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  • CO3
    , contributor
    Comments (245) | Send Message
     
    Just checking the mail boys ...
    Carry on
    20 Jul, 10:36 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Looks inexpensive. <End Snark>
    Plus it's in the way of the PbC strings!

     

    Eberspächer introducing diesel fuel-cell APU at IAA; planned market introduction in US in 2017

     

    http://bit.ly/1u5RUYa
    20 Jul, 11:32 AM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2097) | Send Message
     
    Hi ii,
    Cool idea. Noticed they aren't done developing yet, so no telling what problems they will run into including coming up with PM's for the catalysts (Russian sanctions, oops).
    20 Jul, 12:21 PM Reply Like
  • obieephyhm
    , contributor
    Comments (1567) | Send Message
     
    tres, again . . .
    20 Jul, 12:09 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2388) | Send Message
     
    Too bad ePower isn't from Wisconsin :-)

     

    Badger Fund of Funds to invest across state
    By Kathleen Gallagher of the Journal Sentinel July 19, 2014

     

    http://bit.ly/1rBIcIy

     

    includes some background of the recently acquired Idle Free

     

    "The technology was developed by former over-the-road trucker and Watertown native Robert Jordan, who taught himself electrical engineering and built prototypes in his garage.

     

    Johnson's Fitchburg-based Kegonsa Capital Partners agreed to invest in the technology, and required Jordan to bring on an experienced chief executive officer and an independent board of directors.

     

    Although it is based in Madison, all but five of Idle Free's 25 employees work in Watertown. The company, built from the ground up without any university research, created better technology and competed against bigger companies with more resources"
    20 Jul, 01:25 PM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (979) | Send Message
     
    "To further justify NRG’s push into “distributed generation” like solar panels and basement generators, Crane talks up his belief that the U.S. power grid will succumb to a slow death caused by anticarbon regulation and ever-cheaper alternatives like rooftop solar. It’s like the U.S. Postal Service, he says. All the important mail already goes by UPS or FedEx FDX +0.64%. That puts the post office in a death spiral: It has to raise rates to cover costs, but those higher rates drive away more customers. Electric utilities have already begun responding in the same way by charging home solar adopters new fees for staying attached to the grid."

     

    http://onforb.es/Ww4aTf
    20 Jul, 02:32 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    A friend just sent me a link to the ultimate black humor post.

     

    "Some company announces groundbreaking new battery - again."

     

    http://bit.ly/WwrgZQ
    20 Jul, 04:04 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    "Did I miss any?"

     

    Don’t like eggplants? Singaporean young scientist will use them to change the world

     

    http://bit.ly/Wng8Os
    -
    And for "ye"rinalysis.

     

    Bill Gates’ Latest Cause: Urine-Powered Batteries

     

    http://slate.me/Wng9lI

     

    Oops, I see the post was 2010. I was wondering why his humor hit list was so short!
    20 Jul, 05:37 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    And since the bloggers short bio sez "Proud to eat Kraut ;-)"

     

    Head Rush- Sauerkraut Clock

     

    http://bit.ly/1tnNdVy
    20 Jul, 05:41 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    Another Holy Grail bites the dust.

     

    http://bit.ly/1yPHTNB

     

    Dalhousie, Argonne and the DOE have just admitted that the long-awaited second generation lithium-ion battery with a nickel, cobalt, manganese cathode isn't going to happen any time soon because of insurmountable "voltage fade" issues.
    21 Jul, 08:08 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (996) | Send Message
     
    The "lead crystal" battery company BettaBattery website hasn't updated their "news" since 2011. Are they still around?

     

    Answered my own question: http://bit.ly/1fFKLSX

     

    "Charges up to two times faster than conventional alternatives."

     

    "Can be stored 2 years with no refresh charging required."

     

    1400 80% DOD cycles. (they used to claim 3000).

     

    "By using a unique blending technology, Lead Crystal® is able to combine a variety of inorganic salts and organic substances to co-ordinate a combined reaction to improve the reaction ability between the electrolyte and active material on the lead plates. The electrolyte prevents the active material from becoming brittle and falling of the plates, improving the cycle life. "

     

    A lot of distributor partners, primarily in Europe. http://bit.ly/1yQeT8B

     

    Case Studies and Testimonials pages blank but on the data sheet (a nice data sheet I may add), "ead Crystal® batteries are being used in telecoms, ups, petrochem/marine, defence, renewable energy, health care, manufacturing, transportation and electric motion (wheelchairs, golf carts & trolleys).".
    21 Jul, 10:15 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (996) | Send Message
     
    So basically it is an improvement on Gel batteries in terms of electrolyte and is an AGM-type.

     

    "A unique micro-porous high-absorbent mat (NYSE:AGM), thick plates cast from a high purity lead calcium selenium alloy (which ensure an extended life), and a SiO2 based electrolyte solution."

     

    "Using pressure filling technology in combination with patented gravity filling containers to fill the batteries with electrolyte and a patented terminal connecting equipment. These manufacturing features ensure a much more even distribution of electrolyte in each cell further enhancing the performance of the batteries and increasing the efficiency."

     

    Fails to hold a candle to PbC in terms of charge acceptance it seems, and the performance of the battery seems to hit a wall depending on DOD, presumably when the NAM shorts. I am guessing that the "brittle/falling off" active material that the technology addresses is the positive plate PbO2 corrosion? Also from wikipedia: "The only downside to the gel design is that the gel prevents rapid motion of the ions in the electrolyte, which reduces carrier mobility and thus surge current capability."
    21 Jul, 10:41 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (996) | Send Message
     
    On the other hand, they have good partners selling their batteries for them.
    21 Jul, 10:47 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (996) | Send Message
     
    Also: "Do Lead Crystal® batteries have a lower internal resistance than lead acid batteries?
    Yes, Lead Crystal® batteries have a lower internal resistance than lead acid batteries due to the difference in active material of the positive electrode."
    and
    "Do Lead Crystal® batteries charge faster than lead acid, lead gel or AGM batteries?
    Yes, Lead Crystal® batteries can be charged up to 3C without any impact on their cycle life. This means they can be charged 2-3 faster than other batteries."
    and
    " Do Lead Crystal® batteries sulphate?
    Due to the construction and chemical reaction inside a Lead Crystal® battery, sulfation hardly ever occurs. Lead Crystal® batteries contain less sulphuric acid. They do not contain toxins such as cadmium or antimony either."
    21 Jul, 10:49 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (996) | Send Message
     
    "Betta Batteries has a network of highly trained and experienced distributors worldwide. This enables Betta Batteries to offer clients unparalleled local service, including pre-purchase technical advice, tailor-made solutions and after-sales support."

     

    If only...
    21 Jul, 10:54 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    128.3 million USD

     

    "JAPAN is to build a trial storage battery facility in Osaka. The Govt will spend ~13b yen to build one of world’s largest storage battery facilities in Osaka in fiscal 2015, Yomiuri newspaper reports without attribution. The National Institute of Technology and Evaluation to the operate facility. Japan seeks market leadership in storage batteries by backing domestic product development."

     

    http://bit.ly/WnovK7
    20 Jul, 06:32 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4452) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... Japan may be in horrible financial shape, but like so many ... no, every nation, except the USA ... they prefer to spend their money on domestic product development. We often start down this primrose path and for "free market" reasons screw it up.
    20 Jul, 08:25 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    DRich, How it is for sure. Why? Beats me. Americans don't seem to understand the implications of not so free trade. We will learn on a much broader scale.
    21 Jul, 08:39 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3336) | Send Message
     
    "....they prefer to spend their money on domestic product development."

     

    While we, on the other hand, seem to prefer to spend our money on domestic pothead development...

     

    From the department of uncomfortable truth. ;)
    21 Jul, 12:03 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4452) | Send Message
     
    >481086 ... Just look at what America values ... social media, entertainment and the infrastructure of silicon and fast food to support them. Then, of course, there is healthcare to keep us awake & healthy enough to facilitate the use of social media & entertainment. Everything else is either farmed out to the cheapest foreign provider or allowed to fend for itself.
    21 Jul, 12:20 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3336) | Send Message
     
    Concur most def D...
    21 Jul, 12:59 PM Reply Like
  • bubbleking
    , contributor
    Comments (44) | Send Message
     
    This looks like a big battery event during "Smart Energy Week" 2015, Japan

     

    http://bit.ly/UkUQQe
    21 Jul, 07:50 PM Reply Like
  • Mathieu Malecot
    , contributor
    Comments (980) | Send Message
     
    not sure how on topic this is but thinking on the whole free market versus planned economy thing i conclude: a free market is ideal and also impossible. once you accept that governments, lobbyists and the neighborhood watch will do everything in their power to pervert a free market the best alternative is a planned economy.
    23 Jul, 04:12 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4452) | Send Message
     
    >Mathieu Malecot ... I believe you're right, a Free Market is an impossible ideal ... like so many other things, like a planned economy. Adam Smith wrote that the best way to have a free market is to have it strongly regulated with rather severe penalties for rule breaking.
    23 Jul, 05:22 PM Reply Like
  • alpha5one
    , contributor
    Comments (127) | Send Message
     
    Improving the cost and efficiency of renewable energy storage

     

    Date: July 17, 2014

     

    Source: Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

     

    Summary:

     

    Scientists have developed a method for improving the catalysis of water-splitting reactions used for storing wind and solar energy. The method chemically peels off the outermost surface of a catalyst, thereby maximizing its active surface for the reaction

     

    http://bit.ly/1qvCzP3
    20 Jul, 08:58 PM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4716) | Send Message
     
    ABB, Volvo partner for new electric and hybrid bus
    ABB (NYSE:ABB) and Volvo (OTCPK:VOLVY) are teaming up to revolutionize urban e-mobility by co-developing and commercializing electric and hybrid buses with fast charging systems.The first project will combine Volvo's electric hybrid buses and ABB's automatic e-bus chargers in the Luxembourg public transport system.Twelve Volvo Electric Hybrid buses are expected to be running on existing lines by 2015.

     

    | 6:01 AM|Comment!
    21 Jul, 06:06 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2213) | Send Message
     
    This is the quietest APC ever, I think.

     

    zzzzz

     

    With DiGiacinto on the job for three weeks as of today, one might think that *something* might come out from New Castle. Even a "Hi, I am so glad to be here..." The silence is deafening.

     

    Mr. DiGiacinto commented, "We all wish Tom well in resolving his unexpected health issues. I am looking forward to continuing to work with him. Our vision for the Company has not changed, nor have our short term and long term objectives."

     

    From the 8K, pretty uninspiring. Same-o, same-o. My earlier enthusiasm for the new CEO is waning.
    21 Jul, 10:14 AM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (1491) | Send Message
     
    I would not be surprised at all if DDG comes out with a plan to sell us out to the Colmen group. Hope I can at least recoup my initial investment ;)
    21 Jul, 10:19 AM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1463) | Send Message
     
    An investor who's getting a slice of the company would be afraid of paying up because of potential further dilution. A total buyer who has cash to run the company has no such fears. What Axion and the PbC needs is time - time for their markets to mature and develop systems to run their battery. It wouldn't surprise me if DDG manages to find a buyer at a good price compared to today's share price.
    21 Jul, 10:23 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Would that be a significant sale?
    21 Jul, 10:28 AM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (1491) | Send Message
     
    Ranma,

     

    What is a "good price" for you ? I think a lot of people on this board disagree about the valuation of the company. One thing for sure: no one will be paying more than 50 million or so max for Axion.

     

    More importantly, a lot of investors will be screaming murder if such an event were to happen. Many will blame incompetent management etc...
    21 Jul, 10:32 AM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1463) | Send Message
     
    A good price for me is whatever price outweighs the risk of buying the stock today. At 13 cents, a good price does not have to be much. 50 million would be a near double.

     

    I don't think about my cost basis when making a trade (I try not to anyway). The most important question to ask is, can I make money if I buy today?

     

    50 million won't please the founders or JP, but it's the same logic. Will 50 million pay them out as much as diluting another round would * the risk of success?

