's worth, here is an older pp presentation from Enders given in 2009 in China:

     

    Studies on the Failure Mechanism of VRLA Batteries Under High Rate Partial State-of-Charge (HRPSoC) Operation

     

    Interestingly, if I am not mistaken, it appears the power point has the newer Axion colors and logo, despite being a presentation from 2009.

     

    http://tinyurl.com/pmm...
    15 Jul, 10:00 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2430) | Send Message
     
    US Department of Defense hands out US$334 million contract for PV projects in Hawaii

     

    http://bit.ly/1nDjgA0

     

    "All of these projects, which are located on the island of Oahu, are set to be completed by 2040."

     

    ????
    15 Jul, 10:15 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    Wtb: 2040? Wow! Talk about taking the long view! Let's see ... $334MM divided by 26 years is not a lot per annum. With inflation the amount of gain in the tail years would be quite small too.

     

    HardToLove
    EDIT: P.S. Ah! I overlooked the "and operate". That changes the picture a wee bit.
    15 Jul, 10:40 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2430) | Send Message
     
    Part of what's keeping Altoona busy these days:

     

    Facebook item: http://on.fb.me/1qDp9fA

     

    "There are already eight GP33ECOs in progress at the Juniata Shops. GP50s are being used as cores and they'll have similar specs as the GP59E rebuilds but with flared radiators for tier 3 emissions and all will have admiral cabs. http://bit.ly/1qDp9fH"

     

    link says (among other things)
    Setup to operate with RP-M4C road slugs

     

    and
    CCB26 electronic air brake

     

    My WAG is that's not regenerative, but I REALLY have no idea and I didn't Google them.

     

    Anyway, this raises the question of what are the requirements of the "other" engines in a consist to "mesh" with an OTR, and does just 1 engine in the consist need those special requirements (if any)?

     

    If we were to identify any such requirements, then we might get some hints (in future such postings) about what NSC sees as the OTR future ...
    15 Jul, 10:33 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    The Story Is Storage

     

    "Walking into the 2014 Intersolar North America San Francisco exhibit..."

     

    http://bit.ly/1qDuRxX
    15 Jul, 11:08 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2639) | Send Message
     
    VD -

     

    Have you cold called Greensmith yet?

     

    "They have 30 systems installed at 9 utilities with experience in 8 batteries and 6 inverter technologies. The largest of which is a 20 MW turn-key system."

     

    I particularly impressed by a company named Greensmith. They are currently a privately held company with a reported $14M private investment and offices in Maryland and California. The history of this company dates back to 2008 with software development. Finding it easier to do the front and back end hardware themselves they became a turnkey solution for grid support and energy storage. They have a chemistry-neutral battery management system which makes them relevant to the whole storage landscape. The functions being provided by Greensmith are finding utility markets with New Jersey’s PJM frequency response, New York’s energy arbitrage (example: pumped storage resources can arbitrage price by purchasing lower priced off-peak power and selling power during peak hours of the day along with demand management due to Indian Point shut down) and the previous mentioned California Rule 21 tariff. These functions also include ramp rate control, smoothing, peak shaving and capacity shifting. CEO John Jung provided a presentation to the sessions held at the Intercontinental. They have 30 systems installed at 9 utilities with experience in 8 batteries and 6 inverter technologies. The largest of which is a 20 MW turn-key system. Systems include a 500 kW / 1.5 MWh storage system in San Diego and EV Charge + PV in Brooklyn, NY and Honolulu, HI.
    15 Jul, 11:20 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2639) | Send Message
     
    If we are to believe the idea that a PbC installation only needs to be half the size of a comparable lithium ion installation and do the same work, that should make the value proposition compelling for a company such as Greensmith to sell the PbC.

     

    White paper please.
    15 Jul, 11:23 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    Stefan: Just keep in mind that only certain types of applications would fill the bill: e.g. time shifting would not favor the PbC but various types of grid regulation related activities would likely be good candidates.

     

    HardToLove
    15 Jul, 11:42 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2639) | Send Message
     
    Understood, HTL. And exactly why a sober, high quality white paper is needed to let people know what the PbC is capable of and what it is not capable of.

     

    So sick of reading puff pieces that don't really say anything or misrepresent what the true capabilities are.

     

    Feeds right into Edison's assessment of sellers of batteries.
    15 Jul, 11:47 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    Stefan, I don't know how well Vani serves his role when it comes to energy storage for in front of or behind the meter initiatives. I think he is probably great for automotive, ePower and rail but I'm guessing he doesn't have the connections and the depth of experience for grid based initiatives. I hope I'm wrong but if not he should buy the right resources. Some of the guys in his department have been there forever. Are they the right people for current needs?
    15 Jul, 11:59 AM Reply Like
  • JohnM121
    , contributor
    Comments (396) | Send Message
     
    .. And don't forget once the inverter and related hardware is in place, there can be a mix of fast charge and fast demand response, and slower higher capacity storage for time shifting. PBC are the SD memory cards and some other storage types, such as flow batteries, are the hard disks. Mix and match based on what you want.
    15 Jul, 12:02 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    John, Yes, but that requires a partner. The elusive partner.
    15 Jul, 12:09 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2639) | Send Message
     
    ii - whatever the case, we are going on 2.5 yrs since he was hired and the sales statistics are dismal and while we like to make guesses as to ongoing projects, we really know very little of their status. However, one thing is certain, those contacts have not resulted in any public sales to auto/transport yet.

     

    Additionally, I would like to see more on the idea that a PbC installation for grid based initiatives can be half the size of a li-ion installation and perform the same work.

     

    When we see a battery agnostic integrator selling into the markets that we want to be in, I would expect that the Sr. VP Business Development, Sales & Marketing would be beating down the doors to offer what is supposed to have a superior value proposition.

     

    http://bit.ly/1qDGdlA
    15 Jul, 12:16 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4135) | Send Message
     
    "... I would expect that the Sr. VP Business Development, Sales & Marketing would be beating down the doors to offer what is supposed to have a superior value proposition."

     

    Ahhh but what about the NDAs, Stephan? What about the NDAs? How can Axion possibly consider disclosing entirely unremarkable information to a battery integrator unless they are willing to sign an NDA first and if they do sign how will they be able to sell their packages to potential buyers without first getting Axion's okay to present their proposals to each potential buyer?
    15 Jul, 02:54 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1441) | Send Message
     
    Let's see what DDG has to say about publicity and data disclosure.
    15 Jul, 03:06 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    More on CAES (Compressed Air Energy Storage) & Hyrdostor

     

    How Much Energy Storage Do You Need to Back Up the London Array?

