Mayascribe's  Instablog

Mayascribe
Send Message
Trade stocks by day, and at night am writing a historical epic about the ancient Mayan civilization. "Maya: Spirits Of The Jaguar" is a sweeping saga set in the ancient and magical Mayan landscape where a wronged family struggles against prophecy, power, treachery and forbidden love,... More
  • Axion Power Concentrator 42: Beginning Jan. 4, 2012 213 comments
    Jan 4, 2012 12:12 PM



    Axion Power Chosen for Battery Mini Power Cube in Zero Energy Building in Washington DC Naval Yard (special thanks to Axion Concentrator member f-kru):



    NEW CASTLE, Pa.
    , Jan. 4, 2012 /PRNewswire/— Axion Power International, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: AXPW), the developer of advanced lead­carbon PbC® batteries and energy storage systems, announced today that it was awarded a purchase order from SilTek Inc. confirming their participation in a Zero Energy Building in the Washington DC Naval Yard. Axion will be providing an array of its PbC batteries, system electronics and battery management system that together will serve as an example of Axion’s “mini-Cube” concept based on the scalability, up or down, of its primary PowerCube™. The mini-Cube, which will provide demand response energy storage that will be grid network tied, will be linked to a 32kW solar panel array and will supply standby power service for this Zero Energy Administration Building. The project is underwritten by the US Navy, and the purchase order calls for Axion’s work to begin in January with the full 36 PbC battery mini-PowerCube system to be completed in the first quarter of 2012. The principal contractor for the project is Herndon VA-based SilTek Inc.

    Axion Power Chairman & CEO Thomas Granville commented, “Although this is a small project, in terms of dollars and number of batteries, it is a significant step forward because it comes on the heels of November’s ceremonious integration of our full PbC PowerCube onto the PJM network (a regional transmission organization founded in 1927, ensures the reliability of the high-voltage electric power system serving 58 million people in all or parts of 13 states and the District of Columbia). At the unveiling ceremony with PJM, we spoke of the scalability of our PowerCube technology; this project will be the first deployment demonstrating the range (from small 10kW residential units, to stacked cube modules providing 20MW) of this application. It is also an important step forward because of the strong interest the US federal government in general, and the armed forces in particular, have in zero-energy projects that reduce carbon footprints. Because of our PbC battery’s extended cycle life, high rate of charge acceptance and fast re-charging capability, Axion is able to offer metrics that make economic sense especially when compared to other more exotic chemistries that are currently in the marketplace. We are pleased and honored to be working with SilTek and the US Navy on this important project.”

    The Stella Group, Ltd, President Scott Sklar commented, “The PbC batteries offer the right capabilities with their hybrid storage able to handle varying loads for net-zero energy buildings and smart grid applications that are being scaled by the US Navy and other services within the Department of Defense. In addition, PbC batteries are 100% recyclable and made in the USA.” Sklar, early advisor to NAVFAC on this project and various other ongoing DOD projects and Adjunct Professor at The George Washington University, stated further, “Both the Department of Defense and private industry are increasing their focus on renewable energy as a means of decreasing electric grid failures, reducing carbon and particle-emitting coal-fired plants, strengthening national security and diminishing US dependence on foreign oil. Utilization of advanced energy storage technologies, particularly economically feasible technologies such as PbC-enabled PowerCubes (of all sizes), can be a leading means of accomplishing those goals.”

    PbC technology is proprietary to Axion Power and is protected by multiple patents issued over the last decade. Basically activated carbon is substituted for lead in the negative electrode in an otherwise traditionally constructed ‘lead-acid’ battery. But when compared to traditional, AGM, advanced lead-acid batteries or even lead-acid with carbon additives, the new PbC lead/carbon chemistry creates a much longer lifespan (3 to 4 times), much greater charge acceptance in partial state of charge applications (10 to 20 times more depending on the “state” of the battery), as well as faster re-charging capabilities (again depending on application – at least twice as fast but up to 10 times faster). When compared to some of the more exotic chemistries such as lithium ion, the PbC battery offers a much stronger safety profile, operates at higher efficiency at C° or sub C° temperatures and most importantly, has a total life cycle cost structure that is a fraction of the total life cycle cost of these more highly publicized exotic chemistries. PbC batteries are made in the USA, at Axion’s facilities in New Castle PA., and they can be made with readily available domestic raw materials.

    About SilTek

    SilTek is a customer-centric small, 8(a)-certified business solutions consulting firm providing energy and IT management consulting, energy conservation, and enterprise architecture solutions. SilTek’s technical management team, backed by experienced and innovative leadership, has deep experience in delivering strategic front-end planning for diverse enterprise programs ranging from complex financial systems to power purchase agreements and emergency management.

    About Axion Power International, Inc.

    Axion has developed and patented a next generation energy storage device that won the prestigious Frost & Sullivan Technology Award for North America in the field of lead-acid batteries. According to Frost & Sullivan, Axion’s new PbC batteries have “the potential to revitalize the lead-acid battery industry by breathing new life into an established technology that is not well suited to the requirements of important new applications like hybrid electric vehicles and renewable power.”

    Axion Power International, Inc. is the industry leader in the field of lead-acid-carbon energy storage technologies. Axion believes this new battery technology is the only class of advanced battery that can be assembled on existing lead-acid battery production lines throughout the world utilizing Axion’s proprietary carbon electrodes. Axion’s future goal, after filling their plant’s lead-carbon battery production capacity, is to become the leading supplier of carbon electrode assemblies for the global lead-acid battery industry.

    ####

    Special thanks to f-kru for the link to the article about the Navy choosing the Axion Power MiniCube. I experienced difficulty in linking the direct article, but was able to find one "link-able" originating from Green Tech Media.

     

Back To Mayascribe's Instablog HomePage »

Instablogs are blogs which are instantly set up and networked within the Seeking Alpha community. Instablog posts are not selected, edited or screened by Seeking Alpha editors, in contrast to contributors' articles.

Comments (213)
Track new comments
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Last comment in the previous Concentrator from DMcHattie:

     

    My thoughts, too, pianoman. We're seeing that TG chooses his words very carefully and never makes even an oblique reference without there being much more behind it.

     

    TG has mentioned oil rigs too many times for there not to be an imminent sale. I'm thinking it will come sometime this quarter, probably small at first but will be a sign of much more to come.
    4 Jan 2012, 12:15 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Pianoman: I neglected to include you in on the oil rig up next idea. apologies.
    4 Jan 2012, 03:12 PM Reply Like
  • pianomanshl
    , contributor
    Comments (306) | Send Message
     
    It's OK !
    4 Jan 2012, 05:35 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Hattie: That's my guess, too. Oil rigs coming next. This Concentrator is getting pretty good at predicting, lately!

     

    I share this prediction with you in part because it appears Kirk Tiereny has gone a bit without commenting.

     

    Something else must be up!
    4 Jan 2012, 12:19 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3686) | Send Message
     
    Why do you read KT's silence as a subtle predictor in this area?

     

    "I share this prediction with you in part because it appears Kirk Tiereny has gone a bit without commenting."
    4 Jan 2012, 12:25 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Zooooka: What better person is there out there than KT for Rosewater to hire?

     

    If this did happen (major conjecture here), then KT would therefore be "muffled."

     

    There has been way to many articles and "situational breaks" that have been posted in the last two Concentrators for KT to not come in and make comment.

     

    That's my suspicion.

     

    As an aside, it's a treat to have so many different news stories concurrently occuring in Axion's favor...which to choose from for the lead-in header for this Concentrator?

     

    But...orders are orders! And the Navy order is a significant milestone, in this desk clerk's opinion.
    4 Jan 2012, 01:05 PM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (6282) | Send Message
     
    Yes! It's a sale, and its linked to a solar array. The article also mentioned a 10kw system that could be appropriate for residential homes. The number of demonstrated applicatoins for the PbC seems to be more than doubling each year.
    4 Jan 2012, 01:16 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    Maya,
    Funny, I was just thinking the same thing the other day. Kirk values his insider knowledge more than being visible, so he usually has a habit of going away when he wants to make sure he doesn't say anything he's not open to speak about publicly.
    4 Jan 2012, 02:10 PM Reply Like
  • jlyleluce
    , contributor
    Comments (247) | Send Message
     
    I got so excited about the mini-cube news that I purchased 10,000 more shares. Hope I've jumped on the up elevator, it is even okay if stuck here for a short while.
    4 Jan 2012, 02:41 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Lab: Duly noted. And funny.
    4 Jan 2012, 02:45 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    DRich and others> Chrysler and UQM photo and story for your viewing pleasure:
    http://bit.ly/xfhUHt
    4 Jan 2012, 12:50 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Thanks BW!

     

    I'd not seen that myself.

     

    HardToLove
    4 Jan 2012, 01:42 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    Bangwhiz,
    You can tell it's a 2008 article, since they are reporting on things to happen that have already happened and they are making promises about the recharging abilities of Li-ion batteries from A123 that we now know are far slower than promised.
    4 Jan 2012, 02:18 PM Reply Like
  • Frrat
    , contributor
    Comments (76) | Send Message
     
    I am a little bit disappointed to see AXPW's price is only up 6% when considering the quite high volume (568,050 up to now). I am wondering if big sellers are in today again, otherwise IMO we should see a price spike much higher than this. Any thought?
    4 Jan 2012, 01:39 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    Frrat,
    As Mr. Granville points out, it's not a big order for sales or batteries, so it's not going to move the stock that much on it's own merits. But at the same time, let's not forget that a week ago the stock was moving down every day, with sellers pushing their way into the sell window. If you believe the old adage, "you sell to the good news", then you would expect that if there were large numbers of distressed sellers trying to use this news to sell stocks, then a lot more shares would be in play today and the price would be going back down. IMHO
    4 Jan 2012, 02:24 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Frrat: "High expectations".

     

    We have to accept that coming off a lot of downward pressure there's still a lot of folks that went long expecting to take near-term profits on a small real, but large percentage, price rise.

     

    We really are looking very good, IMO, as I posted in this comment a short while ago today.

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    Momentum takes some time to develop and today's news, while quite positive, is likely not enough to cause folks to abandon all caution and hop aboard. And I don't believe momentum players, that might provide a temporary lift, would be jumping big yet either.

     

    I expect to see, if we continue up, some resistance again at the ~$0.355 level.

     

    I've used the phrase "long slog up" a few times and do believe that is what's ahead *unless* we get rapid-fire PRs. Since many of the applications take some time to develop, I think we'll be well served by "expecting the worst, hoping for the best and can't be disappointed".

     

    Patience is *my* keyword here.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    4 Jan 2012, 02:32 PM Reply Like
  • Frrat
    , contributor
    Comments (76) | Send Message
     
    LabTech and HT, 120% agree that patience is the keyword, since I expect AXPW at least be a 20-bagger in 5 years.
    What I notice is that today's 672K volume only move the price up 6-7%, far less than yesterday. What does this imply? big sellers in or some bottom feeders are taking a quick profits? Are we seeing some kind of new market dynamics come into play? I am just curious....
    4 Jan 2012, 03:26 PM Reply Like
  • battman
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    HTL, would you have expected this kind of price movement, except maybe without the volume, if there was no press release?
    4 Jan 2012, 03:29 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    HTL - The .355 next resistance level is right there on the chart. However, the MACD is still turning up and looks good. I don't care if the big sellers are selling or not. If they are then fine - the sooner they are done the better for us. From a low of .25 to .32 today represented a 25% gain for flippers. We can expect a choppy ride up for a long time.
    4 Jan 2012, 04:37 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Battman: I did expect price to continue to crawl up. I would've expected volume to be lower w/o the PR.