     

    I'm not saying 50 million should be the selling price or management's goal. But I am saying that double today's share price is a hell of a good price, as purely a trade. One would be silly to pass on it.

     

    You could easily deploy your money elsewhere afterwards if you aren't satisfied by a double.
    21 Jul, 10:42 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (996) | Send Message
     
    iindelco> LOL.
    21 Jul, 11:25 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (996) | Send Message
     
    RK> Both trade volume and APC comment volume have fallen off a cliff.

     

    I agree that after nearly two weeks with a new CEO at the helm, the silence is deafening. A simple letter to the shareholders would be appropriate, unless of course DDG, like TG also believes sales are around the corner and wants to announce a win before taking the podium.
    21 Jul, 11:31 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2213) | Send Message
     
    PY - According to the press release, the new CEO officially took over July 1.
    21 Jul, 12:14 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3985) | Send Message
     
    Rick, the official date given in the PR reads July1 as you noted but the PR itself is dated July 8. This suggests to me that DiG has really only had two weeks to get fully up to speed on CEO-Chairman duties.

     

    FWIW, my read of the situation is DiG, despite an already standing commitment as an elected official, stepped up to field an unanticipated corporate issue arising from an emergency health situation. Delay in announcing change of CEO & Chairman, an 8k asserting continuation of AXPW business as usual (no changes in course, etc.), and Bethlehem newspaper article reporting DiG would continue as Controller fit with the emergency situation scenario. Otherwise, I would not still hold shares.

     

    Bethlehem, Pa's fiscal year ended June 30 which likely entails a seasonal upswing in Controller office activity. Timing is difficult all around presently for DiG and for AXPW shareholders. I will not be looking for anything from DiG for another week or two unless positive developments at ePower, Norfolk Southern, or BySolar set a stage.
    21 Jul, 12:47 PM Reply Like
  • Mathieu Malecot
    , contributor
    Comments (980) | Send Message
     
    i would likely feel about any sale of AXPW as i do about Burlington Northern getting sold to Warren.
    23 Jul, 04:15 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (890) | Send Message
     
    I don't think DDG would want to sell nor does he have time to sell in this cycle. You want to sell high. He doesn't have time to do a full roadshow/data room sale of the company other than as a fire sale. And nobody is going to pay for "potential". A review of the company is that we have had "potential" for a long time. A long time of having "potential" means you don't have any.

     

    Also remember the board is basically the same with DDG and TG both still on it. If mgmt. and the BOD had wanted to sell it would have before.

     

    I expect it to be quiet until the annual meeting. Think of what DDG has to do in the next few weeks. In case of one persons pride he is going to;

     

    a) make nice with East Penn to try and keep the toll contract for longer than I think we were all hoping.
    b) get a decent technical understanding of the battery what it does and what it doesn't.
    c) Go on roadshow to introduce himself to whomever we are working with.
    d) meet with current staff and understand the financials of the company. While the deal with East Penn not be a high margin (I use 7-10%) it provides a couple of hundred thousand which covers some manufacuturing mgmt. and probably some engineering resources as well as paying the electric bills.
    e) Get up to speed and meet with bankers and whomever on the reverse split / next financing deal. Remember we are without a CFO. Hell, this alone is a FT commitment.
    f) He needs to find out why TG could not prognosticate worth a damn. Either TG is a liar or someone was lying to him multiple times over the years on where the company was in regards to a sales cycle.

     

    While DDG has somewhat of a free pass as he can admit and be honest with some of prior mgmt.'s mistakes or pull back the curtain in order to gain favor with its shareholder base he also has to be cautious. If while he is doing his own DD of sales (or lack thereof) and it turns out the emporer is naked he may not be fully honest about that as it would hurt his financing effort and (I'm not sure) but in our litigious society lead to a lawsuit against the company.

     

    Give the man some time. I expect that its quiet up until the next call and AGM. After that I wouldn't be surprised to see some other staff changes and new outline/vision.

     

    Remember his bio.
    http://bit.ly/1evIjSu

     

    Operational/Sales turnaround first. Then a sale of the company is his MO not the other way.

     

    A couple of weeks ago upon his announcement I put out a few feelers which were long shots that may have known him at Pfizer. One friend reached out to some people of which one knew him at Pfizer and gave me an idea of him even though that was a long time ago. Fairly generic but positive. All I could ask for. Add in the youtube clip of the Bethlehem City council meeting which is damn direct if you've ever been on these boards/committees and his background where he has to turn the business around and then sell it.

     

    Frankly, while AXPW has been radio silent for too long that is on prior mgmt. and not him. He's got enough to do over the next month.

     

    I'm actually more optimistic than at anytime in the past 3-6 months.
    21 Jul, 11:00 AM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (1491) | Send Message
     
    True words mrholty, true words...

     

    I don't think anyone here blames DDG for the mistakes of the past.
    21 Jul, 11:16 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    Amouna,
    Let's not forget that no one has actually enumerated these so-called "mistakes of the past". The alleged battery of crimes are undisclosed, vague assumption and presumption. No one, most especially not the most vociferous, have offered a single specific market that was ignored. Not one naysayer or TG-detractor has specified a single sales-oriented mistake for consideration. The naysayers continue to say nay, nay, nay and nothing else, boring the life right out of this blog.
    IMO, the past 12 months have been the best yet for sales and progress. Cogent arguments can be and have been made in defense of that statement and Mr. Granville's tenure. I am glad he is still in the picture.
    21 Jul, 12:01 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17446) | Send Message
     
    EM: "... battery of crimes". LoL! Good turn of phrase that!

     

    On top of that, the highlighting of lack of "proof of failure" is important to keep in mind.

     

    HardToLove
    21 Jul, 12:07 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2528) | Send Message
     
    "boring the life right out of this blog."

     

    The lack of anything significant to talk about except another round of dilution is boring the life out of this blog.
    21 Jul, 12:18 PM Reply Like
  • JohnM121
    , contributor
    Comments (365) | Send Message
     
    Speaking of boring, boring machines are just another app for a power demand surge handler such as a portable power cube.
    http://bit.ly/1nuASPK
    http://bit.ly/1nuAQrl
    21 Jul, 01:36 PM Reply Like
  • dogday1
    , contributor
    Comments (56) | Send Message
     
    Edmond, have you looked at the share price 13c.? That is what you call success, That for me is the bottom line.13c.
    Cogent arguments are not required.
    21 Jul, 05:46 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3985) | Send Message
     
    "The naysayers continue to say nay, nay, nay and nothing else, boring the life right out of this blog."

     

    Boring is all the bitching and bellyaching over discussion of management incompetence.

     

    "IMO, the past 12 months have been the best yet for sales and progress. "

     

    LOL! Sure sold a lot of common shares during that time. Could be a good thing you appreciate dilution of your equity interest in the company because it sure looks like you are going to get a lot more of it.
    21 Jul, 09:38 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    For those who don't know their Wall Street pedigrees, Spencer Trask was one of the blue blood bloods while DDG worked for their ventures group. The relationships he built during his time on Wall Strreet undoubtedly grew and strengthened over the years. While I've always thought highly of TG, Tom was never a member of that particular club. I find the presumption of incompetence that permeates much of the recent commentary shocking.
    21 Jul, 10:26 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3985) | Send Message
     
    No presumption. Demonstration of a horizontal learning curve in marketing PbC batteries (assuming the PbC technology is as capable as 'advertised') makes it quite evident Axion management competently developed the technology and sailed into their "Peter Principle" zone of incompetence.

     

    In light of the numbers of people who apparently believed (as evidenced by 2012 vote totals) "if you like your insurance plan you can keep it" the count of those who "like" Edmunds post is not shocking, but appalling. It is beyond my comprehension how any sentient being could 'like' a rant including statements such as "... the past 12 months have been the best yet for sales and progress" and " Not one naysayer or TG-detractor has specified a single sales-oriented mistake for consideration." From my perspective such statements are noteworthy for their lack of objectivity and diminishing returns in reading APC commentary.
    22 Jul, 08:43 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4716) | Send Message
     
    D-inv, it's only 14 out of how many thousand does JP claim ?
    22 Jul, 09:04 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    I could buy the whining, criticism and complaining if Axion was all alone in the "no substantial sales" class and its peers were lighting up the market with their brilliance. The reality is that the only light from Axion's peers was released as they went down in flames, along with a couple bigger companies like C&D and Exide that should have been immune from the bloodbath.

     

    Axion has had a miserable time over the last few years but I'd be hard pressed to name a peer that hasn't had it worse. I defy anybody to name another battery technology company with identified first tier partners that can even hold a candle to Axion.

     

    Investors who apply arbitrary standards in an industry that operates by a different set of rules will invariably find themselves bitter and disillusioned.
    22 Jul, 09:10 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (885) | Send Message
     
    JCI, Maxwell, East Penn...
    22 Jul, 09:30 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    JCI and East Penn are billion dollar companies with decades of history in the lead-acid battery industry. They cannot possibly be classified as Axion peers. Maxwell is smaller than JCI or East Penn, but its revenue passed the $100 million a year mark in 2009 and never looked back.

     

    Axion would love to be a peer to JCI, East Penn or Maxwell, but calling it a peer today is sophistry.
    22 Jul, 09:47 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    D-inv > from monotonic to catatonic at the click of a button.

     

    Presumption... that anyone could do better. Who? Why? No answers.
    Presumption... that significant sales are just a phone call away. To whom? What's the number? No answers.
    Assumption... that the PbC and PC sales made to date are not going to lead to other more significant sales in the near future, in other words, that TG's tenure was not marked by recent important successes.

     

    I say it was. I can name them off and have. You suggest a past of mistakes - not one of which you deign to detail despite numerous requests.

     

    It's pretty obvious I don't post for likes. I find the anti-TG whining tiresome, repetitive, obnoxious but most especially non-contributive. I prefer a focus on identifying problems and solutions rather than judging and assigning blame. Your "Tom's the problem!" does NOT suffice in that regard.

     

    A couple of questions, really for anyone who feels as you do: Now that "the problem" you've identified has been ameliorated, have you found the confidence to purchase more shares? And if not, why not?
    22 Jul, 09:55 AM Reply Like
  • kevin lemm
    , contributor
    Comments (97) | Send Message
     
    The relentless negativity is breath taking. The continuous “snarky” comments coming from people who claim to be shareholders is confusing and a bit juvenile. The desire for news of sales I understand, but the reality is that the time line for additional sales is evidently longer than some of the shareholders who are looking to cash in in their investment are happy with. Norfolk Southern hasn’t left the building, sales will be announced. For stationary storage the business is progressing at a realistic rate.
    Nov. 13, 2013 Axion received a purchase order for a PowerCube to be commissioned into a solar project.
    2 months later, Jan. 31, 2014 Mr. Granville wrote a letter to the shareholders outlining the benefits of our PowerCube and the marketing efforts Axion was pursuing.
    4 months later May 14, 2014 Axion announced a follow up order for four more PowerCubes.
    And now less than 3 months later we want more. I would wager that more sales are coming, which is why I continue to hold and buy when I can. I can’t predict the time line but I am pretty sure it won’t be short enough for some. I will continue to skip past the “snarkasim” but sometimes the show gets so annoying I have to turn it off.
    22 Jul, 10:15 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (885) | Send Message
     
    You just said "battery technology company." Clearly there are companies large and small that are better at promoting and selling their battery technologies than Axion has been. Maxwell mushroomed because you can actually to to a catalog or web page, look up their product, order it, and have it delivered to your location--no NDA required. If that is ever the case with Axion, I might just think about buying back in.
    22 Jul, 10:19 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    That's simply not true.

     

    The companies you're praising have been around for decades manufacturing and selling fully developed products.

     

    Axion has spent the last decade developing a new technology that couldn't fairly be called a product until this time last year.

     

    As long as you insist on applying mid-cap to large-cap metrics to nano-cap companies you'll be nothing but disillusioned and bitter. It's a pity.