     

    http://bit.ly/1qDwZG3
    15 Jul, 11:20 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1441) | Send Message
     
    I much prefer this method to utilize the sea for energy: http://bit.ly/1qDMbmt

     

    Furthermore: http://bit.ly/1nDYhwZ

     

    and: http://bit.ly/1nDYy33
    15 Jul, 12:57 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1441) | Send Message
     
    The ocean is basically a highly efficient thermal solar collector, absorbing more than 90% of incoming radiation and covering 70% of the Earth, naturally http://bit.ly/1nE1gWp,

     

    is an enormous heat sink, with ~90% of the mass at temperatures below 4 deg C http://bit.ly/1nE1gWr.

     

    And to tie this to previous discussions about climate, is orders of magnitude more significant to Earth's thermal balance than the atmosphere: http://bit.ly/1nE1fSn
    15 Jul, 01:09 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    Patrick, Thanks. I remember years ago when this project was first proposed at Cornell University. All the environmentalists went berserk. It was going to ruin Cayuga lake with all the heat that would be sunk into the lake. I didn't follow up to see if it ever passed then but found this.

     

    You'd probably have to walk on water to get this through now.

     

    http://bit.ly/1nE4xVA
    15 Jul, 01:18 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1441) | Send Message
     
    Lakes are problematic because the volume of water is tiny compared to the deep ocean.
    15 Jul, 01:28 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4135) | Send Message
     
    "I much prefer this method to utilize the sea for energy: http://bit.ly/1qDMbmt"

     

    OT: So, no worries about CO2 or sea level rise Patrick?

     

    Pump heat into oceans and logical consequences include 1) oceanic emission of CO2 and 2) thermosteric sea level rise.

     

    http://bit.ly/1ktl61M
    15 Jul, 03:08 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1441) | Send Message
     
    I am still very interested in Sterling Engines (Sterling Energy Systems went bankrupt in 2011). I like it mainly because it requires no special materials and can be built by the same shops as auto manufacturing.

     

    Not sure what happened to SES.
    15 Jul, 03:20 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    How about hybridizing a Stirling ECE with an ICE, using the former to cool the latter?`
    15 Jul, 04:29 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1441) | Send Message
     
    Well it certainly releases less CO2 than burning coal, not to mention Mercury, and it's a renewable resource.
    16 Jul, 10:14 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4135) | Send Message
     
    "Well it certainly releases less CO2 than burning coal, ...."

     

    I wouldn't bet on it.
    16 Jul, 10:37 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4135) | Send Message
     
    :-) Clearly, Patrick. CO2 is not the cause of global warming. NSC's 2014 sustainability report identifies the real culprit!

     

    "On conventional locomotives, the braking energy generated – up to 3 megawatts of power – is blown off as heat through a resistor grid."

     

    It's dem dar railroads.
    16 Jul, 10:51 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1028) | Send Message
     
    NSC has released its 2014 Sustainability Report. This year it is just released in web format with links to different topics. The page about NS 999 is here:

     

    http://bit.ly/1nEHWZ8

     

    >>“Our testing shows that the systems are working as designed and that the batteries should have a long life in the locomotive,” said Gibson Barbee, our senior energy engineer.

     

    Mechanical Department employees at the Juniata Locomotive Shop, who assembled the original NS 999, are outfitting the updated locomotive. If all goes as planned, the new and improved 999 will be ready for field testing in the summer of 2014.<<

     

    And this ominous last sentence:

     

    >>Whether or not it will lead to an affordable alternative to diesel-powered switchers is another question.<<

     

    No mention of industry partner Axion this time.
    15 Jul, 03:21 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4597) | Send Message
     
    >nogoodslacker ... That was a less than enthusiastic outlook for the BP4. They hope it is successful but will it see service? Meh!
    15 Jul, 03:32 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1028) | Send Message
     
    Yeah, they sure don't sound like they are ready to start building a fleet of electric switchers. I predict years of testing to get a better sense of the economics and reliability before they build any more.

     

    Also sounds like the OTR version is still on the drawing board and no indication of being ready to build one in the near future.
    15 Jul, 03:42 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1441) | Send Message
     
    Juniata Shops will rebuild 150 SD60E's saving NSC 250 million over buying new locos.
    15 Jul, 03:43 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1441) | Send Message
     
    "Our development team has conducted around 300 simulated switcher cycles on a new battery-power system at the company’s testing lab in Roanoke, Va. In a partnership with Norfolk Southern, scientists at Penn State University’s Transportation Institute have done separate testing.“Our testing shows that the systems are working as designed and that the batteries should have a long life in the locomotive,” said Gibson Barbee, our senior energy engineer.Mechanical Department employees at the Juniata Locomotive Shop, who assembled the original NS 999, are outfitting the updated locomotive. If all goes as planned, the new and improved 999 will be ready for field testing in the summer of 2014...“I would say that we underestimated the difficulties involved,” Barbee said. “We felt we could do it in a couple of years, and we were overly optimistic.”Based on lab tests of more advanced batteries and an upgraded battery management system, Barbee is confident that NS 999 2.0 will perform as expected during anticipated field trials in 2014. Whether or not it will lead to an affordable alternative to diesel-powered switchers is another question."

     

    Also: "The NS 999 generates zero emissions when running, giving it many advantages, including elimination of criteria pollutants such as ultrafine particulate matter and nitrous oxide emitted by conventional locomotives."
    15 Jul, 03:47 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2639) | Send Message
     
    Talk about circumspect.
    15 Jul, 03:53 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (1441) | Send Message
     
    This is the data we were looking for in High-rate-deep-partial state-of-charge duty cycles, AGM fails after (generous) 30 days. If the PbC batteries failed tomorrow in the same duty cycle, 300 days (or more - they say they expect longer life than current). That's, conservatively 10 times the lifetime of the AGM in the same duty cycle.
    15 Jul, 03:54 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1803) | Send Message
     
    I read the report as largely positive. Barbee has spent 5 years perfecting the new battery system alone. He has dedicated his career on this project. The NS-999 program has been funded along the way. It's going to be the real deal, and not just dropped after testing is finished.

