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  • Axion Power Concentrator 136: Aug. 10, 2012: Axion Power Announces Date Of Its Second Quarter 2012 Earnings Release And Conference Call 184 comments
    Aug 12, 2012 11:52 AM | about stocks: AXPW

    These instablogs and the people who maintain them have no relationship whatsoever to Axion Power International. To our direct knowledge no person with a current relationship to Axion Power International other than being a shareholder participates in these instablogs.

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    Axion Power Announces Date Of Its Second Quarter 2012 Earnings Release And Conference Call

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    Updated July 25th...

    HTL's New Chart Tracking Insta

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    From Bangwhiz August 2nd...

    Questions For The Axion Power 2nd Quarter Earnings Report and Conference Call

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    Axion Power's Weighted Moving Average Price and Volume:

    Over the last two years we've had a sequence of unfortunate events where big holders who *should* have been stable became persistent sellers. The list of significant stockholders and groups that emerged on the scene as persistent sellers is lengthy and includes:

    2010 sellers: FURSA; Liquidation Trust; and Small 2009 investors.

    2011-2012 sellers: Winner Estate; The Quercus Trust; Special Situations; Blackrock; and maybe Manatuck Hill

    Most of those sellers are ancient history because they're either out of stock or almost out of stock. As near as I can tell, there's nobody left that holds large enough blocks to push the market around. I find the current volume spike particularly encouraging because it seems to be a final blow out of the last shares remaining in weak hands. Given the number of shares that have already traded this month I think there's a good chance that our persistent sellers will be out of stock before the mid-August conference call.

    Axion Power Weighted Moving Average Prices:

    (updated through close Aug. 10th)

    (click to enlarge)

    Axion Power Moving Average Volume:

    (updated through close Aug. 10th)

    (click to enlarge)

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    Links to valuable Axion Power research and websites:

    The Axion Power Concentrator Web Sites created by APC commentator Bangwhiz it is a complete easy-to-use online archive of all the information contained in the entire Axion Power Concentrator series from day one; including reports, articles, comments and posted links.

    Axion Power Wikispaces Web Site, created by APC commentator WDD. It is an excellent ongoing notebook aggregation of Axion Power facts.

    Axion Power Website, the first place any prospective investor should go and thoroughly explore with all SEC filings and investor presentations as well as past and present Press Releases.

    Axion Power Chart Tracking, HTL tracks AXPW's intra-day charting.

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    Be sure and either follow the Axion Power Host ID on Seeking Alpha or click the check-box labeled "track new comments on this article" just ahead of the comments section!

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    WARNING: This is a troll free zone. We reserve the right to eliminate posts, or posters that are disruptive.

    Enjoy!

    Disclosure: I am long OTCQB:AXPW.

Back To Axion Power Host's Instablog HomePage »

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Comments (184)
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  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2101) | Send Message
     
    Where is Springer when you need him to start the comments?

     

    Changing a diaper?

     

    Catching a nap?
    10 Aug 2012, 04:42 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    at 4:42... hmmm... I think I was at Wal-mart with a cart that had a baby in a car seat, pea gravel, cereal, and some Jiffy-pop...

     

    I seem to have lost my touch... or APH is just waiting for me to go out now?
    10 Aug 2012, 08:51 PM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2097) | Send Message
     
    Jon,
    OMG, how mundane, next you'll tell us your driving a minivan. ;-)
    10 Aug 2012, 09:46 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1781) | Send Message
     
    Wow!...I didn't know you could purchase babies at Walmart? ;-)
    10 Aug 2012, 10:05 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    LabTech, Curfew off? :-{)
    10 Aug 2012, 10:29 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    Stilldazed...

     

    Actually, my wife wouldn't let me buy a minivan... already been tried.
    11 Aug 2012, 08:42 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1781) | Send Message
     
    Good for her. But you'd better get a wagon at least if you're in driving distance of the grandparents. After you have two, she'll be begging for a minivan! ;-)
    11 Aug 2012, 09:19 AM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    After two?

     

    Next week when her mom, brother, and sister-in law come to visit (from Czech Republic where they live), we'll have to take two cars to go anywhere together.
    11 Aug 2012, 09:26 AM Reply Like
  • jpau
    , contributor
    Comments (714) | Send Message
     
    Rental car, er, minivan? My wife and I get by fine with the cars we already had. The only time we really need more is when family visits.
    11 Aug 2012, 09:40 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3931) | Send Message
     
    "Good for her. But you'd better get a wagon at least if you're in driving distance of the grandparents. After you have two, she'll be begging for a minivan! ;-) "

     

    :-) Could well be the case grandparents or no. The convenience of sliding doors in loading/unloading children and household supplies plus avoidance of stooping/bending while getting toddlers into car seats is pretty appealing. Can't easily hold umbrella in place to fend off rain while leaning and bending inside vehicles to strap in and buckle up squirming kids.
    11 Aug 2012, 12:09 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Or you can pay an extra 10+k USD for a cross over vehicle which is a mini van in disguise.

     

    Americans! No wonder so many of them lost their butts on those cool lithium ion stocks. When it comes to selling things like certificates, clothing and vehicles cool beats cheap. Steak, It needs a little sizzle at any cost.

     

    3 minute 39 seconds. "How do I look? Do I look OK?"

     

    "You look Swell."

     

    http://bit.ly/P0TuEE
    11 Aug 2012, 12:47 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1781) | Send Message
     
    We've managed to get by with two Honda Civics for a number of years with the kids. We just made the grandparents keep duplicate stuff at their house that we couldn't hall back and forth. Problem is now, since they have to be in car seats/boosters for so many years, once you have two, you can't take any of their friends anywhere with them without that 3rd row of seats. The wife and I are small, so we're looking at the Mazda5 instead of the Honda or Toyota minivan, once one of our Civics finally gives up the ghost. Just hoping it doesn't happen until next year when our oldest finally moves from daycare to public kindergarten. Then we might be able to afford a car payment!
    12 Aug 2012, 09:50 PM Reply Like
  • D Lane
    , contributor
    Comments (1206) | Send Message
     
    >Labtech, My wife and I love our Mazda5. Can't beat the sliding rear doors and we had to have the manual tranny.
    13 Aug 2012, 11:00 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1781) | Send Message
     
    D Lane,
    I keep vexing on the choices. My first choice would be a VW Jetta TDI station wagon for the cargo and the great gas mileage, but my wife wants something with a third row for play dates for the kids. I used to laugh about the fact that you had so many soccer moms in SUVs, but I grew up in the era before car seats. Once you realize that you can't just throw three kids in the backseat with seat belts anymore, and God knows how old they have to be to sit in the front seat, then you realize that something with a third row is needed when you have younger kids. The wife likes the Rav4, but if you have car seats in both positions in the second row it is very difficult to get anyone back into the third row, since you can't tip the seats forward. At least the Mazda5 has the space between the second row seats to get through and it's not as gianormous as a Honda or Toyota Minivan.
    13 Aug 2012, 11:27 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Labtech, Make sure you add the acquisition cost into your thought process. I hear lots of focus on efficiency and it's a big part of the capital cost efficiency equation. I've always bought at the end of M.Y. and tried to buy toward the end of platform life when they expected less margin. Make a spread sheet of needs with your wife and then agree to a target audience. Watch and don't buy when you need to but when they need you to. They will blink.
    13 Aug 2012, 11:49 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1781) | Send Message
     
    IINDelco,
    Thanks for the advice. I tend to be the type that buys at the end of the M.Y. or used. Usually you can find the current model year around here where someone has put 25,000 miles onto the vehicle and then decided they can't afford it. That way you don't pay the new car mark-up.
    13 Aug 2012, 11:58 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Labtech, Sure, used has been better for many years. Unfortunately that was not the case when I was looking in my area for a based mid sized car 2 years ago for my son. They were actually selling popular 2 yo vehicles for more than the new cars. I suspected it had something to do with less availability due to the 08 crunch and consumers hanging themselves on their credit rating.
    13 Aug 2012, 12:12 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1781) | Send Message
     
    Here, I'll do it. It's 6 pm on a Friday evening. Go have a beer, hug your kids, kiss your spouse, eat some dinner...oh yeah, turn off the computer! :-)

     

    One edit. If you are on the West Coast, or another time zone other than USA Eastern, do all those things at the appropriate time for your global position and it's alignment with the sun.
    10 Aug 2012, 06:09 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Hmmmm. Got them good South African mining batteries to.

     

    2012 BMW X3: Not Enough Juice?

     

    http://bit.ly/QOSu7f
    11 Aug 2012, 12:12 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3931) | Send Message
     
    "
    2012 BMW X3: Not Enough Juice?

     

    http://bit.ly/QOSu7f"

     

    Interesting, informative comments.
    11 Aug 2012, 12:44 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9597) | Send Message
     
    Loved the polite frustration going on in the comments.

     

    Can't wait to read more ernestness.

     

    It's coming.

     

    11 Aug 2012, 01:01 AM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1506) | Send Message
     
    For my pocketbook I liked the comment:

     

    "duck87 says:
    06:38 AM, 06/11/12
    Out of curiosity, does this X3 have auto start/stop (not sure if the turbo 6 versions have it)? Those systems are notorious for eating batteries."