     

    I think you'd probably be happier with index options, mutual funds and government debt.
    22 Jul, 10:25 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (885) | Send Message
     
    Are you saying it is not true that I can go to a catalog a buy product from the companies that are actually making money, but I cannot as easily buy an Axion battery? I am only comparing companies that are good at selling batteries to one that apparently is not. Maxwell is a good comparison because they have a product that requires new things to be invented to increase sales and they have done a remarkable job in supporting sales growth in new applications like hybrid-electric buses, windmill rotor blade pitch controls systems, pairing with batteries for automotive applications, etc. They have grown in so many segments because their product is accessible. That is my major complaint about Axion--too much trying to control who gets to use their product and in the end the end up picking slow movers and outright losers (Residential HUB anyone?).

     

    Edmund challenged us "complainers" to propose solutions. OK, here you go: if you want to sell batteries, make your danged product available for sale to anyone and everyone who wants to buy one!

     

    Lastly, thank you for your investment advice, but I'm pretty sure my investments are doing better than yours.
    22 Jul, 10:38 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    Your grasp of history is weak bordering on feeble. The mighty Maxwell booked $100 million in sales in 1999 when it had 9.5 million shares outstanding and $97 million in equity (~$10 per share).

     

    http://1.usa.gov/1A1G01W

     

    Their sales "mushroomed" to $193 million over a period of 14 years. At 12/31/13 they had 29.5 million shares outstanding and $140 million in equity (~$5 per share).

     

    http://1.usa.gov/SkEg2v

     

    If you must make comparisons, please do enough work to ensure that you're not comparing apples to pineapples.

     

    Do you want to talk about the bribes and FCPA fines Maxwell had to pay to buy the markets it enjoys today?

     

    http://on.wsj.com/1A1HoBR
    22 Jul, 10:59 AM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1463) | Send Message
     
    "The continuous “snarky” comments coming from people who claim to be shareholders is confusing and a bit juvenile."

     

    Many on the Pee Well committee are longs no more. They do not take responsibility on their trading decisions and thus need to blame the company. Some bash hoping to confirm their decisions to sell as the right one. Others bash to secretly gain some reassurance. The most nefarious bash to buy back in at lower prices.
    22 Jul, 11:06 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (885) | Send Message
     
    JP. So you agree, I can buy Maxwell products easily, but not so with Axion?
    22 Jul, 11:34 AM Reply Like
  • nogoodslacker
    , contributor
    Comments (885) | Send Message
     
    Maxwell had 21% YOY revenue growth in 2013. Maybe not exactly mushrooming, but pretty darn good. You can make it look worse by spreading it over 14 years, but they do seem to know how to sell product. I through arguing with you, though. I'm half tempted to browse through the past two years of my comments and come up with all the times you told me I didn't know what I was talking about, and I turned out to be right, but what's the point.
    22 Jul, 11:44 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    You can buy Maxwell's products over the Internet if you want, but the substantial bulk of their sales arise from OEM relationships that took years to develop.

     

    Maxwell had to go through exactly the same validation process that Axion has been bogged down in for the last couple years with each of its first tier customers.

     

    Axion makes the best racing batteries in the country and has for years. People can buy off the Internet to their hearts content. That doesn't change the fact that racing batteries and specialty batteries for vintage cars only represent $1 million a year in sales.

     

    Success in the battery industry comes from OEMs who buy units in the tens and hundreds of thousands. An Internet site where hobbyists can buy a few batteries to play with is a distraction, not a rich source of potential revenue.
    22 Jul, 11:58 AM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1463) | Send Message
     
    "JP. So you agree, I can buy Maxwell products easily, but not so with Axion?"

     

    http://bit.ly/UmaB9Q
    22 Jul, 12:14 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3985) | Send Message
     
    Edmund, There is no interest here in engaging in a pissing contest with you or anyone else on this board and I'm confident that most APC readers and participants feel similarly. That said, I've just about had my fill of your hard-edged, derisory assertions and unfounded allegations. Should you decide to respond to this 'tit-to-tat' response to you latest missives, consider directing that response to me via PM without burdening the board.

     

    "Presumption... that anyone could do better. Who? Why? No answers."

     

    The quoted statement is a transparent attempt to deflect further discussion of marketing issues. First, the stated 'presumption' is blatantly false. No one has alleged or even intimated that just anyone could do better. Second, to follow the false presumptive statement with questions of who and why to shareholders of a public company without access to inside information disparages the intelligence of those shareholders and attempts to task them to perform a corporate function at expense of their own resources. And, the questions presume redress of marketing deficiencies is resolvable by hiring/replacing one incumbent senior manager.

     

    "Presumption... that significant sales are just a phone call away. To whom? What's the number? No answers."

     

    Again, allegation of absurd presumption. No APC participant has stated or even intimated that "significant sales are just a phone call away" (unless referring to Axion management answering the incoming call of buyer).

     

    "Assumption... that the PbC and PC sales made to date are not going to lead to other more significant sales in the near future, in other words, that TG's tenure was not marked by recent important successes. "

     

    WOW! Statement of an assumption with a possible/probable kernel of validity (while not self evident it qualifies as a general proposition). Truth as camouflage prelude to waffle/weasel/skate away from your earlier assertion that "the past 12 months have been the best yet for sales and progress."

     

    There is no evidence of any regular APC participant asserting TG incompetence throughout his tenure and to suggest otherwise is reprehensible distortion. Relatively recent performance is another story. Over the past year, TG repeatedly did not measure up to or satisfy his own SELF-DEFINED objective of "significant sales" by the next CC (November, 2013) and "it won't be six months" from November.

     

    " I can name them off and have. You suggest a past of mistakes - not one of which you deign to detail despite numerous requests."

     

    In your own mind, perhaps.

     

    " I find the anti-TG whining tiresome, repetitive, obnoxious but most especially non-contributive. I prefer a focus on identifying problems and solutions rather than judging and assigning blame. "

     

    I find your whining, bitching, and bellyaching over constructive, on-target discussion of problems and solutions hypocritical and far more generous to your own viewpoint than warranted by objective Axion business developments.

     

    "A couple of questions, really for anyone who feels as you do: Now that "the problem" you've identified has been ameliorated, have you found the confidence to purchase more shares? And if not, why not? "

     

    Evidence to date does not support your contention that 'the problem' with Axion corporate marketing policy has been ameliorated. Should TG resign his 'golden parachute' executive assistant position and other evidence of change in Axion corporate policies surface I'll revisit the issue. Had DiG been appointed Chairman and CEO in May (without a TG EA position), I likely would have added to my position instead of selling 90%. Shares added would have depended on share price reaction (which IMO could have been a triple).
    22 Jul, 02:39 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    D-inv: 90% sell-off? Strikes me as an odd lack of conviction.
    22 Jul, 02:58 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (996) | Send Message
     
    Silence is definitely not good. Look at Freeport McMoran, a massive company that put big hopes in the Davy Jones well. We haven't heard anything from them about it. Why? Because after $1 billion in spending, it seems to have been a dry hole (few hydrocarbons). The only story you're going to hear from them, is we learned a great deal from the Davy Jones well and are taking those lessons down the street to the Lamond well, which we have confidence will pay out.

     

    My point is, this is not a symptom of small companies. No news is almost always bad news.
    21 Jul, 12:51 PM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2097) | Send Message
     
    Hi PY,
    Sometimes no news is simply "we're working on stuff in the pipeline and nothing to report yet". I don't take this as a negative any more than not hearing from my grown and gone kids for a month or so at a time. In fact, with the kids, no news is good news as they are all busy living their lives and don't need my advice at the moment. ;-)
    21 Jul, 01:21 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (890) | Send Message
     
    While I generally agree Patrick that silence is not good especially in small caps I think we are being too impatient.
    If we don't see a decent update by the quarterly call and AGM then I will agree.

     

    For every story as yours above I can counter. One of my favorite turnarounds ever was Gordon Bethune @ Continental Airlines in the mid 90s. He and his new team spent most of the first few months coming up with a plan and getting financing as they were days away from not making payroll. (If they were a person they would have been guilty of kiteing checks)

     

    They then rolled out a few items that seemed to not make sense but were designed to create a vision and goal. They knew they had one chance to get it right and they did.
    21 Jul, 01:28 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    One things for sure. Things are not business as usual at Axion.

     

    http://linkd.in/10w6Rxx
    21 Jul, 02:17 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (890) | Send Message
     
    Thank Indy.

     

    Seems like there is a lot of turnover in the ranks at Axion over the past 12 months. Some is to be expected and I'm not close enough to know if its good or bad.

     

    I wonder if John knows or believes he knows who PbC believer is. I know he had mentioned in the past that had wondered whom Omy was and what their relation to the company was. PbC seemed to have enough technical knowledge that someone with a good history of those staff could probably identify the writing style.
    21 Jul, 03:14 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Mr. Holty, IIRC John had some suspicions as to who PBCB was. I suspected it was an OMY. I don't want to speak for him as he has more background and thus more of an advantage to be correct. As for OMY, she collects a bunch of information from the boards and rehashes it pretty well but makes horrible mistakes at some frequency. Just enough to make her obvious and to cause moniker changes.
    21 Jul, 03:27 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2528) | Send Message
     
    ii - any thoughts on the recent departures?
    21 Jul, 03:58 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Stefan, Well generally having so many higher level people leave in a fairly concentrated time frame shows something is up. With the limited sales we have coming off a less than favorable last financing with another in the works it has a higher probability of being negative IMO. People don't often get in the water with the possibility of sharks when the land of milk and honey is in the sight glass. But as indicated before in this forum there are many reasons people leave. So nothing positive but worth watching for sure. Oh, we're already doing that.

     

    Now, Is it priced in already? My thoughts are we're close and oh the technology. Waiting... :-I

     

    Hey, Maybe DDG was asking why Axion was carrying so many people w/o sales given they are a commercial entity? He seems to be pretty pragmatic from my very limited findings.
    21 Jul, 04:42 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (890) | Send Message
     
    These changes such as the one you linked states he left Axion in Dec not recently and other ones were in Feb-April. What am I missing?
    21 Jul, 04:56 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Mr. Holty, just thinking about the personnel that have left over the last approx. 1 year. Quite a few I think vs the last 4-5 years or so.
    21 Jul, 04:59 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    I think if you double check the educational profiles of the guys that have left recently you'll find they're "of an age" where retirement is considered normal, particularly if you can do some consulting on the side.

     

    Vichnyakov was a college student in the late 60s and Hollander was early 70s, so they're both in my age group. The boomers I know don't leave jobs thinking about greener pastures.
    21 Jul, 05:03 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1463) | Send Message
     
    Unless they were senior management with stock options, it makes little difference to the employee whether something is happening or not. In fact, the employee may prefer "not" so there is less work. Employees bounce around for better offers, and studies actually show that those who don't move around lose money over the long run.

     

    I left MEAS thinking the company was poorly run, and eventually the company was bought out at 40 times the price I could have joined the employee option pool at...
    21 Jul, 05:08 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (890) | Send Message
     
    Thanks. You were seeing the same thing as I saw. Nothing that saw cleaning in the last few weeks.

     

    When I attend the AGM I plan to hang out at the local watering hole nearest the plant to try and find out any scuttlebutt.
    21 Jul, 05:20 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    John, rational points and could well be a good part of it.
    21 Jul, 06:10 PM Reply Like
  • JohnM121
    , contributor
    Comments (365) | Send Message
     
    Scott left last December. That doesn't seem part of the change now..
    21 Jul, 10:11 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (2432) | Send Message
     
    PbC believer is likely very happy to see people discuss his/her role at Axion. I'm not so sure he/she isn't a troll but at least it keep things lively around here. Some of PbC points made good sense. Overall, nothing on this blog seems to change Axion's modus operandi regardless of who is doing the talking. Heck, JP has spent 5+ years doing free IR/PR for Axion and they still can't chip in and take it from there. Sometimes, it so quiet out of New Castle the only news is the negative kind that involves employees moving on or around.
    21 Jul, 10:16 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (890) | Send Message
     
    Speaking of has anyone spent anytime seeing what DDG did while at Minrad International? I believe this a better comparison than National Pretzel. And this is why I am excited for the DDG era.