     

    The last sentence is just boilerplate. The economics aren't hard to calculate, and they wouldn't have started the program if it was marginal. And in fact, oil price is only going to get higher.
    15 Jul, 03:59 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1028) | Send Message
     
    Ranma, sure the economics are easy to calculate if you just put in a bunch of assumptions in place of real world reliability data. And that last sentence is certainly not boilerplate. I'm not saying there isn't some positive in there, but compared to last year, when NS999 was "leading the charge" and Axion got a big ol' slap on the back from its "industry partner," it indicates to me that this program is not on a fast track. They are going to take their time and collect a lot of data before making any decisions.
    15 Jul, 04:09 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1803) | Send Message
     
    I think you're reading too much into things. These are not prepared high level statements. This is a blurb written by a desk jockey to fill a report.
    15 Jul, 04:15 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1803) | Send Message
     
    Also the OTR is clearly in development concurrently:

     

    " In addition to the NS 999, the company continues to research development of a hybrid electric six-axle long-haul locomotive.Since work on the NS 999 began in 2007, Norfolk Southern has received three U.S. patents related to locomotive battery technologies. The latest, issued in February 2014, covers designs for a hybrid electric line-of-road locomotive equipped with a regenerative braking system to capture and reuse energy generated during dynamic braking. In one configuration, a battery-tender could be positioned between two diesel-electric locomotives to store the captured energy, using braking energy to recharge batteries and to power traction motors. A locomotive’s traction motors, which generate pulling power, are used in dynamic braking on hilly terrain to maintain safe speeds. On conventional locomotives, the braking energy generated – up to 3 megawatts of power – is blown off as heat through a resistor grid. Our eco-friendly hybrid approach to capture and reuse this energy to power traction motors would conserve diesel fuel and reduce emissions."
    15 Jul, 04:17 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Thanks for the link, ngs
    15 Jul, 04:35 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    All I'm saying is, he said lead.
    15 Jul, 04:39 PM Reply Like
  • 23808
    , contributor
    Comments (81) | Send Message
     
    From the report, it clearly showed GB was an emission engineer who did not understand the limitation of batteries.

     

    The first generation NS999 failed. He is not going to stick his neck out and to blow the horn on the second generation. Therefore, on the report, all he wrote was that the laboratory test showed that the PbC and battery management system worked properly for 300 cycles without any problem. Now, NS999 can be assemble and put into field testing in 2014.

     

    By stating a low expectation on the NS999, management can not blame him if field testing fail after 300 cycles.

     

    The decision to build more NS999 is not up to GB. It will be up to higher management after field testing.
    15 Jul, 04:58 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    23808,
    It sounds like you you think these 300 "simulated switcher cycles" means they have cycled the battery up and down 300 times?
    15 Jul, 05:05 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Unless this guy is a complete idiot (which he is not), I can assure you that the correct interpretation of this is that he has imagined 300 unique duty cycles that a switcher might encounter and run the batteries through them.
    15 Jul, 05:07 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Over and over.
    15 Jul, 05:08 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Not to mention, I think he has high expectations.
    15 Jul, 05:09 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2430) | Send Message
     
    Well at the least he's either a little "beaten down" or he's no longer a man on a mission ... a little sad (though possibly entirely properly realistic), but not uncommon in the biz world.

     

    "Barbee has become philosophical about the ultimate outcome of his efforts, recognizing that Norfolk Southern might not revolutionize rail transportation as he once envisioned. He believes the groundbreaking work he’s involved in will help define whether locomotive energy-storage systems are economical and at what cost point they could compete with diesel fuel. The research has been supported by the Federal Railroad Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy, he added.“All of the work we’ve done is necessary to develop an economically feasible hybrid locomotive,” Barbee said. “This research is a long-term effort. It is one of the many applications on Norfolk Southern that will help us achieve our sustainability goals.”"
    15 Jul, 05:15 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1028) | Send Message
     
    Supposedly, the 999 is capable of running a full shift off of the charger. I would imagine the 300 cycles are to simulate a full shift with all the stresses of load and brake regen events. I seem to recall a presentation sometime last year that had some info about the battery testing facility that they built.
    15 Jul, 05:22 PM Reply Like
  • 23808
    , contributor
    Comments (81) | Send Message
     
    EM
    I have no idea how much batteries power is used each time they move a train in the switch yard. I have no idea how much the braking recharge the batteries. I also have no idea how many times they use a switcher to move trains in a day.

     

    The only assumption I have; they will probably use an external source to recharge the batteries if the batteries reach a certain low level.

     

    Therefore, I would assume their test is discharge and charge the batteries many times simulating power consumption like moving a train. When the batteries reach their low level, they would use an external source to recharge the batteries. I would count each time they charge the batteries as one time.

     

    For the 300 switcher cycles test, I would love to know how many simulated trains they moved.

     

    15 Jul, 05:44 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Gibson: “Our testing shows that the systems are working as designed and that the batteries should have a long life in the locomotive,” said Gibson Barbee, our senior energy engineer.

     

    23808: "By stating a low expectation on the NS999, management can not blame him if field testing fail after 300 cycles."

     

    I guess the difference between what he said and what you said he said was what I was thinking about, not so much the 300 in particular.

     

    Would you describe the testing you described as being "rigorous, demanding and abusive"?
    15 Jul, 06:19 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    NGS: Check the links in the header under the railroad section.

     

    HardToLove
    15 Jul, 07:06 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2430) | Send Message
     
    Okay, is it just my browser (Chrome on openSUSE) or are other people seeing just half an engine in the pic?

     

    The angle makes it look like in was in a bad spot during "Under the Dome" ... split in two right down the middle!

     

    Anyway, certainly an odd pic in my book ... people might think it was a half-baked idea!
    15 Jul, 08:19 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4135) | Send Message
     
    "Whether or not it will lead to an affordable alternative to diesel-powered switchers is another question. ....

     

    The NS 999 generates zero emissions when running, giving it many advantages, including elimination of criteria pollutants such as ultrafine particulate matter and nitrous oxide emitted by conventional locomotives."

     

    Just one way of saying, 'Give us some e-vehicle tax subsidies to stimulate enough production volume to make a difference on costs.
    15 Jul, 08:43 PM Reply Like
  • User 393748
    , contributor
    Comments (216) | Send Message
     
    ...“I would say that we underestimated the difficulties involved,” Barbee said. “We felt we could do it in a couple of years, and we were overly optimistic.”

     

    Somewhat ironically, couldn't this same expressed sentiment apply to Axion, itself, as it went through the development of its activated carbon electrode?

     

    15 Jul, 10:55 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    WTB: If you mean the one in the header, looks OK in FF on Centos. Try downloading it and viewing locally. If that works, probably one of the plugins or packet loss when loading the web page?

     

    HardToLove
    16 Jul, 04:14 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    393748: Yep - Axion was optimistic as JP has recalled a couple times.

     

    I think it's "baggage" that comes with the entrepreneurial spirit - sans optimism, why make an effort?

     

    And if we're optimistic, we always think it'll be faster, easier, more successful ...

     

    Maybe we need an eigth deadly sin - optimism? ;-))

     

    HardToLove
    16 Jul, 04:17 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2297) | Send Message
     
    HTL,
    expecting the Pope to add a new sin is unnecessary.

     

    The White House desires a monopoly on hopium trafficking and will soon outlaw it by executive order for anyone without a federal ID.

     

    the NSA already has built AI systems that automatically detect and track optimism in all forms of communication. They are now working on recognizing the brainwave patterns.
    16 Jul, 08:47 AM Reply Like
  • topcat1906
    , contributor
    Comments (74) | Send Message
     
    I question whether NSC's management thinks producing battery powered locomotives is in line with their core competencies.
    I don't have an explanation why they are putting so much effort into the technical testing, but I feel comfortable that they do not want to go through the effort of getting a new class of locomotive certified at the transportation technology center in Pueblo, CO.
    16 Jul, 09:04 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    Ahhh the NS 999 update in the sustainability report.