     

    Part of that was expecting continued effort at bottom-feeding, sans a PR. I combined this with the belief that big sellers, whether for tax-loss or other reasons JP has suggested (except Quercus who we believe limits sales to ~10% of daily volume) were out of the market.

     

    This seems supported by the buy:sell (if we ignore the PR) where we saw a much higher percentage hitting the ask, rather than the hitting the bids when (we think) the big sellers were in the market. Predominately hitting the asks two days in a row now!

     

    Regardless of the PR, if big sellers were still in the market, would they pass up the volume and rising price today? I suspect not. The spreads were narrow enough they would have likely hit the bids harder to assure they got their dumping well underway.

     

    Anyway, without the PR I think there would've been long periods of larger bid/ask spreads (which we saw a lot during the period of the big sellers in the market) with little movement until someone lost patience. This would give lower volume.

     

    As I had mentioned earlier, any PR would surprise me (and it did) and that my expectation of lower volume with a "slog" up wouldn't hold if we got PR. I think the slog is still intact and the lower volume will appear.

     

    The question now is what Frrat asks: pattern change?

     

    Buy:sell ended the day at 1.50:1, a decent number but not as strong as some of the past ratios seen when we had a pop and weaker than yesterday's 1.858:1. My feeling is that headlines have a generally short lifetime and during that lifetime any new apparent "trends" are suspect. *But*, having a weaker buy:sell today even when we had a PR makes me think we are already seeing a little weakness in the uptrend due to profit-taking.

     

    This seems supported by the daily short sales data which shows a doubling in both total volume and short-sales volume (meaning some market-maker(s) had some sell orders for shares they don't yet control - they didn't need to provide much liquidity today AFAICT).

     

    0103 TotVol 0340713, Sht 099149 29.10%
    0104 TotVol 0699563, Sht 200313 28.63%

     

    And the BTIG market-maker was in a long time today. This was one of the ones we saw suppressing price pretty good in late December.

     

    I'll be looking to see what the trend does after a few days w/o PR. I see two possibilities easily.

     

    One is that the two recent PRs make believers out of many on the sidelines who are leery (smart?) of buying during the pops. They'll wait and become the new cadre of bottom feeders. What happens then depends on what JP has referenced many times: the new longs. Do they hold or become sellers for short-term profits?

     

    I believe many that bought recently already became or will become sellers. So they will help cap the near-term rise and might sate the appetite of the new cadre of bottom-feeders. Prognosis: the predicted slog up and falling volume materializes. Today's slightly weaker buy:sell and near-constant short sales percentage seem to support this view.

     

    The second scenario is the same except that those that bought the pop are mostly not near-term sellers. In this case those not yet in who were erstwhile bottom-feeders have difficulty getting the price they might want and (to use another "JPism") start crowding each other to get in the door before the train pulls away.

     

    In this case they could overwhelm whatever sellers there are and move price and volume substantially - even right on past the $0.355 I anticipate offering resistance.

     

    This is *not* *yet* supported, IMO, by what I'm seeing. The slightly weakening buy:sell and near-constant short sales percentage in the presence of positive PR argues against this scenario short-term.

     

    My best bet (reverting to the charts, buy:sell and daily short sales) ...

     

    TA on the charts is very bullish ATM. We continue with higher lows and highs, good (but reducing) volume, good (but weakening) buy:sell.

     

    This seems supported by the fact that almost every oscillator is either slightly in bullish territory or nearing it. The only ones really lagging ATM are accumulation (but it's still moving that direction even though still negative) and ADX is just now trying to cross DI+ above DI-.

     

    So I'm stuck with continued price move up to the $0.355 area on *expected* reducing volume. I would look for indications at that level of what might come next.

     

    Golly, do you realize how many opportunities I give myself to look absolutely foolish? I've got to work on that - it's going to bite me yet again if I don't quit it.

     

    My best SWAG,
    HardToLove
    4 Jan 2012, 07:15 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    BW, yes. In my reply above to Battman, my TA indicators say the same as your MACDs.

     

    hardToLove
    4 Jan 2012, 07:17 PM Reply Like
  • battman
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    Regardless of the share appreciation which we are not yet seeing from the news, it's nice to see the company further strengthen its position and broaden its partnerships. I bet there are quite a few underwater shareholders today with smiles on their faces.
    4 Jan 2012, 01:41 PM Reply Like
  • TATyszka
    , contributor
    Comments (131) | Send Message
     
    : - )
    5 Jan 2012, 11:59 AM Reply Like
  • sonrisa777
    , contributor
    Comments (122) | Send Message
     
    I'm just glad to see the price go up instead of down! At 2:01, it was actually up 8.26%. If you look at the curve starting in feb. 2011, it took a good 2 months before it made it all the way up to 1.26 after starting at .60. It's a small stock. Give it time. I believe it will build up especially if SS are really done with their selling.
    4 Jan 2012, 02:10 PM Reply Like
  • jveal
    , contributor
    Comments (644) | Send Message
     
    The trading this past hour with buyers using 1/100 of a cent to gain advantage shows that we bottom feeders have a hard time chasing rising share prices. Others who have waited to jump in on the turn around are holding back to see if this is truly the inflection point we have all been looking for.
    4 Jan 2012, 02:55 PM Reply Like
  • f-kru
    , contributor
    Comments (263) | Send Message
     
    > Maya, actually I copied the link straight from Axion's RSS feed:
    http://bit.ly/yVlGaD
    4 Jan 2012, 04:04 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » f-kru: Link did work, but the cut and paste did not. It's all okay, as this article is now all over the place, including in my regular email box right from Axion IR. When I "Binged" it about two hours ago, Bing had at least six links.

     

    Hat tip again for the heads up.
    4 Jan 2012, 04:12 PM Reply Like
  • lsd_lsm
    , contributor
    Comments (130) | Send Message
     
    Fellow Concentrators -

     

    I know all of you appreciate a good investment writer. A few days ago, a message board mentor of mine from years ago wrote his first piece on a company called Crexendo (EXE).

     

    He is a first class writer and analyst and in the early 2000's he recommended Faro in the 2's on yahoo when it still had a good message board - it now sits at 46. Additionally, he recommended the former version of Crexendo - Imergent (IIG) to me in the 3's before it went to 30 and then was taken out by a massive coordinated short attack because of their former business model.

     

    I would encourage you to give him a read if you have the time.

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...
    4 Jan 2012, 05:12 PM Reply Like
  • jveal
    , contributor
    Comments (644) | Send Message
     
    I just received this e-mail announcement from Norfolk Southern. It may be that something will be mentioned about their PbC battery testing.

     

    Norfolk Southern to host fourth-quarter 2011 earnings conference call

     

    NORFOLK, VA. – Norfolk Southern Corporation will present its fourth-quarter 2011 earnings on Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2012, at 4:30 p.m. EST via teleconference and live Internet webcast. The company will issue its earnings results shortly after market close on Jan. 24.

     

    Those interested in participating via teleconference may dial 877-869-3847 several minutes prior to the call. An audio replay will be available until Jan. 31, 2012, following the live broadcast, by dialing 877-660-6853, using PIN 2861, and replay number 385544.
    4 Jan 2012, 05:23 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I'd be very surprised if NS said anything about their work on the PbC because from the NS perspective it's a new technology development program and companies hate talking publicly about that kind of project until it suits their purpose to do so.
    4 Jan 2012, 05:32 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2745) | Send Message
     
    I'm not a big fan of the stock analysis at Motley Fool. This piece, though, isn't about stocks and is interesting for the data tables from the USGov. Its got quantitative info about government subsidies for various energy groups. An eye opener and some quotable info for the "if you only eliminated the subsidies to Big Oil you could pay for all the windmills" silliness.

     

    http://bit.ly/zlKToe
    4 Jan 2012, 07:43 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Holy moly! That was an eye-opener ... for those not blinded by faith!

     

    I note the biofuels are, IIRC, also the worst in water use. I'll have to pull up that link I posted a while back and see how those others rate.

     

    Thanks for that link.

     

    The downside is that a couple of those heavily subsidized sources are deal-makers for Axion. Let's hope their efficiency quickly improves dramatically to the point of sustainability.

     

    HardToLove
    4 Jan 2012, 07:55 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    Sorry that I posted this on the last concentrator. Meant for it to be on this one.

     

    For any interested in ZBB and their flow battery this is a must see.
    I really like this 5 minute presentation. Hope Axion gets one soon for interested purchasers.
    http://bit.ly/xa2n34
    4 Jan 2012, 10:18 PM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (1135) | Send Message
     
    Here is a question for those that are smarter than me.

     

    ZBB EnerStor states they use DC/DC converters. What is this? Is this equivalent to the AC/DC inverter in the Powercube or would a user of ZBB have to purchase an AC/DC inverter in addition to ZBB EnerStor.

     

    My knowledge of AC/DC until recently was 'Hells Bells' and 'Back in Black'
    5 Jan 2012, 10:22 AM Reply Like
  • lsd_lsm
    , contributor
    Comments (130) | Send Message
     
    Mr. Holty -

     

    I have been working on an understanding of the engineering involved in your question for a couple months. In layman's terms what it boils down to is this ...

     

    The grid and the wires that electricity runs on in the buildings are AC. However, most of the renewable inputs and the UPS or battery array are DC. As a result, AC/DC converters are required to change back and forth.

     

    A building may use the ZBB Enersection./system to connect or allow different inputs of DC and AC. To make it easy for me, I think of the Enersection much like the tower of your computer to which you hook up all of the plug and play USB components. And as a result, one does not separately have to purchase an inverter for each input because they come as part of the Enersection.

     

    The DC/DC converters are used for the inputs that run on DC and the AC/DC converter is used for inputs such as the grid that run on AC.

     

    These issues started to become clear when I did some research on a new standard that is being developed for data centers called 380vdc. What that means is that there is a push to change data center energy input from AC to 380 volts of DC because every conversion from AC to DC back to AC and back to DC has a significant energy heat loss. An example of that would be the block on the cord of your laptop which converts ac from the wall to dc to your computer but gets hot while plugged in.

     

    The above is a rushed explanation, but if you do some additional digging, I think you will be pleasantly surprised.

     

    Take a look at the following or google - emerge, 380vdc, and intel ... In September, ZBB did their first demonstration at a financial institution. I have a hunch that its represented in this presentation.

     

    http://bit.ly/x2vmo9
    5 Jan 2012, 08:30 PM Reply Like
  • lsd_lsm
    , contributor
    Comments (130) | Send Message
     
    As an aside, interestingly, the battle between AC and DC began as a battle between Tesla (AC) and Edison (DC) ... Tesla originally won out as AC was adopted, but Edison might have the last laugh.

     

    http://bit.ly/AlLBbD
    5 Jan 2012, 09:11 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Lsd_Lsm: IIRC AC won out because it could be transmitted further with fewer problems (i forget what they were). Maybe less current flow and step down/up conversion via transformers was possible due to the AC?

     

    SHB, any info on that?

     

    HardToLove
    6 Jan 2012, 09:32 AM Reply Like
  • lsd_lsm
    , contributor
    Comments (130) | Send Message
     
    As I recall, you are correct, it was cheaper at the time to build centralized electricity generation, and AC although more dangerous was more efficient at moving it long distances through transmission lines ...
    6 Jan 2012, 09:36 AM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2745) | Send Message
     
    With AC you can use transformers to increase (and decrease) voltage.

     

    power transmitted = Voltage X Amps. Raise the voltage and you need lower Amps for the same amount of power.

     

    Power loss = Amps x Amps x resistance. So lower Amps means less power lost to heating the wires, given the same wire size and length (resistance).