     

    Sounds like BMW has lots of battery issues. Hoping they put PbC on the uber-fast track. (Realize it is not going to to solve starter battery problem because of discharge issues of its own.)
    11 Aug 2012, 05:18 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    When the only thing the starter battery has to do is start the darned engine there is no problem. It's important to remember that 90 - 10 ratio of energy use by accessories and the engine itself. If you shift 90% of the work over to the PbC and leave the flooded battery with only 10%, the starter battery will last forever even if its DCA quickly drops off to 5 amps.
    11 Aug 2012, 05:38 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1781) | Send Message
     
    Makes you wonder if the reason they haven't announced the PbC for start-stop is that they're focusing more of their attention trying to get all their electrical system and BMS to actually work correctly. Start-stop may be easy compared to all that!
    11 Aug 2012, 09:22 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    John, You're right about that. I've got a 2003, purchased late 03, that's still got its original battery. It's located under the back seat so it's in a more favorable environment. Also, It's AGM since it's in the interior of the vehicle. Vented to the outside.

     

    I will however change it as winter sets in. I would have done it last year minimum but it's hard to do when you follow the battery sector. Hate to give up a data point even if it costs one jump and a battery change on one of the hotter or colder days of the year.

     

    Car batteries for SLI are just so much better then they were 3 or so decades ago.
    11 Aug 2012, 09:40 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    One other point, As I was reading all the comments at this site and a few others I didn't post re: BMW's car batteries, it became pretty apparent that there is no way BMW is meeting the requirements of the airport test for very long if at all.
    11 Aug 2012, 10:03 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (3931) | Send Message
     
    "'Out of curiosity, does this X3 have auto start/stop (not sure if the turbo 6 versions have it)? Those systems are notorious for eating batteries.'"

     

    That one got my attention, too, metro. But what also came through loud and clear is that many new autos have ongoing battery sappers when vehicles are parked whether they are equipped with S/S or not. Think remote locking/unlocking systems, keyless entry systems, etc.
    11 Aug 2012, 12:20 PM Reply Like
  • carlosgaviria
    , contributor
    Comments (785) | Send Message
     
    Lab Tech.
    I always thought the same thing: SS with all the toys.
    Have a nice week end.
    Carlos.
    11 Aug 2012, 06:02 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2166) | Send Message
     
    To me, BMW electronics sounds like an orgy of engineering hubris or gross incompetency. I remember some BMWs from several decades ago that were true joys to drive; now it seems they are full of geehaws that waste electricity and do not improve the driving experience.

     

    Reminds me of some some cellphones, that take pictures and have kewl apps, but crash regularly and are lousy (at best) as voice telephones. First, a car has to drive, regardless of automated lighting, security annoyances, and such. Battery problems are going to be blamed on the batteries, i.e., Axion, even if it has nothing to do with bio-carbon technology. BMW's hubris will easily overpower Axion's brilliance.
    11 Aug 2012, 09:36 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Rick, You beat me to it. Compared to the Japanese the Germans are like the Lucas of car electrification. Maybe not the worst but heavy contrast. And they, like all the other manufacturers, just keep adding more and more junk at the expense of reliability.

     

    BTW, Is the number one purpose of a passenger vehicle still transportation? I thought it was texting or some other form of entertainment. Well after make-up and eating.
    11 Aug 2012, 09:58 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13442) | Send Message
     
    LOL, I thought it was physical fitness...

     

    12-Way massage seats, heated AND cooled, with 64 different climate settings to take care of any excessive sweating...

     

    And that just covers the front seats...
    11 Aug 2012, 11:07 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    You have to love the bun warmer seats on a cold morning tho.
    11 Aug 2012, 11:11 AM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2166) | Send Message
     
    Except when the car doesn't start...
    11 Aug 2012, 12:35 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2100) | Send Message
     
    >iindelco: Sorry, but you will never convince me that anyone is worse at car electrics than Lucas. The phrase "designed to fail" keeps rising in my mind.
    11 Aug 2012, 01:58 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2511) | Send Message
     
    Leaves U Cursing And Sweating.

     

    But hey, after I replaced the whole wiring harness, no more problems. For like, a day.

     

    Looks like the Bavarians are emulating the Brits a little too well. Was die Hellen?
    11 Aug 2012, 02:11 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13442) | Send Message
     
    Yes, Lord Lucas, the Lord of Darkness.

     

    My first Jaguar resto was an eye opener. Every piece of wire was the consistancy of old spaghetti, and the fuses were bigger than my first house.

     

    Then there was the front brake caliper a prior owner had epoxied back together...
    11 Aug 2012, 03:02 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2100) | Send Message
     
    Lucas plastic headlight switch that got hot and disintegrated. Epoxy and fiberglass string repaired/reinforced the pitifully weak points. It ran for years afterward. Just lousy, cheap design.
    11 Aug 2012, 04:04 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (1140) | Send Message
     
    Actually, I live in Phoenix. I like the "cool-seat" function on my '06... actually works.... for now...
    11 Aug 2012, 05:18 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2235) | Send Message
     
    God, Don't remind me. I had a 58 candy apple red MGA when I was a teen in the early 60's that was sexy on the outside and an electrical nightmare on the inside - and it had 2 starter batteries behind the twin bucket seats. Still died frequently. I still remember my teenage girl friend push starting my car late one night in front of her house wearing a bathrobe!
    11 Aug 2012, 09:03 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    SiHB,

     

    Yes, I was being a little melodramatic. Well, OK, A lot.

     

    Pretty much not appropriate as you have pointed out. Lucas deserves their fame all to themselves.
    11 Aug 2012, 02:04 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Recouping cost of wind turbine may take more than a lifetime

     

    http://bit.ly/QR469H

     

    Solution, Live longer.
    11 Aug 2012, 04:56 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13442) | Send Message
     
    I remember looking into these years ago. Back then they were cheaper (but probably less capable) but the numbers were the same.

     

    I DID discover than the creek in my back yard could be cheaply dammed and generate useable power for a lot less, and generate more power, but the payback period was still about a decade, and did not price in all the labor I would have to put into the project.

     

    Every once in a while I still consider the idea, if only from a backup power/survivalist perspective, but as old and infirm as I am now, I appear to have outrun the necessity.
    11 Aug 2012, 05:14 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Besides you'd get in big trouble from some environmental agency. Not verified but I'd put big money on the fact that it's probably quite illegal or would required environmental impact studies taking it way beyond your payback period.

     

    Didn't read it but I'd guess this will shed some light on it.

     

    http://bit.ly/P8O1Lh
    11 Aug 2012, 05:27 PM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2097) | Send Message
     
    Might have to make the dam look like it is made of sticks and put some plastic beavers in the pond. ;-)
    11 Aug 2012, 08:36 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2166) | Send Message
     
    Small wind is a total scam. Massachusetts subsidizes a lot of small turbines, and did a follow up report, which apparently has been removed from the web. The report later was sanitized, beautified, and republished as http://bit.ly/QpWXcb.

     

    Takeaways (well buried):

     

    - Of 36 projects funded by the State since 2000, only 21 were still functioning by the time of the report, a 42% failure rate.
    - Of the operating turbines, the average production (capacity factor) was 3.9%, ie, a 10 kw turbine produced only 390 watts.

     

    For comparison, typical on-shore commercial (medium and large scale) run at 20-30% capacity factors. Offshore wind farms may run at 40% capacity factor - ten times better.

     

    I spent many dozens of hours a few years back looking for a wind solution for where I live, which is in an "Outstanding" zone, bordering on "Superb" wind resource, according to DoE. http://bit.ly/KphZGW
    I could not find a single, authentic user who had real numbers on production or reliability for a period even as long as a year.

     

    Subsidies solve so many problems......
    11 Aug 2012, 08:45 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2235) | Send Message
     
    Rick - you add a terrific perspective to this forum with your residence on an island 6 months a year having to produce your own power and dealing with reality versus gov't hoopla or lab curiosities. .
    11 Aug 2012, 09:10 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2235) | Send Message
     
    That would work. Then it couldn't be removed even by EPA.
    11 Aug 2012, 10:06 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2166) | Send Message
     
    Did a bit more research and found this British study at http://bit.ly/Ttcmwj

     

    The capacity factor for 26 small turbines (including breakdowns) over 168,950 hours was, wait for it, 0.85%! So 214 kw nameplate of turbines produced 1.8 kw. Oops. Ignoring the non-functional turbines, the Brits got 4.15%, just a hair above Massachusetts.

     

    Favorite quote: "The poorest site generated an average of 41Wh per day when in operation or 15 kWh per year, which is less than the energy it consumed to run the turbine’s electronics."

     

    Both the MA and UK conclusions were that more research was needed...

     

    I really do not understand these kinetic (and acoustic) sculptures.
    11 Aug 2012, 10:46 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2101) | Send Message
     
    Rick,

     

    You will never understand them if you think of them as sculptures. Were the pyramids just sculptures? Was Stonehenge just a sculpture?

     

    They are altars to Gaia.

     

    Who are we mere mortals to judge their cost?
    12 Aug 2012, 08:58 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13442) | Send Message
     
    I have the real thing just downstream of my property (beavers that is) but they just won't cooperate with my plans to train them...
    12 Aug 2012, 11:36 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13442) | Send Message
     
    Yes. It is written that All shall worship at the feet of Gaia. Let all infidels tremble with fear before the just wrath of Her high priest, der Goracle.
    12 Aug 2012, 11:41 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    We have a local contributor to the energy hype market Arista (ASPW). They used to be WindTamer. But now they are experts at everything clean -N- green. Much of the management came from Ultralife (ULBI) where they were finally ousted. Now in legal proceedings.

     

    http://aristapower.com

     

    Their claim to fame was that their windmill was so efficient it could be put closer to the ground. In fact they claim to beat the Betz limit they're so good.