     

    - A far more mature Gibson Barbee. No longer a "Lilywhite Lilith". Tis a big jump from altruism to reality.

     

    - A far more mature NS 999 with the testing to back up that the prototype trial should work well this time if they did their homework. But it's still a prototype and thus a cautious "Once bitten twice shy" Barbee who's not willing to jump out on the dance floor having forgotten his pants, err, again.

     

    - And the economic reality that currently yard slugs work just fine but just like in automotive replacing your winter rat with a newer ride is going to cost more. The wording is leaving an opening for the gov-mint to kick in some $ if they want it. Just like with the development of wiener.
    
    Is anyone really surprised here?
    16 Jul, 09:18 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    SM: "They are now working on recognizing the brainwave patterns"

     

    Likely with the stealthy assistance of the Google Glass group.

     

    There goes the sales overseas! ;-))

     

    HardToLove
    16 Jul, 09:24 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30170) | Send Message
     
    The economics of battery powered machines are always challenging, but everybody knows that. The emissions impacts of locomotives in urban rail yards are far more obvious, and therefore more pressing, than locomotives transiting the south-40. Politicians and businessmen pay more attention to constituents who shop at Kroger than constituents who end up in the meat counter at Kroger.
    16 Jul, 09:28 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4597) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... Can a BP4 work within the confines of a yard for enough shifts that 2 BP4's can replace a diesel for continuous duty? Can a single BP4, parked close enough to a charger, replace a diesel on its own? Can the BP4 be trusted to leave the yard and pickup & deliver customer freight without a diesel rescue mission?

     

    From everything I've been able to ferret out, the battery powered BP4 should cost less to build, to fuel & to maintain than a diesel. The alternatives are gensets & very expensive next generation diesel engines or maybe a technology that isn't practical today. Fuelcells are a flop for the rails because of the lack of (cough, cough) a good battery as well as the fuel needed to stoke a fuelcell. BNSF has more or less proven that. The big question for BP4 is operational duration if we are correct that the Axion PbC is up to the job. Sadly, a question we only hear rumors of being true.
    16 Jul, 09:57 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2430) | Send Message
     
    >HTL: I was referring to the pic at the top of the NS sustainability link (from ngs) that started this particular comment stream/indentation - that is here:

     

    http://bit.ly/1nEHWZ8
    16 Jul, 10:11 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    DRich, I don't have the answers to any of your questions. I do however trust that NSC was intelligent enough to have their industrial engineers study their yards where this technology would be applicable and to make sure they added enough battery strings to cover the intended tasks required with some safety factor.

     

    As for the NS 999 being ready. It's a prototype that has not been through field testing. No it's not ready yet. Nothing new to garner from this latest report in this area.

     

    Is it really cheaper? You'd know better than I. Is it better right now for NSC to get all their yard slugs rebuilt up to tier 1 standards and worry x years down the road? Can they do that?
    16 Jul, 10:44 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    Sorry WTB!

     

    Just looked again and it's still looking good.

     

    I did a rght-click, view image did some ctrl and + and ctrl and - and zoom worked.

     

    All seems OK here.

     

    HardToLove
    16 Jul, 10:48 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2297) | Send Message
     
    HTL,

     

    The upcoming iWatch is reputed to have very sophisticated biometric sensors in it. They will, of course, make no mention of the brainwave monitoring capabilities. Siri is being trained in covert hypnosis techniques.

     

    The Google Glass system will be the controllers for the overlords. The rest of us will only be allowed bluetooth ear dongles as receivers of the masters' signals.

     

    The Borg are coming, and there is nothing you can do about it. Not even your double-layer TFH will protect you.
    16 Jul, 10:59 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    TFH-equipped units are currently being decommissioned in the interest of the general welfare and national security.

     

    "I'm from the Google and I'm here to help you. May I take your hat?"
    16 Jul, 11:11 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    Remove your TFH.

     

    http://bit.ly/O0MbJy
    16 Jul, 11:13 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    Wtb: BTW, if you want a good copy, I'll e-mail to you if you post your addy in a PM to me.

     

    HardToLove
    16 Jul, 11:13 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2430) | Send Message
     
    Brought to you by tin foil ...

     

    http://on.cc.com/1oIa9KY
    16 Jul, 11:22 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    WTB: LoL! I really enjoyed it!

     

    HardToLove
    16 Jul, 12:57 PM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2127) | Send Message
     
    My hat stays. I may have to add extra coverage and a chin strap while I run from Google and the NSA. ;-)
    16 Jul, 01:23 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2297) | Send Message
     
    SD, yer gonna need more than a chin strap.

     

    May I suggest the entire wardrobe from this company: http://bit.ly/SjMbdl

     

    Start with the balaclava and goggles.
    16 Jul, 02:16 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1511) | Send Message
     
    "What our customers tell us:
    "I bought the brain shielding cap....and I wanted to say THANK YOU FOR HAVING THIS PRODUCT. It helped stop the feelings I had from some device that was being used on me. I couldn't believe that the day I put on the cap the feeling and signal was blocked and it instantly felt myself again. I also bought the RF shielding poncho and few others products... I'm in awe on how these things are actually a cure to my suffering."

     

    Was that you SMaturin that wrote this?
    16 Jul, 04:14 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2297) | Send Message
     
    One happy customer! Yessirree!

     

    I just wish they made outfits for our little doggies. They are just as terrified of the NSA!

     

    And they can hear those choppers coming way before I do!
    16 Jul, 04:35 PM Reply Like
  • raleigh731
    , contributor
    Comments (288) | Send Message
     
    HTL...do you realize that WTB backwards is spelled BTW??? (:<)
    16 Jul, 06:47 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    SM: Turn off the GPS tracking on your doggies' smart phones. Better yet, power them down.

     

    HardToLove
    16 Jul, 07:42 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    Raleigh: Never occurred to me. Might be useful when he posts and I have to get "back" to him. ;-))
    16 Jul, 07:44 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2430) | Send Message
     
    Foiled .... http://bit.ly/1rsgkXv
    16 Jul, 08:53 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2297) | Send Message
     
    HTL,

     

    Too late. They're chipped. That's why the need the Faraday Cage Poochie Coveralls.

     

    Besides that, if I turned off their iPhones, how would I know at night whether they are out with Lady or The Tramp? That Find My iPhone feature can be a godsend for helicopter parents.