     

    Hence tall towers, 400kV and wire small enough to hang on the towers. BTW, all transmission wire is aluminum today.

     

    Only with the development of relatively cheap power semiconductors has DC become an option for power transmission. Or BESS systems. It gets converted back into AC for local distribution in the grid.

     

    See "Tres Amigos" power interconnect planned in the US southwest. Superconducting DC transmission to interconnect different grids. Very cool!

     

    http://bit.ly/2vpsf2
    6 Jan 2012, 01:25 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    Again I apologize for posting this US Navy link to the last concentrator. In the comment stream of concentrator 40 I jokingly said that the Navy was an Axion supporter and hoped the Army Hybrid Humvee program would be a hit for Axion. Little did I expect the Navy to buy the first Mini-Cube from Axion the next day.

     

    This is my source for stating that the Navy likes the Axion Product. From a 2009 study.

     

    http://1.usa.gov/vZ528s

     

    Although technical in nature it really is a sound article which talks about the merit of the Axion product.

     

    To see the US Navy adopting the PowerCube is understandable.
    I can't wait for that Army to tell us how they are going to use it.

     

    Its only January 4,2012 and a 36 PbC mini-Cube is sold. An estimated $25,000 piece of equipment that can be used in millions of buildings and commercial centers around the globe.
    Just another niche market. Just a scalable product that can really be a game changer disruptive technology.

     

    All journeys begin with the first step. Congrats to Axion for taking the first step.
    4 Jan 2012, 10:22 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    Futurist,

     

    Actually, we've seen the Navy link before. IINDelco posted it on Yahoo about a month ago and it got circulated around here as well. Does show that the US Navy has been looking at many choices for a while and that the PbC was on their radar long before today's announcement.
    4 Jan 2012, 11:03 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    So how should we understand the term "grid network tied" for the Navy Zero Energy Building?

     

    My reading of the Press Release is that the power stored from the Solar Array is on standby, to be used when demand response (from Viridity?) asks the building to take less power from the Grid.

     

    Am I in the ballpark, or confused?

     

    With only 36 batteries, I don't think we can meet the minimum requirement to selling power onto the Grid, right?

     

    Also wondering if it's really 4 Strings of 8, with an extra allocated to each string for "backup." Seems a little excessive ... what are the odds that all 4 strings would need a replacement at nearly the same time. So there's probably a better explanation ...

     

    Also wondering whether some type of inverter would be required for this, and whether the price of the batteries end up dwarfed by the price of the inverter.

     

    Help!
    5 Jan 2012, 01:38 AM Reply Like
  • KentG
    , contributor
    Comments (368) | Send Message
     
    wt, good questions.

     

    I was also wondering what "zero energy building" means?

     

    Your assumption about the size of the system and selling power to the grid seems correct, but the statement "will provide demand response energy storage" is confusing.

     

    I used to have a 4.2 kW DC array on my house in Livermore which provided enough electricity for my 1300 SQFT home. After a year I had a total electric bill of approx. $60. A 32kW system is not small which ties into my "zero energy building" question.
    5 Jan 2012, 01:58 AM Reply Like
  • KentG
    , contributor
    Comments (368) | Send Message
     
    I was able to answer my own question. "zero energy building" means energy neutral. They will generate approx. as much energy from solar and wind as they think they will use.

     

    Grid tied means energy created in excess of what is needed during peak generation times will be fed back into the grid and during off peak generation times the grid will supply the additional energy needed. At least that is how it worked with my solar system. I wonder if there is a feed-in-tariff which would allow them to be paid for their excess peak generation and then they buy it back at night at a lower cost?
    5 Jan 2012, 04:44 AM Reply Like
  • Charlieburg
    , contributor
    Comments (49) | Send Message
     
    How many of us thought that AXPW would be announcing these types of battery deployments first? Viridity? The Navy? There has been so much chatter on JP's comment section about electric cars that you would have thought that was where the market would form first. It seems (to me) by the time the OEM's make a decision about PbC, Axion will have more business orders and interest than it can handle. They will probably need the production capacity of East Penn and Exide to fill their orders. My faith in this company is growing!! In just about every comment I read, I think one of two things to myself, "gee, these guys are pretty smart" or "why didn't I think of that"!
    Thanks everyone for the great conversations and contributions!
    Charlie
    5 Jan 2012, 08:17 AM Reply Like
  • Ricknplano
    , contributor
    Comments (318) | Send Message
     
    It does look like we may get more PowerCube orders this year than I would have expected 6 months ago. I expect news regarding NS in the next 3-6 months and maybe an auto OEM by year end. But the stationary markets may grow faster than the motive applications.
    5 Jan 2012, 09:05 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    Charlie...AXPW management & some of us have tried to tone down the auto expectations. We are probably a couple of years from anything big there...the best we can hope for is a couple of small fleets to test this year with orders coming in summer of '13 or '14.

     

    I think we get there, but it's maybe 2 yrs. away. Meantime the grid looks the most promising and that surfaced almost overnight with the PC, Viridity & PJM.
    5 Jan 2012, 09:50 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » LT: It's tough to debate time frames. But it's also fun...

     

    Depends what you deem "big." We have to remember that TG stated BMW is, "Fast tracking," the PbC (on Nov. 28). BMW has already done a lot of testing, and they must know that the plain Jane AGM battery won't cut it for their coming stop/start vehicles.

     

    On the flip side, I heard Bob Avrill say to not get too excited about any "big" order from BMW (on July 20), and that likely there will be more fleet testing of 200 vehicles, or so, will be the way BMW goes for a little while, and to some extent that fleet testing has already been going on with German police cruisers. But now, almost a half year has passed by since I heard Avrill say this at the July Shareholders' Conference.

     

    I don't know what "big" means either, but I expect BMW this coming fall to announce that they will be using the PbC in at least one of their I-series cars, for their 2013 model.

     

    We all know the Viridity/PJM announcement took us by surprise, but what I believe we all also realized by that announcement is that the stationary PbC applications could far outsell the mobile applications in the future.

     

    BMW is sexier, but in my opinion the grid is far larger, and holds far greater promise for the PbC and the HT30. TG joked that he didn't expect to (paraphrasing), "to get all of the $122B," that the US is expected to spend on the grid by 2022.

     

    I agree with most everything you say, except that by 2013, I'm pretty sure we'll be seeing something that qualifies as "big." Both from BMW (and likely GM and Ford, too), as well as Viridity/PJM.

     

    By 2014, if the world doesn't collapse, I'm pretty sure we'll see Axion up 1000% off the 25.1 cent bottom we saw just last month.
    5 Jan 2012, 10:17 AM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1960) | Send Message
     
    Maya,
    I think one of Axions biggest challenges is going to be ramping up production and meeting demand for what is going to be coming down the pike by the end of this year, and the capital raise that will need to accompany that. Thankfully we see that through the 2009 DOE grant to Exide that Exide has been building manufacturing capabilities that will accept Axion's carbon negative electrode. All the progress we have been seeing in many different areas from grid to locomotive to auto to Exide and east penn partnerships all seem to continue to point in one direction...PbC production to ramp up nicely by the end of 2012, perhaps nothing extraordinary but the continued one step in front of the other progress that has marked the past few years..

     

    I have not seen anything that pushes against that current momentum trend other than the global economic malaise, which bares consideration.
    5 Jan 2012, 10:31 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » jakurtz: I'm not going to quibble with ramping up occurring this year; especially after I saw that small mountain of empty battery casings on Nov. 28.

     

    What I did not see, or learn of, is that Axion is in process of building the 11 Gen2A lines out. It's coming. But I know for a fact that only one Gen 2 line exists right now.

     

    Again, it's the question of how one defines "big." Big to me means a fully functioning factory must come first.

     

    5 Jan 2012, 10:43 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    "BMW is sexier, but in my opinion the grid is far larger, and holds far greater promise for the PbC and the HT30. TG joked that he didn't expect to (paraphrasing), "to get all of the $122B," that the US is expected to spend on the grid by 2022. "

     

    Maya...we are both in agreement on all that you posted ... the above quote is what I was referring to the most...the grid is the holy grail near term. I hope that you are right on the time frame and 1000 x rise in price ! Then we both win!
    5 Jan 2012, 11:15 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    Quercus down to 3 million shares now. If volume holds, we won't have to deal with them long.

     

    http://bit.ly/ywmgxF
    5 Jan 2012, 09:00 AM Reply Like
  • Ricknplano
    , contributor
    Comments (318) | Send Message
     
    They dumped 380,000 shares in the last five trading days.
    5 Jan 2012, 09:12 AM Reply Like
  • battman
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    So out of 3,784,678 shares traded in that five trading day period (which is doubled, so actually 1,892,339 shares) Quercus accounted for 380,000 which means 1,512,339 shares came from other sources. Hopefully Special Sits is out.
    5 Jan 2012, 09:21 AM Reply Like
  • Ricknplano
    , contributor
    Comments (318) | Send Message
     
    I am still not clear whether those trades double count or not. But either way, Quercus, at 10%-20% of all sales, is definitely a drag on the stock and may be for a bit longer.
    5 Jan 2012, 09:30 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Under Rule 144, a selling stockholder is subject to several important limits. Firstly, sales in any rolling 90-day period can't exceed the greater of (a) 1% of the issuer's outstanding stock, or (b) the average weekly trading volume for the four calendar weeks preceding the filing of a notice of proposed sale on Form 144.

     

    Quercus filed a Form 144 on December 28th that said it planned to sell 850,000 shares in the next 90 days. It has already sold 625,000 of those shares, which leaves 225,000 shares left in inventory. While it can file an amendment to the Form 144 and increase the number of shares it plans to sell, it will still be subject to the basic limits of the rule. If trading volume continues at the pace set last year, Quercus should be out of the picture by the end of May.
    5 Jan 2012, 09:37 AM Reply Like
  • Ricknplano
    , contributor
    Comments (318) | Send Message
     
    The form was filed 12/28/11 but it says the sales start date was 12/19/11. Odd that they file in arrears a form stating how much they plan to sell in the future. But given the quantity sold already, they should be less of a drag on the price until, let's see..."beware the ides of March".
    5 Jan 2012, 10:16 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    My favorite view of their sales:
    http://bit.ly/oNHcd3
    5 Jan 2012, 03:49 PM Reply Like
  • SimpleInstrument
    , contributor
    Comments (79) | Send Message
     
    Put the word out at .27; enjoy. I do have skin in the game now. Also enjoyed the emails from the company on the powercube. If they can take the time; ...
    Have a good year.
    5 Jan 2012, 10:37 PM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    HTL..I thought we would test .35 this morning...but volume dried up and strong resistance here at .325
    any thoughts?
    5 Jan 2012, 10:13 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I'd say the bottom feeders are being patient in the hope that there are still a few willing sellers waiting in the wings. Particularly after a beat down like we saw last quarter, investors are cautious about moving the price until they're confident the pressure has abated. If our eager sellers are finally out of stock, we may be in for a few days of very low volume.
    5 Jan 2012, 10:34 AM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1960) | Send Message
     
    This trading is actually what I expected to see on Tuesday. With a market moving down traders are still going to be cautious after a 16% gain in two days.
    5 Jan 2012, 10:40 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    LT: What JP and JAK said. But if it did hit $0.35 I would've been (pleasantly) shocked based on what I saw yesterday and discussed in my comment.

     

    Volume does look to be retreating (we do have to consolidate somewhere after a nice move up) and it looks like the bottom-feeder scenario is in play near-term.

     

    Eyeballing the buy:sell ATM (11:52), we have 1.177:1. I suspect as volume tapers off into the afternoon (if it acts as "normal"), some of the sellers will be afraid a small retrace will appear. I expect the ratio to *begin* to swing towards the sell side, although I can't guess if the ratio will actually swing to the other side.