     

    http://bit.ly/Nr5yhS

     

    These are the guys that GE signed an agreement with to market their new batteries. Also they have made sales to the government for their power everywhere solution. They are great at one thing. Selling crap for good money.

     

    I met their installer who had bought into a N.E. install agreement early on in their existence. He was less than kind in his words with regard to their WindTamer windmill product. It was awhile ago just before their founder and CEO got executed when the fictional promises met the realities of early deployment.
    12 Aug 2012, 12:08 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2100) | Send Message
     
    Rick, my favorite part of the British report is the bold text, 3rd paragraph in the executive summary. I can only wonder what study they accessed to get this positive and firmly stated information. But wait, there is no reference! Wanna bet it was added after the original document was delivered to whoever requested the study?
    13 Aug 2012, 01:19 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Wed. August 15th. Hug an Axionista day.

     

    http://bit.ly/Ocxrct
    12 Aug 2012, 12:25 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1506) | Send Message
     
    She doesn't seemed perplexed about being slimed by that ugly brute: there is hope for us.
    12 Aug 2012, 12:49 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    Like us, she's probably a bottom-feeder too and that's what she was hugging!

     

    HardToLove
    12 Aug 2012, 04:18 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    John, Just an FYI. East Penn was targeted to conclude their study with Sandia on "Carbon-Enhanced VRLA batteries" this month. (last page).

     

    http://1.usa.gov/QnO7y7

     

    The East Penn rep. in the Sandia study is Rod Shane is slated to present in Europe @ 13 ELBC with the topic being Ultrabattery uses. Maybe he'll talk carbon in some form? (pg 10)

     

    http://bit.ly/P5miha

     

    Anyway, Just another opportunity. You lucky dog! :)
    12 Aug 2012, 12:45 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    I expect there will be a lot of talk about carbon at the ELBC. I'll also be attending the DCA workshop on the 25th, which may be one of the most important pre-conference events in a long time. I expect this to be a very worthwhile trip ;-)
    12 Aug 2012, 12:51 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3332) | Send Message
     
    http://engt.co/ScgJJD

     

    Another sad Fisker episode... though may not implicate the battery..
    12 Aug 2012, 02:12 PM Reply Like
  • jpau
    , contributor
    Comments (714) | Send Message
     
    D'oh, you beat me 4..86
    12 Aug 2012, 02:21 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    It's a shame that Fisker is having these kinds of problems. I don't mind criticizing the sensibility of cars with plugs, but these kinds of defects can damage a company's brand and reputation for a very long time.
    12 Aug 2012, 02:25 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3332) | Send Message
     
    I'm with you there John. We should always keep in mind that many good and sincere people have put a lot of toil, sweat, time, money, and heart into these projects, in some measure because they thought they were pioneering something truly worthwhile. It's wrenching to watch whenever such dreams go up in smoke, but it's always the cosmic judge of nature who gets the final vote as to what works and what doesn't. Our fragile humanity is ever grist for the mill...
    12 Aug 2012, 02:44 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1506) | Send Message
     
    Make mental note not to park alongside a Fisker.
    12 Aug 2012, 10:07 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9597) | Send Message
     
    Metro: That's funny. But ya know what, there's a derivative element of truth to your comedy (that surely Vandi would appreciate). How many tow truck owners, wreckers, whatever we call them in the far parts of our land, are queasy at best about how they will rescue some, any lithium battery toting vehicle that has gotten into an accident.

     

    If I owned a tow truck, and a call came in about towing some T-boned Chevy, I would ask, "is it a Volt?"

     

    Lithium batteries are "somewhat" akin to weaponized ancient Greek fire; you can't put out either with water.

     

    Michael J. Crichton, a Sci-Fi writer, made good use of of Greek fire in his novel titled "Timeline."

     

    Surely some sci-fi novelist, maybe even the next James Bond movie, is working or themed on how lithium batteries, if integrated deeply into any grid, would somehow screw up the God-particle, or, that humongous lithium BYD plant in China. ;-)
    12 Aug 2012, 11:19 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1506) | Send Message
     
    Not good would be sitting in the living room eating popcorn while watching old Hogan's Heroes episodes at 4 o'clock in the morning with the new EV tied to the grid; to discover that the burning smell isn't the popcorn that you had slightly overdone, but is emitting from the garage.
    13 Aug 2012, 12:10 AM Reply Like
  • Deamiter
    , contributor
    Comments (158) | Send Message
     
    Just make sure you've got an explosive-bolt ejection system installed on the tow cable so when you see sparks in the mirrors, you can leave the problem on the highway.
    13 Aug 2012, 10:52 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    Metro: Just think what McGuyver would've done with those cars and batteries to extricate himself from another precarious predicament if they had been around in his day.

     

    HardToLove
    13 Aug 2012, 01:45 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    With all those expensive materials, he could have built a one man SST.
    13 Aug 2012, 02:09 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    John, I was thinking along the lines of an explosive device. Sort of a "FED" if you will - a Fisker Explosive Device.

     

    HardToLove
    13 Aug 2012, 02:28 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1506) | Send Message
     
    I was just thinking hypothetically that say you get an evening text from Elin Nordegren to go over to her Palm Beach mansion to share a bottle of champagne and you pull up into her circular driveway with your rusty non-repainted '91 Saturn S and park beside her Fisker. It would kind of put a damper on the evening as you would be so preoccupied with the well-being of the Saturn. Probably be better just to take a rain check.
    13 Aug 2012, 02:32 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    History would sway you toward the rain check anyway Metro.

     

    http://bloom.bg/O3a7em

     

    PS, The body panels were plastic and thus didn't rust. So ya can't blame it on a rusty car body.
    13 Aug 2012, 05:09 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1506) | Send Message
     
    "Hybridization" - hadn't thought of it in those terms.
    13 Aug 2012, 07:03 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    48, I always thought it was good engineering and not good enough engineering that came into play during development. Anyway, They will figure out the issue(s) and correct them. Unfortunately, as John has suggested, it will play on their reputation and the group as a whole. It will also probably prove one other thing that's been pointed out. Scale matters. Fisker may not be large enough to shoulder the pain during the learning curve. I heard somewhere that that's a Tesla risk factor!
    12 Aug 2012, 03:01 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    In my view the risk is an order of magnitude greater for Tesla because their resources are already stretched to the limit and their ramp rate is obscenely ambitious. The bi-plane is doing a power dive from 5,000 feet and planning on a pull out 15 feet above the tree-tops. There is no margin for error. Arrogance thy name is Elon.
    12 Aug 2012, 03:16 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3332) | Send Message
     
    Oh, I'm quite sure the cosmic judge weighs the engineering in quite heavily...
    12 Aug 2012, 03:44 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Lot's more metal on the way to chase a very small market.

     

    New electric cars face bleak prospects as Europe sales stumble

     

    http://bit.ly/Sct5S0?odyssey=mod|newswell|...
    12 Aug 2012, 04:05 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    (AXPW): 8/10/2012: EOD stuff, will be copied to my instablog later.
    # Trds: 39, MinTrSz: 100, MaxTrSz: 90000, Vol 353845, AvTrSz: 9073
    Min. Pr: 0.3024, Max Pr: 0.3100, VW Avg. Trade Pr: 0.3080
    # Buys, Shares: 25 111245, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.3087
    # Sells, Shares: 14 242600, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.3077
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 1:2.18 (31.4% “buys”), DlyShts 82200 (23.2%)

     

    Using my experimental charts I’m judging that consolidation continues nearing an end. The average short sales continues to drop (10-day average percentage now solidly below the 25-day average and looks to continue to move lower in relation to the 50 and 100-day averages). Meanwhile total trade volume seems to be hovering around the 50 and 100-day averages even as the 10 and 25-day averages are now above the 50-day and 100-day averages and the 50-day is above the 100-day as well.

     

    The four short sales averages are 20.87%, 26.41%, 25.47%, and 22.20%. The four average daily volume values are 371K, 415K, 305K, and 304K.

     

    The buy:sell ratio has been deteriorating, which should not be surprising as the Mega-C, Quercus (might be done now) and maybe some Blackrock shares have been released into the market. We know these folks are not price-sensitive and will sell at the bid very frequently. I will say that they seemed to have exhibited a tad more discipline as they are more often waiting for some rise in the bids before hitting it.

     

    The price has been quite stable since 8/2, staying at or above $0.30 on the low.

     

    Moreover, average trade sizes are holding fairly steady. This can be misleading as market activities can often take more than one reported trade to fill a given order, there are occasional “lures” and other “outliers”. As an example of this last, there were two trades (40K and 90K) far above the rest of the trade sizes. Taking these out would move average trade size to 6,050, roughly 50% below what I reported above. OTOH, there were a few which I could guess were a single trade and could bump the average up a few hundred shares if I combined them.

     

    Anyway, the 10, 25, 50 and 100-day averages are at 6,883, 7,598, 6,346, and 5,767 respectively. It should be noted that these numbers are substantially improved from the end of June when they were 4,357, 5,097, 5,131, and 4,698.

     

    From John’s tracking we are fairly certain that Quercus is about exhausted for this quarter and strongly suspect the Mega-C trustee is nearly done as well. I have surmised that the Mega-C shares are at a brokerage that doesn’t have ready access to the exchanges for their shares and so sales will appear in daily short sales along with any other folks. There’s also always some miscellaneous daily short sales that occur from normal market-maker activities handling orders for brokerage customers. Anyway, I believe the falling short sales strongly support John’s assessment that that Quercus is done (or very nearly so) and the Mega-C trustee is also nearly done. The wild-card would be Blackrock being in the market.