     

    My greatest fear is that they chipped ME when they filled me with propofol for a colonoscopy (Michael Jackson's favorite).
    16 Jul, 10:27 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2297) | Send Message
     
    WTB,

     

    Snowdenfreude
    http://atfp.co/1sqwh2U
    16 Jul, 10:50 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2639) | Send Message
     
    Here is a link to last fall's ASME presentation for comparision purposes:

     

    http://bit.ly/1nEU4t3
    15 Jul, 04:05 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2639) | Send Message
     
    Last year's report:

     

    http://bit.ly/153097V
    15 Jul, 04:18 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2639) | Send Message
     
    Another oldie, but a goodie:

     

    http://bit.ly/NtHEOW
    15 Jul, 04:54 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2430) | Send Message
     
    First link has expired ... do you have a "higher level" to point to it?
    15 Jul, 08:32 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2639) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/1nGrOWP

     

    From the Axion website.
    15 Jul, 11:05 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2430) | Send Message
     
    2015 Audi A3 e-tron Sportback – Forget frumpy, this sporty plug-in sizzles

     

    http://bit.ly/1ktyNOi

     

    "Price: not yet available
    Engine: 1.5-L turbocharged 4-cylinder, 75-kW electric motor
    Power/Torque: 204 hp/258 lb.-ft. combined
    Fuel consumption L/100 km: 1.5 estimated, 4.0 as tested
    Competition: BMW i3 range-extended, Toyota Prius Plug-in Hybrid, Lexus CT200h
    What’s Best: High level of refinement, seamless transitioning between energy sources.
    What’s Worst: No all-wheel-drive — yet.
    What’s interesting: Regenerative brake forces not only recapture spent energy, but significantly extend life of mechanical brakes since they’re used a lot less.

     

    ...

     

    There are four drive modes, accessed through the push of a single button on the centre stack.

     

    The default is EV mode, in which the car silently powers up and serenely glides along for 50 km under electric power at a speed of up to 130 km/h. Stepping on the throttle prompts the gas engine to fire up.

     

    In Hybrid Auto Mode, the gas engine and electric motor work together to provide maximum efficiency.

     

    Hybrid Hold mode conserves the battery’s charge by preventing the electric motor from operating until it’s needed. This is useful if you want to reserve energy for downtown congestion, where electric power is more efficient during stop and go traffic.

     

    Hybrid Charge mode uses the gas engine as a generator, helping to replenish a depleted battery. It’s only during this mode that we notice the regenerative braking working to scavenge energy expended while coasting — it is fairly unobtrusive in other modes."
    15 Jul, 04:29 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Fuel consumption L/100 km: 1.5 estimated, 4.0 as tested

     

    Fuel consumption, mpg: 156 estimated, 26 as tested.
    16 Jul, 07:42 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30170) | Send Message
     
    I just got an e-mail from Energy Storage North America about their late-September conference that identified our own Vani Dantam as one of the headline speakers.

     

    http://www.esnaexpo.com

     

    I'm not familiar with this particular conference but I like the location.
    15 Jul, 06:35 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1803) | Send Message
     
    hmm... worth visiting?
    15 Jul, 06:43 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2639) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/1nFzAjW
    15 Jul, 06:53 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (1025) | Send Message
     
    Thanks John. I see there is a transportation track but Vani is presenting with a guy from Viridity and Powertree Services.
    15 Jul, 07:19 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2430) | Send Message
     
    Frequency Regulation and Behind the Meter Energy Storage across North America
    October 2nd, 3:10 pm

     

    Speakers:

     

    H.G. Chissell
    Senior Vice President
    Viridity Energy

     

    Stacey Reineccius
    CEO
    Powertree Services

     

    Vani Dantam
    Senior Vice President Business Development, Sales & Marketing
    Axion Power International
    15 Jul, 08:29 PM Reply Like
  • Kenneth_2003
    , contributor
    Comments (34) | Send Message
     
    Vani might be speaking at that conference, but Axion Power does not show up in their directory of Energy Storage Companies...
    15 Jul, 07:12 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (853) | Send Message
     
    I would suspect that Axion is Inside the product of someone who is.
    15 Jul, 07:52 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1803) | Send Message
     
    GT, that's an important statement. Axion isn't just there to hawk its wares: they have a partnership that we haven't really factored. Viridity is likely that partner, and they may just be getting started in FR.

     

    http://bit.ly/1nGbrtl

     

    Click "Read More" at the DR and Energy Markets section.
    15 Jul, 09:50 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    GT: As Ranma said - important thought. I differ only on the "inside" part. - Viridity has the experience managing both Axion's and others' grid resources. So they are a good partner to present, but have no Axion inside.

     

    "Powertree"? Wasn't that what they called the solar array outside the Axion plant? Regardless, that seems a likely "Axion Inside" partner based on the company profile.

     

    Experience of both Viridity and Powertree being presented is likely to spark some long-lead-time ( :-(( ) inquiries, at least.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    16 Jul, 04:27 AM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (1025) | Send Message
     
    If so that is a dumb idea by Axion to be tied to Viridity. Viridity isn't 100% tied to Axion in that they use different batteries and different tools depending on the project/needs of the client. If they were we'd have something going in Philly with SEPTA. Alas, we don't.

     

    At this conference should be integrators, other battery companies, PV companies, etc. If Axion wants to be a credible player in this market we should have our own booth, and several engineers there meeting with anybody and everybody in how we can build dual battery systems with flow battery companies, etc.

     

    The statement on the honesty of the battery market being full of liars is true for the PV market as well. In general its poorly done. If you think of BiSolar as one regional guy who will sell PV with storage and is comfortable with the PbC you need to think larger in that we need 30 some of these guys by region.

     

    If we don't have our own booth there its simply as sign that we really are not a commercial company and still an R&D company despite what TG said 15 months ago.
    16 Jul, 09:35 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2639) | Send Message
     
    "If you think of BiSolar as one regional guy who will sell PV with storage and is comfortable with the PbC you need to think larger we need 30 some of these guys by region."

     

    IF stationary is the short term way forward, Mr. Holty you are 100% correct. They need to use a scattergun approach and get as many projects in the pipeline as possible b/c it appears most never go forward or take years to go forward anyway.
    16 Jul, 10:02 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4597) | Send Message
     
    >mrholty & Stefan ... Not that I disagree ... I don't ... but what you propose is not the sales model Axion has pinned its hopes on. Axion has demonstrated no desire to be the star of any show. It wants to service & sell to those that find it, not those they can find to which they offer a solution.
    16 Jul, 10:07 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2639) | Send Message
     
    DRich, Isn't two sides of the same coin? For example, Greensmith goes out an finds prospects and then integrates other storage solutions ... are we not talking about the same thing?
    16 Jul, 10:14 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2430) | Send Message
     
    >SM and MH:

     

    You guys seem to have bisolar disorder ...

     

    it bYsolar!

     

    http://www.bysolar.com

     

    Let's spell our precious customer's name right!

