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Trade stocks by day, and at night am writing a historical epic about the ancient Mayan civilization. "Maya: Spirits Of The Jaguar" is a sweeping saga set in the ancient and magical Mayan landscape where a wronged family struggles against prophecy, power, treachery and forbidden love,... More
  • Axion Power Concentrater 13: Beginning Sept. 26, 2011  145 comments
    Sep 26, 2011 5:51 PM
    PLEASE NOTE! I haven't a clue as to why what I wrote got so badly broken up in translating from the draft to the published post. I tried to fix it, but it turned out even worse. I guess there must be some "gap script" monitor that fouls things up.

    It's what I get for working for a couple of hours, when I should be out gathering up falling leaves! In any case, I hope the translation is still suitable to read. And I further hope the below list acts as a reader's guide for choosing a book or two to read about the ancient Maya. 

    ####   


    I greatly appreciate the interest about the ancient Mayan Civilization. Of the some 100 plus books about the ancient Maya I hold in my library, I've chosen the ones below based on some of the commentary and questions regarding the ancient Maya in the past Concentrators:

     

    Breaking The Maya Code, by Michael D. Coe   

    "One of the great stories of 20th-century scientific discovery." --New York Times


    "A fascinating tale...Coe's narration captures the thrill of each advancing step. He takes pains to make clear to the uninitiated reader obscure and complicated aspects of Mayan lore, and does so with a light touch that bespeaks of a gifted teacher and writer."  Associated Press

    Though dated (copyright 1992), I found this book to be the benchmark work about how epigraphers cracked the ancient Mayan writing system.


    The Ancient Maya, Fifth Edition, by Robert Sharer

    "As readable as it is comprehensive, this volume is an admirable and up-to-date account of the Ancient Maya." 

    Scientific American

    I have many times met Bob Sharer. Once, years ago, I showed him my copy of his textbook, so stuffed with Post-Its I used to tag things pertinent to my saga, that the binder is about a half inch less thick than the pages. Anyone truly interested in learning more about the ancient Maya, this 900 page textbook is the one to own. I believe there is now a 7th Edition. 

    The Blood Of Kings: Dynasty And Ritual In Mayan Art, by Linda Schele and Mary Ellen Miller

    "An elegantly written narrative history of the Mayas...that gives us a disturbing and comprehensive portrait of a people and their world." 

    The New York Times

    "[A] work as remarkable for its text as for the photographs and drawings that illustrate it." -- Octavia Paz, The New York Review of Books

    These two blurbs say it all! 

    I never met Linda Schele. I understood she passed away while in the middle of writing a novel about the ancient Maya. She was beloved by all and instrumental in discovery of all things Maya...the writing system, astrology, mathematics.... Someday, I hope she smiles down upon my saga.

    I have met Mary Ellen Miller, of Yale University. 

    Please allow me to slide a "digest story" in here I view of remarkable quality:

    A few years ago, I was in Copan, Honduras, attending a global summit themed about the ancient Maya. Dr. Miller gave a lecture about solar eclipses that occurred back when the Maya were thriving. In conjunction with NASA, using back dating astronomical computer software, she spoke of a date when a total eclipse occurred over Copan, Honduras, the principle setting in my novel. 

    Some five years before this global conference, I took a little literary license and installed a solar eclipse into my manuscript...when the last of sixteen jaguars was about to be caught, while elsewhere a war was to begin exactly at total eclipse, while also, a child of destiny was being born.

    The timeframe of this total solar eclipse occurring in my historical novel, again written some five years before, was dead spot on, within mere hours of the date I had years later learned from Dr. Mary Ellen Miller during that lecture. 

    Truly one of my more favorite stories of serendipity or benign happenstance I love to share that have occurred while writing my book.  


    Scribes, Warriors And Kings: The City of Copan and the Ancient Maya, 
    by William L. Fash

    "Copan's role in the development of Maya archeology is charted in lavishly illustrated detail." -- New Scientist

    Bill Fash, of Harvard, along with aforementioned Bob Sharer, of UPenn, and my Honduran pal, Dr. David Sedat, all worked in Copan for 15 to 20 years. Dr. Fash has numerous times generously advised me on various subjects and queries. All three of these brilliant men have been immortalized by the citizens of Copan in the erecting of a monument located in Plaza de Central, in commeroration to both their livelong work, and for their love of Copan itself.


    Chronicle Of The Maya Kings And Queens
    by Simon Martin and Nikolai Grube

    "Beautifully designed and illustrated...a handy guide to the latest in Maya written history."

    This is one terrific book, if you're into understanding the interrelationships occurring over hundreds of years between Mayan dynasties. A mesmerizing account of the history of the founding fathers and mothers of many cities, all the way to the final leaders, before grand cities to small-ish towns, depopulated. 
     

    Star Gods Of The Maya: Astronomy In Art, Folklore, And Calendars, 
    by Susan Milbrath

    "This book is destined to become a standard reference work on the Maya archeoastronomy. It offers detailed analysis of asterisms [constellations] in the ancient Maya culture unavailable in any other source....Hence Star Gods is not just a compendium of previous work (though it excels at that) but is original and...well-agrued. It provides a basic, sound and utterly comprehensive introduction to the subject ot the ancient Maya astronomy." --Andrea Stone, Professor of History, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

    Another one of my favorite textbooks, this one being intensely highlighted by me more than most so than most textbooks. Scholarly written with a certain mystical flair. 


    All the above books are scholarly works, written by university employed renowned PhDs. Below are books that are either written by independent scholars, or by those who lived, worked and learned from actual present day Maya shamans:


    Maya Cosmogenisis 2012, by John Major Jenkins

    "The extensive research by John Major Jenkins into the Mayan astronomy and mystery is very important indeed, and his book will no doubt become a classic in this field of study. It is a must read for all those who feel that there is far more to our past than meets the eye."

    This book takes wonderful leaps by a wonderful man greatly followed by spritualists. While there are so many books written by charlatans self-proclaimed shamans, this book is taken seriously by the scholars.


    Skywatchers Of Ancient Mexico, by Anthony F. Aveni

    "...a well-written book, stimulating, and excellently illustrated book. Buy it or borrow it." -- Archeoastronomy

    I'll add...and don't return it! Though Aveni has been employed by universities during his career, I view this as both a text book as well as a terrific work that remains both highly detailed and innovative, despite its 1980 Copyright date.


    Rainforest Home Remedies: The Maya Way to Heal Your Body & Replenish Your Soul, by Rosita Arvigo and Nadine Epstein

    "If we are to survive as a species, it will be because of ideas like these become important again." -- Patch Adams, M.D.

    I loved this book! And the one that follows beneath. What we get between both books, is an account of a real life Maya shaman, who after great pains by Rosita Arvigo, accepted her to then learn the true way of a Mayan Shaman, named Elijio Panti. This shaman, or better put, "doctor priest," lived to be 103 years old. In Belize, a documentary was made about this magical man. It was so popular, the rating so high, the Belezian TV station showed it every day for over a month!

    I put up an Insta back when H1N1 the media darlings were scaring the world to death; the Insta held a remedy for the flu. You can read about it here:


    http://seekingalpha.com/instablog/228383-mayascribe/33132-ancient-mayan-remedies-a-study-of-mayan-healer-don-eligio-panti-and-dr-rosita-argivo
     

    So, above you get remedies for 85% of all known ailments, and below you get the story of this incredible man of rainforest knowledge.


    Sastun: My Apprenticeship With A Maya Healer
    , by Rosita Arvigo with Nadine Epstein

    "Arvigo presents an engaging account of her five-year association with Panti and his patients" -- Publishers Weekly

    "None of the characters in Sastun is drawn simply...[Arvigo's] quest is gripping, and all the more poignant for being carried out wirthin the disappearing rainforest and a pervasive loss of faith in the mystic world of the spirits." -- San Francisco Chronicle


    ####

    I have many other books that are more specialized, such as about Maya textiles, chocolate, insects, birds, lizards and animals; the vanilla bean, architecture, pottery, etc. If any of you have a particular field of interest that is not in the above list, than I should be able to point you toward a book of that specialized interest.

    Thank you again all for your interest. And don't hassle me about finishing my novel, Maya: Spirits Of The Jaguar. It will get done! In due time. It will get done.

      

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Comments (145)
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  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Last comment from the previous Comcentrator posted by John Petersen:

     

    In the last conference call Mr. Granville said the work was continuing. Since the relationship had been underway for at least a year before the grant application was filed, the highest risks of failure were probably history by that point.
    26 Sep 2011, 06:03 PM Reply Like
  • maxkilmachina
    , contributor
    Comments (19) | Send Message
     
    Seems like the National Science Foundation funded scientists who just read John's articles.

     

    "U.S. Battery, Plug-in Car Push Costs Exceed Rewards, New Study Says"
    http://bloom.bg/nQvyfB
    26 Sep 2011, 11:28 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    Thank you for giving me something to write about.
    27 Sep 2011, 01:33 AM Reply Like
  • D. McHattie
    , contributor
    Comments (1826) | Send Message
     
    Will the article be about how perverse the tax incentives on electric vehicles are?

     

    It drives me nuts to think about my income being forcibly redistributed to pay for someone else's waste of batteries.