     

    Prior to DDG arrival at Minrad, the company has outsourced the selling of its primary products to another small company that was trying to roll up generics and create a sales force.
    When he joined the company had $200k in cash and $11M in receivables, and $14M in Accounts Payables and $28M in Liabilities overall. They had a $5M line of credit in the fall of 2007 and had replaced it with a $15M borrowing of debt at an ugly 15% a few months prior to his arrival. Within a few months he paid this off and got a more reasonable Long term debt with warrant coverage. Their sales in 2006 had been $18M and decreased in 2007 to $12M due to a production problem of their main product. In 2007 they had beefed up their sales force by 60% and results started to show in Q1 2008 before he was CEO hitting $11M in sales in 1Q vs $12M for all of 2007. Q2 2008 his first full Q as CEO sales were down to $4M and they took a huge hit on the loss of debt but they weren't paying 18%. Q3 sales bumped up to $7M which was almost all International, which was a flip from before) as their exclusive selling agent in the US he had cancelled in the quarter and sales dried up.
    Within 6 months of DDG arrival he canceled the 'exclusive agreement' to a 'non-exclusive agreement' and had already added a sales force in a different market a few months prior.

     

    The problem was even with increased sales they were losing money on gross sales even before SG&A, and R&D. The business was sold for about 1.3x TTM revenue which was 300% higher than the year before he took over and 200% over 2 years before.

     

    I don't know what the future holds but I see a company that had ugly sales basically thru an outsourced sales channel dominated in the US. A horrible balance sheet with no cash on hand and huge AP and AR balances who had just signed an ugly financing of debt @ 15% plus warrants equal to 1/3 of the value of the debt. He cleaned it up and took a financial hit but within 3 months had borrowed $40M to replace the mafia-ish previous agreement which gave him the flexibility to break ties with their US sales which they were dependant on. His growth in International sales staff seemed to have been paying off.

     

    All in all I see financing, a shift in strategy and execution in a 9 month period before selling out. All at a price that seems attractive for a business that had negative gross margin.
    21 Jul, 01:18 PM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (1491) | Send Message
     
    mrholty,

     

    DDG sold Minrad for 1.3 TTM revenue, so if we apply the same valuation to Axion, it works out to a little bit more than 10 million USD, 1/3 of current market cap! No one cares about 100 million spent in R&D over 10 years just to bring the PbC to commercial life!

     

    On the other hand, the other option is to slowly bleed by diluting shares for more capital and hoping for the best. I still prefer this option, and would be willing to put my faith behind DDG and see what he has to deliver.
    21 Jul, 04:22 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (890) | Send Message
     
    If we used the TTM revenue before DDG came on it would have been 2.3x revenue. My illustrative purpose was not to show what it could sell for but the changes were made both operationally and financially in a short period of time in a business that was in much worse shape.
    21 Jul, 04:46 PM Reply Like
  • geopark
    , contributor
    Comments (257) | Send Message
     
    Excellent commentary mrholty.

     

    I believe Mr. DiGiacinto taking over as CEO creates a real existential danger to Axion Power as we know it.

     

    Mr.Granville had/has emotional (ego) as well as financial skin in the game including the 2009 share prices above $2/sh. Perhaps this was a detriment to advancing the company but I give him credit for keeping it in our (legacy) hands.

     

    Mr. DiGiancinto arrives with an emotional (ego) base of ~$0.15/share. If he sells the company for .30 he has realized a 100% gain, respectable perhaps but disappointing or devastating for the many who purchased at higher prices and highly disappointing for the many who believe in the technology and expect that it one day will find its 'day in the sun' and reward investors handsomely.

     

    Whether legacy shareholders would be rewarded after a sale of the company depends on many factors. Original purchase price vs. sale price obviously, public or private purchaser, if public will new shares be issues for old and if PbC became a small part of a large company the rewards would likely be highly diluted. Without a doubt however, rewards after a sale will be a shadow of what they will be if Axion can succeed as a commercial venture as per the original business plan.

     

    I like that Mr. Granville is still on board and hope his health will allow him to discuss (and influence) Mr. DiGiacinto on these issues.

     

    So as to your post it is highly valid to explore at what price Mr. DiGiacinto might possibly sell the company should he indeed proceed that direction.

     

    I accept the fragile existential state of our company and remain a shareholder with an average price in the .20/sh range (excluding sales gains) including my first purchase at 1.21/sh in feb2010. I trust Mr. DiGiacinto to lead the company responsibly and seek to increase shareholder value. Making the company a commercial success (SALES) is to some degree out of his hands (and frankly, I don't believe this is his strong suit) and so the question remains, if sales do not begin in earnest, how long until he decides it is time to sell . . and at what price will he be willing to do so.

     

    I look forward to our first conference call with Mr. DiGiacinto and will likely ask a question in the above vein if he does not address it in his remarks.

     

    One other qualifier, we do have a board of Directors, so Mr DiGiacinto is not judge, jury and executioner (excuse the analogy please), so some cursory research into the BOD would certainly be called for in this discussion as well.
    21 Jul, 06:37 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1463) | Send Message
     
    Why is it an existential danger? If DDG can produce an offer at even 30 cents a share, it can only help our cause. Heck even 15 cents a share.

     

    If the Board doesn't like it, it doesn't have to take it. BUT, that 15 cent offer puts a floor on our stock price and helps them raise money at better prices!

     

    But suppose all is nefarious and DDG and the board conspired to force you to lose your shares at 15 cents. Take your 2 cent gain at today's prices you scum! Well you just plow it into another stock that has the same potential as AXPW. You didn't lose anything. You had an instant gain. You even had a gain you couldn't possibly have realized because of illiquidity.

     

    The only thing we lose is the time we have invested in AXPW, and that is really what we're crowing about. Rationally however, I would take any sort of buyout that's higher than market price.

     

    This is not because I've lost faith in Axion. This is a true statement for any stock. Take your gains and redeploy. How can you complain about that!

     

    Imagine there is a perfect clone of Axion, called Axiom Power International (OTCPK:AXMP), trading at par with AXPW. You own AXPW, and the rat bastards force you to sell at 15 cents. Well, you'd just go buy AXMP and gain (15/13) = ~15% more shares than you had before. You certainly wouldn't complain about having more shares of essentially the same company.

     

    If DDG decides to grace us with a sale, then all we'll have to do is move the Concentrator to some other stock with the same risk/reward profile.
    21 Jul, 07:03 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    Supercapacitors USA 2014 | November 19-20, 2014 | Santa Clara, CA, USA

     

    Best-in-class speakers from Europe, America, East Asia and Australia will detail how, why and what next - notably in replacing batteries. This event covers the next technologies from non-flammable safer electrolytes, to graphene for energy density, and progress in using new printing technology and test equipment.
    Topics include:
    How supercapacitors wholly or partly replace batteries - what next?
    Road map of how supercapacitors, pseudocapacitors, supercabatteries and other variants are improving and what markets this will open up.
    New forms - structural, smart skin, flexible, transparent, foldable, paper.
    Today's supercapacitors and their variants - comparative data, sales successes and applicational challenges. - How supercapacitors replace electrolytic capacitors.
    The future of hybrid and pure electric EV's using supercapacitors by land, water or air.
    Applications for supercapacitors (cold start, regenerative braking, etc.).
    Static applications - grid, welding and other electrical engineering applications.
    Supercapacitor applications in consumer electronics including mobile phones.
    Technical challenges and improvements needed for supercabatteries to fully realize their potential.
    Printing technology and supercapacitors, including control circuits and their integration.
    Co-located events
    Co-located alongside this event are the Energy Harvesting & Storage, Printed Electronics and Graphene LIVE, 3D Printing LIVE!, Internet of Things Applications, and Wearable Technology LIVE! shows. Attendees have access to all these conference tracks to maximize value and networking opportunities.

     

    http://bit.ly/1nuziO1
    21 Jul, 01:25 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (890) | Send Message
     
    That is something Axion needs to be at. Companies at this event are looking for changing tech and are interested in Supercapacitors. The PbC is hybrid between a battery and a supercapacitors and I bet there are a few people there looking for this.
    21 Jul, 03:16 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    From the El Tuna Facebook page. Too late, no pin for us!

     

    Even Edmund was late!

     

    "Let's give away a pin.... When first released from the shop in 2009, NS 999, the experimental battery powered locomotive had 1,080 lead-acid batteries. Soon the 999 will be released again for testing with how many lead-carbon batteries? First correct commenter wins this hat/lapel pin. (Aaron D is correct with 864 batteries)"

     

    http://on.fb.me/1yRixPu
    21 Jul, 02:44 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17446) | Send Message
     
    Watched the video on the same page of the "helpers" hooking up. It occurred to me that with a PbC OTR consist, fewer stops for adding/shedding helpers would be needed. This would result in higher average route speeds, good for (NYSE:NSC). Also, fuel savings just from not having to dump speed, stop, idle while the hookups occur, and the accelerate again.

     

    HardToLove
    21 Jul, 03:07 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4452) | Send Message
     
    >H.T.Love ... You left out the fuel saved from the helpers deadheading back to where they came from. Pray for stellar field trials and the price of diesel going into the stratosphere, even though NSC has a bio-diesel facility in Alabama. I haven't kept up with what is going on down in 'bama.
    21 Jul, 03:20 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (747) | Send Message
     
    So no NS-999 tweets?
    Hopefully the ePower at Cummings meeting should give something to chew on when "Jay's Bi-Weekly Update" leaks.
    21 Jul, 03:02 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Release the kraken!

     

    Innovation Is Marketing’s Job, Too

     

    "Incubate new businesses and models. Part of marketing’s mandate at GE is to find ways the company has not thought of before to promote ongoing innovation. That can be as simple as creating a “protected class” of ideas that are therefore given more time to prove their value. This kind of treatment gave rise to the Durathon battery, which provides backup power for cell towers in parts of Africa where the electricity supply is intermittent. The technology began life as a project to create a battery for a hybrid locomotive; only later was it adapted for other applications... "

     

    http://bloom.bg/1nuQjaP
    21 Jul, 03:13 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    The unspoken "rest of the story" is that GE has quietly shelved its hybrid locomotive project, or at least removed all references from the website for its locomotive division.

     

    http://bit.ly/Rk3TiP

     

    It's telling when you get to the locomotive division and typing the word hybrid into the search function yields no results.
    21 Jul, 03:41 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    That is interesting. Makes you go hmmm. GE also worked with quite a few hybrid systems along with their battery. IIRC it was a demonstration bus with lithium ion and supercaps. So they have experience outside of their internal offerings.
    21 Jul, 03:51 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    If you use battery as a search term you get several results for the use of the Durathon battery in mining equipment, but nothing for railroad rolling stock.
    21 Jul, 04:03 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (890) | Send Message
     
    John-

     

    As a reminder wasn't Durathon a battery that GE bought from a company is Switzerland and is a molton salt battery that operates at a very high temperature. Correct?

     

    What else is out there?
    22 Jul, 12:05 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    I'm not sure whether GE bought the Durathon technology, or simply adopted the technology after the patents expired. In either event GE is making the same device as FZ Sonick. The universe of proven battery technologies is small and the potential demands are enormous. Holy grail's are often claimed but rarely materialize.
    22 Jul, 05:57 AM Reply Like
  • bubbleking
    , contributor
    Comments (44) | Send Message
     
    I came across this battery in a pic from a 2012 Bysolar residential project.

     

    http://bit.ly/1nvnyL6

     

    http://bit.ly/1nvnACN
    21 Jul, 07:15 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2528) | Send Message
     
    Story of Aquion Energy:

     

    http://bit.ly/1zZfjLl
    21 Jul, 09:32 PM Reply Like
  • tonys23
    , contributor
    Comments (94) | Send Message
     
    Too bad Acquion isn't public!
    21 Jul, 10:51 PM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4716) | Send Message
     
    RADICAL HYDROGEN-ELECTRIC CAR HITS THE ROAD

     

    http://foxs.pt/1yUwwnG
    22 Jul, 04:47 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    If you read the article it becomes obvious that the car is powered by a flow battery, not a hydrogen fuel cell. Unfortunately the article offers no insight into battery details.
    22 Jul, 06:03 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    This YouTube video makes it clear that they're using a Redox Flow battery.