     

    This is part of the "slog" scenario, IMO. Confirms my "news has a short shelf-life" thought for now.

     

    In all honesty, whether price moves up or down, I'm much more comfortable when it acts as "expected" - it suggests that we are getting a handle on things.

     

    HardToLove
    5 Jan 2012, 12:10 PM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (958) | Send Message
     
    patience...
    5 Jan 2012, 01:24 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    Took until this afternoon. Then someone quickly grab another 50K of shares at $0.34.
    5 Jan 2012, 01:47 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3686) | Send Message
     
    I think "patience" has left the building. Even a few friends of mine (who I tipped off back below .30) are asking me today if it's still a good buy. Some lurkers will chase it up for sure. 20% up is kind of fun =)
    5 Jan 2012, 02:26 PM Reply Like
  • SimpleInstrument
    , contributor
    Comments (79) | Send Message
     
    Sadly, I heard a few a home had sold (will regret that one). Normally I would cut and run with such gains... but I'd rather see them survive (this time).
    5 Jan 2012, 10:41 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Level 2 looking quite interesting this morning.

     

    The three largest bids out there right now are 82,000, and 44,000 shares, each for $0.32, backstopped by another 50,000 shares bidding $0.30.

     

    Here's the fun part. The largest ask is only 25,450 shares for $0.35.

     

    Pretty safe bet we'll close at least at or above 32 cents today.

     

    $0.329 right now, with volume (as expected) pretty low at just above 87,000.
    5 Jan 2012, 11:29 AM Reply Like
  • 23808
    , contributor
    Comments (87) | Send Message
     
    Quercus 12/30/2011 sale - 122,000 shares at $0.1856 ??? What a sweet heart deal for the MM??? How did it happen when so many bottom feeders had a higher bid than .18?
    5 Jan 2012, 11:29 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    That's a common "negotiated" deal. The broker/mm takes the shares at an agreed-upon price and sells into the market at their convenience.

     

    I wish Quercus had us advising them. They'd get a better price ... probably.

     

    I wish they would offer those shares to us. I'm pretty sure we'd give them a better deal - when both sides benefit it's a good bargain.

     

    HardToLove
    5 Jan 2012, 12:19 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    NEW GRANVILLE INTERVIEW:

     

    http://bit.ly/wRWooI

     

    Altenergymag just published a new interview with Tom Granville that drills deeper into the technical performance of the PowerCube than anything else I've seen.

     

    It belongs on your must-read list.
    5 Jan 2012, 11:30 AM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4810) | Send Message
     
    NICE find, John. I note, in particular, Granville's comment near the end of the interview reading,
    "Q: Are there any installations currently using PowerCube™ technology?

     

    Ans:The PowerCube on our site is the first deployment of this technology. We have purchase orders for batteries and have other PowerCube proposals in various stages right now, but everyone wants to be able to see one and touch one that is actually operating in the marketplace. That's why we’re so excited to see our PowerCube in action."

     

    The man says, we HAVE PURCHASE ORDERS for batteries!
    5 Jan 2012, 11:57 AM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    Its nice to see a continual flow of articles about Axion hitting my Google Alerts inbox with "Axion" as the key word. Lots of visibility. Nice interview. Purchase orders in hand wonderful!
    5 Jan 2012, 12:03 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    It wasn't a find by me. It was an e-mail notification from Axion.
    5 Jan 2012, 12:24 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » JP: Yes! A must-read! Purchase orders in hand!

     

    My favorite part of this interview was the answer to the last question, especially the very last phrase:

     

    : Where does Axion go from here with this technology?

     

    Ans:As mentioned already, we have applications in numerous markets that alllend themselves to the unique characteristics of our product namely – increased cycle life; high state of charge acceptance; fast re-charge capability and low voltage variation in large string applications. The hybride vehicle stop/start market; hybrid trains; solar and wind storage; oil rigs; residential storage – are but a few of these market applications
    5 Jan 2012, 11:56 AM Reply Like
  • D. McHattie
    , contributor
    Comments (1844) | Send Message
     
    And, as I'm sure pianoman noticed, he mentioned oil rigs again. It's not here yet but I have to believe it's in the mail.
    5 Jan 2012, 12:32 PM Reply Like
  • jlyleluce
    , contributor
    Comments (247) | Send Message
     
    Thanks for the link.
    " We have purchase orders for batteries and have other PowerCube proposals in various stages right now, but everyone wants to be able to see one and touch one that is actually operating in the marketplace."

     

    From Granville interview linked by JP. More good news.
    5 Jan 2012, 12:02 PM Reply Like
  • jlyleluce
    , contributor
    Comments (247) | Send Message
     
    D-inv,
    You beat my thought by five minutes.
    5 Jan 2012, 12:10 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Notice that TG again mentions, "Oil drilling platform," and that, in his mind, was listed before the, "hybrid locomotives market."

     

    I don't care which happens first, but it sure does seem like the PowerCube is soon heading for some oil rigs.
    5 Jan 2012, 12:24 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The oil industry isn't always the most cost-conscious crowd but their opportunities to wave the green flag are few and far between. If you can save them a pile of money and help them protect air quality at the same time it's a double benefit.
    5 Jan 2012, 12:35 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » I feel like I'm at the quarter horse race track.

     

    Twenty minutes ago, a 45,000 share bid was put in at 33 cents.
    5 Jan 2012, 12:30 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    I feel like the sun set on Dec 30th, 2011 and now we are finally seeing it rise in 2012. So far, it's a pretty sunrise! :-)

     

    "We have purchase orders for batteries and have other PowerCube proposals in various stages right now"

     

    I just like to read that statement over and over.
    5 Jan 2012, 12:58 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    WOW!! Had a sentiment swing just happen!

     

    Trades had been hitting the bid, $0.33 and suddenly started hitting the ask.

     

    $0.3499 just hit and bid/ask *presented* 71K/40K $0.33/$0.35.

     

    Still low volume, but it looks like some folks that were waiting decided why quibble over a penny or two with the good upside potential.

     

    I hope it just blows right through $0.35 and makes me look really foolish.

     

    Might teach me to keep my mouth shut! :-)) FAT CHANCE!

     

    HardToLove
    5 Jan 2012, 01:00 PM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (6282) | Send Message
     
    I am seeing it at .35... that is the upper Bollinger.
    5 Jan 2012, 01:13 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    It's right up against my falling resistance @ $0.35. If/when it breaks that on strong volume, we're looking at $0.38 easily.

     

    But ATM, it looks like $0.35 is it for today. ... What'd I just say about keeping my mouth shut?

     

    HardToLove
    5 Jan 2012, 01:25 PM Reply Like
  • Mercy Jimenez
    , contributor
    Comments (2710) | Send Message
     
    1980XLS-2.0 just posted a signal for AXPW on SA StockTalks. Activity will likely grow with day traders since he tends to have a strong following.
    5 Jan 2012, 01:07 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Are they of the buy at the open and sell at the close variety?

     

    That would be useful to know.

     

    HardToLove
    5 Jan 2012, 01:30 PM Reply Like
  • Mercy Jimenez
    , contributor
    Comments (2710) | Send Message
     
    There is a real mix on the thread, but IMO many are in it for the day scalp -- and few hold over a weekend. In the short-term some of the trades may actually provide some positive momentum to the AXPW share price -- if buyers can overwhelm the short trade.
    5 Jan 2012, 01:44 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Thanks Mercy!

     

    Recalling some JP wisdom, if they're shorting at these price levels I think they're foolish regardless of upside potential. There doesn't appear to be enough downside potential to make shorting here worthwhile.

     

    Moreover, I suspect that when they go to cover they might need a crow bar to pry the shares out of the hands of many here.

     

    Maybe a new adage: "Know your potential victim" is something they should consider.

     

    MHO, of course,
    HardToLove
    5 Jan 2012, 02:02 PM Reply Like
  • pianomanshl
    , contributor
    Comments (306) | Send Message
     
    I don't think my bid at 0.33 is going to get filled today.

     

    But I am happy............
    5 Jan 2012, 01:45 PM Reply Like
  • battman
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    0.36 bid 0.365 ask
    5 Jan 2012, 02:06 PM Reply Like
  • Poul Brandt
    , contributor
    Comments (254) | Send Message
     
    0.38
    5 Jan 2012, 02:08 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4810) | Send Message
     
    Just for LabTech.

     

    "We have purchase orders for batteries and have other PowerCube proposals in various stages right now"
    5 Jan 2012, 02:06 PM Reply Like
  • battman
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    0.365 bid 0.38 ask.
    5 Jan 2012, 02:08 PM Reply Like
  • battman
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    It's up even more now. Has to be momentum buyers. Porbably won't be around tomorrow.
    5 Jan 2012, 02:11 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    Jesus - my last buy at .34 is in the black at least temporarily. I haven't been in the black on any buy forever!

     

    Somebody's serious: $0.3400 50,000
    5 Jan 2012, 02:14 PM Reply Like
  • jpau
    , contributor
    Comments (967) | Send Message
     
    Wow, for just a moment, 2 of my accounts went green
    5 Jan 2012, 02:14 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    It's all good. Good volume (431.85K, 25-day moving average 500.725K). If pps stays >=$0.36, it closes above the falling resistance. That's *normally* a good sign.

     

    It penetrated the 50 day SMA. PSAR is about to flip bullish. Every oscillator is in bullish mode except MFI, which is still moving that direction. Accumulation/distribution still negative but moving slowly up.

     

    But it would be normal if there were a pause, now looking to be around the ~0.40 area, which we hit and pulled back from.

     

    Based on what Mercy said, we need to watch and see what the day-trader profile looks like.

     

    HardToLove
    5 Jan 2012, 02:30 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    Must be JP's supply and demand inasight coming into play with the sudden jump to .39. Are the lurkers joining the party? They aren't going to pry any shares out of our hands.
    5 Jan 2012, 02:31 PM Reply Like
  • Ricknplano
    , contributor
    Comments (318) | Send Message
     
    Agreed, I am still a buyer when I get cash. All in at the moment.
    5 Jan 2012, 02:34 PM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1960) | Send Message
     
    Just watch it a bit guys Mercy did have a good tip about some day-trader "dudes" (from the looks of their avatars) got AXPW on their radar. I believe they will be playing with fire trying to toy with AXPW but we should just keep a good watch. Thanks MJ.
    5 Jan 2012, 02:48 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    Bangwhiz,
    Hey, I'll be nice. I'll sell them some of mine for $3.00/share! :-) Not all, but just "some" of them.
    5 Jan 2012, 03:07 PM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (958) | Send Message
     
    MJ...jak...good points...but...

     

    I agree..."playing with fire"...methinks Mr. Granville orchestrating this well...especially since he has to yield to OEM and PO status...I wouldn't play with short with too many potential positive variables out there...just sayin'
    5 Jan 2012, 05:47 PM Reply Like
  • Al Marshall
    , contributor
    Comments (631) | Send Message
     
    The new Granville interview is very interesting. It looks like we have a "new" technical advantage to add to the list, at least relative to other lead-acid formulations. That is consistency, or to quote: "low voltage variation in large string applications". This is important because: "In a series string of individual batteries, the overall string capacity is limited by the lowest performing battery. The module-to-module voltage variation of PbC® battery strings is ten times lower than that of lead–acid battery strings, which require frequent equalization charges and/or battery replacements to maintain system capacity over time."

     

    Reading between the lines here, this variation may not be an issue for lithium-ion, but it might be an important factor in encouraging customers who currently use lead-acid batteries to transition to PbC given all the maintenance costs.