     

    It makes me want to go torches and pitch-forks to think that some multi-millionaire buying a $100k tesla takes money away from cancer research and other legitimately noble causes.
    27 Sep 2011, 07:29 AM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1908) | Send Message
     
    I just have to ask...How the f$%& couldn't all these brilliant s.o.b's figure this stuff out a LONG time ago?! or at least bring it up for serious discussion before they threw taxpayers money away.

     

    "grrrrrr!" -- as Maya might say.

     

    (pardon the offensive insinuations)
    27 Sep 2011, 07:39 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    Great find. I propose that the lawmakers, administration and scientists start following JP and/or our various blogs here on SA to get a quicker read on "The Coming Future".

     

    One thing that caught my eye in the article was "Both Toyota and Ford Motor Co. (F), which are working together to develop a hybrid system for light trucks ...".

     

    So, although not confirmation, it does suggest (F) might be the undisclosed automaker JP has thought might be involved.

     

    It also leads me to think (UQM) might be involved with (F) - maybe indirectly via someone like JCI - and will benefit from Ford and Toyota efforts. 'Course, Toyota probably already has another supplier, but a second source always is a nice security blanket for a large automaker.

     

    HardToLove
    27 Sep 2011, 12:20 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2235) | Send Message
     
    Anyone care to speculate as to when Axion will report appreciable PcB and/or electrode sales, along with a number? Failing a sales guess, anyone care to speculate on when Axion will have a price "spike" that will facilitate additional stock financing. and what will drive the spike?
    27 Sep 2011, 01:06 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >bangwhiz ... OK, I'll bite. Since I know you to be a sales centric kind of guy, here is my forecast. The bulk of selling will subside by Dec 2011. The price of the stock will rise toward the magic $1 but will not make it though Fed 2012. Then on 20Mar2012 Axion will get an order for 30k electrode assemblies from NS. The price will spike to $1.80 and come back down to $.85 through 15Apil2012 and start to rise throughout the summer. Back around the high ... we wait once more.

     

    There. How's that for a fantasy prediction (but is about how I see things progressing).
    27 Sep 2011, 01:24 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » DRich: Sign me up for that rollercoaster. Much better than the "stop/start/stop/start" idle, engine off, engine on we're experiencing right now. We're stuck in traffic!

     

    ####

     

    max: Thanks for posting that article. Hattie and jakurtz, forget the pitchforks, I want stun guns. Have you seen the lastest advertisement for the Chevy "Dolt?" That's our tax dollars at work!

     

    ####

     

    John: Looking forward to your "pen" being a WMD toward the hypocrisy going on in DC. Can't wait to read how you carve up the moronic politocos! You've got another multi-hundred commented on article within your grasp.

     

    ####

     

    Seeking Alpha curtails punctuational prowess. Tom Wolfe would find it frustrating to write on the website.
    27 Sep 2011, 08:03 AM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2128) | Send Message
     
    Bang,
    I will take a flyer on this also. My bar napkin calculations show that at the next Conference call the Gen 2 line could have produced enough negative electrodes to build and ship 25,000 PbC Batteries. NS only needed 1,000 of them for the yard locomotive. They need another 1,500 for the over the road locomotive. I'm sure there was some pent up demand for PbC's for testing in other industries. It is hard to imagine that full production would have been instituted or that the need was there to produce that many batteries in one quarter.
    So I will take a flyer that 10,000 PbC's will have been sold by the end of the quarter. Sales of PbC's will equal $2,500,000 this quarter.

     

    I fully expect that NS will take 1/2 of the production next year. That will lock in $12,500,000 in sales from yard locomotives only. From that point the growth story is on.

     

    The PbC can accomplish much simply in the rail area. The number of yard locomotives is staggering. If the Long haul locomotive hybrid works then "please stand aside" as a rush of orders are coming".

     

    I have said before that the symbol of success will be when Granville announces the ordering and construction of the Gen 3 line. It will be built because Axion needs it to satisfy orders. Not to prove manufacturing expertise.

     

    If you plan on buying more Axion stock I would do it before the next conference call.
    Last March 11, 2011 I broke down my predictions in the comment section of an article John wrote here:
    http://bit.ly/nHmE38
    27 Sep 2011, 08:41 AM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1908) | Send Message
     
    Sales numbers are not going to be the driver in the near term...Sideliners are just waiting for a confirmation the battery works in any commercial real world capacity, so they can be sure this thing is for real. This is what the white paper said but the proof will be with an additional order/confirmation from any of the manufacturers currently testing the PbC.
    27 Sep 2011, 10:57 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    (AXPW): DRich,

     

    LoL! My first thought, with no malice or criticism was "He's a nascent comic!" :-))

     

    First, I presume that TG's statement that NS is on track for a big order this year, although behind NS's own schedule, is true. With that in mind, I like my 11/20 target, although that was picked just figuring how holiday's affect things and NS might want that order out the door before EOY holidays deplete the personnel ranks for a few weeks.

     

    Based on that, we jump well over $1. Follow-on selling to take profits will be small since, as JP has pointed out, the pool of sellers is currently a puddle and I think it's morphing towards a stain as more and more shares are falling into the "strong hands".

     

    So we will see some near-term pps drop, but only early-on as the upward momentum tails off and looks to retrace a bit. The majority of strong hands will not let go during that time, knowing how much potential AXPW is still in the company and the pps.

     

    As all the pundits keep driving the general market higher towards EOY, Quercus et all will need to sell a little less as holdings strengthen, removing some pressure from that quarter.

     

    The unknown in my scenario is when & how much new share issuance. If it's large, late - I think your March scenario might come into play. But if it's smallish, timed correctly, seen as accretive - March is off the table IMO.

     

    If we get even a rumor of the Gen 2 lines being "certified" or an additional order from a major auto manufacturer for fleet testing, that removes sub-$1 altogether I think. Or a rumor that a major battery manufacturer is sniffng hard ...

     

    Of course, my scenario carries no more water than yours and I may be the first "clown" of many to pop out the Volkwagen!

     

    HardToLove
    27 Sep 2011, 11:34 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >jakurtz ... I think your right about sales not being a driver. If, or when, the rails put in an order the price will spike then drop. My reasoning for that is Axion can handle it in-house (unless a lot of roads jump in). The big push that everyone here is waiting for is that lone order that forces Axion to enter into a manufacturing agreement with a real battery manufacturer. That would prove the model works and that would get the attention of funds.
    27 Sep 2011, 11:37 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    Way off topic, but Ener1's board replaced Gassenheimer as CEO last night. It looks like the reorganization team they brought in a couple months ago is now firmly in control.
    27 Sep 2011, 09:18 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » I'm surprised Gassenheimer lasted this long. He opened a "Field of Dreams" factory in Indiana that makes cobwebs faster than batteries.

     

    Then he opened a NYC office so he could hobnob and drink appletinis with the Wall Street fat cats. I recall seeing him numerous times on CNBC talking up his $17,500 lithium battery. Should I add in how unth!nkably "smart" the Th!nk eurocar smart car was? Can this guy read a balance sheet?

     

    I wouldn't trust the idiot with the Grim Reaper's money.

     

    And the fun part is, I made a small killing off Ener1. Thank heavens JP verbally kicked me in the privates about 100 times, and I bailed while this basement idea was still flush with the waters of hype.

     

    In all truth, though, I'm still down with Axion more than I made off of "Enerhell."

     

    But that soon enough will fix itself.

     

    I'm still holding my November 15, $1.00 share price call.
    27 Sep 2011, 11:51 AM Reply Like
  • amishelvis
    , contributor
    Comments (143) | Send Message
     
    At this point I think an announcement from NS saying that pbc batteries work,, we have two engines running and will install more over the next year will move the price of axpw up into the high ones,,, $1.60- $1.90 with maybe a retest to the low ones,, but not sure about that. My point being,, the quality of the technology may have more weight than the actual sales.
    btw, JLP's articles on the merits of hybrids over pure electric are solid, he was a first responder,, but some depth with other studies, and more people saying the same thing will take this movement further. This is happening as per the above article. Stay the course John, I think its a very important endeavor.
    27 Sep 2011, 09:39 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    Another OT issue - Gendell reported selling another 815,000 Exide shares on the 22nd, 23rd and 26th. His Form 4 filing checked the box to confirm that he's no longer subject to Section 16 and future sales will not be separately reported.

     

    Dropping below 10% was probably important for portfolio valuation purposes, but Gendell and the Tontine funds remain a big holder with just under 10% of the stock. They may slow their selling now that the September 30th window dressing period is over, but there's no way to predict with any certainty. From this point forward it will be much harder to track their impact on the market.
    27 Sep 2011, 10:16 AM Reply Like
  • anthlj
    , contributor
    Comments (230) | Send Message
     
    Key for price rise is new buyers. In the prevailing environment, rigger point likely to be the placement of 'real' orders, as opposed to orders for further testing. If NS is at the head of the queue, then real orders are unlikely to be seen before this time next year, and then will be a trickle before any flood. Patience will be needed in spades, even in a best-case scenario.
    27 Sep 2011, 10:37 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    I'd normally agree with you but there's been a very unusual supply and demand dynamic over the last 18 months and I tend to think we may see a major supply and demand inflection point before we see significant orders.
    27 Sep 2011, 10:59 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    Last week HT noted the appearance of a strong correlation between several storage stocks and the S&P 500. I've just published an Instablog that does a side by side comparison and shows some very surprising differences in the amplitude of the correlations.