     

    http://bit.ly/1yUSTJE
    22 Jul, 06:16 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (996) | Send Message
     
    Very cool company run by a self-taught inventor. No formal higher education. Hope they succeed.
    22 Jul, 11:07 AM Reply Like
  • 12770111
    , contributor
    Comment (1) | Send Message
     
    If you look up the inventors history, you could find the NLV Quant, a similar car, covered with solar cells and built since 2011 in series by Koenigsegg. At least that was the plan in 2009. Which leaves us with question marks...
    22 Jul, 03:46 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17446) | Send Message
     
    07/21/2014: EOD stuff partially copied from blog (up now).
    # Trds: 46, MinTrSz: 75, MaxTrSz: 65000, Vol: 546751, AvTrSz: 11886
    Min. Pr: 0.1300, Max Pr: 0.1379, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.1318
    # Buys, Shares: 15 188074, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.1330
    # Sells, Shares: 31 358677, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.1312
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 1:1.91 (34.40% "buys"), DlyShts 155300 (28.40%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 43.30%

     

    We had one outlier at 12:02 in the form of a 4,999 share trade at $0.1379, the high of the day. The next lower price was $0.1350 in ...

     

    Today's low, high, VWAP, trade volume, and daily short sales moved -2.26%, -1.36%, -01.94%, 69.92% and -7.56% respectively. Price spread today was 6.08% vs. 5.11%, 17.35% (thanks to the two $0.1193 trades), 12.53%, 10.13%, 3.37%, 3.88%, 7.84%, 6.21% and 16.19% on prior days.

     

    If we throw out the $0.1379 outlier, the high movement becomes -3.43% and the spread becomes 3.85%.

     

    The $0.135 weak support caved today as both VWAP, $0.1318, and the close, $0.1301, were below it on rising and decisive volume. We also closed below the rising 200-day SMA of $0.1318, right where the VWAP is today. Discounting the “outlier” would also move the high $0.1350.

     

    Excluding the one outlier 4,999 trade at $0.1379, 100% of volume traded below $0.1350.

     

    Of the traditional TA oscillators ...

     

    Our next potential support is around $0.125 and I'm now wondering about its strength. There's not any signs of which I'm aware that might act as a catalyst to stop this down trend. ...

     

    We saw a couple notable offers, relative to our volume, in a 65K offer at $0.133 from BNCH and a 75K offer at $0.135 from NITE. ...

     

    The larger trades (>= 15K) occurred on 10 of the 46 trades, 21.74%. These 304,500 shares were 55.69% of day's volume, and traded at a VWAP of $0.1316. 3 of the larger trades, 30.00% ...

     

    The other 36 trades, 78.26% of the day's trades, traded 242,251 shares, 44.31% of the days volume. The VWAP was $0.1321. 12 trades, 33.33% ...

     

    The usual is in the blog here.
    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    HardToLove
    22 Jul, 07:36 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4716) | Send Message
     
    FuelCell Energy +5% as German government issues €4.9M in research awards
    Jul 22 2014, 08:09 ET | About: FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCEL)
    FuelCell Energy (NASDAQ:FCEL) +5% premarket on news its German affiliate received nearly €5M in awards from the government to support a three-year research and development project targeting enhancements to Direct FuelCell technology by increasing power density and operating life of the fuel cells, leading to lower costs.

     

    The research is being performed in Germany by FCEL at an existing facility in Ottobrunn and by joint venture partner Fraunhofer IKTS at a facility located in Dresden.

     

    Also: PLUG +3.8%, KNDI +2.9%, BLDP +2.2%, ZBB +1.8%.
    22 Jul, 08:30 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1767) | Send Message
     
    LT,
    The money is nice, but it is just to do more research, not to actually purchase a product. Granted I wouldn't mind if the US government would throw $5 million in research money Axion's way, but it still wouldn't result in any near term sales. That what Axion really needs.
    22 Jul, 09:48 AM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (781) | Send Message
     
    This is an old article from Dec 2013 that was posted back then. I am only reposting now since I have been wondering how Puerto Rico is coming alone with their progress.

     

    "Puerto Rico Mandates Energy Storage in Green Power Mix

     

    Earlier this month, the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) and the island’s main utility, the Autoridad de Energía Eléctrica (NYSE:AEE), released a set of minimum technical requirements (MTRs) that govern new power projects. These MTRs apply to new solar or wind farm projects that are seeking to interconnect to the island territory’s grid, to which PREPA and AEE are hoping to add 600 megawatts of green power next year, to bring its share from about 1 percent today to 6 percent by the end of 2014."

     

    http://bit.ly/1A1n0Rg

     

    I believe that Puerto Rico was part of TG's potential significant orders. He had mentioned government agencies taking much longer than anticipated and this project definitely fits that description. I know PR is also dealing with dept and bond issues. I sure wish I knew if this project was moving along! My wife and I own a house at the base of the rain forest in PR and I know about how expensive the electricity is there.
    22 Jul, 09:40 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Why It Took So Long for the World’s Fiercest Supercars to Go Hybrid

     

    "So why is it that Toyota’s been selling the Prius for nearly two decades, but McLaren and company—who are used to pioneering new technologies, not following the mass automakers—have only started making hybrids in past few years? Two things have changed, says Karl Brauer, a senior analyst at Kelley Blue Book: “The processing power of computers, and weight.”"

     

    http://wrd.cm/Um35Ma
    22 Jul, 11:02 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Following up that failed program with the Cadillac ELR. GM, Uggh, Will they ever wake up?

     

    Opel Ampera to Be Discontinued, Chevrolet Volt Lives On For Another Generation

     

    http://bit.ly/Um3Jt5
    22 Jul, 11:09 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    DOD. They've got money.

     

    Arotech Battery and Power Systems obtains major order

     

    http://bit.ly/1A1SlTO
    22 Jul, 11:48 AM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    Have you run into details on what chemistries the DOD PO targets? Arotech has just about all of the usual culprits.
    22 Jul, 01:51 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Edmund, I suspect it will come from their portfolio of offerings. MIL SPEC stuff. Money is no object. It has to perform its mission.

     

    http://www.arotech.com
    22 Jul, 02:04 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (890) | Send Message
     
    I would really like to understand what Axions role is in the item in the Powerpoint that states "Began Initiative with Large Off-shore Defense Contractor on
    Multiple Projects Worldwide" on page 25.

     

    Also note that the Presentation has changed again from a few weeks ago as all the pages state '2014' at the bottom where many were still 2013 a week ago.

     

    BTW, Chuck Trego is not listed as an acting CFO but is simply CFO.
    22 Jul, 02:46 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2528) | Send Message
     
    Mr. H - if I recall correctly, the powerpoint has said that for approximately 2 years or more with no real reference to it in prepared or off-the cuff remarks.

     

    While a $10M sale to a military entity would be great, given the lack of discussion concerning the "initiative," I cannot give it much weight.
    22 Jul, 03:38 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (890) | Send Message
     
    I agree. Its strange that if there was something really going on they should be able to talk about it. We see in this thread other companies showing off design wins.

     

    However this has been there for a few years and other stuff has changed, stuff has come off and stuff has been added. There must be something but it appears as a $0 today.
    22 Jul, 04:17 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Utilities Cry “Fowl” Over Duck Chart And Distributed Solar Power

     

    http://bit.ly/Um9bMr
    22 Jul, 12:02 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2193) | Send Message
     
    Distributed solar turkeys love to chase wild geese.
    22 Jul, 12:20 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Tis interesting all the things that the utilities can spend other peoples money on to support the inflexible solar generation. But it's the utilities that are inflexible you know!
    22 Jul, 12:26 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1463) | Send Message
     
    Let's get another alt-energy rally!

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...
    22 Jul, 02:38 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    I just downloaded the new Investor Presentation from Axion's website (http://bit.ly/13GdnJ6) and found significant clarity on several issues that have been the subject of endless hand-wringing, pessimism and gloom over the last several months. The highlights of my quick review are:

     

    • In 2009 the Company began stop/start technology work with a large automotive company. That work continues today.
    • In February 2011 Company accepted contract to produce ~10,000 specialty batteries/month for a large lead–acid battery manufacturer. That contract remains in place today and for the foreseeable future. (slide 5)

     

    • Recent Developments
    —Stop/Start Initiative with a Diesel Engine Manufacturer (slide 24)
    —Began New Initiatives with Two Major Lead–Acid Battery Manufacturers (slide 25)

     

    These are simple declarative statements made in connection with an effort to sell securities. Misstatements of material fact in connection with securities offerings subject the speaker to potential civil and criminal liability. They're one step removed from sworn testimony, but it's a small step.

     

    The one that excites me the most is the "Stop-start initiative with a diesel engine manufacturer." I've previously said that Axion's ability to get ePower a big-league audience with Cummins last summer was almost miraculous. Now we have Axion claiming an ongoing initiative with a diesel engine manufacturer.

     

    By my count Axion now has three multi-billion dollar first tier companies that have been spending their own money testing and validating the PbC for years – BMW, NS and now CMI, plus a couple of draft choices to be named later.
    22 Jul, 03:26 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4452) | Send Message
     
    Starting diesel engines back the 1980's is how all this got started. It's about time someone took that seriously.
    22 Jul, 03:54 PM Reply Like
  • jveal
    , contributor
    Comments (654) | Send Message
     
    Thanks John. It does indeed communicate that several things under the radar are still in development. BMW and the two battery suppliers are the ones that many have assumed were lost.

     

    It is good to see an update that will most likely be used to have a healthy capital raise in the near future.
    22 Jul, 04:00 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    DRich, I cannot for the life of me, given Axion's relationship with NSC, understand why they do not have a development agreement with them in this area. Is it due to the small format Axion has to offer in current production that makes this a nonstarter?
    22 Jul, 04:01 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4452) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... I don't think there is any reason that NSC & Axion couldn't work on a starter battery with the size format they have to work with. When it comes to fielding a finished device for operation then format would come into play. With, in the grand scheme of things, very little money Axion should be able to build an electrode line that a battery OEM could use in a size format the rail already use.

     

    Just one more mystery to deal with and each & every one is just a matter of money & a reluctance to change.
    22 Jul, 05:35 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1500) | Send Message
     
    In the midst of a 10 day pub exploration of the Yorkshire Dales and the Lake District. Just returned from sampling several local ales. Glad that PbC Believer is not along on the trip with me.
    22 Jul, 06:18 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Thanks DRich, thought so directionally but still the final format would need to be tested. Given the lower risk it would seem to be a better application to use something closer to the ePower method of program development. A little less time at the puter with more trial and error/field testing. Throw it at the wall and see what sticks if you will. Actually far less complex than what ePower is looking to do.
    -
    Metro, Not willing to share some company and tip a few with a fellow Axionista, PBCB? Where's the kinship in that. All for one and one for all you know. Sock drawer brethren. Keepers of the flame.
    22 Jul, 06:30 PM Reply Like
  • carlosgaviria
    , contributor
    Comments (789) | Send Message
     
    Buenas noches Mr. John:

     

    Is CMI Cummins Motor?

     

    Saludos-Carlos
    22 Jul, 08:18 PM Reply Like
  • mds5375
    , contributor
    Comments (155) | Send Message
     
    'CMI' is the stock symbol for Cummins.
    22 Jul, 08:38 PM Reply Like
  • carlosgaviria
    , contributor
    Comments (789) | Send Message
     
    Gracias!!

     

    Good Night-Carlos
    22 Jul, 08:48 PM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (979) | Send Message
     
    It appears about time that these under the radar endeavors appear on the radar screen...too much behind the scenes to continue in stealth mode.
    22 Jul, 10:02 PM Reply Like
  • JohnM121
    , contributor
    Comments (365) | Send Message
     
    John,
    I want to add to this comment with something that has not been mentioned here lately, but make intuitive sense.