     

    Speaking of which, has anyone that gives good phone (which is a dying art among the younger text based IM generation) called these guys and chatted them up?
    16 Jul, 10:25 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2430) | Send Message
     
    Given current cash concerns, I'm happy at least Vani is appearing somewhere. A bit of a catch-22?

     

    On the other hand, maybe the big "marketing" push won't come till after the RS/uplist new strategic partner(s) ... maybe they'll have enough biz to keep them quite busy (and working out a few more kinks in the processes?) and maybe they think the marketing costs for selling such systems will be happily borne by their partner while at the same time getting them hard data that makes their marketing efforts to others much easier and also much more likely to succeed (or get their foot in the right doors.)

     

    Sadly for us, if JP's estimate is correct, this won't likely happen till September at the earliest.

     

    How much money to put into marketing is an interesting/difficult optimization problem given scarce $$ resources right now, but which might get better, or at the least clearer, in a few months. Maybe they feel relatively certain (or it's the only path they see) about the RS/uplist/Strategic partner scenario and we'll just have to be patient one more time ...
    16 Jul, 10:46 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    MrHolty: "If so that is a dumb idea by Axion to be tied to Viridity".

     

    OTOH, to be able to have real data collected by and presented by a major participant in the markets in which Axion wishes to participate has a lot of value - independent verification of certain performance characteristics is high value, I think, to potential customers.

     

    Other than that, is there any "tie to Viridity" that I overlooked?

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    16 Jul, 11:10 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2430) | Send Message
     
    Unfounded/uninformed speculation:

     

    One wonders just how relevant Viridity is these days since their (co?) founder Audrey Zibelman left for the State Government of NY job with big ambitions and big plans.

     

    Was she their Steve Jobs?

     

    No idea what terms she left on ... maybe no "bitterness" and she'll make sure they are relevant in NY ...

     

    Not sure how the date of her leaving meshed with this:

     

    Mitsui & Co., Ltd. Announces $15 Million Investment In Viridity Energy

     

    Expanding Electric Load as a Resource Worldwide and Energy Storage to Be a Focus

     

    Philadelphia, PA and Tokyo, Japan – August 6, 2012

     

    http://bit.ly/QhsDps

     

    There was a "promise" of worldwide impact ... but whether it's even close to being fulfilled ... who knows? $15 mill maybe peanuts to Mitsui ..
    16 Jul, 12:19 PM Reply Like
  • User 393748
    , contributor
    Comments (216) | Send Message
     
    A few thoughts on NSC:

     

    The idea of NSC testing other battery chemistries does not really strike me as being a worrisome concern, at this point in time. As I may have mentioned in a previous post, the jury is still out on which battery chemistries will survive and be serious contenders in the fight for market share in the electro-motive field.

     

    Looking at this from NSC's point of view, a convincing business case can be made for NSC continuing to research and experiment with all suitable forms of chemistries for locomotives. Presumably, NSC wishes to retain its current position in the field of locomotive assembly. Given that there is no clear consensus, at present, on which chemistry or chemistries will take the lead in the next 25 years, NSC would be well advised to learn as much as they can about working with many different battery chemistries. The more that NSC knows about all suitable forms of batteries for locos, the better they can meet their own loco assembly customer's needs. For instance, it is quite possible, that for the next 10 to 15 years, NSC could have any number of railway customers that may want a loco powered by some variety of lithium ion batteries, or, perhaps, an UltraBattery. If such were to happen, and NSC were to have done the necessary study and research and aquired the expertise for building such locomotives, then there would be no problem in NSC taking on those customers' orders. If, on the other hand, NSC were to commit too early to any one chemistry, or a very limited number of battery chemistries, it could find that it has to turn away an indeterminate number of customer orders, and lose revenue (and reputation) as those customers find other shops that will fill their orders.

     

    Noting the growing interest that is being seen in capacitors, it would be within the realm of possibilities for the railroad industry to actively research and experiment with all manner of capacitors. Such would simply be one more chapter in the continuing quest for the next generation of electrical motive power for railways.
    15 Jul, 11:19 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    Good stuff, User 393748,
    I would agree that the application is battery-agnostic; no matter how much tweaking is made for any one chemistry, another could be introduced.

     

    That said, the Ultrabattery is a lead-acid battery and would not support locomotive applications, at least not in the current form we have seen data for. As I have noted, however, their patents do allow for pure carbon electrodes such as Axions to be inserted in UltraB-cell-sandwiches.

     

    Lithium is just too dangerous and environmentally finicky for railroads. Shit happens and BOOM. I don't believe Li-based chemistries will find a home in rail apps.

     

    So what about lead? It's not nice stuff, it has to be kept encased, it is incompatible with biology. But it's highly recyclable, has been used for ages and presents special electronic properties.

     

    Going forward, lead-acid batteries will almost certainly see a decreasing (downsized) role in their current automotive market and the resulting Pb glut (which could last decades) will ensure lead-based chemistries remain an economically attractive alternative. Lithium? graphite? Other "exotics"? Not so much.

     

    It's about the economy. That was one of Barbee's main points once he got philosophical.
    16 Jul, 09:46 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    393748: Good thoughts. From past discussions and the timing of battery delivery vs. utilization and receipt of government grant $, I have my own theory about why investigate other chemistries.

     

    Regardless, re " may want a loco powered by some variety of lithium ion batteries, or, perhaps, an UltraBattery". I hope they give a very limited warranty! :-))

     

    Seriously, I'll add this to your thoughts. Maybe more for their own benefit than any potential customers. Avoiding all the "eggs in one basket" scenario may be the driver. As we know, the "enviro favored energy of the day" shifts (see, e.g., nat gas losing favor when pricing began to threaten their "windmills", which kills too many birds, which put droppings all over your T E S L A, ... that last one is facetious). So (NYSE:NSC) might just be doing a preemptive strike here. After all, we have these nasty administration changes every few years and policy (if there is such) seems to change with them.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    16 Jul, 04:41 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    07/15/2014: EOD stuff partially copied from the blog (up now).
    # Trds: 17, MinTrSz: 100, MaxTrSz: 32900, Vol: 78025, AvTrSz: 4590
    Min. Pr: 0.1362, Max Pr: 0.1500, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.1399
    # Buys, Shares: 8 39800, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.1403
    # Sells, Shares: 9 38225, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.1395
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 1.04:1 (51.01% "buys"), DlyShts 36900 (47.29%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 96.53%

     

    Last week I said that sans a catalyst, I suspected $0.14 will be breached on the close next [now this] week. I thought today was going to do it until the last seven minutes in the day when the bid came up to $0.14/$0.1401 (had sat at $0.1381 x 10K since 13:04 from ATDF) and we got a sell of 1K for $0.14 at 15:53.

     

    I also suggested that as we retreated from the very high daily short percentage we would see VWAP move below $0.14. That did occur today, in spite of the “lures” (described below) attempting to get trading going around $0.15.