     

    Another point that really caught my eye was the point related to response time: "Fast responding assets like Axion’s PowerCube™ will benefit PJM by providing them with the ability to control the frequency of the grid in real time. It should be noted that the further the frequency drifts out of balance, the more difficult rebalancing becomes. The amount of power required to move back into balance increases geometrically, so it is incumbent that the provider respond quickly."

     

    From this statement, we can infer that quick response time is a sort of force multiplier that will not only help the owner win bids but will increase value. That is, if a watt for a second of power in three seconds is worth more than 2 watts/second of power say in 10 seconds (made up numbers) then that would go a long way towards explaining the high revenue numbers presented in the Viridity Power Cube press releases. It also would also help explain why a customer would use the PbC rather than a flow battery for some fixed applications.
    5 Jan 2012, 02:51 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Voltage variations in battery strings are an immense problem with all battery chemistries and it was news to me that the PbC worked so well in large string applications. As I understand it, lithium battery pack manufactures have to sort batteries based on their individual performance characteristics to ensure consistent performance within the module and from module to module. The biggest reason is that batteries with different voltages charge at different rates and like any chain the weakest link is the weakest link.

     

    I'll be fascinated to hear what some of our more technical astute brethren can add to that discussion.
    5 Jan 2012, 02:57 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    I like to remember that many of those facts were pointed out to us about 10 concentrators ago by Kirk T. Now the general public is finding out too.
    5 Jan 2012, 03:12 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    JP, me too! Until I hear otherwise I'm thinking that the strings are somewhat (almost totally?) self-balancing because of the capacitor nature.

     

    The capacitance requires no chemical reaction and gains and loses charge easily. So my guess that I posted was that's why they don't have the variation.

     

    It was pure guesswork by me, but maybe SHB has some insight on that.

     

    HardToLove
    5 Jan 2012, 03:40 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    If you think about it, one reason for the lack of variation within a string could be due to the very nature of the PbC itself-- the elimination of the negative electrode and the associated sulfation which stands to reason could be somewhat unpredictable from battery to battery and cell to cell...thereby affecting SOC and voltage in non-uniform ways. It would seem to me that the capacitance nature of the carbon electrode, since it doesn't involve any galvanic reactions, would be much more uniform and consistent cell to cell and battery to battery. And as far as the positive electrode, we all know that's not where the principle failure modes are found, so it just stands to reason that the PbC would experience much less variation battery to battery than other types. I know from handling Li-Polymer hobby batteries that cells must be closely matched and great care must be taken to ensure they remain balanced during charge. PbC will never replace Li-Poly, but I'd bet the superior string consistency simplifies what can be a very real headache and should not be something we under-appreciate.
    5 Jan 2012, 03:56 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Ah. Good thought. I'd forgotten that elimination of sulfation alone might be sufficient.

     

    Thanks for taking my blinders off.

     

    HardToLove
    5 Jan 2012, 05:07 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2745) | Send Message
     
    JP, HTL: I wrote something about the "matching batteries within a string" a few concentrators ago. Let me dig it out and I will re-post it.
    5 Jan 2012, 06:15 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Thanks sir! I remember that. But I don't recall it 'splainin' why PbC requires less effort to balance and tends to stay better balanced? That's what's got my curiosity piqued!

     

    HardToLove
    5 Jan 2012, 06:59 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2745) | Send Message
     
    THL: I just don't know enough about the innards of the PbC cell to take on that question. "A man has got to know his limitations" :-)
    5 Jan 2012, 08:15 PM Reply Like
  • lsd_lsm
    , contributor
    Comments (130) | Send Message
     
    Agreed. If I remember correctly, four or five weeks ago I tried to make a comparison between response times of Beacon's flywheels and Axion's batteries ... as opposed to the 4 second time, I think both the flywheels and Pbc came in at under .255 seconds ... although TG mentioned .5 seconds the other day?

     

    One bad point that has previously been mentioned is that there may be a collapse in pricing as more of the value streams are aggregated ... I believe JP wrote an article on this idea ...

     

    John - how would you see such a collapse affecting Axion?
    5 Jan 2012, 09:27 PM Reply Like
  • lsd_lsm
    , contributor
    Comments (130) | Send Message
     
    Nevermind - reading the altenergy emag interview now -

     

    The PowerCube™ can respond to the REGA signal received from viridity in 250 ms. The roundtrip communication time between PJM, Viridity and the PowerCube™ is on the order of 3 seconds. Currently, utility assets (natural gas fired peakers) that are participating in the regulation market have 5 minutes to respond to the regulation signal. Fast responding assets like Axion’s PowerCube™ will benefit PJM by providing them with the ability to control the frequency of the grid in real time. It should be noted that the further the frequency drifts out of balance, the more difficult rebalancing becomes. The amount of power required to move back into balance increases geometrically, so it is incumbent that the provider respond quickly.
    5 Jan 2012, 09:59 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The space will ultimately follow the law of economic gravity where the cheapest solution wins. In an economic gravity world the PowerCube should far better than its higher cost brethren, particularly if it's used in ways that aggregate lots of different benefit streams instead of focusing on something like FR that has very high value today, but very limited demand. The original article is here:

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...
    5 Jan 2012, 11:57 PM Reply Like
  • jpau
    , contributor
    Comments (967) | Send Message
     
    You're up early JP
    6 Jan 2012, 12:04 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I'm usually by about 6. The morning is prime work time for me then I like to nap after lunch so that I'm fresh when the market opens in the States. While I take calls and respond to comments till bed-time, it's mostly done with one eye on the TV.
    6 Jan 2012, 12:30 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Isd_Ism: Axion's PowerCube response time is 250 milliseconds. Beacon's best was 4 seconds, which by industry standards was amazing. Axion holds a 16 fold improvement over Beacon's flywheel.

     

    Until I learn more, Beacon's was the best, which has just been annihilated by Axion Power.

     

    I'm not too worried about such collapse in price. One bit.
    6 Jan 2012, 12:54 AM Reply Like
  • mrholty
    , contributor
    Comments (1135) | Send Message
     
    In some of Beacon's BK filings they state 3 seconds but I don't know if that theory or reality. Knowing Beacons self promoting nature I'd guess 4 seconds in the real world, and 3 theoretical.

     

    From my standpoint however, while AXPW speed is cool, really, really cool its not worth anything in FERC regulation arena as the pricing will be based on 6 second increments and both Beacon and AXPW will get premiums based on that. (caveat: if Beacon's survives their bankruptcy).

     

    Additionally if we have a collaspe in price for energy we got bigger items to worry about. Remember pricing for electricity, oil and airline seats is at the margin. Demand and pricing has already dropped as the economic slowdown has reduced power demand and therefore there are some unproductive assets sitting around willing to bid cheaply to atleast cover their marginal revenue.

     

    The last minute NYISO market has supposedly been hit the worst as there are lots of older assets are sitting to be used as the manufacturing cuts have freed up lots of energy that previously was used in upstate NY. (This is my interpretation from reading lots of documents).
    6 Jan 2012, 01:36 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3686) | Send Message
     
    Does anyone have a link for free real time otcbb quotes? I seem to be looking at old data.
    5 Jan 2012, 02:55 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    I don't think "free real time otcbb quotes" exists.
    5 Jan 2012, 03:00 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    I get "real time" quotes from TD Ameritrade, but you have to have an account with them. Don't know how "real time" they are, but I would assume it is the same for most trading companies' softwares.
    5 Jan 2012, 03:15 PM Reply Like
  • battman
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/A3TYY3 gives free real time bid ask but price is delayed 15 minutes.
    5 Jan 2012, 03:24 PM Reply Like
  • f-kru
    , contributor
    Comments (263) | Send Message
     
    Most of the free sites like google finance or the free Bloomberg iPad app are delayed by 15 minutes.

     

    Isnt't it nice to see this kind of upswing for a change?
    5 Jan 2012, 03:30 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Bazook, the last trade is delayed ~15 minutes here, but in tiny print under it the last bid/ask seems to be updated real-time.

     

    http://bit.ly/A87h9f

     

    HTH,
    HardToLove
    5 Jan 2012, 03:47 PM Reply Like
  • battman
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    Well,, it blew through 0.35 but I would expect a pull back tomorrow as it regroups and some of the day traders close out their positions. That could be a good thing, I don't think my "smiling" muscles can withstand a full week of positive gains.
    5 Jan 2012, 03:56 PM Reply Like
  • Poul Brandt
    , contributor
    Comments (254) | Send Message
     
    H.T.L.
    Thanks for the link. Just what I needed.
    5 Jan 2012, 04:09 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Battman beat me to it by several minutes!

     

    I'll tell ya, that's one of the great things about this crew - everybody who can help does!

     

    HardToLove
    5 Jan 2012, 05:10 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    Yes, Yahoo finance use to be the same way. Then they decided to start charging for real time quotes.
    5 Jan 2012, 05:14 PM Reply Like
  • sonrisa777
    , contributor
    Comments (122) | Send Message
     
    I get free quotes with:

     

    http://bit.ly/y6MV4G

     

    It's only one quote at a time but then, who cares! At least it's real time!
    5 Jan 2012, 03:55 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The bid and ask are real time on OTC Quotes, but the trade data is 15 minute delayed.
    5 Jan 2012, 04:01 PM Reply Like
  • Mathieu Malecot
    , contributor
    Comments (1288) | Send Message
     
    gotta love the close, hope battman is right about a pullback as i am closing out some longer dated options to raise cash. i too expect AT LEAST an early morning decline.
    5 Jan 2012, 04:06 PM Reply Like
  • f-kru
    , contributor
    Comments (263) | Send Message
     
    I wonder where the volume comes from - 887K. Maybe some profit taking from those who bought last week? If Quercus is sticking to his 10% metrics he'll be out pretty soon, too.
    5 Jan 2012, 04:37 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3686) | Send Message
     
    Nice day. Can you remember another 20% jump in recent times. Hopefully this isn't just a news pop that will later be faded. Then again if little news does this, what would "big" news do.
    5 Jan 2012, 04:51 PM Reply Like
  • f-kru
    , contributor
    Comments (263) | Send Message
     
    > bazooka, we had some good news in December, too, which has just been ignored because of the relentless selling. It sure looks like the market is recovering from SS's hammering.
    Maybe I'm overly optimistic... but maybe we'll have another run like the one early last year and see $1 in early March.
    5 Jan 2012, 04:58 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Remember that we theorized that the December news might cause a lot of DD and those folks would take at least a few days to come in.

     

    Maybe some of the action is them? After they finished opening their XMAS presents they came into the market and both received another present and gave us one too! :-))

     

    The second news item might have been the clincher for some of those folks.

     

    I'm going to try and be alert to see if there's evidence of those day traders Mercy mentioned. How would I tell? I'm not sure. Some kind of change in patterns I guess.

     

    HardToLove
    5 Jan 2012, 05:18 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3686) | Send Message
     
    Day traders likely will be moving large trade sizes - imo. Normally you'd see a 10,000-50,000 shares or more I'd think. These guys scalp for 3-5% on small caps I've heard. I doubt you can make much of a living on a 5% scalp unless you have a $5000-$10,000 position and win more than you lose. Heck, even the best day traders (like handicappers) only hit on a 60/40 clip. I'd expect the trader aspect to be minimal. But we might have a few swing traders here who bought near the lows and our looking at 25%+ gains now.
    5 Jan 2012, 05:30 PM Reply Like
  • Mercy Jimenez
    , contributor
    Comments (2710) | Send Message
     
    HTL, the "pattern" I have often seen is best described as "ride the bull until it knocks you off." Much like that described by bazooooka. In other words, if the US market is mixed (like last couple of days) or on an uptrend -- these short term trades are likely to hold. The moment a roller coaster melt-down appears on the scene and margin calls kick in, however, I would anticipate a run for the exits to raise cash on winners. One trader today touted his buy of 20,000 shares @ 27 cents last week. He is still holding the lot one week later, but then we have not had a juicy meltdown yet this year.