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...
    27 Sep 2011, 10:55 AM Reply Like
  • tocoadog
    , contributor
    Comments (72) | Send Message
     
    So I've been lurking for a few weeks now. I appreciate the continued research and dialogue for Axion Power.

     

    I bought a modest position of few weeks ago (about 900 shares) then added another similar position today. My plan is to continue to throw as much as I can each month until there is significant upward price movement (undefined at this point).

     

    Based on my research, tea leaves and the direction the wind is blowing, I like Axion. My fear is they run out of money before there is significant ROI though.

     

    With that said, has anyone seen the commercial that portrays this smoggy polluted air and then midway through a BMW shows up touting clean air? Would this have the Axion battery? I did some research but came up empty handed. Just wondering...

     

    Again, thanks for the continued dialogue on this company.
    27 Sep 2011, 02:04 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    The PbC is not in any production cars this year and I don't expect a design win till next year. I am, however, hoping for a couple test fleet trials this year.
    27 Sep 2011, 02:26 PM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1908) | Send Message
     
    You are thinking of the BMW commercial for its clean diesel. There is no stop-start application on that particular model but, if/when, a model like that would implement stop/start with a PbC battery it would be an excellent demonstration of easy extremely cost effective way to significantly reduce oil consumption and Co2 emissions. It is absolutely the most sensible approach to significant reductions and it is available now. Not some thoeretical idea still trying to birth its way out of a lab.
    27 Sep 2011, 02:48 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    Yes, and the only re-engineering needed would be to examine battery capacity and starter used to handle the higher cranking loads caused by the diesel compression ratios. But still off-the-shelf equipment, so should be duck soup.

     

    Might be niether needs to be changed, but don't want to be slipshod by making assumptions.

     

    HardToLove
    27 Sep 2011, 02:55 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    We need an Axion engineer to visit Wrightspeed - they'll end up being big down the road! At least they've got Capstone on-board!

     

    "A123 Batteries for Wrightspeed"

     

    http://bit.ly/rnAedp

     

    HardToLove
    27 Sep 2011, 02:46 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2235) | Send Message
     
    Thanks for all the speculation on PbC sales and stock price "spike". The spread was from November earnings call to essentially November 2012. The possible catalysts being NS, current sellers eventually running out of stock to sell, potential auto test fleet orders (but with an announcement?), a surprise order requiring selection of a manufacturing partner and/or Axion ordering a Gen 3 line, and certification of the current Gen2 line.

     

    Now for my guess. Since the sellers (Quercus and possibly Special Situations) still have close to 8 Million shares (gave or take 500K) they can sell it will take something happening for the price to reach $1.00 before year-end. I think we wallow along until year end with a max price of .80-.85 cents.

     

    After year end Axion needs a price spike for its next round of financing. That would point to a big order before June 30 from NS. Let's say they want to see how the yard locomotive does for six months before ordering any more conversions. There is enough time for NS to work out the bugs and get six months use under its belt by June 2012. If things go well, it would be possible to meet DRich's end of March NS order date, but in any event Spring 2012 would certainly work for Axion (although they would be running on the fumes.)

     

    So for the next six months you can buy cheap for perhaps the last time if I am correct, then things get more interesting. I'll go back to sleep now until something wakes me up or the snow starts melting in March. As for the broader market it is relatively immaterial to Axion - they aren't a profitable business yet so normal market metrics don't apply to AXPW. We're buying the science and the bees buzzing around Axion right now and hoping it matures into a successful public company and a real pot of honey. (or should I say money?)
    27 Sep 2011, 10:37 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2128) | Send Message
     
    Nice re-cap Bang,
    I am the most optimistic but that hasn't changed in over two years. Thanks for the exercise. It was fun.
    28 Sep 2011, 07:21 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    (AXPW): Looks like pps might start trying to move back up a bit. But it will take a day or two to see if it's a "head fake" or might go back towards the $0.6x range or not.

     

    Yesterday was the first higher high and low in a while with volume suggesting that the bottom is in for now. We could just consolidate here, <*sigh*>, and see how volume come in.

     

    HardToLove
    28 Sep 2011, 09:25 AM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1908) | Send Message
     
    HTL,

     

    Sounds like another wonderful day of watching paint dry....so exciting.
    28 Sep 2011, 09:45 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Ever hear of the Christmas song, "All I Want For Christmas Is My Two Front Teeth?"

     

    To me, it doesn't make any difference what Axion's share price is in the next month, two months or six months.

     

    It's what the share price is, or will be, in 2014 or 2015.

     

    Though it's great fun to do, speculation of share pricing during the coming months doesn't mean squat. It's the end game I'm looking at. It's when Axion has those dozen or so Gen3 lines up and running. It's when Axion is farming out their patented technology to other battery manufacturers to enhance their batteries.

     

    It's when the hype of the more expensive battery options out there, gets its butt kicked by economic viability and reality.

     

    It's Axion at more than four or five bucks per share. And though at a seemingly snail's pace, Axion is positioning itself to accomplish just that.

     

    Between now and five bucks per, there will be exciting times, and monotonous times. Right now, the latter is where we are stuck, the only jitter and jolt coming in the form of news, not increasing share price.

     

    Same goes for three other stocks I own, Great Western Minerals (GWMGF), Sangamo Biosciences (SGMO) and Novavax (NVAX).

     

    What I do see as desk clerk to this thread where some very smart people comment, is that there exists a pretty much unified opinion that Axion is one of, if not the best microcap investing options out there. That's why I have scads more $ in Axion than the other teething stocks I mentioned above.

     

    But alas, it's going to take a while longer for Axion to cut its teeth.

     

    Now I need to go listen to Carly Simon sing, "Anticipation!"
    28 Sep 2011, 10:30 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    Maya,

     

    Don't forget (NVAX) will release top-line results for the RSV vaccine 10/3. Since there is *no* currently-approved RSV vaccine and it causes hospitalization of 100K+ children/year, that should provide some short-distraction for you.

     

    Based on that expectation, I recently took profits off my short Oct. $2 strikes in preparation for the "pop", when I'll got short calls again.

     

    <dig> Just to stay on topic, for a guy that only cares about years out, you seem to exhibit a lot of enthusiasm when (AXPW) starts a trend up towards to ... $0.65(?) and moan when your buys at $0.51 get skipped.
    </dig> ;-))

     

    HardToLove
    28 Sep 2011, 11:32 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Excellent digs, HTL. How do you deal with that I would LOVE to pick up those 10k shares I have GTCed in my brokaerage account for $0.44?

     

    Or, rather, how would I deal with that? Talk about a mish mash of emotions ;-)

     

    The fun stuff of angst, hope, dread and dreams....

     

    28 Sep 2011, 12:07 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    (AXPW): I deal with it by having a bifurcated emotional outlook.

     

    In reality I care most about years out results (and worry about it bumping into the emerging graphene stuff that DRich and RBF have noted - BTW, thank you DRich!). But that doesn't preclude the glee and disappointment that comes with the short-term moves.

     

    And since I'm early in my learning curve I add on the satisfaction I get if I get it right.

     

    So the long-term lets me go with "What's a few pennies upside missed", when I don't get the lowest possible price, and the short-term let's me go with "Aha! Beat those suckers again and can now compound to end up with more shares down the road"!

     

    That's the primary reason for trading around my core compounding *and* avoiding the feeling of "dead money" while I wait.

     

    Heh! I just noticed I tend to put a positive spin on things - that is my nature though.

     

    I also have the advantage that I don't tend to have extremes of emotion. Lot's of times it's just <*shrug*>.

     

    HardToLove
    28 Sep 2011, 12:40 PM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1908) | Send Message
     
    Many days I want to send a mass email to all AXPW shareholders. It would go like this...

     

    "Seriously guys, just keep your shares in your pocket, and I will keep my shares in my pocket, and sooner rather than later, we will all be very happy. That is just how it works.

     

    P.S. Ignore Special Sits and Quercus, they can sell a few here and there to the newcomers...just to keep it real."
    28 Sep 2011, 02:41 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    FWIW it looks like I've riled the EVangelicals once again. One of these days I just gotta stop peeing on those big battery packs.
    28 Sep 2011, 10:53 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    >JP: "Again" implies a cessation of "riling". That can't be true can it? ;-))

     

    HardToLove
    28 Sep 2011, 12:41 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    Some hobbies are just too much fun.
    28 Sep 2011, 12:51 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >Mayascribe ... Gee, if you like plunking money down on looooooong term bets, might I suggest the following. This looks like a good bet going into 2020-2024 and might be the killer of Axion technology. I wonder if Axion is in contact with Chapel Hill on this (?)

     

    http://bit.ly/nGYds1

     

    I've wondered if this might infringe on Axion patents. Anyway, this looks like what the next generation of management & research ought to be looking at.