     

    I believe what we are seeing supports John’s contention about Quercus and the Mega-C trustee and I think confirmation of that will occur when a trend in short sales begins to flatten out and the buy:sell averages improve enough over time to stop the descent of the 10-day average that began the first week in July.

     

    WARNING! PURE UNADULTERATED OPTIMISM FOLLOWS!

     

    I believe this reversal will have it’s beginnings no later than 8/17 based my expectation of a positive, even if not stellar, quarterly report and positive comments during the conference call.

     

    HardToLove
    12 Aug 2012, 04:16 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2166) | Send Message
     
    iindelco, your link was munched by SA, try http://bit.ly/Sct5S1

     

    My favorite quote from the article:

     

    "Heylen does note one very successful electric car offshoot though.

     

    "There is a remarkable parallel and very flourishing market for subsidized support groups and websites, studies, forecast, symposia and so on. During the first three months of 2012 I counted 89 Electric Car Forums and Conferences with very high attendance fees. Prices for reports for forecast, studies etc increased from around 700 euros ($870) to around 3,000 euros ($3,700) today," Heylen said."

     

    And here on SA, we are just giving it for free! How can we monetize ourselves?
    12 Aug 2012, 04:17 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Rick, That's strange because I tried it and it works for me as does yours. Hmmm.

     

    As to monetizing the Axionista efforts. I think the majority of us are hoping investments will do that. (Imagine that, People who think they are going to make money in the battery sector!) In addition those with personal interests in the sector, while not actually equated in currency, are rewarded by the sharing on the site. Well maybe I can't speak for everyone else but I know I am.
    12 Aug 2012, 04:52 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2166) | Send Message
     
    <retroactive sarcasm alert>
    And here on SA, we are just giving it for free! How can we monetize ourselves? </alert>

     

    I certainly enjoy the sharing and learning, too. Hope the $$$ shows up some day...
    12 Aug 2012, 05:21 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2235) | Send Message
     
    Maybe we could release a "Best of SA's Axion Power Concentrator comments, insights, and complete AXPW daily stock trading analysis by Super-Star Trader HTL." as a DVD or download. Visa, Master, Paypal. Includes bonus Tesla (TSLA) Put trading strategies and analysis!
    12 Aug 2012, 09:13 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13442) | Send Message
     
    Some of us already discussed the idea of monetizing the instablogs, and SA had no interest (not a surprise, given the overall thrust of the site).
    13 Aug 2012, 11:55 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    "... analysis by Super-Star Trader HTL".

     

    We'll see about that.

     

    Added 35K at $0.301 in two trades and waiting for the last 5K. xxx<--fingers crossed. Since I started waiting for that 5K, 68.1K in ~10 trades went by at my price but none landed on my MM. :-((

     

    HardToLove
    13 Aug 2012, 01:49 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Sarcasm, Well who'da thunk it. I never use it myself so it's hard to recognize by the inexperienced! ;-)
    12 Aug 2012, 05:45 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2388) | Send Message
     
    As JP pointed out in

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    "The placement agents got 801,017 shares of stock as part of their fee and are precluded from selling before the end of July."

     

    (and HTL reiterated in
    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    )

     

    So my questions are:

     

    1) do we think they've already sold?

     

    2) when they do sell, do we think they would be disciplined sellers? Are they likely to use multiple market makers to sell? There was a point last week when I saw 5 different market sellers selling around .32

     

    3) would their sales would show up in the Short Data?

     

    4) might some of the shares recently sold we attributed to "maybe Blackrock" equally as likely have been from the placement agent?
    13 Aug 2012, 10:05 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    I put all those questions into the great mysteries of life category.

     

    Since the shares were part of the selling commission, I'd be surprised if the brokers decided to hold them for the long term. I'd also be surprised to see them dumping the shares out at a price below the offering. I thought we were seeing February flippers in the $0.42 range, but once the price dropped into the mid-$.30s my bet is the February buyers hit the sidelines because you can't buy for $.35, sell for $.32 and make it up on volume. Since the shares given to the brokers as compensation were registered, I wouldn't normally expect them to impact the short data.
    13 Aug 2012, 10:37 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    Special Sits reduced their holdings by 20% during Q2, going from 3,408,000 shares on March 31 (http://1.usa.gov/LUpyZv) to 2,608,000 on June 30 (http://1.usa.gov/RHnOod). To put that number in perspective, my tally of Quercus sales for Q2 was 690,000 shares. They're not particularly relevant numbers on their own, but they do help give us a better idea of where the shares came from.
    13 Aug 2012, 11:06 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >JP ... Special Sits has got about the strangest trading pattern in a stock I can remember seeing. They have to be playing this for the tax loss to cover other equities in their portfolio and hoping AXPW actually does something positive. Very odd.
    13 Aug 2012, 11:11 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    It's a puzzlement to me too DR, although the price was pretty solid in the low- to mid-$.40s until May 12th when somebody with a heavier hand started throwing their weight around.

     

    It really is a shame that Axion is not a stock that must be included in Rule 13(f) holdings reports which only require reporting of securities "that are admitted to trading on a national securities exchange or quoted on the automated quotation system of a registered securities association."
    13 Aug 2012, 11:23 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Or they have a puter that's just trading it. In such a case they don't really care what direction the stock goes in. All they want is noise. Although one would think they'd want more liquidity than this asset offers. Well, of late anyways.

     

    Hey, Maybe they have a giddy Granville algorithm and it's adjusting accordingly. Or they are an introverted bottom feeder and it's getting too crowded for their personality.
    13 Aug 2012, 11:23 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >JP & iindelco ... I would lay money on Special Sits blocking the pay window if something ... anything ... caused an upward bias to the stock. Does anyone one know if there is some legacy grudge component to SS?
    13 Aug 2012, 11:33 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1781) | Send Message
     
    Special Sits just can't seem to decide what they think about Axion. They drove the stock price down last year, dumping the stock as fast as they could, only to buy shares back this Spring. And now they are selling again.
    13 Aug 2012, 11:33 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    I've never met a fund manager that held a grudge, but I've met plenty who were opportunists and now that most of the weak hands are empty hands the environment for opportunism is more attractive.
    13 Aug 2012, 11:42 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    John, does that cause recalculation of the running totals you've been tracking?

     

    HardToLove
    13 Aug 2012, 02:31 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    I focus on broad supply and demand dynamics. That means it's almost impossible to tie things down to anything better than "give or take a million shares." If SS had sold half their position, for instance, I'd have been a good deal more concerned. Positions moving up or down 20% simply aren't enough to establish any patterns or justify any assumptions.
    13 Aug 2012, 02:39 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2557) | Send Message
     
    I have a pdf of the grant application uploaded.

     

    Unfortunately, later in the document it states "A technical memorandum summarizes SEPTA's chosen technologies from this project and is attached as an appendix to this application [memo was not attached]. Technologies include: lithium phosphate; lithium ion; nickel-metal-hydride; lithium iron phosphate; and lithium-titanate. SEPTA selected a lithium ion device for its pilot project and commits to selecting two alternative technologies for this project to allow for desired comparability."

     

    There was no mention of a lead carbon device being considered.
    If you send me a pm with an email address, I will email you a copy of the pdf.
    13 Aug 2012, 10:24 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1781) | Send Message
     
    Once again showing what happens when you plan for a renewable energies industry in your state but don't force the utilities to actually buy the more expensive power generated.

     

    http://bit.ly/OepNyf
    13 Aug 2012, 11:54 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    What's really sad is they have had wind and solar for many many years so they should have known to be more cautious. Oh, That's right, with scale those windmill costs will drop like a rock. Never mind the magnets, copper and steel. They should drop as well while the dollar appreciates due to our strong dollar policy!
    13 Aug 2012, 01:07 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2100) | Send Message
     
    Strange. I keep hearing that the cost of windy energy is now fully competitive with coal plants. The windmill makers looking for government subsidies say so!

     

    Good for Idaho for not pouring money into the myth of green energy. Businesses in Idaho, and any looking to relocate, should appreciate the low electricity cost.
    13 Aug 2012, 01:37 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2388) | Send Message
     
    To be fair, some of these plans nationwide were made before the US Natural Gas "glut" came along and helped drive the price of competition down. Not many saw that coming 5-6 years ago. They didn't see unprecedented droughts driving up corn and Ethanol prices either. Get enough drought and I suppose hydroelectric power gets more expensive (in terms of replacing its former level) as well.

     

    We're "fortunate" that Europe is so screwed up right now such that oil prices have moderated for the time being. Maybe we're "lucky" that (I'm guessing) uranium prices are down due to the Japan situation.

     

    And who knows what the true economic price of coal fired generation is, but I'm pretty sure Utilities (and of course their customers) haven't traditionally paid it. How much higher are all our insurance costs for treating respiratory related illnesses? Not to mention those that suffer that don't have insurance or can't afford or think twice about paying the Doctor Co-Pays or Medicine Co-Pays.

     

    I'm reminded of a friend who moved to the Chicago area from Canada, and was astounded how bad our roads are. The true costs of all the alignment and tire related repairs aren't included there either. Maybe it even affects the car you decide to purchase if replacing those kind of parts is particularly expensive on your preferred model. Even a car "tuned" for good roads could be a bad buy in the US.

     

    Not that I'm saying it's easy to compute these costs. Just that I think there's not much interest in even trying.
    13 Aug 2012, 02:06 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Don't worry WTB, We have an incredibly efficient and unselfish government doing cost/benefit analysis so you don't need to worry about it. They will make sure your portion of the redistribution is applied where it will do the most good.