     

    My hope is that price momentum has a chance to firm up so any block selling will generate a minimal swing for those of us in it for the longer term (and yes that includes me after 24 hours on this ship with you guys.) The 25% gain is nice, but I want Maya's 1000% gain forecast :-)
    5 Jan 2012, 06:18 PM Reply Like
  • jlyleluce
    , contributor
    Comments (247) | Send Message
     
    HTL,
    really appreciate all the time you put into your technical analysis's. thanks.
    5 Jan 2012, 06:36 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Bazooka and Mercy, thanks. Those clues may help me out.

     

    Golly. The more I (think?) I learn, the more I have yet to learn.

     

    Well, that's always when I've been happiest - learning when I can see progress.

     

    HardToLove
    5 Jan 2012, 07:04 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Thank you!

     

    I hope it really helps. Whenever we get unexpected moves like today, I really wonder.

     

    Especially, if as Maya avers, it's not useful when there's catalysts around (which I've bought into in the past, but can't always judge what's a catalyst and what's not - the "market" seems fickle in that regard).

     

    HardToLove
    5 Jan 2012, 07:06 PM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    600% Growth Industry: Electric Cars

     

    http://bit.ly/xfOCL8
    5 Jan 2012, 04:54 PM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    Torque News article on yesterdays news...pretty good write up & may be a part of todays move.

     

    PbC battery technology proves extended capability at DC Naval Yard

     

    http://bit.ly/zhOSlw
    5 Jan 2012, 05:00 PM Reply Like
  • WDD
    , contributor
    Comments (60) | Send Message
     
    Greetings All!

     

    I'm a long-time SA reader, finally making my first post. It’s a long one, so I ran it by Mayascribe for his blessing, and he said, “Go for it”, so here tis.

     

    Like many Axion investors I’ve felt compelled to share my excitement regarding the apparent potential of AXPW, with the result that several months ago I convinced my Father to take a smallish position against the advice of his broker. Of course the price then proceeded to tank. This morning I sent Dad the message below. I’m sharing it in the hope that it might be of interest to the other readers of Maya’s fantastic Concentrator. There isn’t anything here that is new to this well-informed audience, but it might provide some insight into how everyone’s contributions have been digested by this humble reader. If it seems well reasoned, then maybe someone else may adapt it as they explain their own AXPW-love to their family and friends. And if I’ve made substantive errors, I’d sure like to have those pointed out pronto.

     

    E-mail message to Dad follows:

     

    ++++++++++++++++++++++...

     

    Hi Dad,

     

    As I talked you into investing in AXPW last year, I’m inclined to encourage you to hang on to it for awhile yet. The long slide over the past few months has not been fun, but there are reasons to think that the upswing has begun. In my case I used the dip as an opportunity to buy additional shares and bring my average cost down--I actually snagged another 4,000 shares at .25, the rock bottom ( I hope). My first Axion purchase was at $1.77, but my subsequent purchases have brought my cost basis to below .40. To be realistic, my whole portfolio is pretty humble compared to many but it is real to me, and AXPW is now the largest holding in my self-managed SEP-IRA. I’m out of cash at the moment but if the stock genuinely begins a steady climb (as I hope and anticipate), I may liquidate other positions so that I may continue to accumulate AXPW during the ride up. The stock has been under sustained pressure due to steady liquidation by a couple of very large stockholders, at least one of which has publically stated that their action is due to unrelated needs rather than any concern about the quality of Axion. One of the big sellers may finally be completely out, but the other can be expected to continue to sell steadily for the foreseeable future. While the big boy selling has certainly suppressed the price of AXPW, the optimist’s take is that this is promoting unusual liquidity for a microcap company and makes it possible for the rest of us to buy at great prices. Of course now that I am all-in, I’m impatient for the lighting of the booster rockets. In the meantime, I thought I would share with you my take on what the next 12 months may bring for Axion Power. Your feedback is invited—while I try not to fall in love with a stock, with this company I’ve become a true believer and I can’t tell you that I don’t have my sunglasses on in anticipation of a bright future. I really think this company has the right technology at the right time, and has good management at the helm. Okay, here is a glance at my radar screen….

     

    “Torque News” is an automotive news on-line magazine that follows the business side of the industry as well as the cars themselves. The current issue includes a story on Axion Power’s announced sale this week of a scaled-down version of their PowerCube to the U.S. Navy. Its interesting that this showed up in a car magazine—I think it is clear that the author has been following AXPW because of its anticipated use in upcoming automotive Stop-Start applications, and thinks the further expansion of the stationary storage side of the business bodes well for Axion’s health as it waits for BMW (and others) to conclude their testing and proceed with mass incorporation of PbC batteries in their S-S systems. The DoD has ambitious plans to shift military installations towards use of locally sustainable energy over the next decade, but I think the D.C. Naval Yard project is likely a test-bed for other applications.

     

    While at Joshua’s appointment to have his wisdom teeth extracted, I perused the waiting-room copy of the September 2011 issue of “SeaPower” magazine which has a cover story interview with the Commandant of the Marine Corps. It is clear from several of the articles that the Marines are looking at ways to conserve petrol in the field—from a different source I have seen the assertion that the effective cost of diesel delivered to the battlefield is around $400 per gallon. I suspect that they are looking at the Mini-PowerCube, incorporated with photovoltaic and possibly wind technologies, as a means of powering battalions in the field. I think they are also looking at hybrid applications in vehicles. On a different note, I have elsewhere read the suggestion that the military has some real hesitation regarding the competing technology of lithium-ion batteries, in spite of their light weight and terrific rechargability. The issue is that lithium fires are extremely difficult to extinguish, and Lion battery packs have had a small but not insignificant history of spontaneously bursting into flames. I think the Air Force is troubled by the thought of a sudden lithium fire aboard heavy-lift aircraft transporting Lion-powered vehicles. The Navy probably has the same concerns when stuffing the hold of a transport ship. The PbC battery does not share this problem.

     

    Reading the opinions of people who are really foamy-mouthed about AXPW, they seem to think that the next two big announcements will be the adoption of the PowerCube by drilling-platform operators in the oil industry and the post- testing adoption of PbC by Norfolk Southern Railroad. In the case of the former, apparently drilling operations are very sensitive to power supply reliability, such that they have diesel-powered backup generators running in idle just in case they lose main power. The use of the PowerCube will ensure a sufficient cushion of backup power that they can bring the emergency generators on-line from a cold-start, saving thousands of gallons of diesel each month for each platform. In the case of the latter, the locomotives already use electric motors powered by diesel engines. Incorporating PbC storage batteries with regenerative braking allows road locomotives to run their diesel engines at optimal RPM for fuel efficiency while powering high demand by the electric drive motors from the battery bank. NS is also looking to the PbC to reduce CO emissions in rail yards, thus helping them in areas where they are in trouble with the EPA due to air-quality issues. The consensus opinion seems to be that both of these developments will be achieved before the end of Q2, and the hope is that at least one will be announced in Q1.

     

    The brass-ring is the anticipated adoption of the PbC battery by the automotive industry. My understanding is that BMW is in the third year of what is typically a three-year testing process. The general thinking is that around the end of Q3 or beginning of Q4 they will announce the incorporation of the PbC in the 2013 product line, although some commentators argue that the 2014 product line may be more realistic. (Ouch. Being too early hurts as much as being too late.) Axion management has indicated that they are also working with Detroit, so the dream development may be that the whole industry shifts to PbC-powered Stop-Start systems in a 2-3 year period. While Axion has been producing complete PbC batteries on its own lines in New Castle for the purpose of supplying test batteries, their business model is to manufacture the negative electrodes and sell them to the big OEM battery manufacturers (e.g. Johnson Control, East Penn, Exide, others) to incorporate into their own branded products. So while we won’t see “Axion-brand” batteries under many hoods, we may well see Axion components in other companies’ batteries under every hood. (May it be so.)

     

    The other issue that seems to get a fair amount of attention is the anticipated need to raise additional working capital by the end of Q2. Opinions are divided regarding what effect this might have on stock price, but the voices I consider most convincing assert that the capital will be available on reasonable terms and that the funds will be well used, with the effect that there should not be any adverse impact on the stock. There are dissenting perspectives, but I don’t follow their logic and do not presently share their concern.

     

    Anyway, the view from my chair boils down to this: with the first sale of the PowerCube last month, Axion transitioned from a development-stage company to one with actual products available for purchase. This week’s sale of the Mini-PowerCube to the Navy shows that Axion has a foot in the door with the DoD and a potentially big role in their efforts towards greater energy independence. The known proof-of-concept and durability testing being conducted by railroads and automakers is nearing important decision points. The ongoing dysfunctions in the Middle East seem to ensure that oil will stay expensive and energy security will remain a front-page concern, with the result that energy storage technologies such as the PowerCube will only grown in importance at both the grid-level and at the local facility level. Stop-Start technology is already being incorporated in cars in Europe and is on the launch-pad in the U.S., despite the fact that it kills current state-of-the-art AGM batteries in a matter of months, thus presenting a huge warranty headache for automakers; both the PbC and lithium-ion batteries can meet the need in this application, but the latter are horrendously expensive. I’m feeling quite good about AXPW over the next five years.

     

    What do you think? Is this a convincing thesis?

     

    Love, David
    5 Jan 2012, 05:37 PM Reply Like
  • jlyleluce
    , contributor
    Comments (247) | Send Message
     
    a nice summary of what are my thoughts also.
    5 Jan 2012, 06:35 PM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1960) | Send Message
     
    I like your effort David and a very nice thesis on the company. I can relate because recently I told a sibling about this stock. I don't know exactly where he stands on it yet, but he is an engineer so I imagine he will take his time absorbing the scientific aspects of the PbC before making a decision.

     

    If your Dad has a good time-frame as it seems you indicate a few years, you should both be happy and he should be proud of his sons advice.

     

    Most of what you have written is right on I will say the one thing about the PowerCube sale last month is not entirely accurate and I feel this might need to correcting. Technically we can not call that a sale. That is still a demonstration project for PJM/Vridity. Axion is getting paid by PJM using it to smooth the grid but they did not sell the actual PowerCube to either PJM or Viridity in that case. You are correct on the sale of the "mini" PowerCube to the Navy.

     

    If I were you I would be inclined to send him the link to Granville's Q&A in the Altenergymag link JP posted earlier today. I think that gives some very good info on the PowerCube, where they are at with it, and where they are going with it in the not too distant future.

     

    Welcome, by the way and thanks for sharing!
    5 Jan 2012, 07:11 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    Pretty good summary. I convinced all of my family members into buying Axion and did not enjoy watching all their sterns go up in the air. However, all but one who was in a cash crunch stayed in. The one who got out planned to rebuy later. You have to let people make their own decisions. The line between conviction and insanity is very thin.
    5 Jan 2012, 07:16 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4810) | Send Message
     
    Nice summary, WDD, with a quibble here and there, though. IINM this week's announcement re- a Mini-PowerCube sale to a system integrator for a Navy installation was the first commercial system sale made by Axion. The late November announcement by PJM/Viridity of a PC connection to the PJM grid marked a very important milepost toward commercial viability but involved a PC owned by Axion, not a PC sale.