     

    I think the source material will be mined and fed into this process from large flake graphite reserves. Not to worry though;

     

    http://bit.ly/rlQ6HC

     

    And thus my recommendation to add to your long dated portfolio is Northern Graphite (NGPHF.PK). I could be wrong but the clock is running.
    28 Sep 2011, 10:57 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    That is one double cool technology, but it's a bit like a platinum and gold sandwich. I'm not going to worry about it being cost competitive in my lifetime.

     

    A little while back my colleague Jack Lifton wrote about the future of graphite investments and included a discussion of Northern Graphite as a quality speculation. Since I think highly of Jack's skills, your pick may be a good one.

     

    http://bit.ly/qb1koC
    28 Sep 2011, 11:05 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >JP ... I had forgotten Jack's article. I like graphite because it cuts so many ways. If Li-on really catches fire ... well, it will need graphite. If carbon materials are the electrical storage miracle ... well, it will need graphite to turn into graphene. If semiconductors and going to continue to follow Moore's Law ... well, it will need graphene ... and that will need graphite. If light weight, metal substitution construction is the future ... well, it will need graphite.

     

    I found and liked Northern Graphite because of their resources but I really like where it is located. Close to rail, ports, roads, the grid and spitting distance to the USA Rust Belt. I look at that scenario as a great set-up for my kids and I might see the beginning if I live long enough.
    28 Sep 2011, 12:04 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    Strategic resources properly positioned can do nothing but increase in value as the 6 billion strive to catch the 600 million. It may happen far quicker than you assume.
    28 Sep 2011, 12:14 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    I particularly liked the "strongest material" assertion too. Imagine all cars, buildings, ... replacing the dwindling and easily accessible supplies of the various metals we currently use.

     

    Now, if it could just replace REEs in magnets too!

     

    I enjoyed the articles, thanks.

     

    HardToLove
    28 Sep 2011, 12:45 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » DRich: Amazing, and close to home. My pop used to sell printing presses for a company named Miller Printing Machinery, based in Pittsburgh. Always wanted one of those five color, mammoth-sized presses for my own purposes, because those printing presses he sold...printed US currency.

     

    Agree with John. That's incredible technology.
    28 Sep 2011, 05:48 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >Mayscribe ... The really amazing part of this very young technology lays with the semiconductor side of things where the graphene is deposited with standard vapor dep methods magnetic spintronics, magnetic bearings, flywheel rotor, tri-gate transistors ..... and what I get a kick out of reading about. It's better than sci-fi, but since this is not what interests this group I'll leave that out.

     

    Here is a link to a technology that quite possibly could kill the Li-on battery. It's got the chance of being very cheap (not as cheap as LABs but that has its own challenge from this tech) although I think the link goes way overboard on the application side. They are fishing for grants after all. The money being sunk into this means that by 2015-18 we'll know how commercially viable it is.

     

    http://bit.ly/ox24Rx/

     

    Just something to keep in mind. Like I said, this is entertainment for me.
    28 Sep 2011, 07:23 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » DRich: That's neat! By then, I should be able to peel off some Axion for the next emerging battery technology.

     

    Here's my favorite future battery, still far over the horizon. There's a Maya slant to this, because they were among the first to cultivate this plant.

     

    http://bit.ly/opaIXa
    28 Sep 2011, 10:18 PM Reply Like
  • CO3
    , contributor
    Comments (246) | Send Message
     
    DRich: It's better than sci-fi, but since this is not what interests this group I'll leave that out.

     

    More of us may be interested than you think !
    (I've read all of Asimov)
    Maya's got a following, I'd say you do too.

     

    We may need to set up another corner to share our pet projects !
    You know, kind of a virtual pub where we can relax after getting all
    excited about finance & business.
    (From the comfort of our caves )
    29 Sep 2011, 12:24 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >CO3 ... I'm flattered but I would hope you make better use of your time than to find anything I have to say as interesting enough to follow.
    29 Sep 2011, 12:46 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » CO3: Please allow me to correct you. I don't have a following, Axion Power's game plan does--as well as other battery ideas.

     

    We are all hanging out in an idea, a forum, that sooner or later somebody would have done.

     

    What's really cool, is one of us who hangs here, designed two Asimov book cover illustrations, that is, if my fleeting memory serves me correctly.
    29 Sep 2011, 01:52 AM Reply Like
  • CO3
    , contributor
    Comments (246) | Send Message
     
    Maya: I was referring to the group interest in Mayan culture
    29 Sep 2011, 11:56 AM Reply Like
  • alsobirdman
    , contributor
    Comments (366) | Send Message
     
    Hello y'all,

     

    I've been lurking here in Maya's instablog for a bit, and I really appreciate all of your insight. I have posted on a few of John's articles and certainly appreciate his knowledge and candor.

     

    I first bought Axion @ about $2, rode it down to $1.25 before selling and then started buying back in @ .50. Bought more on the way down after the spring spike and just bought another 10K @ .54. Figured I would get ready in case NS does come through with an order. I have a pretty good position now with an average of about 63 cents.

     

    Keep up the good work.
    28 Sep 2011, 12:32 PM Reply Like
  • pianomanshl
    , contributor
    Comments (313) | Send Message
     
    Anyone following ZBB?

     

    It is under 0.60 now. Once in a life time buying opportunity?

     

    I missed the last chance when it was 0.5-0.6 range. I originally got in at 1.32 years ago.

     

    I understand their business is going along pretty well though.....

     

    Long AXPW, XIDE, KNDI, ZBB, ACPW, ABAT.
    28 Sep 2011, 03:39 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2100) | Send Message
     
    >piano: The problem I see is for ZBB to survive long enough to attract some real customers. There technology seems good but they have no revenue.

     

    I'm afraid the scenario I see as most likely is that some large cap company will buy them up for peanuts (market cap of $18mil) and then put in the resources to attract some customers. It's too bad that their "product introduction" timing is so bad. You can't seem to give away energy tech companies these days.

     

    Look at Axion. Great product, reasonable (actually, low) valuation and several LARGE customers lined up to buy millions of $$ of product as soon as the test trials are finished. Which should be within 12 months for NSC.
    They are priced as if they sold used kitty litter in ton lots :-) Timing isn't everything, but it's sure important now.
    28 Sep 2011, 06:02 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2100) | Send Message
     
    Oh yeah, I own some ZBB that I paid about twice the going price for. Sigh.
    28 Sep 2011, 06:02 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >siliconhillbilly ... You said " ... some large cap company will buy them up for peanuts", I think for all intents and purpose they've sold themselves already. If the market weren't so awful, I'd be spinning conspiracy theories about what we see in ZBB are the death throes of an American company morphing into Chinese.

     

    http://bit.ly/qrodU3;topic=ZBB
    28 Sep 2011, 07:36 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2100) | Send Message
     
    >DRich: I think I commented on that "partnership" at the time. It does seem to be the beginning of the end of ZBB owning the zinc-bromide technology. They did give it away for use in China. Chinese companies invariably appropriate any good technology they can get a grip on and thereafter try and use it in areas they can get away with. And then the patents expire......

     

    So yes, I think ZBB did give away the farm. Eventually.

     

    Maybe some nice Korean company will buy ZBB and stare down the Chinese. I wonder how long the basic patents have to run?
    28 Sep 2011, 07:57 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >siliconhillbilly ... You did indeed comment on that. I would have passed up the opportunity to bring it up but I'm still peeved about it. Promise not to do it again.
    28 Sep 2011, 08:00 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2128) | Send Message
     
    I have to disagree with your analysis of ZBB. They sold their technology first to the South Koreans and then to the Chineese. In each of the deals ZBB gets Mlti-National partners, access to a much larger distribution and technology partners and immediate sales.

     

    We can agree that there is a risk to the plan not working but I am pretty amazed at the agreements themselves. Let me ask you this.
    If Axion teamed up with two large China utility suppliers, both who sell to China's largest utility ( State Grid), got a free brand new manufacturing plant, Was given 9 Million to invest , and was awarded 1/3 rd of all the profits derived from Axion sales in China, would you consider that a bad deal? In Axions case maybe the deal would be done with a couple of China auto companies instead of utility companies.

     

    I realize that tZBB sold its technology. But isn't 1/3rd of China worth more than having China steal your product? Just asking?
    29 Sep 2011, 07:36 AM Reply Like
  • D. McHattie
    , contributor
    Comments (1826) | Send Message
     
    For what it's worth, I'm with you, Futurist. Perhaps I'm naive but I still think this deal will be positive for ZBB as a way of getting their products into the market and into use.

     

    Even if they get pirated in China they will be protected by patents outside of China and the success of their technology, even in pirated form, should help them gain acceptance outside of China.
    29 Sep 2011, 08:10 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >Futurist ... Simply put, I think it would be a terrible deal for you, me, our kids, the economy and the future. Maybe not for the current directors, management and stockholders as long as they remember to promptly leave.

     

    Selling into the market, as in shipping electrode assemblies to a Chinese battery manufacturer, would be a good thing. Following the business model and setting up an autonomous fab next door would not be as good, but might prove OK. The following link is to a previous comment I made about doing business in China

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    Just a reminder of how business is done in China from the NY Times.