     

    Here, In case you were thinking of buying a 25k USD E-bike. Maybe this will even get HTL to jump back on a green torque converter.

     

    Electric Bikes Get $2,500 Federal Tax Credit

     

    http://bit.ly/OUZk7A
    13 Aug 2012, 02:15 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    As much as I want to see us get more efficient, I will never take advantage of such a credit. It's theft to support social engineering. If there's anybody I don't want doing social engineering, it's out government. especially by making my neighbors suffer.

     

    The fact that their reduced resources and concomitant suffering are "hidden" doesn't change anything. To me, it's along the lines of the hidden costs mentioned in other threads on other topics.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    13 Aug 2012, 02:46 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    HLT, Your right but alas it happens all the time.

     

    BTW, I see you broke away from your all or none block strategy on your buy order today. I generally avoid these as they can be a burden on low volume trading stocks/days. Although with some stocks you can get burned with a commission for few shares.
    13 Aug 2012, 02:57 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    Yeah, I finally decided it was better to get some at what I thought was a great price rather than get none at what I thought was a great price.

     

    So no AorN today.

     

    HardToLove
    13 Aug 2012, 03:26 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Well, Even if you don't get it all you got a pretty good fill. I've had mm's give me one share (Yes that's right 1) without the AorN. Nice guys.
    13 Aug 2012, 03:31 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    Iindelco: something like that happend to me and I called ETrade and they refunded the fees. I told them I would be trying again and I got filled.

     

    Also, they bought my shares once when I was trying to sell because I watched T&S and knew that I was first in line and had qty that matched a bid.

     

    They didn't do it easily though - several phone calls, explanations, ..., The market was different back then IIRC. I doubt I could get that service today.

     

    HardToLove
    13 Aug 2012, 03:39 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    HTL, I get traded around weekly in pennies.

     

    I once had Fidelity give me a retroactive after the close trade because their service person would not put a trade through for me. He was confused about the rules between differing plans and I told him so during the recorded message. I was sorry to do it but there was a significant impact had it not been corrected.
    13 Aug 2012, 03:50 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Nissan Leaf Battery Pack Survives Massive Fire!

     

    http://bit.ly/PedzGV
    13 Aug 2012, 01:32 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1506) | Send Message
     
    "........it was ruled that interior trim pieces caught fire, not the battery,......."

     

    ...like the chrome attachment to the seat belt latch just suddenly underwent spontaneous combustion? Hmm, something about that doesn't seem quite right. Something had to cause the trim pieces to start burning.
    13 Aug 2012, 01:48 PM Reply Like
  • Rick Krementz
    , contributor
    Comments (2166) | Send Message
     
    metro, following the links, it appears that the Leaf suffered from " ...is strictly associated burn damage from a fire in Colorado". http://bit.ly/MXqPfd

     

    For a shouting headline about batteries, why is there no picture of the battery that "survived"? What, exactly, does survive mean in the context of a vehicle fire?

     

    Very poor article, nobody can verify if it was a Leaf or some other vehicle, when it happened, state of battery charge, nada.
    13 Aug 2012, 02:03 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    Well that's enough to make me feel all warm and fuzzy forever. Not!
    13 Aug 2012, 02:16 PM Reply Like
  • metroneanderthal
    , contributor
    Comments (1506) | Send Message
     
    Rick,
    It makes sense now, the occurrence, not the article.
    13 Aug 2012, 02:33 PM Reply Like
  • JohnM121
    , contributor
    Comments (359) | Send Message
     
    The comment from "Staff" indicates that it is written by a member of the cult. In the age of news to confirm existing beliefs, don't expect details that contradict dogma. This is an engineering problem. But if too many version 0.1 pre-alpha prototypes are on the road before they become commercialization, there will be a public backlash that will damage the cause for 20 years.

     

    "Was not our intention for anything to be taken too seriously on this one. We love plug-in electric cars (obviously), we follow them, live them 24-7."
    13 Aug 2012, 02:34 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    Rick: too much critical thinking is not good for the MSM ... or the masses either I guess.

     

    HardToLove
    13 Aug 2012, 02:51 PM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (971) | Send Message
     
    "For a bargain to soar in price, there has to be a catalyst...that catalyst is change. Whatever the change may be, it must have a significant impact within a country or an industry, and it must also be recognized as significant externally within a few years. If the change is real, others will notice the improvement, and prices will rise to reflect the new circumstances. New investors will catch on and prices can rise considerably for years."

     

    Jim Rogers

     

    A familiar AXPW ring?...hope so!
    13 Aug 2012, 03:18 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    magounsq, I'm a real Jim Rogers fan.

     

    Hope he's wrong on occasion about the "within a few years part". Although AXPW has been developmental and is just looking to scale so I guess we're OK under this rule of thumb.
    13 Aug 2012, 03:35 PM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (971) | Send Message
     
    iinelco

     

    "...so I guess we're OK under this rule of thumb."
    That was my thinking...is has been "a few years".
    13 Aug 2012, 09:17 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1781) | Send Message
     
    You've gotta love Tesla. Musk makes the following statement and the stock goes up over $31/share.

     

    "Tesla Motors, Inc. (NASDAQ:TSLA) could face its most difficult times during the next six months. Tesla CEO Elon Musk admitted at the National Clean Energy Summit last week in Las Vegas, and he stated: “The challenge that Tesla faces over the next few months is scaling production enough to achieve a certain gross margin on our product so we can be cash flow positive. That’s extremely important. If we’re unable to do that, we’ll enter the grave yard with all the other car company startups of the last 90 years.” The shares traded up $0.65 (2.17%) recently at $30.59.
    13 Aug 2012, 03:22 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    LabTech: Options expiration week effect is all that price is today.

     

    Still low volume. If I can time it right, I'll scare some more puts at near the peak this week.

     

    HardToLove
    13 Aug 2012, 03:29 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    That may well be the scariest CEO quote of all time.
    14 Aug 2012, 11:38 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9597) | Send Message
     
    Mario Battero, of Rosewater, emailed me and said the website is currently being updated, with new resi-cube pictures, etc., and will give me a heads up when the updating is complete.

     

    Just in time for...

     

    Looks like I will be attending the Cedia Show in Indy next month.

     

    Anyone else going?
    13 Aug 2012, 03:35 PM Reply Like
  • runSILVERrun
    , contributor
    Comments (44) | Send Message
     
    Hello to all who bow down to Axion. I had to get out for a while as i did not see it going anywhere and lo and behold i was right. I was out at $.38 so after my little sabbatical I am back in just before the close today at a smidgen below $.31. I am hoping for something positive in the news and perhaps a rebound back up near $.40 relatively soon. Is that realistic? I know this bull has been sleeping a while but I gotta believe if the Axion stock is going to move at all it should be soon. Hope I'm right.
    13 Aug 2012, 04:07 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Actually I was hoping TG would announce something before earnings. Can't get much quieter that's for sure.

     

    TG announcing something would get him an official "Tom Terrific" badge. Actually the theme should not be that he can become many things but that he can improve many things.

     

    http://bit.ly/PeCk63
    13 Aug 2012, 04:18 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Fisker Statement: Karma batteries not to blame for fire

     

    http://aol.it/NupYop
    13 Aug 2012, 05:47 PM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (971) | Send Message
     
    Interesting NPR Podcast...A123...Lithi... Sodaway (MIT) - Ethan Zindler (Bloomberg) question Li costs/timing etc.
    Both accent energy storage need (stationary grid storage).
    Long interview...these 2 start at 12 minute mark.
    At 30 minute mark, gets more interesting...Reference made to IEEE Real Time Conference
    June 11‐12, 2012 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory...DOE annual conference..."...conse... is Li car market will not make it..."

     

    China & U.S. Battery Technology

     

    http://bit.ly/PffoVz
    13 Aug 2012, 10:06 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >magounsq ... The question in my mind concerning A123 is this. Our FED has pumped $12T dollars into our financial sector. Why, out of the roughly 400k actual people that have been the beneficiary of this taxpayer largess, is there no American industrial interest in saving our American IP & jobs?

     

    There certainly seems to be no lack of interest in receiving even more welfare or spending that money on speculation in food & oil or derivatives gambling. No appetite for economic growth speculation just goes against the fictional corporate PR line of entrepreneurship and disdain for government handouts.
    13 Aug 2012, 11:05 PM Reply Like
  • Mathieu Malecot
    , contributor
    Comments (966) | Send Message
     
    i don't get the bailout either. http://bit.ly/PlOXKD
    14 Aug 2012, 12:21 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >Mathieu Malecot ... I understand & even approve of some bailouts. The seemingly hated GM bailout made good strategic sense (if you believe in domestic security) because the entire auto industry was facing the same problem A123 is today ... no American private sector bid. It would have been the complete collapse of the entire industry in the USA because there wasn't a foreign bidder either. At least A123 has the Chinese and it will probably workout a lot like the Japanese did buying every scrap of real estate they could get their hands on 30 years ago.

     

    Throwing money down a rat hole to make sure bond holders don't have to mark to market and unreserved derivatives don't get triggered ... I have different view on that.
    14 Aug 2012, 12:48 AM Reply Like
  • Mathieu Malecot
    , contributor
    Comments (966) | Send Message
     
    all i know is that bank assets remain a mystery and rather than shed light on it, governments prefer to help bury the rot on the books.

     

    ironically real savings in real dollars continue to lose value so more money can pass through enough hands. that seems to be the growth we are looking for.