     

    Regarding working capital, I have the impression that Axion's stated expectation of having sufficient capital to carry them through 12Q2 is conservative, reflecting expected expiration of its assembly service contract with a first tier battery manufacturer and distributor. Extension of that service contract or a ramp-up in PC system sales could change Axion's capital needs outlook.
    5 Jan 2012, 07:18 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    WDD: Welcome and what I great post! That's a very thorough and concise summary. The only *potential* error (*if* I read your intent correctly) was "first sale of the PowerCube last month". If you refer to the PJM/Veridity deal, that's not a sale, IIUC. The trio involved are demonstrating and ramping up the facility, likely to prove the PowerCube worthiness. AFAIK, Axion owns the cube and will be generating some savings and income from it as part of the demonstration.

     

    If I've got that wrong, someone will correct me.

     

    Now onto the fun stuff.

     

    "people who are really foamy-mouthed about AXPW ..."

     

    Did we meet somewhere? ;-))

     

    HardToLove
    5 Jan 2012, 07:20 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » WDD: Thanks so much! Surely many of us will identify with the gambit of emotions. For a first time ever commenter, you have a fine grasp of what's going on with AXPW.

     

    And a hearty welcome to the Axion Power Concentrator.
    5 Jan 2012, 07:34 PM Reply Like
  • KentG
    , contributor
    Comments (368) | Send Message
     
    WDD: very nicely written. I am one of those "people who are really foamy-mouthed about AXPW ..." but I thought I wiped it all off.

     

    HTL: Love your humor man! Keep up the good work and keep sharing your TA.
    5 Jan 2012, 08:18 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    David,
    Welcome to the concentrator. Glad that you recognize the Axon colored sunglasses you are wearing. At the next stockholders meeting you and your Dad will be able to recognize the rest of us. We will have on the same sunglasses and our Axionista's "We have the Power" tee shirts. Please dress appropriately.

     

    BTW. Loved the letter. Please continue to join in the ever enlightening conversation. And enjoy that $.39 stock price we obtained today.
    5 Jan 2012, 10:13 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » D-inv: I will write tomorrow about new pending legislation that "may" enable AXPW to raise capital, which should "in part" ease those concerned about that dilution thingy out there.

     

    I'm sleeping in tomorrow, because I'm a little tipsy after buying a few pals of mine some drinks tonight; the result of my winning a NFL Fantasy Football League.
    6 Jan 2012, 01:10 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    congrats on the FTL win :)
    6 Jan 2012, 04:00 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Maya: Hm, I like that way that works: you by *them* drinks and *you* get tipsy?!

     

    So they are the designated drivers, suffer the liver damage, lose a few brain cells, get no buzz, ... and you get all the enjoyment at the cost of a few bucks?

     

    I need a strategy like that! ;-))

     

    HardToLove
    6 Jan 2012, 10:03 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13581) | Send Message
     
    Sounds like "fantasy football celebrating" to me all right...
    6 Jan 2012, 10:11 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Notice: I wrote (or, rather ranted) about this pending legislation called, "The Crowd Funding Bill" over in Quick Chat. It's about comment 182, or so.

     

    Here is a link to that thread:

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...
    6 Jan 2012, 01:56 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    "Such an exemption has drawn strong opposition from the North American Securities Administrators Association Inc., which claims that states would not be able to stop a fraud until after it were perpetrated. "

     

    And this is different in what way from the current and past situation?

     

    (%^&&*^ SEC can't even stop it when they are warned years in advance about Madoff and takes years to catch one or two transgressions after the fact.

     

    MF Global anyone?

     

    That "prevention" argument is spurious at best.

     

    MHO,
    HardToLove
    6 Jan 2012, 03:34 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » It's nuts that this bill has stalled in the Senate! This is a fantastic job creator bill! And it also enhances American ingenuity.
    6 Jan 2012, 03:52 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    Blew right through the previous resistance at .35, although I suspect tomorrow's action will keep it in the .35-.40 range.
    5 Jan 2012, 05:37 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2745) | Send Message
     
    My re-posted comment on balancing a battery string.

     

    Axion Concentrator 38: Beginning Dec. 27, 2011 [View instapost]
    wtb: I think I can help on that question.

     

    A battery string is a group of batteries all connected in series. That is, plus terminal of one connected to the minus terminal of the next. This produces a total voltage of hundreds of volts, 500-600V for the NS yard slug, IIRC.
    50each, 12V batteries=600V, for example.

     

    The output current, possibly 200Amps or more, must flow thru every battery in the string. Ideal efficiency occurs if every battery has exactly the same Charge State and same internal resistance. This rarely happens, in practice.
    Worse, in many types of batteries the CS differences between cells (and batteries) can diverge with each string charge-discharge cycle.

     

    This is where the "intra-string" battery equalization feature is involved. It is some mechanism, either electronics external to the (12V) battery or some inherent mechanism of the battery physics, that prevents and possibly reverses the tendency for the battery's CS to diverge. Ideally, the mechanism prevents any CS divergence from becoming a problem.

     

    If this equalization is NOT achieved, eventually one battery in the string could fall to zero charge state while the others all have finite charge in them. The zero CS battery would then have current forced through it BACKWARD while the others were discharging normally. A worst case result is the battery innards get very hot and blow open the vents, with acidic steam coming out. The outer housing might even burn, if there are no safety systems to spot the heat spike. (There ARE thermal sensors to prevent this type of catastrophic fault in any commercial system).

     

    So safety, reliability and efficiency are the reasons to be concerned about "string equalization".

     

    There is another problem when the voltage of the entire 50 battery string is not equal to the voltage of its neighboring string(s). This is more a problem for the Battery Management System. It should be much less of a problem with the PbC because of its "capacitor like" behavior.

     

    Remember that there is "battery to battery" equalization in a string and then "string to string" equalization. They are handled in different ways.

     

    A PS to my comment above:
    The higher the discharge rate for a given cell size, the more important it is to balance the cells in a series string. Running a cell at 5 or more C is asking for early failure in a string that isn't initially balanced. I am assuming that individual cell monitoring can prevent cell damage if the string is shut down in time. I'm not sure about the technique(s) for re-balancing the string without "hands on" maintenance. I know smaller ni-cads batteries have "smart chargers" that reduce the problem to some extent. I'm not knowledgeable on the details of the electronics or the chemistry/physics.
    5 Jan 2012, 06:28 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4810) | Send Message
     
    Thanks, shb. That certainly helps my understanding of the nature of the string balancing issue mentioned by TG and its implications.
    5 Jan 2012, 06:51 PM Reply Like
  • cfvaughnii
    , contributor
    Comments (58) | Send Message
     
    Isn't 75 Million shares outstanding a large number for such a small research company? It might be helpful to use market cap to measure how big the company is. This is especially good for comparing with other players. I realize it is a simple algebra problem, but I think knowing that the company has a $33M market cap is important. That is bigger than I realized when I first saw the $.25 price a couple weeks ago.

     

    So, is it realistic for the company to achieve a $100M value based on the revenue streams being discussed? If so, great!
    5 Jan 2012, 09:40 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    CFVAUGHNII> We all think so I believe. We aren't holding these shares for a small gain - particularly when we collectively purchased probably more than a million shares in December in the face of a free-falling elevator. At the high in 2011 Axion had a market cap of $1.27 times 85,000,000 or close to $100M. We certainly expect to exceed that high by a large margin within a reasonable time frame.
    5 Jan 2012, 11:12 PM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1960) | Send Message
     
    I think you will find that many R&D companies with just good technology but little or no revenue stream often trade in the $50M range. A company such as Axion Power with a potentially disruptive technology that could be used in multiple $10B - $100B markets is quite undervalued at this time even if they did not have revenue.

     

    Now that they are transitioning from R&D to commercial manufacturing and as there revenue stream shows a consistent upward trajectory through the rest of this year (250% in 2011 over 2010) we could start to see them more fairly valued in the 100M-200M range in the not too distant future.

     

    With some key design wins this year like Norfolk Southern and/or BMW, and some PowerCube sales which will in turn show the continued ramping up of revenue, I do not think it would be hard to argue for at least a $300-$400M market cap shortly there after.
    6 Jan 2012, 08:19 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    Jak -

     

    Wondering what your definition of "many" is.

     

    I think you're hand-waving a little ... and I realize you probably spent 5 minutes on this. The argument would get much stronger with current data.

     

    It sounds very plausible to me what you're saying used to be true, but I'm wondering whether it's still true given current economic conditions and "risk off." A key component of Market-Cap is what people are willing to pay for "earnings," and while I realize R&D companies may not have them, we could substitute "predicted earnings," but I would assert that average PE ratios have been decreasing over the last decade. (now I'm hand-waving :-) )

     

    Also, I've heard claims that more startups are delaying IPOs, which may change these related data over time.
    6 Jan 2012, 09:12 AM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1960) | Send Message
     
    WTB,

     

    Here is an example. Valence technologies produced revenue of $16M in 2010 and began trading in 2011 for over $300M. A123 entered the market and traded for around $1B and had revenue of less than $100M (I believe there first 10q shows revenue around $70M). In 2008 HEV had revenue of $6M and were trading for about $700M and after the crash they continued to trade for 600M with about $30M in revenue.

     

    The point here is that revenue has little to do with valuation of companies at these transitioning stages from R&D to commercial viability. However, a revenues stream that continually improves year over year while not increasing debt too early is part of a good valuation method. Also, companies with potentially disruptive technology and an ability to show an upward trajectory in revenue stream are shown to be richly rewarded in the market. While in possession of disruptive technology they can increase their revenue (250% last year, I expect at least another 200% this year) while not getting mired in debt the market *should* reward even more.

     

    This is why I believe producing revenue of around $20M this year, with just one design win with one customer in one of the many large markets they are currently testing in should demand a price in the $200M range by next year. Knowing there could be multiple wins in multiple large markets increases that valuation.
    6 Jan 2012, 09:59 AM Reply Like
  • battman
    , contributor
    Comments (370) | Send Message
     
    Tesla also has a ridiculous multiple to potential earnings. I believe if Axion had an "exotic" chemistry, the share price would be at least 4 x higher than it is today.
    6 Jan 2012, 10:06 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    CFVaughnii: The share count being where it is a result of a long march with some surprises thrown in. Read John Petersen's comment stream and you'll quickly find a recital of how that came about. And I believe you'll also gain confidence from that recounting as well.

     

    Welcome to the Axion Concentrator!

     

    HardToLove
    6 Jan 2012, 10:11 AM Reply Like
  • Al Marshall
    , contributor
    Comments (631) | Send Message
     
    One thing to be careful with in terms of valuing Axion by revenue is that the 2011 revenue ramp was primarily due to contract manufacturing of conventional lead acid batteries. If you eliminate that and the legacy "special" battery business for I believe antique cars, that leaves us with, and others might be able to be more specific, roughly $2m/year in PbC revenue for testing. The $10k or so in battery revenue from the Navy order earlier this week is likely the first "commercial" revenue and arguably should be the starting point for this kind of analysis.

     

    Still, the technology itself, its degree of differentiation vs. substitute products, and the years of successful testing by blue chip companies in major applications clearly merits in my mind a far higher valuation than we are seeing right now. To me, pre-revenue value of anything under $100m is a bargain, under $50m was a gift, and $25m was insanity. Now, with first commercial revenue, those numbers should all be increased.

     

    Eventually, I think we'll all look back on the second half of 2011 as an unusual confluence of circumstances that resulted in a near unique opportunity. John Petersen is the reason that so many individual investors were able and willing to take advantage. As someone else posted earlier, I fully expect someone will be writing a Harvard Business School case or PhD paper describing Axion as a triumph for the "little guys".