     

    http://nyti.ms/ri7IZR
    29 Sep 2011, 09:55 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3332) | Send Message
     
    I think the logjam at ZBB is the UL certification of the Enersection PECC. Nothing much can move until they have that in pocket. Supposedly it's a near-term event, but we've all heard variations of that song before. Until then, no cert, no sales, no revenues, no fun.
    28 Sep 2011, 08:22 PM Reply Like
  • Mitch Vine
    , contributor
    Comments (220) | Send Message
     
    I am ignorant of ZBB's technology, but I've reviewed a few thousand financial statements, and this is a company that is sooo likely to create a lot of retail investor pain. They have almost no cash and they are burning a lot. By all means follow them, but i'd be keeping my dollars far away from them until after the venture guys have done their diluting.
    29 Sep 2011, 09:39 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    The counterpoint to the weak financial condition is the equally weak market cap of $17.6 million. Hell Mitch, I've seen empty shells with higher market caps than that. ZBB went public in June 2007 at a price of $6.00 per share and it's been on a downhill slide ever since.

     

    http://1.usa.gov/nxDva3

     

    While it's as speculative as a company can be, the distance it can fall is small while the upside potential of a turnaround could be impressive. As long as they keep spending under control, ZBB can limp along for a long time with very little downside risk from here.
    29 Sep 2011, 09:58 AM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2100) | Send Message
     
    A nice summary of what dealing with a Chinese company did to American Superconductor (AMSC). It's not pretty.

     

    http://bit.ly/rmzTjg
    29 Sep 2011, 12:56 PM Reply Like
  • pianomanshl
    , contributor
    Comments (313) | Send Message
     
    HEV closed at 0.09

     

    My other holdings in energy storage sector are not doing well either but I am glad that I did not buy HEV, AONE.

     

    Thanks John !!!
    29 Sep 2011, 04:10 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    I like to be right but really hate being this right.
    29 Sep 2011, 04:13 PM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1908) | Send Message
     
    When I first started in the energy sector I rode HEV down for awhile and kept saying, "Well, it can't get much lower." Luckily I got out with my shirt but that is about all. I learned a thing or two on that ride.
    29 Sep 2011, 09:25 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    "Well, it can't get much lower" used to be my felling up until the low of 2009. I lost my shirt on that, and being totally ignorant got out of all my "blue chips" at the low.

     

    To paraphrase Poe, "Quothe the sucker, never more".

     

    Now I only let very small positions ride big moves.

     

    HardToLove
    29 Sep 2011, 09:58 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2100) | Send Message
     
    John, isn't it about time for the DOE and their enablers in Congress to move on to the next "great technological jobs maker" so they can shovel out more money to Congress friendly companies?

     

    What will it be this time?

     

    I vote for compressed natural gas transportation fuel. It will cost lots to implement (gov. loans) but should produce jobs in infrastructure construction and research into the best ways to update vehicle designs. Maybe they could combine it with hybrid ICE-battery-electric drive systems and make it sound like something all new and techie. Put it on big trucks and buses first to get a "good of the people thru cheaper transport cost" buzz.

     

    Something new is needed if the great guv'mint technology subsidy machine is to be kept running :-(
    29 Sep 2011, 05:29 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    Congress is trying to muck up the natural gas market too with a credit for 80% of CNG conversion premiums. I wish they'd just get out of the way, eliminate a raft of the most burdensome regulations and simply let the market figure it out. The only reason CNG systems cost thousands of dollars is the cost of regulatory compliance. Get rid of the foolishness and the economics will be compelling on their own.
    29 Sep 2011, 11:51 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3332) | Send Message
     
    Bullseye John, though part of me still thinks adding some taxes on gasoline and conventional diesel, whilst slashing them on everything else (everything) would really light a fire under things. Kill all the freakin credits and exclusions and exemptions and subsidies. Wring the damn thing down to two pages, a front and a back. Then leave it the hell alone. But we would need many brave grownups fully engaged to get that done.
    30 Sep 2011, 12:06 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    We'd need grownups without "constituents" who promote their own interests over the national interest. I won't be holding my breath.
    30 Sep 2011, 12:31 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    IMO tax as a social change tool has way too many negatives, all related to things JP has discussed *and* the raw negatives just from giving government more money. Especially under the guise of "it's good for the country", it is almost always wrong.

     

    Tax to provide constitutional services (including interstate commerce, if more strictly defined) is OK. Aiding in providing infrastructure good for the nation, as a whole (e.g. interstate highway system), seems reasonable as well since no state or individual private enterprise would seem capable of providing it initially.

     

    Other than that sort of stuff, I say no. Taxes are nasty in that they seldom disappear and pile one atop the other forever.

     

    And government has to do something with the new revenue. Just as capital in the private sector seeks yield, capital in the government sector seeks waste, fraud and abuse and exponential growth.

     

    HardToLove
    30 Sep 2011, 07:59 AM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (5803) | Send Message
     
    The power to tax is the power to destroy - from the words of Daniel Webster and John Marshall in the Supreme Court case, McCulloch v. Maryland.
    30 Sep 2011, 08:37 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3332) | Send Message
     
    Roger all. I certainly hate the current obscene 11,000 page code and all its attendant distortions and injuries. Hence my gleefull use of the word "slash". Which I meant, and meant to apply to the code itself and all the other rates. But as revenues are neccessary from some source, if they have to come from somewhere, I'd prefer more came from imported oil consumption. just sayin. We've seen the gov't fail horribly at picking winners. I'd rather they'd just pick the loser, imported oil, and leave the rest alone more.
    30 Sep 2011, 11:48 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3332) | Send Message
     
    Sigh. In truth, me neither. One of favorite new sayings is "sooner or later, real reality trumps political reality" (one of many golden Steynisms) Trouble is, real reality comes in lots of nasty flavors and only a few sweet ones. I fear we're fixin to get quite acquainted soon with real reality. So I keep praying (likely in vain) for the emergence of a few true souls willing to surmount political realities now.
    30 Sep 2011, 01:00 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    Unfortunately grand plans with exaggerated time scales are far more palatable than baby steps that require results in the short term. If you plan big enough you can move up the ladder from bureaucratic functionary to elder statesman and venture capitalist before the all too predictable blow-back from your bad decision-making becomes apparent.
    30 Sep 2011, 01:15 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3332) | Send Message
     
    Blowback you say? In spades. And it won't be selective. I can never forget Clint Eastwood's timeless line in "The Unforgiven": "We all got it comin', kid...."
    30 Sep 2011, 01:24 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    Some years back a commentator (Art Buchwald or Andy Rooney I think) suggested that every election ballot should include a block for "None of the Above." It could be a wonderful tool if strictly enforced so that an office would remain empty if None of the Above got a majority.
    30 Sep 2011, 01:29 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Art Buchwald's son, Joel, was one wild dude. He belonged to my fraternity at Ohio Wesleyan University.

     

    Once, I needed a ride into Columbus, Ohio. A few years older than me, my fraternity brother offered me a lift. It was a blustery, snowy, wintry day. Joel had a faded canary yellow Jeep, and it was then that I learned his canvas top was broken. The half hour drive on I-71 was a "topless" event.

     

    I will never forget his freckled face beet red, his beyond shoulder-lengthed golden blonde locks and Snoopy-like Red Baron scarf trailing straight back, wind-whipped, as he leaned in toward the propped up windshield.

     

    I was huddled down as much as I could behind that little windshield. A top ten coldest moment in my life.
    30 Sep 2011, 06:50 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    A bit like a snowmobile with bigger seats?
    1 Oct 2011, 01:31 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Yup, only me without proper garb.
    1 Oct 2011, 10:49 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    I went snowmobiling one time in Western Montana and learned there is no such thing as proper garb. I'd rather buy Ener1 than do it again.
    1 Oct 2011, 10:55 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » This is a thread about batteries; yet once in a while the lean about political economics has to be examined. Especially about the wildy corrupt and confused energy sector.

     

    User 481086 + JP: Rising through the ranks is Herman Cain. I just learned about this fellow. Debate is on about that he has never served an elected position. So? Neither has Donald Trump. He's contiplating... Obama's best resume stripe before being elected was being in charge of some Illinois communuty service program.

     

    Very sad.

     

    However, here is a man who won the Fla. straw vote, of which whom I know little about. Yet, here is a man who apparently and innately understsands how things work.

     

    I'm not saying whom is which that could make sense of all our energy problems, which is only part of US's problems.

     

    But we may have someone outside of common knowledge, about to gain widespread public curiosity, who knows how to make things work.

     

    Over in QC, there is frequently some buzz about who should lead our country. I popped in with Herman Cain winning the FLA straw vote, and here's a sampling of what my mates have dug up about this guy that makes me up my curiosity.

     

    Pasting in from Quick Chat is Doubleguns most excellent post of this Herman Cain's resume:

     

    ####

     

    Bio on Herman Cain. I have to say that is my lean now too.

     

    MEET THE REAL HERMAN CAIN!

     

    Here’s his bio:

     

    Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics.
    Master’s degree in Computer Science.
    Mathematician for the Navy, where he worked on missile ballistics (making him a rocket scientist).
    Computer systems analyst for Coca-Cola.
    VP of Corporate Data Systems and Services for Pillsbury (this is the top of the ladder in the computer world, being in charge of information systems for a major corporation).

     

    All achieved before reaching the age of 35. Since he reached the top of the information systems world, he changed careers!