     

    The first thing in an evaluation of a component is to do what you can to eliminate it as a candidate. The teams responsible within these mega-companies are responsible for results and have a budget. For a battery, that amounts to some harsh testing. If these companies are still even talking with a micro-cap like Axion, they already know what problems it solves for them. It's in their tool belt, but there is no telling when it will be pulled out.
    23 Jul, 09:17 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    In their 2010 ELBC presentation Renault explained that their validation cycle for commodity batteries was 6 months of quality and performance testing followed by 18 to 24 months of supplier evaluation including manufacturing facilities, production methods, quality control and supply chains. They made it clear that most companies didn't survive the first six months and only a tiny percentage survived the entire process. The process they described was a bit like special forces school on steroids.

     

    I can identify any number of Axion issues that would give an automaker indigestion, so I view four years of ongoing work on a non-commodity battery as a ringing endorsement of the PbC, particularly when it comes from three first tier players in very different industries.

     

    I see financing and the effective management if growth as tremendous challenges for Axion, but I don't believe demand for the PbC will ever be an issue.
    23 Jul, 09:56 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2388) | Send Message
     
    >Drich -

     

    How big is the locomotive starter battery market?

     

    Is there a dominant provider at this point?

     

    If the PbC were chosen, could the size of the market shrink significantly due to PbC lasting much longer?

     

    If AXPW were to "kill the market" (in time), and they were killing some profitable niche market for a potential strategic partner, is it possible they might decide to forgo the small opportunity if light of the bigger picture?

     

    Any chance supercapacitor companies have been nosing around the market ... or even some version of JCI's "2 state solution?"
    23 Jul, 10:12 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4452) | Send Message
     
    >wtblanchard ... I wish I could find the exact data on how big loco starting batteries market might be both in units & dollars, but, alas, I've seen hints in passing, just not specifics I can recall. For a mental exercise you can figure each loco has between 3 & 8 of these behemoth cellboxes on board (average weight 800 to 1250 lb) and, from reading BNSF info I have somewhere, normal maintenance will replace 1 or 2 cell boxes per year per loco.

     

    http://bit.ly/16R5n4Z
    http://bit.ly/1jVxtZo

     

    I guess that worldwide there are near 100 manufacturer of loco batteries, but remember this same battery is used in many types of mining equipment which is an even bigger information blackhole to me. The two leaders I know of are East Penn & Enersys in N.America, SAFT in the EU (there are several others) and, of course, China that has, I believe, 5 in the motive energy sector. Now, about supercapacitors, the answer is YES, only the sole company known to me is KEMET. Maxwell is no where I can find although I'd bet they have a project somewhere.

     

    Enough rambling from me. I'd guess the worldwide market is somewhere in the $100B USD range per year and is large enough of a niche that just starting those diesel engines should not be overlooked.
    23 Jul, 01:07 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    DRich, You mention SAFT as a battery supplier for diesel locomotive SLI. Do you happen to know if they have had success in selling their NiC supercabatteries for this purpose? This being the technology they produce under license from a Russian firm.
    23 Jul, 01:56 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4452) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... I do know they sell a Nickel battery. Whether it is a supercap, I can't answer. I did leave out the Russians because I can't even tell you who makes what and for what sector.
    23 Jul, 02:39 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Thanks DRich, I just looked at their offerings for loco engine starting and it looks like they offer NiCd and nickle super caps with the latter being the Russian asymmetric supercapacitor I was referring to. Don't have a clue about how many they might be selling. Would seem to be good for certain climates. But alas so would PbC.

     

    http://bit.ly/1jVJZs4
    23 Jul, 02:55 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    Here's a company selling NiC supercabatteries:

     

    http://bit.ly/1tB4ASW
    23 Jul, 02:55 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Edmund, They are all tied together. Here's an announcement that indicates the relationships.

     

    Saft and ESMA to cooperate on supercapacitor development, production and commercialization

     

    http://bit.ly/1tB61Rf

     

    EDIT: BTW, you'll note they market them as capacitors not batteries.
    23 Jul, 03:00 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4452) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... As should Axion. It is a capacitor that carries around its own recharge supply. What a customer should be interested in is how much power can be extracted over what time, how long it takes to recover and how many times it can do it before needing an external power source. Forcing Axion's battery to compete with the Energizer Bunny or A123 as an energy source has been just plain poor marketing.
    23 Jul, 03:19 PM Reply Like
  • greentongue
    , contributor
    Comments (747) | Send Message
     
    Axion has a Cabattery that doesn't go Kaboom.
    23 Jul, 07:19 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    DRich, Well we're out of the shop on the NS 999 so we're going to see, hopefully soon, signs that the darn thing works. Let's hope NSC/US gov-mint get a good return on their dollars spent in R&D and the elusive Greenie lives up to what the test data indicates it should do. Still wish NSC had used the asymmetric supercapacitor in some other areas near and dear to their heart like locomotive SLI, solar charged signals, track lubricators and diesel electric lift cranes to name a few. These other applications would have put some nuts and berries on the table far faster IMO. Maybe even a squirrel or two. And Axion had their ear I suppose.
    23 Jul, 07:51 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4452) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco ... I still haven't seen or heard of it being out of the shop. It's quite possible NSC is dabbling with other applications but the OTR is the important one. None of these other applications are fasttrack and the OTR absolutely must be perfect or a failure with no middle ground.
    23 Jul, 08:59 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2528) | Send Message
     
    There was some discussion at some point that NSC had ordered some batteries to fiddle around with in other areas. At that time, there was a mention of cranes and a discussion of whether they might be using them there. Otherwise, crickets.
    23 Jul, 09:14 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2213) | Send Message
     
    iindelco - Is the 999 actually "out of the shop". We heard it was towed out, and saw a picture of it wedged between two other locos on Facebook, but do we know if it has actually moved on its own power? Has it actually pushed a few cars around? Or is it possibly out in the rain just because some high priority job needed that bay?

     

    Not trying to be negative, just trying to separate hopes from facts.
    24 Jul, 10:33 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2193) | Send Message
     
    According to the twitter feed, the batteries are installed (7/9) and it is painted (6/29) and presumably ready to go.

     

    http://bit.ly/RJnpDI
    24 Jul, 10:41 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4452) | Send Message
     
    >Rick Krementz ... In my way of thinking, it won't be out of the shop until it is on the other side of the turntable and preferably in Rose Yard ... with pictures. There is no confirmation it has moved under its own power or is doing any shakedown or work. It sure is a pretty paint job though and with any luck it will be actually out within the next several weeks.
    24 Jul, 10:49 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Rick, There has been no sign yet that the NS 999 has moved under its own power. Agree with SMaturin and DRich.

     

    Someday...
    24 Jul, 10:55 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4716) | Send Message
     
    Fuel-cell stocks rally on GE plans, FuelCell project award
    Jul 22 2014, 14:31 ET

     

    GE's (GE -0.2%) plan to build a new fuel-cell manufacturing facility in upstate New York to improve the production of fuel cells that run on natural gas isn't lifting its own shares, but it seems to be providing a big boost to fuel-cell stocks and other alternative energy names.

     

    FuelCell Energy (FCEL +14.5%) is soaring after Germany’s Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy awarded it and a joint venture partner €5M (~$6.7M) in a project to increase power density and the operating life of fuel cells, which would cut costs.

     

    Ocean Power Tech (OPTT +35.3%) is exploding higher today with no company specific news to account for the strength, and water management solutions provider GreenHunter Resources (GRH +13.8%) is up sharply on MLP news.

     

    Also rising: PLUG +6.9%, BLDP +5.8%, ZBB +4.8%, CBAK +2.3%, CPST +5.1%.
    22 Jul, 03:38 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2528) | Send Message
     
    John,

     

    While I agree with you concerning civil and criminal liability, those appear to be cut and paste from prior PowerPoints with little or no clarification in the SEC documents or CCs.

     

    Unfortunately, in my opinion, that doesn't really say anything new.
    22 Jul, 03:41 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    The stop-start initiative with a diesel engine manufacturer is brand new. I've speculated, but this is the first time Axion has spoken.

     

    Confirmation that the flooded battery contract is in place for the foreseeable future negates speculation that East Penn is going to call the rug out from under us.

     

    Confirmation that the BMW work is ongoing negates speculation that automotive has been shoved to the back burner. The same is true for ongoing work with NS and the other lead-acid battery manufacturers.

     

    I'm sure Axion could generate frequent news if it was willing to sell its soul for pennies like ZBB has. Doing this kind of stuff right takes a long time and a lot of secrecy. Any time the needs of a business conflict with the desires of a few for more information, management has a fiduciary duty to run the business and tell the voyeurs to pound sand.
    22 Jul, 04:07 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2528) | Send Message
     
    "Any time the needs of a business conflict with the desires of a few for more information, management has a fiduciary duty to run the business and tell the voyeurs to pound sand."

     

    John -- I'm not saying mgt should't do what it needs to do. However, at this point, I take any claims in the battery industry with a grain of salt and the likelihood that either the claims are either way out on the horizon or puffery.

     

    FWIW, and my memory is far from perfect, I thought the s/s diesel was in the last pp iteration.

     

    And Axion has basically said in prepared comments that while it continues to work on automotive, other items such as storage have moved to the front of the list.
    22 Jul, 04:20 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    There was no reference to the stop-start initiative with a diesel engine manufacturer in the November 2013 presentation, which is the last version I downloaded.

     

    I happen to think I know which manufacturer Axion is referring to, but there are only a handful of truck engine manufacturers in the world and they're all monsters. I expect Axion to eventually disclose a relationship with Cummins, but I'd be every bit as happy with CAT, VOLVO, Detroit Diesel or Mercedes.

     

    It's one thing to have a rational view that it takes a long time for relationships to develop in the battery industry and another altogether to be so busy looking for things to complain about that you refuse to see the news that's laid out in clear view.

     

    Stationary storage has moved to the front of the list because it's the one that's generating revenue and orders now. That does not suggest that everything else has been a waste of time and money.
    22 Jul, 04:35 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (890) | Send Message
     
    Wouldn't it be nice if we could have a slide like #12 in this presentation?

     

    http://bit.ly/1p87nim

     

    That would get us around some NDA, right?
    22 Jul, 06:16 PM Reply Like
  • User 393748
    , contributor
    Comments (216) | Send Message
     
    -->> JP

     

    PACCAR could be added to that list of diesel engine manufacturers. In the last couple of years, they have started equipping their trucks with their own engines, and they are getting away from using Cat's and Cummins' engines.

     

    Paccar opened a DAF plant in Brazil in 2013, and they expect to produce at least 140,000 vehicles for the South American Market. All of the DAF trucks that will be made in the Brazilian plant are scheduled to have PACCAR's own engine inside.

     

    Between Canada and the US, PACCAR manufactures probably another 150,000 vehicles (for all classes) per year.
    22 Jul, 08:08 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    I'd be perfectly happy with PACCAR too.
    22 Jul, 08:54 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1767) | Send Message
     
    John,
    "There was no reference to the stop-start initiative with a diesel engine manufacturer in the November 2013 presentation, which is the last version I downloaded."

     

    Perhaps not, but it was in both paperwork filed for the last few CCs and in TG's remarks during those CCs. So while I agree that it is something new to the presentation, I would argue that it is something that has been talked about, by Axion, in the past.

     

    From 10-K 12-31-12
    <<Also in August, relying further on Vani Dantam’s trucking experience and reputation, we began exploratory talks with an OEM
    leader in the heavy duty trucking industry. We resurrected an initiative aimed at providing a product that would be a well - suited
    solution to the issues that arose in the trucking industry because of “anti-idling” legislation. These discussions have further
    evolved into a stop/start two battery system initiative which has continued into 2013. >>
    22 Jul, 10:52 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2528) | Send Message
     
    Mr. H - me thinks there are a lot of creative ways to get some more information into the marketplace. At some point, the absence in the face of dire circumstances makes you go hmm.