     

    With the traditional TA stuff showing weakness, buy percentage generally remaining low (leaving yesterday's aberration behind and starting to return to trend?), daily short percentage in a down leg now, low volume, and our history, I see no reason yet to modify those views.

     

    We had the 100K offer from CDEL for $0.15 again.

     

    We again saw an oddity with ARCA appearing pre-market, but only on the buy side today. They bid $0.136 for 10K, the same as the prior day. The bid disappeared at the open, which is a change from the prior couple days.

     

    We had four “lures” today, two buys of 100 shares for $0.15 at 9:47 and 9:49, a buy for 100 shares for $0.1499 at 9:53, and a buy of 100 shares for $0.1443 at 12:49. These were “unique” prices not seen again during the session.

     

    Without these our high would be $0.1438 (2.5K at 10:12).

     

    The short percentage again behaved as it should ... I have mentioned as short percentage began to fall that was likely when our share price would move VWAP into the $0.13xx range and our close(s) will drop below $0.14. Part one is done – VWAP today moved from yesterday's $0.1406 to $0.1399 today.

     

    Part two was prevented by the bid going to $0.14 and $0.1401 in the last seven minutes. A 1K sell for $0.14 may have saved the day.

     

    Today's low, high, VWAP, trade volume, and daily short sales moved -2.30%, 4.09%, -00.51%, -25.62% and -42.25% respectively. Price spread today was 10.13% vs. 3.37%, 3.88%, 7.84%, 6.21%, 16.19%, 18.52%, 7.07%, 5.08% and 14.29% on prior days.

     

    If we remove our “fishing lures” and use $0.1438 as our high, the high and spread changes go to -0.21% and 5.58% instead of the 4.09% and 10.13% we got.

     

    All the usual is in the blog here.
    http://bit.ly/1mKKjJL

     

    HardToLove
    16 Jul, 06:47 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2430) | Send Message
     
    1 hour free webinar Tuesday, July 22, 2014

     

    Community Microgrids: Creating a Resilient Power System with New Utility Business Opportunities

     

    http://bit.ly/1oHP8Qw

     

    During this one-hour webinar, Greg Thomson of the Clean Coalition and John Kelly of the Perfect Power Institute will discuss:

     

    1. A Community Microgrid architecture that improves grid resilience, ensures power to critical services during grid outages, establishes a price responsive grid, and leverages grid services from customers

     

    2. How Community Microgrids create new utility services that enable investment in and integration of distributed energy resources

     

    3. The Hunters Point Project in San Francisco, which sets the stage for any utility to create its own Community Microgrid by optimizing distributed energy resources and dynamic grid solutions to achieve the most cost-effective and sustainable solutions.
    ======================...

     

    Hunters Point info:

     

    http://bit.ly/1oHP7fw

     

    "The flagship Community Microgrid project, being conducted in collaboration with Pacific Gas & Electric, is designed to transform the Bayview and Hunters Point areas of San Francisco into a world-class Community Microgrid. The Hunters Point Community Microgrid Project, named after the substation that serves the area, showcases how a utility can deploy higher levels of local renewables to secure economic, energy, and environmental benefits for its customers, which are detailed in the Hunters Point Project Benefits Analysis. The Hunters Point Project also demonstrates that the technologies and methodologies required to deploy Community Microgrids are readily available today.

     

    The Community Microgrid Initiative is accelerating the transformation of the electric utility sector. By demonstrating that locally sited renewables can cost-effectively and reliably replace centralized generation, the replicable demonstration projects will enable the rapid deployment of clean energy and robust grids in communities across the country."
    16 Jul, 09:23 AM Reply Like
  • dlmca
    , contributor
    Comments (356) | Send Message
     
    User

     

    "for the next 10 to 15 years, NSC could have any number of railway customers that may want a loco powered by some variety of lithium ion batteries"

     

    why wold a customer care what battery their transport or railway company were using?
    16 Jul, 11:39 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1509) | Send Message
     
    dlmca,
    I believe the idea was related to NSC possibly building these kinds of locomotives for other railroads (the "customer").

     

    In the long run, ISTM, the need for a common architecture throughout the entire system argues against being battery agnostic, as to do so would require other elements to also be compatible, such as wayside stations, foreign power, helper locos/slugs, BMS and even the LAS.
    16 Jul, 12:24 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1803) | Send Message
     
    Some large blocks traded in the morning, including at .15. Were they from the same CDEL guy?
    16 Jul, 12:09 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17876) | Send Message
     
    Ranma: I can't say because the large CDEL order hadn't appeared when I checked just before the open, I was on another screen looking at another stock when they went off.

     

    My best SWAG is "yes" because the bid was $0.15 x 5K NITE at 9:10 and we know there's often a lot behind that present. CDEL had offered as low as $0.145 for some time, so $0.15 would have been better than what they had asked at one time. Yesterday CDEL was 100K @ $0.15, so this would have met the latest known desired offer price.

     

    Since the rush this A.M., CDEL has sat patiently at $0.16 x 20K.

     

    But we've had a lot of selling at lower price, includng a ~66..3K @ $0.1353, 30K @ $0.1333, 42.7K @ $0.1390. So there's still some pressure.

     

    Current buy:sell, unadjusted, at 12:46 (last trade so far) 1:3.37 (22.89% "buys"). Adjusted for recognized reporting errors it's 1:2.50 (28.56% "buys")

     

    HTH,
    HardToLove
    16 Jul, 01:45 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    The Morning Rundown: Massive lithium-production deal signals optimism in shift to batteries

     

    http://bit.ly/1oIxCvr
    16 Jul, 01:25 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    Zn air.

     

    RI, US produce ‘green’ cellular tower batteries

     

    http://bit.ly/1oICkJC
    16 Jul, 01:45 PM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (1616) | Send Message
     
    I think we should ratchet down the expectations of having any number of loco rebuilds using pbC until NSC comes out with a definitive assessment of the 999 first. I also hope that the new CEO has enough strategic sight about how to set Axion on its best marketing path going forward. Maybe more focus on stationary energy storage, FR and less on railroads and auto. I know it is an approach that has been started late under TG...
    16 Jul, 01:45 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2737) | Send Message
     
    I ratcheted down my NSC expectations over time, starting w/ the comments here a couple years ago saying Bob Averill thought Axion should downplay railroad, then the giant periods of time from the April 2012 999 battery order to its delivery to its installation only now, the disconnect between the 1/1/2015 emission standards and PbC non-ordering by NSC, Axion's clear message saying their top current prospects are stationary and ePower, and now this tepid Sustainability Report article.

     

    Rail will hopefully still have its day, but in the prospects pecking order, a lot of things are telling investors that it's 3rd at best.
    16 Jul, 02:52 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2639) | Send Message
     
    Unfortunately, and with all due respect to the process, ePower does not appear to be a near term item either.