     

    if you are going to throw tax money at companies, at least develop a manufacturing base that has some moat - like semiconductor manufacture...
    14 Aug 2012, 01:24 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    8/13/2012: EOD stuff.
    # Trds: 41, MinTrSz: 100, MaxTrSz: 12525, Vol 184415, AvTrSz: 4498
    Min. Pr: 0.3000, Max Pr: 0.3085, Min. Pr: 0.3000, Max Pr: 0.3085
    # Buys, Shares: 13 28450, VW Avg Buy Pr: 0.3069
    # Sells, Shares: 28 155965, VW Avg Sell Pr: 0.3013
    # Unkn, Shares: 0 0, VW Avg Unk. Pr: 0.0000
    Buy:Sell 1:5.48 (15.43% “buys”), DlyShts 39200 (21.26%)

     

    Price compression continues.

     

    Most notable today was the buy:sell ratio, which is the fourth lowest I’ve recorded since I started tracking 2/6/2012. But it doesn’t concern me as I was expecting heavy selling based on JP’s estimates that the Mega-C shares should be nearing an end. My thinking is when there’s not much left to sell, price is less significant since fewer shares times a fraction of a penny is much less money in the seller’s eyes and likely not worth haggling over. That’s why when I saw the bid frozen at $0.30 early today, I popped mine in at $0.301, figuring I had a good chance to fill. I also broke the order into two tranches, 15K and 25K, so that I didn’t present excessive demand. It was worth eating the second transaction fee. I got all but 5K filled.

     

    The second notable thing was the relatively low daily short sales percentage, considering the obvious selling that was going on, suggested by the price action and buy:sell ratio. The average since I began tracking is 22.3% and the median is 19.9%. So the percentage came in much lower than I would have expected under these circumstances, unless ...

     

    Two easy scenarios: I think Quercus and Blackrock were not in - their certificate conversion would generate short sales flags - and (apparently?) the Mega-C shares trustee was a little light today as it has been my best guess in the past that they caused short sales, it appearing their broker can’t easily transfer shares into a market-maker’s books; the market-makers may have been covering prior short sales as the price(s) became attractive and subsequently the shares flowing in from those prior sell orders were darn near “free” and could be sold into the market at a low price to make still more profit.

     

    Based on John’s post today about Special Situations, a third possibility presents: Special Situations could be selling and I’m guessing that they have well-established relationships with one or more brokerages that are holding their shares. I’d also guess that the makers they use have their own, or ready access to, market-makers such that shares could be easily placed into market-maker portfolios, thereby obviating the need for flagging the SS sales as shorts. I wouldn’t be surprised if they were selling now as the reduction in share count reported in John’s comment,

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    occurred when price was dropping from around $0.44x down to around $0.34 and even lower during that period. But we have no way to know if they are still selling or not.

     

    Regarding the “strange” behavior of Special Situations, they are acting a lot like “swing traders”. Dumped out Q4 of ‘11 (maybe some tax reasons too?), helping to create extreme lows, bought back in at or near those lows in Q1 ‘12, began selling near the highs around (after?) EOM March. If they are astute “swing traders”, they ought to start buying again around this price level, IMO.

     

    In spite of all this, today price stayed at or above $0.30 yet again. And the early bids for $0.30 from four(?) different market makers presenting “standard” sizes remained throughout the day. We don’t really know the size of that support because the “standard” blocks hide the real volume behind those bids.

     

    Average trade sizes appear to be stabilizing as the general trend lower has subsided and early moves slightly higher have occurred. Volume is hanging in and daily FINRA-reported short sales continue to trend lower.

     

    HardToLove
    14 Aug 2012, 01:29 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >Mathieu Malecot ... I think if your going to build a manufacturing base it should first be a sustainable one that services local, regional & national needs to cut down on the dependance of debt financed importation. Walmart shoppers & multi-nationals would disagree but ... eh.
    14 Aug 2012, 02:03 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3332) | Send Message
     
    I love Rick Scantelli, but from the present vantage point, I wish they *had* just paid off half of everyone's mortgage. sigh.
    14 Aug 2012, 03:55 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    IIRC, there were several discussions by folks on CNBC and in print (blogs?) that pointed out how much better off we'd be if that money was just divied up and given to every man, woman and child.

     

    It would get spent, pay of mortgages, other debts, increase GDP via velocity of money and all those folks could qualify for new loans.

     

    Might have taken down a few miscreant banks, but that couldn't be a bad thing from what we've learned since. Not as good as perp walks, but some executive suites would have to buy more reasonably priced furniture and maybe take smaller bonuses.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    14 Aug 2012, 09:43 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >48108 & HTLove ... I've thought a lot about and read a mountain of info on this very topic. The money we've spent could have gone to nearly pay-off the entire USA mortgage market but that wasn't the problem and do so would have exposed the problem. It really seems that mortgage default was only the trigger. The market that blew up was the dark pools of the shadow banking system derivatives. The ones that were not held by people with any "skin in the game".

     

    Paying off MBS would have destroyed that market by forcing unreserved derivatives to mark-to-market with the accompanying destruction of leverage and the banks were (and still are) totally against this. TARP forced the FED's hand to pay the banks face value and allow the derivative market to run out. If only the banks had plowed that money back into the real economy, but they didn't it went into EU bond derivatives (again with no reserve requirements).

     

    This market was $500T then & $750T today. As long as these instruments are considered assets for repo (look at JPM, it hold 5x derivatives to what you & I would consider assets) we're screwed. Until the public sector has absorbed all the risk it can stand and collapse, I think the game is for the private sector or escape their debt and wind up with the world's hard assets to-boot. The thing I think is morbidly humorous is the public is convinced that the financial sector's pawning-off of its risk is the result of over spending when it's seemingly just a thaw in the credit market and a freezing of the real economy.

     

    Welcome to 4th Annual Zombieland Games. Maps & programs are available at the concession stand. Can't pick-out the players without a program. Enjoy.
    14 Aug 2012, 10:16 AM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (971) | Send Message
     
    DRich

     

    The thrust of my point was the continuing/growing theme of energy storage...lithium ion losing due to cost and timing...and the quote by Sadaway from the Conference with DOE..."...the consensus is the lithium ion car market will not make it...".
    But...my point might have been lost due to the length of the program.

     

    The program did have a heavy discussion re A123 and subsidy...open argument there in my mind.
    14 Aug 2012, 11:13 AM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (971) | Send Message
     
    DRich

     

    Going OT but I'll just post this.
    IMHO...financial bailout was necessary for your GM rationale...strategic.... (international) security/financial stability(as is were).
    Having said that, the financial industry/pols leadership failed to pay the full price and be fully accountable.
    Arguably, I'm not convinced a GM and A123 bailout was/is necessary.

     

    "... no American industrial interest in saving our American IP & jobs?"...not with the current political leadership...falls on both parties.

     

    At this point in time it would be curious if a foreign company would jump on AXPW...THAT would bother me!
    14 Aug 2012, 11:32 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >magounsq ... Fair enough. You'll get little argument from me as to whether Li-on in autos will succeed ... I don't see it. I do see value in the Li-on industry and I wonder why our USA *entrepreneur class* doesn't (and only engages in financial engineering instead of investment). If it takes the Chinese are willing to engage in economic activity ... god bless the commies.

     

    Our USA private financial sector just pisses me off with their surviving on welfare.
    14 Aug 2012, 11:34 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >magounsq ... The "strategic" part of the GM bailout was more a defense (as in DOD) issue than financial. Though the 2 are inseparable on many stages. I view very little through the political lens that most of y'all seem to think matters so much because the politics is such a lagging motivation. Politics is a good tool to divide & distract but by the time most issues of economic import come to light & public conscience ... it is a settled outcome and doesn't matter.
    14 Aug 2012, 02:23 PM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (971) | Send Message
     
    DRich

     

    "...I do see value in the Li-on industry ..."
    That is what I am more curious about as we go forward.
    I tire of the incessant pro/defensive EV/Li comments without value added.
    When the paint is finally dry re AXPW, non EV/Li something I'd like to explore further.
    14 Aug 2012, 04:29 PM Reply Like
  • Stefan Moroney
    , contributor
    Comments (2557) | Send Message
     
    hmm ... don't like the sound of that.

     

    http://bit.ly/TAN4wo
    13 Aug 2012, 11:13 PM Reply Like
  • 42itus1
    , contributor
    Comments (214) | Send Message
     
    Again, I say: Stop-start is in its infancy, European implementation of stop-start is still just acclimating drivers to this new tech, And I don't believe the U.S. will accept stop-start implementation as a means of attaining CAFE standards until/unless it is essentially full time and the whole of the system is robust enough to demonstrably last as long as other emissions components are required to last.
    I do believe stop-start will be implemented in the U.S. market in a big way, but there are hurdles yet to be tamed and AXION's battery will be a part of that. It is not AXION that has been slow evolving their product, rather the industry has been aiming in too many directions to hit the target and thus has missed what AXION can bring to the challenge.
    14 Aug 2012, 12:51 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    Based on announced automaker production plans Lux is forecasting ±2 million new micro-hybrids in the US in 2014; ±4 million in 2015 and ±8 million in 2017. The technology will go from 0% of the new car fleet today to 40% of the new car fleet in 5 years.

     

    Recent forecasts from JCI reach the same conclusion.

     

    The key point to remember is that it takes years of planning and supply chain preparation for the auto industry to implement any new technology.