     

    And I would agree a slide similar to that outlining where they stand with different confidential relationships as opposed to the same boilerplate language that for the most part has been appearing in the powerpoint for at least a year would be appreciated. I am not sure it would do much of anything at this point though b/c it's Jerry Macguire time.
    23 Jul, 12:49 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17446) | Send Message
     
    There was a rumor, supposedly from a high-up connected former exec that's well-connected, that Mercedes was looking to make a buyout offer for (NASDAQ:PCAR).

     

    HardToLove
    23 Jul, 04:36 AM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2097) | Send Message
     
    Hi HTL,
    Nice rumor. Mercedes already owns Freightliner and Sterling trucks and Detroit Diesel. The last year I was on the road Freightliner was running an engine called a Detroit international engine also referred to as a Mercedes engine (just to keep things confusing). :-)
    23 Jul, 04:42 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    LabTech> I believe the language you're looking at was a reference to the work Axion was doing on a possible APU solution mandated by anti-idling legislation. The goal of an APU is to carry hotel loads for long periods of time like lunch breaks and overnight rest intervals when the old way of doing things was to simply leave the engine idling for hours on end.

     

    A stop-start system for trucking is an entirely different animal because it's supposed to act as an analog for an automotive stop-start system – turn the engine off at every stop light and restart the engine when the light changes. It would offer all the advantages of automotive stop-start and make life a lot easier for vehicles like FedEx delivery trucks which reportedly go through batteries like I go through clean underwear.

     

    The APU market is relatively small because the long-haul fleet is only a couple million units and many of them don't have anti-idling problems.

     

    The stop-start market, in comparison, would include Classes 2B through 8. That market is almost two orders of magnitude larger than the APU market and far more important to urban air quality.

     

    The EPA maintains a great summary resource for people who want to better understand trucking fuel consumption and emissions patterns. Every couple months the SmartWay Program publishes a set of three overview graphs on a particular topic and offers a snapshot of where the industry is.

     

    The jump page is here – http://1.usa.gov/17x3Rb6

     

    The August 26, 2013 issue shows the annual average idle hours for each weight class. Very good.
    23 Jul, 07:30 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1767) | Send Message
     
    John,
    I have to disagree. The text of the 10K clearly states that the APU discussions had evolved into a two battery start-stop initiative and I remember TG talking about this initiative during that CC, and following ones. I am hopeful that the reason it is now in the presentation is due to an amount of progress on those initiatives to make it worth mentioning in the presentation.

     

    <<that arose in the trucking industry because of “anti-idling” legislation. These discussions have further
    evolved into a stop/start two battery system initiative which has continued into 2013.>>
    23 Jul, 10:59 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29660) | Send Message
     
    I'm perfectly happy with that alternative explanation because it would suggest that the relationship has two years of history and is progressing well.
    23 Jul, 11:08 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1767) | Send Message
     
    OT- Don't know if this has been posted before about GE's new fuel cell development?

     

    The New Power Generation: This Fuel Cell System Could Spark A Revolution

     

    http://bit.ly/1r4bwGy
    22 Jul, 04:48 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Remember this?

     

    The mysterious story of the battery startup that promised GM a 200-mile electric car

     

    http://bit.ly/19f2EKl

     

    No problem.

     

    USABC Awards $7.7M Contract to Envia for Advanced EV Battery Tech

     

    http://bit.ly/1p81T7d
    22 Jul, 05:45 PM Reply Like
  • Amouna
    , contributor
    Comments (1491) | Send Message
     
    iindelco,

     

    Thought Envia was a uncovered as a fraud, or maybe confusing it with something else...
    22 Jul, 06:06 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Amouna, So it appeared about a year ago. I guess in the battery business that's OK.
    22 Jul, 06:20 PM Reply Like
  • renim
    , contributor
    Comments (1068) | Send Message
     
    Envia the company is a fraud but the technology is real.

     

    Envia misrepresented who they got the materials from, and were not able to recreate them properly.

     

    LG is also progressing the technology, its quite suitable for both CE and automotive applications, but has some distinctive behaviours that the both important and different to conventional Li ion. (Primarily due to activation continuing during use of battery, so its properties are not static like a conventional Li ion)
    22 Jul, 09:29 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (890) | Send Message
     
    Jezus- That is depressing. A year ago it was a fraud. How they get gov't funding is sad.
    22 Jul, 06:27 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Latest on Guam.

     

    Integrated solution is necessary

     

    http://bit.ly/1A3kuKm
    22 Jul, 06:42 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17446) | Send Message
     
    07/22/2014: EOD stuff partially copied from blog (up now).
    # Trds: 17, MinTrSz: 323, MaxTrSz: 44600, Vol: 169923, AvTrSz: 9995
    Min. Pr: 0.1300, Max Pr: 0.1335, VW Avg. Tr. Pr: 0.1315
    # Buys, Shares: 8 85923, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.1321
    # Sells, Shares: 9 84000, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.1309
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 1.02:1 (50.57% "buys"), DlyShts 23323 (13.73%), Dly Sht % of 'sells' 27.77%

     

    No outlier today.

     

    Today's low, high, VWAP, trade volume, and daily short sales moved 0.00%, -3.19%, -00.26%, -68.92% and -84.98% respectively. Price spread today was 2.69% vs. 6.08%, 5.11%, 17.35% (thanks to the two $0.1193 trades), 12.53%, 10.13%, 3.37%, 3.88%, 7.84% and 6.21% on prior days.

     

    Of the traditional TA oscillators I watch, the low volume bites us again – all flipped negative yesterday on reasonable and rising volume so it seemed we should give that movement some weight. Today's price action does suggest that was a correct assessment. Today we get minuscule volume and mixed readings as a couple improve and a couple continue to weaken and a couple go flat. Just ignore them for now.

     

    The Bollinger lower limit continues to drop ...

     

    The 5, 10, 25 and 50-day averages for the VWAPs again all continued down. Today the averages are ...

     

    The larger trades (>= 15K) occurred on 3 of the 17 trades, 17.65%. These 92,100 shares were 54.20% of day's volume, and traded at a VWAP of $0.1315. 1 of the larger trades, 33.33% ...

     

    The other 14 trades, 82.35% of the day's trades, traded 77,823 shares, 45.80% of the days volume. The VWAP was $0.1315. 7 trades, 50.00% ...

     

    Mostly just the numbers in the blog today.
    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    HardToLove
    22 Jul, 07:05 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1463) | Send Message
     
    The latest investor presentation is a significant positive assurance, since it is dated July 2014 and lists many programs thought dead and some we haven't heard before. Many have written off BMW as dead, and many think they aren't going after solar aggressively. It's also a sign that DDG is hitting up his rolodex for funding.
    22 Jul, 08:24 PM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (996) | Send Message
     
    Great comment Ranma. I hadn't noticed the update. What an improvement on previous iterations of the presentation. Lay it all out on the table. This is who we are. This is where we come from. This is what we're doing. It directly addresses many of the lingering questions on this board: BMW is a go. Toll contract continues. Followed by a simple to understand CAGR chart. Inside views of the manufacturing plant. Highlights the value proposition of the battery: 2-4X faster charge than Li-ion and same lifetime for significantly less money and beats the heck out of VRLA for micro-hybrid. I am inclined to give DDG full credit for it.
    23 Jul, 09:55 AM Reply Like
  • Patrick Young
    , contributor
    Comments (996) | Send Message
     
    Oh and slide 20 hasn't been seen before I believe. 20 MWh!

     

    Love slide 21 and 22: has DDG written all over it:
    Slide 21:
    "NSC, 1500 horsepower, PbC batteries." Nuff said.

     

    Slide 22:
    ePower 0 to 60 time half that of your truck.
    (who cares about fuel economy anyways?)

     

    New developments:
    1. Began Initiative with Large Off-shore Defense Contractor on Multiple Projects Worldwide.
    2. Began New Initiatives with Two Major Lead–Acid Battery Manufacturers.

     

    Bravo. Outstanding. (Applause)
    23 Jul, 10:06 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2388) | Send Message
     
    "I hadn't noticed the update"

     

    Isn't it sad that it's so difficult to know there's an updated investor presentation?

     

    I was amused to see on Vani's LinkedIn page (though admittedly near the bottom of his list of accomplishments) something about web sites ... implying that it might be something to be proud of (given some prominence in his resume) when it fact, while he did no doubt cause it be improved significantly from the stone age, is still no where near a great marketing arm that makes it easy to get the information you need and want. And yeah, I get that marketing $$ are scarce, and many folks embellish resumes, but it just kinda galled me ...

     

    Here's the line:
    Develop and manage business web sites and Youtube Channels

     

    http://linkd.in/1jViVZK

     

    And how 'bout that Youtube Channel, eh?
    23 Jul, 10:23 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2528) | Send Message
     
    Does someone have a link to the last iteration of the powerpoint in their dropbox that they could post?

     

    It was updated last month also and only had 3 executives on the exec page, TG/VG/Baker.

     

    Would be interesting to compare.
    23 Jul, 10:35 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1767) | Send Message
     
    Stefan,
    Actually, I just checked and I have the presentation from July 2013. Unfortunately, John is wrong. Slide 24 from a year ago already has the Start/stop initiative with a diesel manufacturer listed on it. I don't know how to dropbox it to anyone, but if you sent me an email through seekingalpha I can send it to you.

     

    <<Stop/Start Initiative with a Diesel Engine Manufacturer>>
    23 Jul, 11:32 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1767) | Send Message
     
    Stefan,
    One other comment. I'm glad that John was wrong about this, and my memory was correct, because it means that this isn't a new initiative, but one that they have been working on for 1 1/2 years. I'd rather it be something that has a chance of coming to fruition sooner, than something they are just starting. IMHO.
    23 Jul, 11:42 AM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2528) | Send Message
     
    Agreed. I would like them to have been working on it for as long as possible to make it possible to occur before the next financing.

     

    It's just unfortunate that it has become boilerplate with nothing else ever mentioned.
    23 Jul, 12:01 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2498) | Send Message
     
    Well, guys, sometimes going back to the source documents is needed, like right now. We've had some sloppy due dilly recently regarding Axion's newest Investor Pres. I would like to help there.

     

    I have a copy of one from 2013, and the only substantive changes I've been able to notice are the change from TG to DG and this bullet point added to the end of the Recent Developments slides:

     

    "Received a follow-on purchase order for four more PowerCube™ energy storage systems from its strategic partner, a NJ-based solar installer for commercial and residential markets."

     

    I see Axion has had some sloppiness, too---the duplicate bullet point in the Recent Developments section, as already noted by another Axionista, and, despite four attempts, I have been unable to verify the calc of the 62.4% CAGR of revenues, which, almost unbelievably, remained unchanged between the two presentations despite another year's data point. Please let me know if you are able to calc 62.4% from any of the data presented.

     

    The obvious initial conclusions regarding the slop is that either 1) the new pres is a draft, or 2) the prior presentation was hurriedly updated, both of which call into doubt some of the other points presented, such as the "That contract remains in
    place today and for the foreseeable future." remark regarding the toll relationship.

     

    And what about the material things left out? Why no reference to the 'investors seeking fixed income revenue streams'? An oversight, or is this now immaterial, or has it gone away?

     

    I hope Axion reads this comment and improves the presentation before they give this crap to a prospective investor. If I were DG I would not be amused.
    23 Jul, 01:07 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17446) | Send Message
     
    MrI: "... for the foreseeable future"

     

    Caught my eye too because of it's contradiction to the most recent known status.

     

    HardToLove
    23 Jul, 01:13 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2498) | Send Message
     
    HTL, if forced to choose, I would choose TG's comments from the last conf call over this pres' comment. I expect DG to address the toll contract (which I consider a small-ish thing, actually---between DG and TG, they have two guys that know how to keep expenses in line) and more, though, in about three weeks during the next conf call. So hopefully we'll have the real answer by then, anyway.

     

    I am rarely snarky here, but this time is too hard for even me to pass up---"foreseeable" for Axion has been about a week or two, if that, so technically, they're stmt is ok, lol!
    23 Jul, 01:27 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2528) | Send Message
     
    Mr. I - very simple explanation - boilerplate and simply unacceptable for a company trying to find money.