     

    So we are left with stationary and the mystery that was TG repeating over and over again that "significant sales" are coming.

     

    I really want to know what the factual basis for sticking behind that statement for close to a year was. And, I think it is a more than fair question.
    16 Jul, 03:17 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    I wonder how DDG would field that question on the next cc?

     

    BTW, If DDG doesn't take the reigns during the next cc I will be very disappointed. Really have no interest in hearing TG again. I wish him well in his health battle but business is business and it's time to move on.
    16 Jul, 03:23 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4597) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... Just moving would suite me just fine.

     

    One sale of one PC just can't justify a years' worth of effort.
    16 Jul, 03:33 PM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (786) | Send Message
     
    ii,

     

    I have a concern that DDG's response to that question might not make Axionistas happy!

     

    My guess is that the illusive significant orders are associated with the government and they have not decided to move forward with the project yet! But then I am completely speculating here!
    16 Jul, 03:38 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2737) | Send Message
     
    DG's coming out party is only 4 wks away now. Hope our new CEO gives the impression that he can deliver on two of his three resume strengths of sales and fund raising to AXPW shareholders. Even a clearer communication style than TG would help. TG was really good at pinching pennies in a hostile environment IMO, but half the time I couldn't quite tell what he was saying.

     

    Anyway, DG's first impression will be important to retail investors next month. Hope he kicks it.
    16 Jul, 03:41 PM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (1028) | Send Message
     
    I'm not counting on ePower to take off any time soon either. I think they are learning more quickly what Gibson Barbee took 5 years to learn. It seems like the goal to get the tractor in the hands of an independent driver has been "within two weeks" since last February. Getting a system like this to work well and then engineering in the reliability can take years.
    16 Jul, 03:51 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    DRich, you got that right. Heck, you almost have to wonder how they can consolidate operations and cut back on their expenses. Pretty draconian but given visible performance since they announced they have product to sell is darn expensive.
    -
    RBrun, Could be that it isn't what we want to hear however being given some level of perception by TG again and again with it coming up manure isn't exactly easy to swallow. I like my facts straight up without mixer.
    16 Jul, 03:55 PM Reply Like
  • AlbertinBermuda
    , contributor
    Comments (733) | Send Message
     
    MRI.

     

    I hear you.

     

    Given that the new EPA standard takes effect 1/1/2015 the thought that comes to my mind is what are the other RR Cos doing to conform? That's only 5+ months away.

     

    Are new slugs being purchased from whoever or are all the RR Co's just sitting back and challenging the EPA?
    16 Jul, 05:26 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    Albert, If the article about Electro-Motive Diesel being behind on their next Gen EPA compliant engine but not being worried because sales are pulled forward holds true, it could be that there will be a lag of orders for this purpose as well. Perhaps many will pull forward maintenance on older locos that will not need to be upgraded or replaced until the next rebuild requirement.

     

    Pure speculation on my part. Maybe DRich or Valleywood, being far more knowledgable than I on the rail industry, can speak to this point.
    16 Jul, 05:59 PM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (1616) | Send Message
     
    All those 18 hour days that TG spent in the office or on the road have yielded very little in terms of closed business (if any). As iindelco said, we all wish him well with his health, but running something as time consuming as Axion is not for him anymore.
    16 Jul, 06:34 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2737) | Send Message
     
    Albert, if I may add to iinde's reply, IMO we here have not had an expert comment on how, in detail, the EPA requirements affect NS's loco plans. We've had some nibbling on the edges, but no deep dive. Nothing that concludes with something like, "therefore, NS will need 5 alt-energy yard locos and 5 alt-energy OTRs per year starting in 2015."

     

    Just another area where a good stk analyst, or for that matter a RR analyst, might be able to add some big value.

     

    Until then, I've been forced to conclude that NS has other ways of meeting the new regs, such as rebuilding, perhaps purchasing ahead of 1/1/15 as mentioned here, perhaps buying new stuff from GE as mentioned here, perhaps through pooling credits? or negotiations w/ the EPA/local authorities? or other?

     

    What I DO know is we don't know enough to say with any useful precision, unfortunately. NS' intentions with the PbC is one of several major things we haven't been able to crack here. Maybe we will figure out how to add some more subject matter experts and thereby increase the value of this wonderful blog dramatically.

     

    JP tried and succeeded for awhile with Dr Beuil regarding the PbC's characteristics, and has been an open book with ePower's intentions. But what we all wanna know now, and have for some time, is the other prospective customer's intentions, too---for stationary, rail and auto. Giant black holes of our knowledge, and have been for some time. Is a giant part of why we're still limping along at 14 cents. Not only not a clear path, but we can't really even see a path. Just a murky shape in the foreground.
    16 Jul, 08:07 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    Mr. I, Emissions reductions are worth something to the government.

     

    Why The Government Just Threw Down $225 Million On Hybrid Electric Trains

     

    http://bit.ly/1rsrf3g
    16 Jul, 10:40 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1803) | Send Message
     
    Mr I, I did some digging on EPA requirements a while ago.

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    The requirements force NSC to rebuild locos instead of buying new ones, as the build supply has already been earmarked for other companies.

     

    Ultimately however, the PbC is not an either/or case with whichever tech NSC goes with, as a hybrid train should be compatible with any fuel, and the cost savings should be compelling. The only possible cheap fuel is LNG, but according to NSC LNG won't be known and ready until 2017.

     

    Thus, I don't think EPA regs are driving the PbC program. I think NSC will find the PbC valuable for fuel savings and rebuild savings alone, let alone emissions savings. However expensive batteries are, it's certainly cheaper rebuilding old trains than buying new ones.
    16 Jul, 11:41 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    Note the perspective on cost.

     

    Toyota's massive engine overhaul

     

    "Toyota Motor Corp., after long neglecting the humble internal combustion engine in favor of hybrids, is preparing a sweeping powertrain makeover."

     

    "Toyota is seeking fuel economy increases of up to 30 percent and cost cuts on key components of up to 50 percent."

     

    http://bit.ly/1qfXgyo
    16 Jul, 02:21 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (9460) | Send Message
     
    Phillips & Temro Industries Announces the Acquisition of Idle Free Systems

     

    http://bit.ly/1oIUmLW
    16 Jul, 03:32 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (1025) | Send Message
     
    I tried to post this a couple days ago but I couldn't get it to post and then I forgot. Thanks.

     

    I have to assume that any APU work is dead. But then John speaks very highly of Axion's involvement in getting ePower help at Cummins. Is there something there?

     

    Edmund or any other google sleuths - On page 25 of the
    Investor Presentation there is this line:

     

    "Began Initiative with Large Off-shore Defense Contractor on
    Multiple Projects Worldwide"

     

    Do we have any color on this? This was in the October 2013 presentation as well. I read this as that mean we should have something deployed in the field at least as a test. Thoughts.
    16 Jul, 04:03 PM