     

    It's all happening at a level that isn't obvious to consumers because the products aren't on the showroom floor yet; but the micro-hybrids are coming.

     

    These decisions are not being driven by consumer choice. They're being driven by CAFE standards that require fleet average economy to ramp from 30.5 mpg for the 2013 MY to 34.1 mpg for the 2016 MY.

     

    It will be a classic disruptive technology. Cheap and easy at the beginning with poor performance that rapidly improves to displace more expensive technology.
    14 Aug 2012, 01:57 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    Stefan: I actually like it. Since the s/s is regulation-driven, if wholesale disabling of the function occurs, it will get the attention of regulators. The auto companies know this.

     

    They should be more likely to take a look at the better solution that *could* be available fairly quickly with just a word or two to their major battery suppliers.

     

    Any failure of existing systems to perform as designed opens the door a smidgen wider for AXPW.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    14 Aug 2012, 09:54 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    HTL, I think it's a positive sign as well. For me SS will not be a viable technology until it's pretty much invisible to the driver. From all my snooping around this is not the case with BMW's system. How can it be? They already appear to have a less than robust energy storage system. Keep adding more electrical features and SS with it's added drive by wire features and an electrical pump for automatic transmissions is just an added stress on a system that has already been compromised. Even more notable as it's an upscale nameplate.

     

    Their dreams are ahead of their available energy wallet. This is a sign that they broke the bank.

     

    BTW, For clarity sake, SS is not advantageous for CAFE standards in the US based on the current test standards. The plot starts to thicken when you begin to read about how the EPA is starting to sniff around with their GHG magnifying glass. They have not chimed in yet but they have reported that they are looking at it.
    14 Aug 2012, 10:23 AM Reply Like
  • 42itus1
    , contributor
    Comments (214) | Send Message
     
    With a good morning stretch it seems you are agreeing with my premise that stop-start is still in its infancy by your statement;

     

    "It's all happening at a level that isn't obvious to consumers because the products aren't on the showroom floor yet; but the micro-hybrids are coming."

     

    And my point that the industry [automotive] has been all over the map with various iterations of stop-start implementations, with none seeming to hit the mark, so far, is because;

     

    "The key point to remember is that it takes years of planning and supply chain preparation for the auto industry to implement any new technology."

     

    So my key points are still that:
    Automotive OEM's are the bottle neck to stop-start implementation, not AXION.
    CAFE standards are the driving force for stop-start implementation,
    but I know of NO government adoption of testing standards or protocols that would allow manufacturers to utilize stop-start fuel/emission improvements to meet the CAFE standaeds. Lacking such mechanisms there is little incentive to the manufacturers or final consumers to adopt and pay a premium for stop-start implementation. My question then becomes; Has there been any ACTUAL/TANGIBLE progress in U.S. adoption of stop-start strategies as being applicable to the new CAFE standards?

     

    Since I expect that adoption of such standards and testing protocols will seperate the wheat from the chaff, will require robust designs that last 5 years, and not be optional (on-off switch or reprograming) I believe that the PbC battery will be a key beneficiary. Lacking such adoption/acceptence of stop-start as applicable to the CAFE standards would relegate stop-start to a minor note in the evolution of automobiles and the PbC role in automotive virtually negligible. All of the studies, LUX, JCI, all presume the adoption of such standards in the calculations of their forcasts.
    I know that my posts aren't as good at sniping alternate energy platforms as many on the APC, but I sure hope that the two key obstacles to AXION's success in automotive ---- being the confused auto OEM strategies, and the lack of U.S. government acceptance of stop-start as an efficiency enhancement worthy of inclusion when testing fuel efficiency (thus helping to meet the new CAFE standards) --- can be understood as an area of concern that is greater than how fast the Gen 2 line is cranking!
    14 Aug 2012, 10:30 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2388) | Send Message
     
    Interesting discussion. One size fits all doesn't really work here.

     

    I know we have City and Highway mileage results reported, but I have no idea what kind of city is "programmed."

     

    I am reminded of really big city (with so many people compressed in a relatively small space) mayors like Bloomberg of NYC has a really different take on issues than others. Could you imagine if the mayors or our biggest cities banded together and starting penalizing/taxing vehicles that didn't have working (and that continues to work) start-stop systems?

     

    Maybe they start with the taxis?!

     

    Maybe we need another Vani with some political chops for both Start-Stop and for SEPTA like projects all over the country that focuses on big cities. Or hell, just start with NYC.
    14 Aug 2012, 10:50 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    WTB: If the mayors tried that the push-back would be incredible as the Feds, the state, ... claimed dominion over that stuff and the automakers complained about too many local standards.

     

    Keep in mind that the POTUS just signed an executive order that gives control of *everything* to federal agencies "in case of emergency".

     

    Think there's any chance they'll let anyone usurp that under any conditions, emergency or not?

     

    HardToLove
    14 Aug 2012, 11:11 AM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Posted before but for reference. Section 2.x addresses CO2 emissions during idle. SS addressed. Ultimately it's still an open issue.

     

    http://1.usa.gov/Nh62oq
    14 Aug 2012, 11:42 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    It's probably worth remembering that the Final Rule Release for the April 2010 CAFE standards included a table that predicted 39% stop start penetration by 2016.

     

    http://bit.ly/nCsiif

     

    As far as the regulators are concerned, stop-start is already baked into the cake and any implementation slowdown would be viewed as big-time back-pedaling.
    14 Aug 2012, 12:04 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    I suspect how close they will come to their penetration prediction will end up being supported by how the system is qualified/quantified which is not yet fully defined by the various government agencies. Thus far the test cycles utilized by the US government to determine CAFE mileage do not reward SS in the city or the highway test cycles. Thus it is not supportive in helping to achieve their predictions for implementation.

     

    As an aside. Boy, It seems at least one party does not want to wait around to see the Q2 earnings release.
    14 Aug 2012, 01:08 PM Reply Like
  • 42itus1
    , contributor
    Comments (214) | Send Message
     
    Yeah, like we've never seen big time back pedaling from government or manufacturers before!

     

    But the regulators are assuming a cake that rises, not one that resemles a pancake. The automotive OEM's are not creating a product that matches the regulators expectations of robustness, and simple implementation. The regulators don't allow me to turn off my emissions control apparatus or even modify my exhaust system, and they expect the emission components to last at least five years. The stop-start systems we have all read about don't seem to meet those standards.
    The chart of manufacturers implementation HOPES were best guesses at the time and now the putzes seem to be trying to see how little they can get away with in terms of robustness/simplicity/... and that strategy seems to be keeping the "other" regulators skeptical of adopting the standards that would make stop-start a real competitor.

     

    Until stop-start is formalized to meet the CAFE standards, there is no reason understandable to the auto OEM's to use an AXION battery. (You would think customer satisfaction alone would have greater standing, but todays retail is approached differently from common sense!)
    14 Aug 2012, 01:22 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    It strikes me as the kind of "get this darned file off my desk" behavior one sees when a bankruptcy trustee sets out to sell 2 million shares and only has a few hundred thousand left to go.

     

    Total trading volume since July 6th has been 9.6 million shares. If the bankruptcy trustee was the only seller during that period he'd probably be out by now, but with Quercus selling some shares and perhaps others, I don't think the trustee is out of the game yet. Soon, but not yet.
    14 Aug 2012, 01:24 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    Well, It's actually interesting because you have the regulators that would like to see reduced pollution in densely populated areas. They spend tons of US tax dollars in both grants and legislation targeting reductions in these areas. On the other hand you have the battery makers that are just chomping at the bit hoping for broad scale adoption of an energy storage solution that delivers far higher margins to their bank account at the expense of the consumer. The battery suppliers want a just good enough solution or it hurts them significantly. In between you have an automaker taking all the risk of delivering a solution in an attempt to satisfy regulators at the risk of fewer sales due to higher prices and a not quite durable enough solution which will upset consumers.

     

    At least I can't fault the US regulators for going the path of the Europeans and to a lesser extent the Japanese. The consumer is surely not getting value for their money. We'll see how it plays out in automotive.
    14 Aug 2012, 02:10 PM Reply Like
  • 42itus1
    , contributor
    Comments (214) | Send Message
     
    iindelco, Thanks, once more, for this link. Hope this gets resolved soon, so as to justify my "Bottom Feeding".
    14 Aug 2012, 04:49 PM Reply Like
  • iindelco
    , contributor
    Comments (8848) | Send Message
     
    42itus1, I think the EPA might apply some pressure for sure. We shall see.

     

    I don't predict timing, magnitude or direction of stock prices so as a fellow bottom feeder I'll will just have to wait like everyone else to see what's on the other end of the line. Some will choose to spit the hook. Maybe I'll spit as well at some point.

     

    I suspect I've got something on the line. Perhaps it's Blue Fin or maybe Blue Gill or Bell Bottom Blues? We'll get another sign soon enough.

     

    http://bit.ly/NilVLa
    14 Aug 2012, 05:11 PM Reply Like
  • runSILVERrun
    , contributor
    Comments (44) | Send Message
     
    I have been reading this Concentrator for months. The confidence in this group regarding the stock is admirable but for someone not a member of the "force' behind this blog, I am only wondering where the optimism comes from. The company has shown promise for a long time but it has to be frustrating to see 30 cents a share bounce to 34, back to 30 and return to the other side of the ping pong table over and over again. Certainly a run to 40 or 50 cents will make for a true celebration but is that a realistic range in say the next 6 months????
    14 Aug 2012, 02:20 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    In most cases, stock price is a fairly accurate proxy for the value of a business. In Axion's case the price mechanism has been broken since April 2010 because a few large holders have tried to force more shares into the market than the market could possibly digest. Those selling decisions had nothing to do with business fundamentals and everything to do with the particular circumstances of the holders themselves.