     

    Imagine Axion was pitching you for its next financing round and came to you with this tired presentation that has seen little change over the last two years when they closed the past two devastating secondaries for legacy investors and tell me what about the investor presentation would get you excited?

     

    If this conversation is not going on in the executive suite something is really wrong.

     

    ** I still have not ever sold a share and have held for multiple years.
    23 Jul, 01:29 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2498) | Send Message
     
    Stefan, concur. It's also a sign to me that they have yet to beef up the mkting dept, like they said they would.

     

    The contrarian view is that a lot of this stuff---e.g., mkting "collateral" like their web site and brochures, doesn't really matter much anyway, so when you're still in scrambling mode, don't waste ur time on stuff that doesn't matter much. Triage, if u will. Common among struggling, largely pre-revenue micro-caps.

     

    I fall somewhere in-between. The most important thing is the human contact, such as DG's call to an investor contact, but the follow-up must be fairly solid, or too much doubt can creep in.
    23 Jul, 01:39 PM Reply Like
  • Ranma
    , contributor
    Comments (1463) | Send Message
     
    What's wrong with "foreseeable"? The contract, as presented by TG, is potentially winding down because Axion might need those lines to make PbCs. It's not winding down because EP is cancelling it. Thus the contract will be there if needed, and not if not needed. There was no timeline for winding down given. As such, it's fair to present to investors that it's reliable income.
    23 Jul, 02:03 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17446) | Send Message
     
    Ranma: "As such, it's fair to present to investors that it's reliable income"

     

    Just reviewed the quarterly and from what was stated there it is not fair to present it as reliable income when the plans are, regardless of at who's instigation, is to wind that down due to all the considerations he stated there.

     

    What would be fair, IMO, would be to say something like " ... and if we don't need the resources they are still interested in ...".

     

    That has a negative slant though as it suggests that the big things they thought would need the resouces are not coming to fruition.

     

    Regardless, when your own plans said we aren't going to do it anymore, as things stood at the time, it's not entirely accurate to claim it as a reliable revenue stream now *unless* the other plans for those resources fell through, or appear likely to do so.

     

    That wouldn't be good either.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    23 Jul, 02:18 PM Reply Like
  • Edmund Metcalfe
    , contributor
    Comments (1508) | Send Message
     
    Not sure on which side of the fence the data falls:
    This from the latest cc:
    "Unidentified Analyst:
    So my first question was in the 10-K you commented on the fact that it looks like you’re going to be decreasing the number of batteries you’re making in the toll battery contract and going to be increasing the number of batteries that you’re going to be making for PbC. Is this something where the toll company doesn’t want as many batteries or are you just think that you’re going to need more of your production staff for PbC battery?

     

    Thomas Granville
    So, it’s always been the plan that we would make -- that we would toll batteries as long as there was adequate space and there were adequate assets to do that. Everyone knew including our partner, strategic partner, that that was the case. Eventually we would have to part ways in that tolling arrangement because there just isn’t enough room that there is not enough people, there is not enough dry charge availability to both. So I think its combination of both of the items that you mentioned. Since they know that it’s going to end at some point in time, they have to take steps in order to fill that void."
    23 Jul, 02:22 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2498) | Send Message
     
    Ranma, what is ur source for ur stmt, "Thus the contract will be there if needed"?

     

    The big picture, as I understand it, and I could be wrong, because, among other things, I've forgotten something or because we haven't been given enough info from Axion to conclusively tell, is that Axion and East Penn entered into their arrangement some time ago with the thought that it would not be perpetual. Axion expected to need that space/equipment for PbC manufacture by sometime in the 2nd half of 2014.

     

    I assume lead times are important, so East Penn presumably needed some to make other manufacturing arrangements to replace the expected lost supply from Axion. Other here have commented about EP's plant expansion---perhaps that's the alternative source.

     

    Some reasonable potential outcomes are obvious:

     

    1) East Penn may have made firm commitments to alternative supply and will stay that course, regardless of whether Axion can continue to fullfill EP's needs.

     

    2) Axion may desire to keep that space/equip available for PbC manufacture, as originally expected, regardless of whether it will really need that or not.

     

    3) Both parties may have the ability and desire for Axion to continue to supply EP, perhaps even 'in full', until substantial PbC orders arrive.

     

    yada yada yada

     

    I have confidence that DG with TG (DTG, 8^P) can deal with the EP stuff adequately. Big layoffs if needed, worst case, for example. Or extend the supply agreement with EP for awhile---EP has helped Axion in the past (although EP tragically lost its leader recently. I don't know if that changes the relationship). Almost every prospective investor eye is still on the PbC, I believe.
    23 Jul, 02:40 PM Reply Like
  • RuggedDC
    , contributor
    Comments (215) | Send Message
     
    East Penn (along with state/local subsidies, I believe) has built one or more new battery making facilities. I don't have cites handy, but these announcements were covered by general circulation newspapers in East Penn's area as cited in the APCs some time ago.
    23 Jul, 04:06 PM Reply Like
  • pascquale
    , contributor
    Comments (99) | Send Message
     
    Re "Please let me know if you are able to calc 62.4% from any of the data presented."
    I get 63.5% CAGR from the data presented.
    23 Jul, 04:33 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2498) | Send Message
     
    pasc, I also get that using:
    PV = (534)
    FV = 10,187
    n = 6

     

    But it's not 62.4%. Perhaps there was major rounding there somewhere, BUT:

     

    From the 7/2013 pres:
    PV = (534)
    FV = 9,779
    n = 5

     

    gives a CAGR of 78.9% vs the stated 62.4%.

     

    My point was that it supports the idea of a sloppy updating (just make a few quick updates without being thorough) thereby calling into doubt some of the other items.

     

    I don't consider this the end of the world by any means, but when we only have some tidbits to chew on, and a material number of those seem to be wrong/sloppy/etc. it adds to the suck factor for prospective investors.

     

    THAT matters. Come'on Axion, tighten things up a bit.
    23 Jul, 05:17 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3985) | Send Message
     
    Thanks for looking at the "updated" investor presentation a bit more closely than first readers/commenters. The thing needs a redo if there is any thought of presenting it to potential investors in Axion equities or debt. It strikes me as far more usable as an Axion product sales tool (investors in PbCs and/or PbC configured energy storage systems.)
    23 Jul, 08:46 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2213) | Send Message
     
    Meme: "Competency matters"
    24 Jul, 10:34 AM Reply Like
  • JamesBBecker
    , contributor
    Comments (182) | Send Message
     
    The Investor Presentation does hold promise. Its why I hold the stock.

     

    Its got a pretty serious typo though. Page 25, one of the bullet points (continuous sheeting) is completely duplicated for no reason. They should fix that.
    22 Jul, 09:29 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (890) | Send Message
     
    James-

     

    When the updated the Powerpoint a week ago I emailed them about it along with a few other issues such as having TG on it even though he resigned.

     

    They fixed all of my other items that I requested but that one.

     

    They fixed all of my other items that I requested but that one.

     

    Sloppy indeed.
    23 Jul, 04:59 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8961) | Send Message
     
    Mr. Holty, Can you call them and ask them to make a significant sale? Err, ask more than once please. lol
    -
    So, would this be an opportunity to add in a little SS action w/ pollution control standard levels of durability/verification required? Probably not if the autos are agreeing to it.

     

    US EPA Proposes Track Tests For Fuel Economy Testing

     

    http://bit.ly/1jW24Gv
    23 Jul, 05:07 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2498) | Send Message
     
    Mr H, thx much for letting Axion know. Good work!
    23 Jul, 05:38 PM Reply Like
  • User 393748
    , contributor
    Comments (216) | Send Message
     
    A note on the failed next-gen Li-Ion battery that Argonne and Dalhousie were working on with the nickel, cobalt, manganese cathode.

     

    It appears that what they were doing that is different is that they were trying to get the chemistry to work by "bulking" the nickel, manganese and the cobalt within each particle in the electrode, rather than by assembling it in the usual non-bulked format. The nickel was put in the center, with the manganese basically in the middle and the cobalt added in increasing amounts as the outer surface of the particle is reached.

     

    The nickel will provide good capacity and the cobalt would help to properly format the battery and also help in controlling the battery's oxygen state during cycling. There has been, for a long time, great interest in getting manganese to work in a Li-Ion battery. Mn is in great supply, with no resource issues, and it is therefore inexpensive to purchase as a raw material, and it is quite environmentally friendly. However, the big problem that has been intractable so far is that the manganese tends to very easily deteriorate in the electrolyte, which, in turn, causes significant capacity fade early on in the battery's life.

     

    One report that I had read felt that the standard layered form of this chemistry would be meet the requirements for a PHEV - 10, but not a PHEV - 40. So, it would seem that Argonne et al were pursuing this "bulked "chemical format in order to attain a rating of at least PHEV - 40 for such a battery.

     

    Argonne began the work on this particular "bulked particle" nickel, cobalt, manganese chemistry format over 13 years ago.

     

    It is most likely that when they say that the battery suffers from "voltage fade", they are probably using a different phrase to refer to the fairly rapidly occurring capacity fade that is found in batteries using more than nominal amounts of manganese. If such is the case, then it means that using a "bulked chemical" format involving Mn will provide the battery with a higher voltage limit (> 4.5 volts), but will not solve the problem of capacity fade or voltage fade.

     

    Once again, it is interesting to note that the serious work on the non-lead acid batteries that we hear about today, began about 1960. So, in the last 55 years, the pick of the litter has turned out to be Lithium ion based batteries, and all the other chemistries that were promised to be in production and everyday use by 1980, all of those have either been given up on, or are still in development with perhaps as many as 5 to 10 major obstacles that have to be solved before they will be ready for prime time.

     

    One has to note that we are already very near the limits in capacity that the laws of thermodynamics will allow us to get out of all of the economically feasible Li-ion chemistries.
    22 Jul, 09:35 PM Reply Like
  • renim
    , contributor
    Comments (1068) | Send Message
     
    >User 393748

     

    Li Ion cathodes using differing materials for the particles shells/core is generally different to high voltage cathodes.

     

    Voltage fade is a specific to referring to lithium ion batteries whose discharge voltage profile changes. Conventional Li ion cathodes only display capacity degradation. High Voltage Li ion cathodes display capacity growth/ degradation/ regeneration as well as voltage fade.

     

    That is 3 attributes not shared with conventional Li ion.
    conventional Li ion does not display capacity growth, capacity regeneration or voltage fade.

     

    Li-Mn2O4 actually has 2 voltage planes, 4V and 3V but suffers degradation when it transition between them, so only half the capacity of the cathode is used. That capacity is further reduced by doping to toughen up the cathode near the transition. Li rich/Mn rich cathodes (ie high voltage) can use the full capacity of the cathode, and does so at a higher voltage, so it has roughly 2.5x the capacity of a plain Mn cathode.

     

    LiFePO4 uses the full amount of its capacity, there is no capacity improvement left. Mn cathodes use less than 1/2 of their capacity, there is significant improvement left.
    22 Jul, 10:50 PM Reply Like
  • abcd9876
    , contributor
    Comments (30) | Send Message
     
    Pretty impressive investor presentation I must say. While I agree with distribution issues - I had signed up for investor updates but never got a notification of the updated presentation - I consider those as somewhat trivial compared to getting this to interested parties for the upcoming financing round.

     

    One quick question - Bullet 2 on slide 25 - Commissioned PowerCube at D C Naval Yard - Is that old info? I don't remember seeing it earlier but I am relatively a newbie. Either way, that and 2500% increase in RFP volume are great to see. Now just need only 10-20% out of those 2500% to materialize as sales in near future and we would be off...
    23 Jul, 10:33 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2213) | Send Message
     
    The DC Power Cube was a few years ago, and then disappeared into the black hole of silence. No report (that I know of) of real world performance, cost effectiveness, reliability, etc. Also, no further orders have been disclosed, and no discussion of issues related to lack of sales beyond the single prototype.
    23 Jul, 11:07 AM Reply Like