     

    Business Manager. Took charge of Pillsbury’s 400 Burger King restaurants in the Philadelphia area, which were the company’s poorest performers in the country. Spent the first nine months learning the business from the ground up, cooking hamburger and yes, cleaning toilets. After three years he had turned them into the company’s best performers.
    Godfather’s Pizza CEO. Was asked by Pillsbury to take charge of their Godfather’s Pizza chain (which was on the verge of bankruptcy). He made it profitable in 14 months.
    In 1988 he led a buyout of the Godfather’s Pizza chain from Pillsbury. He was now the owner of a restaurant chain. Again he reached the top of the ladder of another industry.
    He was also chairman of the National Restaurant Association during this time. This is a group that interacts with government on behalf of the restaurant industry, and it gave him political experience from the non-politician side.

     

    Having reached the top of a second industry, he changed careers again!

     

    Adviser to the Federal Reserve System. Herman Cain went to work for the Federal Reserve Banking System advising them on how monetary policy changes would affect American businesses.
    Chairman of the Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank. He worked his way up to the chairmanship of a regional Federal Reserve bank. This is only one step below the chairmanship of the entire Federal Reserve System (the top banking position in the country). This position allowed him to see how monetary policy is made from the inside, and understand the political forces that impact the monetary system.

     

    After reaching the top of the banking industry, he changed careers for a fourth time!

     

    Writer and public speaker. He then started to write and speak on leadership. His books include Speak as a Leader, CEO of Self, Leadership is Common Sense, and They Think You’re Stupid.
    Radio Host. Around 2007—after a remarkable 40 year career—he started hosting a radio show on WSB in Atlanta (the largest talk radio station in the country).

     

    He did all this starting from rock bottom (his father was a chauffeur and his mother was a maid). When you add up his accomplishments in his life—including reaching the top of three unrelated industries: information systems, business management, and banking—

     

    STACK THAT UP AGAINST THE 'COMMUNITY ORGANIZER'....

     

    Herman Cain may have the most impressive resume of anyone that has run for the presidency in the last half century.

     

    Yes I have met the man at the Ohio Patriot group rally this July in Columbus Ohio and spoke with him. Introduced him to GOOOH also!!! I just could not help myself.
    30 Sep 2011, 01:52 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    From an HR perspective, he's a "job hopper" and shouldn't be considered! :-))

     

    OTOH, for the POTUS, it's really what we want! A guy gets in, gets the job done, says "My work here is done", and moves on!

     

    Now if we could just get 535 more folks with such an attitude.

     

    HardToLove
    30 Sep 2011, 08:06 AM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (971) | Send Message
     
    Maya...
    Unfortunately, politics has to have a place in energy blogs...assuming the veracity of that reply, impressive on the surface...interesting!
    30 Sep 2011, 05:52 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » magounsg: Unfortunate? Yes. Tangential? Yes.

     

    Necessary. Check.

     

    I imagine if we had a leader that was more business minded, we would have a leader that would understand the billions us taxpayers have wasted on inane green tech ideas.

     

    (Indiotic) Political policies most definitely have affected the battery industry.
    30 Sep 2011, 07:01 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    What a concept, a real executive running for the job of chief executive. I'm impressed, and I don't say that often.
    30 Sep 2011, 02:18 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3332) | Send Message
     
    Maya,

     

    I confess I've been something of a Cain admirer for several months now and in fact I read the very same summary (you just posted) just a few days ago. The man strikes me as decent, genuine, and solidly capable. We have done much worse (see 2008). And imho he has the potential for greatness. I don't mind at all that he hasn't exactly been swimming in the fetid waters of politics all his life either. It's, dare I say, refreshing. Plus, he's a math major...and I rarely believe in anyone who hasn't taken calculus. ;)
    30 Sep 2011, 02:35 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    "We have done much worse (see 2008)".

     

    IMO, see 1992 and all subsequent years.

     

    Then see mid-1960s through 1984.

     

    HardToLove
    30 Sep 2011, 08:12 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Just picked up my $0.51 shares...which I could have nabbed at $0.46.
    30 Sep 2011, 10:15 AM Reply Like
  • alsobirdman
    , contributor
    Comments (366) | Send Message
     
    Good for you, Maya. I need to learn to be more patient. I also need to stop watching the daily action on my speculative portfolio. It's not good for the blood pressure.

     

    I just don't understand why someone would sell @ .46, when it seemed to be holding steady in the .54 range.
    30 Sep 2011, 10:27 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    I've heard good things come to them who wait, but I'd really hoped you wouldn't fill the GTC.
    30 Sep 2011, 10:33 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » alsobirdman: If they were listening to Cramer on CNBC this morning, I understand why they would move some shares.

     

    But then along comes Buffet spinning a brighter picture, aided by the Chicago PMI, which soared from 55.6 to 60.4, as reported by Focal Point Analytics over in the Quick Chat thread.

     

    Why is no one in the MSM reporting that China is on a huge coal buying binge the last month?
    30 Sep 2011, 10:36 AM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (2353) | Send Message
     
    Who do you think mopped up the supply this morning; retail or institution? Seems strange that there was as much volume in the first two hours as we saw all week.

     

    AXPW took out the stops below .50 and then went for another down dive again and found more liquidity sub .50 on the double dip. If we assume retail than it's hard to see how the orders re-populated so quickly (i.e. logic would dictate that the orders had to have been filled on its first down dive or it wouldn't have kept falling to .46).
    30 Sep 2011, 12:25 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    I think the buying is all retail. It looks like a single holder decided to take all the GTC offers and did so in fairly short order. From there it looks like active watchers who didn't have GTCs outstanding came riding over the hill to buy what they could on the cheap. I was shocked by the drop but even more impressed with the rebound.
    30 Sep 2011, 12:42 PM Reply Like
  • Frrat
    , contributor
    Comments (77) | Send Message
     
    I was too late. I was busy all around this morning and didn't notice such a big buying opportunity suddenly popped up. Hope I could still get some at the level of 0.50.
    By the way, anyone know something special about why we have a such a big discount selling? Happy buying to all bottom fishers!!
    30 Sep 2011, 01:45 PM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (971) | Send Message
     
    Maya
    Cramer...negative outlook?
    1 Oct 2011, 12:45 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    (AXPW): Quercus, Gelbaum or Special Sits is in today FWICT.

     

    The ADVFN shows about 90% "sells" with many more blocks greater than normal size. Lots more of 10K, 12K, 25K, 30K+ already.

     

    267K traded already.

     

    HardToLove
    30 Sep 2011, 10:33 AM Reply Like
  • jpau
    , contributor
    Comments (714) | Send Message
     
    I just missed the $.48, #$%$#
    30 Sep 2011, 11:23 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Hard: Talkin' 'bout a mish mash of feelings?

     

    Happy I am to have snagged those $0.51 shares, especially since Axion bounced right back to 55 cents..

     

    Grrrr that I didn't get those shares for $0.46.

     

    Doubel grrrr that shares didn't dip to my brokerage account's 90-day GTC for $0.44.

     

    JP would have been bouncing of the chalet walls if I would have snagged those shares!
    30 Sep 2011, 11:26 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    A chalet is a tiny wooden house above the tree-line. I would have been bouncing off the château walls until I broke a collarbone on the stone.
    30 Sep 2011, 11:31 AM Reply Like
  • Tim Enright
    , contributor
    Comments (1341) | Send Message
     
    I have watched the price dip below my GTC several times without any luck (nature of the OTC I am told). However, today the deal took place @ $.48...
    30 Sep 2011, 01:33 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    (AXPW): I would've snagged some, but I'm already comfy with both my trading and core blocks ATM.

     

    Went ahead and took profits just now (trailing stop-loss) on my (http://bit.ly/nPBNjS).

     

    Now what to do with that cash?

     

    Sit on it based on expectations of market fall this coming quarter or put it to work?

     

    Regardless, I'll wait 'till Monday!

     

    Congrats on the snag.

     

    HardToLove
    30 Sep 2011, 02:10 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    That "url" is really SPXU - ultra-short SPX.

     

    Edit got me again!

     

    HardToLove
    30 Sep 2011, 06:41 PM Reply Like
  • pianomanshl
    , contributor
    Comments (313) | Send Message
     
    What a swift bounce back !

     

    Good to know that a lot of potential buyers do exist waiting for a chance.

     

    I missed it today.............
    30 Sep 2011, 12:00 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Last trading day of the month portfolio repositioning is likely what is causing today's dip.

     

    Put in another tiny GTC for $0.46. Again, if I get-em, I get-em. And will consider selling on whatever spike is coming that Granville alluded to, hopefully when my average share price is achieved.
    30 Sep 2011, 01:13 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2100) | Send Message
     
    >Maya: My excuse is that I want to round up the number of shares of (AXPW) I hold to an even multiple of 10k :-)

     

    BUY, GTC at $0.46, 2k shares.

     

    I just saw a bid or 0.47 and an asked of 0.60.
    30 Sep 2011, 01:39 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2235) | Send Message
     
    Wonder what Granville believes will achieve a spike? Only known pending PbC sale is the NS road locomotive batteries, although I think someone alluded to a pending power cube demo sale to a utility in one of the reports from the annual meeting by either you Maya, or a poster on Yahoo. Nothing frustrates me more with Axion than the lack of any information regarding pending sales activity outside of NS.