     

    Trailing twelve month volume was 4.1 million shares in August 2009, 13.9 million shares in August 2010, 58.2 million shares in August 2011 and 77.6 million shares today. The growth was driven by selling pressure and the only buyers were bottom feeders.

     

    The number of shares remaining in the hands of legacy holders is dwindling rapidly because most of them are already out of stock. When the willing sellers are gone, the only holders that can feed the market will be the bottom feeders who've been buying over the last two years. While many would smile at a bounce into the $.50 range, it's hard to read this concentrator for long and identify many people who'd be interested in selling at that price.

     

    Supply and demand inflections are rare, but they're beautiful things to behold.
    14 Aug 2012, 02:54 AM Reply Like
  • runSILVERrun
    , contributor
    Comments (44) | Send Message
     
    "While many would smile at a bounce into the $.50 range, it's hard to read this concentrator for long and identify many people who'd be interested in selling at that price."

     

    True but if I was able to nearly double my investment, especially in a short amount of time, I would consider selling. With that said, I'd likely get my principle back and go on the free ride to profits from that point on.
    14 Aug 2012, 09:05 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    That's a perfectly rational trading approach and functional markets couldn't exist without hot money that's willing to trade in and out for modest advantage.

     

    Stocks like Axion don't generally appeal to hot money because they have a nasty tendency to stay in a narrow price range for longer than most traders can tolerate. So instead of investing for a percentage gain, investors who are drawn to stocks like Axion tend to invest for a time horizon that's usually long to start with and tends to stretch with performance. Longer term investors tend to take their money out of the game after 300% to 400%, but they'll ride the wave for a very long time once they've gotten their bait back.
    14 Aug 2012, 09:25 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2388) | Send Message
     
    Suspect there will some of us with core and trading positions. If one assumes any really big auto related news is at least 9 months away (wild guess) and you "know" a financing is coming sooner, you might let portions of your trading position go as the price hits certain levels on the way up.

     

    Even good news on the NSC OTR front may be a selling opportunity for a trading block, especially if you either know from the release or suspect that NSC is going to have a distressingly long (to us) "fleet testing" period before signing a significant long term contract.

     

    Even though many of us may be happy to have built our position fully (or way past full!), I suspect some of feel like smucks to have known that the last financing was coming and have held everything through it. I'm not sure so many of us will do that again, especially if Special Situations still seems to be hanging around being unpredictable.
    14 Aug 2012, 10:27 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    WTB: good thoughts and, as I and others have made public, we do have trading blocks. Opportunity cost, to me, is an important consideration and I view my trading blocks as a "compounding" strategy that overcomes part of the opportunity cost.

     

    Fortunately, (I think), most of us will be disciplined sellers that will not hammer the prices, unlike some of the more distressed folks that have been buzzing around likes flies around a POS.

     

    This will make for a "healthy" market that will have normal ups and downs allowing many more to do well, over the long haul.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    14 Aug 2012, 10:48 AM Reply Like
  • runSILVERrun
    , contributor
    Comments (44) | Send Message
     
    Your patience with this one is admirable. How long will that patience last? I would think this stock should at the very least move its way out of the 30s and get back tot he 40s where it resided for quite a while in the recent past.
    15 Aug 2012, 08:26 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    I can't speak for anybody else, but patience is a virtue that's forced on larger holders by circumstances. It's easy to trade nimbly in and out of a small position and shave a few cents here and there. If I tried to play that game with 1.5 million shares, or for that matter if a substantial number of Axionistas with larger positions tried to play that game, the impact on the market could be significant and might very well make a bad situation worse. I bought my ticket for this movie and I'm not leaving until my goals are reached or the credits roll.
    15 Aug 2012, 08:36 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    And, as I suspected, your former persona begins to emerge.

     

    HardToLove
    15 Aug 2012, 11:32 AM Reply Like
  • Articula
    , contributor
    Comments (245) | Send Message
     
    John I thought you were going to say that's a perfectly rational approach but some of us Axionistas have been deemed irrational from time to time :)
    14 Aug 2012, 09:47 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    Irrational is in the eye of the beholder. It all depends on your personal experience. I'm an elephant hunter and upside targets of less than 5x to 10x don't hold my interest for long. I can't have that upside without assuming the risk of wash out. In the first half of my career the losses outnumbered the gains but the total was positive. I learned way more from losing than I did from winning. As a result, I haven't suffered a big loss since '98 when I bit off more than I could chew with a software company. Delays are always painful, but they're also part of the process.
    14 Aug 2012, 10:14 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    I think I'll get P.O.'d at VFinance (MM VFIN) - they're the ones that got my shares yesterday at $0.301 (ETrade should have routed me to another market if they couldn't get the job done - not surprising they didn't) and today there's VFIN again with 100K bid at $0.301.

     

    Oh well, sincerest form of flattery and all that.

     

    HardToLove
    14 Aug 2012, 10:08 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    Well, got my 5K at $0.301. I did it not only because that was my target, but I wanted to take out that 5.5xK ARCA offer and let the next higher one come into play.

     

    :-))

     

    HardToLove
    14 Aug 2012, 10:50 AM Reply Like
  • RBrun357
    , contributor
    Comments (797) | Send Message
     
    H.T. I think you should keep on buying and taking out more of them!

     

    Keep up the good work, please know that we appreciate you!
    14 Aug 2012, 10:57 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    RBrun357: I'd like to but my remaining dry powder has another target in its sights.

     

    HardToLove
    14 Aug 2012, 11:45 AM Reply Like
  • Articula
    , contributor
    Comments (245) | Send Message
     
    The gravy train that is TSLA? :)
    14 Aug 2012, 11:50 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    Articula: nope! It's going in my favor today and I only wanted to add if it acted irrationally again.

     

    (CPST) for a trade if it goes under $1 in the next week or so. I think it will and I need to get a target price lined up.

     

    HardToLove
    14 Aug 2012, 11:55 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >H.T.Love ... I've been watching Capstone(CPST) and wondering where it might bottom out. My bottom-feeding range is $0.65 to $0.85 but that is a dire area to target and I can't nail down a finer tuned price. I've been having the same broad range problem with many of these AltEnergy stocks like Active Power (ACPW). U.S Geothermal is as close to an absolute bottom as any I follow and looks a lot like Axion.
    14 Aug 2012, 12:03 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    DRich: If I find anything with conviction, I'll holler. The $0.8x range looks very possible and reasonable. The $0.6x I'm thinking is less likely because all the metrics *except* the important one has 17 quarters, IIRC, of improvement. So it's a matter of time if they've again found religion (worship at "The Church of Manage to Cash Flow"). Comments in the last CC made me think they had returned to the church. If so, they'll stop missing and start beating.

     

    Anyway, shorts and MMs control it, so it's dicey sometimes trying to play for a very short-term trade.

     

    Anyway, I'll post (cautiously) if and when.

     

    HardToLove

     

    EDIT: My last play ended up being good only for lunch money as it hit my entry point but the charts told me no strength on the move up, so I took an early exit.
    14 Aug 2012, 12:14 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13442) | Send Message
     
    Axion back in the $.2x's...

     

    Bottom feeder alert.

     

    Dinner is served.

     

    Fear and loathing in front of the report and CC...
    14 Aug 2012, 01:27 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13442) | Send Message
     
    Adding some tidbits cheap today...
    14 Aug 2012, 01:50 PM Reply Like
  • JohnM121
    , contributor
    Comments (359) | Send Message
     
    I call it capitulation. The worst that I expect is nothing. I like my catfish blackened.
    14 Aug 2012, 01:51 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    JohnM: Volume seems to support that - already over the 50 and 100-day averages. Almost double yesterday's and above Friday's.

     

    HardToLove
    14 Aug 2012, 01:58 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    I'm not paying attention, so I'll ask. Any really large blocks going by or it all just retail?
    14 Aug 2012, 02:01 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17298) | Send Message
     
    DRich: a 100K went and what I think were larger blocks (based on trading same price same or *very* near each other in seconds) also.

     

    Right now, even not adjusting anything, our average trade size is 7,990, which is above all four averages I track (10,25, 50, 100) of 6850, 7292, 6365, and 5770 respectively.

     

    HardToLove

     

    EDIT: And recent action has bids rising rather than asks falling. Now $0.2975/$0.30 5K/5Kx2 *presented*.
    14 Aug 2012, 02:12 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29568) | Send Message
     
    It started the day with a 100,000 share block followed another in the 50,000 range. Currently there's just a single 30,000 share block showing, but my time and trade data just has the last 30 transactions. Most of the recent trading has been retail sized 5s and 10s.
    14 Aug 2012, 02:13 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1781) | Send Message
     
    DRich,
    A couple larger blocks filled in by some normal retail ones. Looks like the usual, I'm expecting nothing from the CC, so I'm going to sell some blocks and see if the price goes down after the CC so I can buy them back cheaper kind of action. But there's still 2 hrs until the close, so who knows what will happen in the last 30 minutes. Sellers seem to love to dump Axion just before and after the CC.
    14 Aug 2012, 02:12 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    Thanks all for the info. No time today to watch the tape.
    14 Aug 2012, 03:27 PM Reply Like
  • Axion Power Host
    , contributor
    Comments (430) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Onward to the next APC...

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...
    14 Aug 2012, 02:15 PM Reply Like
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