     

    The European auto leads and any Detroit action is far into the future with the exception of road testing activity and R&D into using the PbC in mild hybrids. That will take a long time to materialize into significant sales, although I suppose I could hope for something in 2012.

     

    Bear in mind I am all-in on Axion and I manage another account with a significant position for their resources also, so I've paid for the right to bitch about it. ;-)
    1 Oct 2011, 07:16 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2100) | Send Message
     
    >Bang: You've paid your money and we listen to you ;-)

     

    I agree it would be nice to hang over the shoulder of whoever is talking to Axion customers who are checking out the PbC. " With visions of increased business profit in their eyes, they order enough batteries to satisfy their engineering department. The VP smiles at them, knowing they have a winner for 2013."

     

    Well, that's how I see it :-)

     

    Relax and enjoy the cooler weather (if you are anywhere near the central Southwest).
    1 Oct 2011, 07:31 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >bangwhiz ... Now don't take this the wrong way but why don't you contact Granville and ask? Drop the man a letter. I think your sales force concerns are legitimate and as a shareholder asking would seem reasonable. I've often wondered whether any effort was being expended looking into other markets (like my pet interest in marine hybrids) or the company was just having a run of good luck with potential customers stumbling across the technology somehow.

     

    Now I don't think it would instigate any detailed response or anything more than the stock & standard wording we've gotten from the CC's but it might get a little more attention in the next quarterly. Besides, how many other shareholders have asked? Might be very few or zero. It's never a bad thing to bring things that concern shareholders to the attention of management directly. I doubt Mr. Granville ever reads SA so this is just howling into the wind here.
    1 Oct 2011, 07:37 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    The problem with discussing pending sales activity is that the hunters (a/k/a salesmen) are always confident that they'll be bringing home an elk to feed the family through the winter but sometimes have to settle for deer or rabbits or squirrels, or the ever popular road kill.

     

    You know better than most that salesmen must be optimists because they have to go out and search great horned beast on a daily basis.

     

    Most of Axion's selling activities are focused on proving the utility of the PbC in a variety of applications. Since these sales are highly technical by nature, they also require a lot of hard data. When you have a commodity product and an established market, the selling process is pretty straightforward. It's far tougher when the product is unique and the market is emerging rather than established.

     

    The harder part of selling in a public company is the reality that you have two products rather than one. In addition to the product that generates your business revenue, your stock is a secondary product.

     

    People who buy the secondary product (a/k/a investors) are very sensitive to public statements and tend to turn specific discussions of marketing efforts into promises of performance. They can also be vicious bastards if they think you failed to deliver on a promise. Every advisor to public companies tells his clients that promises are dangerous and it's best to talk about milestones after you've passed them. My throwaway line is "take care of the business and let the market take care of itself."

     

    I hate not knowing what's going on behind closed doors, but know that talking about marketing activities before the outcome is certain can be far more dangerous than keeping your mouth shut till the T crossing and I dotting is done.
    2 Oct 2011, 02:45 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3332) | Send Message
     
    Seems to me, from all the tangibles and intangibles we've been given to contemplate, that they're really not worried much about *getting* business. Everything evinces that. What they do want to get nailed down, and to the sixth sigma, is being able to *handle* that business. "If you build it, they will come" is the paradigm here, and for Axion, it's truly valid. Heck, some big customers have already shown up way early. Axion knows its hotcakes are gonna sell. They're not worried. But they are NOT gonna rush it. The store will open when them cakes are done. But they're not done until TG is satisfied they're done. No stumbles, no apologies. When at last they have a bulletproof product, and that time is coming near, then it's game on.
    1 Oct 2011, 11:03 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >481086 ... All true. It is amazing that BMW found Axion early on. NS doesn't surprise me at all. Still, if someone has a concern there is no harm, no foul in asking.

     

    Now to play Devil's advocate for a minute. The original business plan was to make batteries in small quantities, make them "good enough", kick them out the door and see what markets were interested. My understanding of where they are in development is the battery is "good enough" if not finished even as the manufacturing process needs perfecting. Even if your tweaking the fab line for the satisfaction of a potential future ISO 9000 client, are they not running product and isn't it logical to do that tweaking using the original business plan or do you just scrap what comes off the line (assuming the present "tweak" production is "good enough")?

     

    Do you pin the future on a specific client showing up by a certain date? In this market, Axion has already said it will need to raise cash. Does it make sense to take the chance that orders won't be put off because of business climate (I know about the regulations coming down but those implementation dates could be "adjusted") ? Is it not possible to both continue perfecting the process and selling into 2nd & 3rd Tier markets?

     

    I don't have answers for any of this. I see the rail showing up next year in very small quantity, sales to the auto industry starting small in 2013-14, PowerCube sales starting 2015-16 and that's if the real economy doesn't shoot itself in the head. I see no harm in asking about marketing or what sales force development is being considered or pursued.
    1 Oct 2011, 11:56 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    To clarify the initial business plan a little, the goal was to make the product "good enough," manufacture devices in sufficient quantities to support paid demonstration projects with established end users, and launch a commercial rollout after demonstration and testing validate the advantages of the PbC under real-world operating conditions.

     

    It's always been viewed as a technical selling process where the first step is creating enough data to support a marketing effort and the second step is creating enough manufacturing capacity to support a commercial rollout for a specific market niche.

     

    First tier customers sought out Axion sooner than anybody expected. While these potential customers have higher expectations than we thought we'd have to satisfy during the initial testing phases, the overall process is proceeding according to plan.

     

    The original goal was to spend a couple years in testing and demonstration before commencing commercial sales to the bottom of the food chain. From there we figured several more years would be needed to work our way to the top of the food chain. It's a real high class problem when you start at the top of the food chain, but have to spend a little extra time in testing and honing your manufacturing skills.
    2 Oct 2011, 03:06 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3332) | Send Message
     
    D, certainly no harm whatsoever and I sure didn't mean to sound like I was trying to shush anyone. We all are basically in the same boat here waiting and watching for this kettle to boil. And it does seem just agonizingly slow. JP's buzzards are most appropos. So the temptation is there to commiserate, to wanna stir the pot, chew the fat....Offer up our impressions for discussion. In hard facts though, we're all of us pretty much still in the dark. It just seems to me from everything that these guys are absolutely committed to not putting the cart before the horse. They're not gonna crow until the final product is out there, available in quantity at a consistent highest quality, and price/performance-wise speaking plenty loudly enough for itself. Talking much sales and marketing before they are ready to fire for effect just doesn't seem to be in their DNA... At one time, putting out a battery that was "good enough" to the smaller markets may have been a viable plan, but that was when they truly were nobody. Clearly they're not nobody anymore. NS would not be going down the track this far with nobody. To my mind, Axion is attempting to pull off something pretty major. They're trying to debut directly in the big leagues. And so their product has to be ready to play at that level. When the big debut finally comes they want it to be flawless, they want to have a 100% ready-for-primetime product, 100% ready to roll. Synchronization of effects is what the military calls it. Blow that and your battle plan goes straight to shinola before lunchtime. The last thing they want is any kind of hiccup or trickle-out. Hence the dearth of PR and puffery. They're gonna keep as tight lipped as possible until they're sure they see them the whites of them eyes. But when it's finally time, it's time. Then there will be some noise. One day we'll wake up and they will just be a fact in the market. These guys have been at this for good part of a decade. That's too long to go and goon it by getting squirrelly just as the flag's about to go up. And there's been nothing squirrelly out of them ever as far as I can tell. So I think they're just staying focused, heads down, doggedly working the plan, tuning out the cries for more information. When they finally do hit the ground with a fully commercial product, they will hit that ground running---with a bulletproof steamroller of a product that's been tested to the limits and won't quit..
    2 Oct 2011, 03:08 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    Well said, and from all I know about the boys and the process an accurate description of what's going on.
    2 Oct 2011, 03:19 AM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (2353) | Send Message
     
    John, assuming the "I" dotting and "T" crossing takes us into 2013 and beyond, do you worry about current cash levels? I would think that no matter how prudent Axion is, they will run out of cash by EOY 2012. The above being assumed, wouldn't some trickle of PRs make good business since so they don't have to do an offering at current fire sale prices (not to mention the prospects of a double dip recession).

     

    I don't think any of the founders would want to do an 8 figure offering that'd require 20M+ shares.
    2 Oct 2011, 03:48 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    Any way you cut it I think there have to be a series of releases or conference call discussions that will have the desired impact.

     

    If you read the commentary many investors are still fretting about whether NS will do the NS 999 retrofit and the road locomotive. From what I can tell both projects have been a done deal since last summer when NS hired Axion to build a BMS that would only be useful in locomotives equipped with PbC batteries. I've always interpreted that action as a yes decision with a possible escape hatch if things went badly. I know that NS is being ultra cautious about saying anything because they ended up with egg on their face after making a big deal on the original launch of the NS 999 and running into battery problems a couple weeks later. The reason I know is I tried to arrange an interview and was told they wanted to stay quiet until both locomotives were on the road. When you have a PR shy customer you respect their wishes and only report the minimal facts - even if you want to shout it from the rooftops.

     

    The more intriguing issue from my perspective is the references TG has made to vehicle testing in the US and Europe. A recent JPS article discussed how BMW used Munich police cars and VIP shuttles for their first round vehicle tests. I would not be surprised to learn that testing of a 25 to 50 vehicle fleet is under way but under wraps. I don't know how a US OEM would structure their first round, but assume they all have similar user relationships. I think a hint of the next likely step was Maya's report that a board member was predicting a test of several hundred cars. I'd certainly be happy with a release that said "After a one-year test with vehicles operated by XXX, YYY Motor Company has placed an order for ZZZ PbC batteries that will be installed in a consumer test fleet that will be evaluated in # cities."

     

    All big companies are incredibly PR shy unless the PR originates in their house and on their schedule. I'm still amazed that NS & BMW publicly aligned themselves with the PbC technology before there was a PbC product. I've never seen that before. Unfortunately, there is no such thing as a trickle of PR that associates a $50 million market cap company with a $50 billion market cap company.
    2 Oct 2011, 04:50 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » 481086: Terrifically put. A while back, before these incredulously successful Concentrators came into my life, I wrote that I feel like Mother Goose patiently sitting on some golden eggs.

     

    I don't know when they will hatch. But hatch they will.

     

    Axion reminds me of playing canasta with my grandpop.
    2 Oct 2011, 11:21 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    Or watching golf on television.
    2 Oct 2011, 11:24 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >481086 ... I like the description and I didn't take the previous as trying to shush anyone (like that would work). I was just trying to state a legitimate shareholder concern. Although it's not my take and not what I'm waiting on. I came to Axion with a very specific application in mind and it looks good for that. What I'm waiting on is announcement of a production partnership. That will move the stock unlike any demonstration sales could ever hope to because that will grab the attention of Mr. Market. Until then all sales will be seen as demos unless it is an order that is huge. Four years & counting. The greater economy falling apart is the biggest threat I see.
    2 Oct 2011, 03:38 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3332) | Send Message
     
    D, concur with all, heartily. Though I'm thinking the greater economy would really, really have to soil the bed in order to derail NS and automaker's plans. Some degree of double dip is imho already baked into many corporate cakes and most are forewarned and fortified enough to ride it through.. The election year, as it approaches, will keep the waters of hope churning too I'm thinking. But total economic collapse? That would curdle our whole cheese for sure...
    2 Oct 2011, 04:10 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    >481086 ... I haven't ruled out total collapse. These holders of the black pool, unregulated derivatives have fought so hard not to take a write down of the base assets that originally failed and been so successful at handing their losses off on sovereigns that I think they might risk it. After all, the way things are going if sovereign backed banks do collapse they will wind up owning sooooo many more hard assets and tax receipts into the future. Collapse could very well mean that those that caused the problem might be the only real winners on the other end.
    2 Oct 2011, 10:14 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    (XIDE): For any following, GENDELL JEFFREY L ET AL sold

     

    9/22-9/26/11: 368K $3.932, 386K $3.961, 60.6K $4.0101.

     

    http://bit.ly/pgTTLn

     

    Thx to Ecomike at Investorshub for the post.

     

    HardToLove
    2 Oct 2011, 10:57 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    The Form 4 that Gendell filed on September 26th included a critical X in the tick box on the form that says "Check this box if no longer subject to Section 16."

     

    That means Gendell has fallen below the 10% ownership level that requires the filing of Form 4 reports of sales. The only way we'll be able to track future sales are through quarterly holdings reports.

     

    Getting below 10% is a very important goal for Gendell's funds because large ownership positions are valued differently for reporting purposes. I have no idea whether their sales will continue at past rates, but there is certain to be increased speculation about who the seller might be on days when volume seems high.
    2 Oct 2011, 11:07 AM Reply Like
  • Frrat
    , contributor
    Comments (77) | Send Message
     
    Big drop today and fantastic buying opportunity just keep coming....
    3 Oct 2011, 09:48 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1781) | Send Message
     
    Anybody else getting conflicting data from their brokerage house today on Axion? My streaming data says that 503,000 shares have been traded, but the chart says 286,000. Something's not right. Either way, a lot of shares are being sold cheap.
    Oh, and I just saw it posted that C & D Technologies got bought out for $9.75/share. Have to wonder if something like that will happen to Axion in the future.
    3 Oct 2011, 02:51 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    Not likely. The C&D buyout is being forced by the holder of 95% of its stock who wants to take it private. C&D got into trouble when a huge intangible asset impairment (goodwill write-off) forced a debt restructuring that gave 95% of the equity to a vulture fund that had bought up the debt. When you control 95% of a company it's easy to force a going private transaction. No single stockholder owns or has the ability to control more than 15% of Axion.
    3 Oct 2011, 03:03 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17304) | Send Message
     
    (AXPW) My market depth & watch list say 286,520.

     

    HardToLove
    3 Oct 2011, 03:07 PM Reply Like
  • Frrat
    , contributor
    Comments (77) | Send Message
     
    To me, today and last Friday have amazingly similar pattern in terms of price and volume movement. Let's see if similar thing will happen tomorrow. I am going to set my account for tomorrow to pick up share in the low 0.40....
    3 Oct 2011, 05:16 PM Reply Like
  • D. McHattie
    , contributor
    Comments (1826) | Send Message
     
    I had a 60 day buy order at .45 that was filled today. My average cost just keeps getting lower. Love that chaos!
    3 Oct 2011, 07:46 PM Reply Like
  • Frrat
    , contributor
    Comments (77) | Send Message
     
    Smart!!
    3 Oct 2011, 08:18 PM Reply Like
  • anthlj
    , contributor
    Comments (230) | Send Message
     
    maybe, maybe not
    4 Oct 2011, 10:49 AM Reply Like
  • jvanwest
    , contributor
    Comments (57) | Send Message
     
    Are any of you familiar with this company?

     

    http://bit.ly/q4BaOW/

     

    It looks like they have a very interesting technology if it is cost effective could be a nice solution. I also wonder if it would be made better with stop start?
    4 Oct 2011, 09:14 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    Not burning fuel while a vehicle is not moving improves fuel economy and it doesn't matter what the underlying engine technology is.
    4 Oct 2011, 09:55 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Well...while were down here, would someone sell me some 44 cent shares? GTC order hasn't yet triggered.

     

    Brokerage account is queued in front.
    4 Oct 2011, 10:51 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » John: Better put some wrassl'n mats up around your chateau walls. Broker's assistant advises that 10k shares bought at 44 cents at 10:26:47 went into my brokerage account.

     

    Yet to get a smaller amount in my gamer account at the same price.
    4 Oct 2011, 11:05 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    That at least makes the trade a little more palatable. Mercifully I've had enough experience with small stocks in volatile markets to know that it's not the end of the world and the occasional beat down is to be expected even if it's no fun.
    4 Oct 2011, 11:10 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1781) | Send Message
     
    Maya,

     

    I have mixed feelings about your new purchase. Besides feeling envious that you got them for that, there's a part of me that is disappointed that I bought more shares 2 weeks ago and paid over $0.6/share, whereas if I had waited, I could have bought 25% more shares than I got. Yes, everyone who has shares that cost them $1.25-3.00/share can each take a whack at me now! The point is still that, it's not that I think the stock wasn't worth $0.63/share, since obviously I think it will be worth much more, but that if I had just waited I could have gotten "more" of them. It is the advantage, I suppose, of someone who is doing this for a retirement account. I can't touch the money for 15 years, so short term ups and downs mean nothing to me as long as Axion eventually does transition from R&D to a profitable company.
    4 Oct 2011, 12:11 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Lab: If you would have told me two, three, five months ago that I would be landing 44 cent shares today, I would thought you were a little touched.

     

    I also have a block of 10,000 shares I bought at $1.20. I don't even want to begin to ponder about how many shares I would have if I began buying at 50 cents.

     

    I truly hope my gamer account doesn't add more 44 cent shares. But, the buy is still open.
    4 Oct 2011, 12:20 PM Reply Like
  • jpau
    , contributor
    Comments (714) | Send Message
     
    John, what's the view in Switzerland on the Euro problem? I ask because I think the biggest danger to Axion is the economy, and it's hard to filter out the noise/bias in the media over here.
    4 Oct 2011, 11:20 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    You need to understand that Switzerland is an island of freedom and common sense in the bastion of collective foolishness known as the EU. As a result, Switzerland has seen a catastrophic rise in the value of the Swiss Franc and has recently taken action to unofficially peg its currency to the Euro. To put things in perspective, a dollar bought 1.8 Swiss Francs when I moved here in 1998. Today that dollar will buy 0.9 Swiss Francs.

     

    On balance the view seems to be that politicians in Europe are doing exactly the same thing politicians in the US did before they increased the debt ceiling. They're screaming, whining and moaning in an effort to build political cover before they do the only thing they can do, which is solve the problem. It truly is political theatre.
    4 Oct 2011, 11:38 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4429) | Send Message
     
    Definition: Politics - show business for unattractive people.
    4 Oct 2011, 11:52 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (29573) | Send Message
     
    Can I get a witness?
    4 Oct 2011, 11:56 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9598) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Next Concentrator ready for (ab)use!

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...
    4 Oct 2011, 12:10 PM Reply Like
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