     

    One thing that'll be interesting to see is how many of the existing shareholders will still be holding at $1, $5 and $10? Right now, we're probably at the peak in terms of percentage of Axion shares held by individual investors. Hopefully, as a group we can "handle" a rising share price as well as we've handled a falling share price.
    6 Jan 2012, 11:52 AM Reply Like
  • lsd_lsm
    , contributor
    Comments (130) | Send Message
     
    SHB -

     

    Does the string balancing have anything to do with how large a unit can be scaled (i.e. 20MW) up to or what are the limiting factors?

     

    Thanks.

     

    "The PowerCube™ integrates the batteries, power electronics, safety systems and computer controls into a complete system module. The current “building block” is rated at 500 kW but can be scaled to a 20MW system"
    5 Jan 2012, 09:42 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2745) | Send Message
     
    Isd_Ism: No. The multiple strings in a single PC are connected in parallel to achieve higher power/energy ratings. The Battery Management System watches and controls the string interconnections and prevents problems. Adding more containers full of batteries is an extension of what happens in one PC.

     

    I don't know what might limit the total rating of a multi-Cube system. It might be software. 20MW is a lot of juice and there could be some commercial inverter upper limit. Interesting question.
    6 Jan 2012, 02:58 AM Reply Like
  • User550230
    , contributor
    Comments (64) | Send Message
     
    This has probably been discussed in previous concentrators, but what is the consensus of how large the imminent capital raise will be? I'm assuming they will need operating cash, maybe some cash for anticipated new hires, and enough cash to scale their gen ii lines. Additionally, do you think the company might be willing to partner/give up some control or board seats for a large enough infusion? I'm not discussing dilution or share price, but surely there's a feel for how much they want in the warchest.
    5 Jan 2012, 10:18 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    I believe the original goal was $18M, but they burn less than a couple million per quarter except for cap-ex which will only occur as orders justify. Their plans for use of the funds are spelled out in the Q2 2011 10Q. I am sure they will adjust funding to what is prudent and reasonable based on financing available when the capital raise occurs. They have a lot of flexibility - they can buy time with a small capital raise and raise more when the stock price has appreciated substantially.
    5 Jan 2012, 11:17 PM Reply Like
  • KentG
    , contributor
    Comments (368) | Send Message
     
    Plus, more revenue = slower burn rate.
    6 Jan 2012, 12:15 AM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1960) | Send Message
     
    They filed to raise between $18M and $28M. They have stated in their 10q they do not need or plan on raising the full $28M unless they need to dramatically increase PbC manufacturing due to increased orders.
    6 Jan 2012, 08:24 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Total $28M in *two* tranches: one authorized at $18M. The second $10M needs board approval to occur.

     

    HardToLove
    6 Jan 2012, 10:14 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    JAK: $28M total, $18M and $10M with board approval.

     

    From memory.

     

    HardToLove
    6 Jan 2012, 10:16 AM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    Totally OT but revealing information about wind power: From National Review Online. See Excerpt:

     

    "Texas has 10,135 megawatts of installed wind-generation capacity. That’s nearly three times as much as any other state. But during three sweltering days last week, when the state set new records for electricity demand, the state’s vast herd of turbines proved incapable of producing any serious amount of power.

     

    Consider the afternoon of August 2, when electricity demand hit 67,929 megawatts. Although electricity demand and prices were peaking, output from the state’s wind turbines was just 1,500 megawatts, or about 15 percent of their total nameplate capacity. Put another way, wind energy was able to provide only about 2.2 percent of the total power demand even though the installed capacity of Texas’s wind turbines theoretically equals nearly 15 percent of peak demand. This was no anomaly. On four days in August 2010, when electricity demand set records, wind energy was able to contribute just 1, 2, 1, and 1 percent, respectively, of total demand."

     

    Anybody want to invest in windmills? Maybe Texas would like to buy a 10,135 megawatt Powercube. Full article here: http://bit.ly/zheoQL
    5 Jan 2012, 11:19 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4819) | Send Message
     
    >bangwhiz ... On a typical balmy August day at +105F, the wind just doesn't blow until after sunset.
    5 Jan 2012, 11:38 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    You'd think the heat would squeeze all the BS out of Texans. By the way, doesn't look like Texas is going to get rid of Perry - Thank God.
    6 Jan 2012, 12:05 AM Reply Like
  • Al Marshall
    , contributor
    Comments (631) | Send Message
     
    Good info. From the info in the article a couple of days ago I think windmills in NY State operated on average at about 10% of nameplate capacity. If wind costs $2m per megawatt at nameplate capacity, then that's $20m based on actual output. If you look at it that way, the benefit from integrating storage (say a combination of Axion and flow batteries) would be well worth the additional cost.
    6 Jan 2012, 12:11 PM Reply Like
  • matthewchic
    , contributor
    Comments (12) | Send Message
     
    cvaughnii > The way I've been thinking about it is that market cap is now roughly 3x revenue. Probably appropriately so given the business they've generated so far. With a consistent stream of positive business development news, my estimate is the market can tolerate trading around 5-6x revenue (having done MUCH more that that last march). Axion delivered a little over 200% growth in 2011. If they can sustain that rate, they'll hit around ~$30M in sales this year. There is a lot of combinations between existing flooded batteries, small cubes PbC, large cube PbC, trains and car test orders that could make it so. 5x $30M revenue = roughly a $150M market cap...say they raise outstanding shares to 100M, that gives us all a $1.50pps at a 5x revenue valuation by year end 2012.
    5 Jan 2012, 11:32 PM Reply Like
  • amishelvis
    , contributor
    Comments (143) | Send Message
     
    cfvaugnii, I think you are looking at axpw in the wrong light. What one needs to ask, what new technology are they developing? and is it needed? Then ask, How far along is that development?
    In Axions case,,the research probably started 15 years ago (counting the early Russian research) and for all purposes it is completed. It is now being tested/proven by customers before roll-out.
    If it is viable, How much will this tech be worth? So far it appears to be very viable,, in a multitude of applications.
    Now the last question,,How much is it worth? If it all goes real good, I'm thinking 3-4 $B , well, hope no one spit coffee on their keyboard, but thats what it is in my mind.
    6 Jan 2012, 06:31 AM Reply Like
  • Ricknplano
    , contributor
    Comments (318) | Send Message
     
    I have no idea what new tech is being tested or researched at Axion, but I read an article where scientists used graphene (single layer of nano sized carbon atoms) for the negative electrode in laboratory lithium batteries to achieve dramatic improvement over current anodes (on the order of 10 times). Well, that same graphene could be used in a lead battery for the same results. Axion uses a similar concept with its carbon anode, but the tech is less exotic. If they were to push the tech envelope to the next level using graphene the Axion battery chemistry would leap forward by another order of magnitude or so.

     

    Assuming that Axion might research the use of nano tech to super charge an already great battery is not far fetched. One of the Axion board members wisely recruited by John Petersen when he was CEO, is Dr. Howard Schmidt. Dr. Schmidt was formerly head of the Rice University Nano Tech labs. Rice is where nobel prize winner Richard Smalley discovered nano carbons and named them Bucky Balls in honor of Buckminister Fuller due to their geodesic shape (the same used by Fuller in his dome buildings). Since Dr. Schmidt is a reseacher on the leading edge of nano technology and also a board member of Axion, I can easily see his assistance in putting the right people in touch to insure Axion stays at the forefront of the industry as new tech is available that could improve the battery's performance even more.

     

    All that is a way of agreeing with your assumption that the potential size of Axion is limited mainly by the imagination and diligence of management. We are fortunate that management seems to be quite good.
    6 Jan 2012, 07:58 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    Ford Motor Co. CEO opening new tech lab in Silicon Valley --- Read the 5th paragraph mentions energy storage

     

    Ford Motor Company (NYSE: F) today announced plans to create and open its first dedicated research lab in Silicon Valley early this year, further growing the company's commitment to make technology affordable for millions.
    "Ford has an incredible heritage of driving innovation in the transportation and manufacturing sectors during the past 107 years," said Paul Mascarenas, Ford chief technical officer and vice president of Research and Innovation. "Now it's time to prepare for the next 100 years, ushering in a new era of collaboration and finding new partners to help us transform what it means to be an automaker."
    Ford President and CEO Alan Mulally will elaborate on the new areas of focus for the forthcoming Silicon Valley lab, plus Ford's latest industry-leading technologies including SYNC , EcoBoost , MyKey and inflatable rear safety belts, when he returns to the International CES on Jan. 11 for the Innovation Power Panel keynote. This will be Ford's fourth consecutive keynote presentation at CES.
    Ford Research and Innovation, the company's advanced engineering arm, will open the new Silicon Valley lab in the first quarter, helping ensure Ford keeps pace with consumer trends and aggressively prepares for the future by developing mobility solutions to harness the power of seamless connectivity, cloud computing and clean technology.
    "An open attitude to new ideas is critical to solving the transportation, environmental and societal challenges we expect in the future," said Mascarenas. "With increasing pressures from urbanization and the need to reduce energy use, we're going to see energy storage, wireless connectivity, sensing systems and even autonomous vehicles as key parts of the solution."
    The new Ford lab will be located in the San Francisco Bay area of California and will serve as a hub for independent technology projects and identification of new research investments and partners located along the west coast. Ultimately, the lab will create an "innovation network" connecting Ford's Advanced Design Studio in Irvine, Calif., and Ford employees working with connectivity platform partner Microsoft Corp. in Redmond, Wash.
    "Silicon Valley represents a deep and dynamic technology neighborhood and is far from Dearborn," said K. Venkatesh Prasad, senior technical leader for open innovation with Ford Research and Innovation. "With so many opportunities and so much potential, our new lab will allow us to scout new technologies and partners in their own environment and continue our expansion beyond the traditional automaker mindset to drive innovation for a better mobility experience."
    Prasad " a Silicon Valley veteran himself " will travel from Dearborn to the Bay area regularly to shape the lab. The new research lab's employees will be recruited both locally and rotated-in from the global network of Ford employees and will spend their time developing and discovering new technologies, trends, partners and collaborative research projects, said Prasad.
    The number of Ford employees at its new lab will be comparable to what you expect of a startup, with an emphasis on quality over quantity, said Prasad.
    Prasad added that the establishment of Ford's all-new Silicon Valley lab will not duplicate or replace work being done at the company's Research and Innovation Center in Dearborn, its European facility in Aachen, Germany, or the recently established technology office in Nanjing, China.
    6 Jan 2012, 07:30 AM Reply Like
  • jveal
    , contributor
    Comments (644) | Send Message
     
    New article on CNET:

     

    New lead-acid battery angles for micro hybrids

     

    http://cnet.co/y7SmLC
    6 Jan 2012, 09:09 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    nice find... and it's nice to see TG come out of hiding and touting AXWP benefits.
    6 Jan 2012, 09:15 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    I posted on the comment section of the article in answer to some general questions about the PbC. Hope they help.
    6 Jan 2012, 10:35 AM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (958) | Send Message
     
    jveal...LT...yes...AXPW PR kicking into gear...
    Who was it Bang who was shouting for a sales force?...have 3rd party now...wonder if it's there influence to GET THE WORD OUT!
    6 Jan 2012, 04:52 PM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    something rarely seen:

     

    bid .39 ask .39 5000 shr. each way...on PINK

     

    hmmm....MM will give or take .39...interesting
    6 Jan 2012, 09:09 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    LT: When I've seen that in Level 2 it has usually meant the data feed got out of sync *unless* they can't match due to something like "all or none" and one side is *much* larger than what is *presented* (we know they aren't showing us their whole book).

     

    I just switch for a moment to something like SPY and switch back and the real stuff comes up.

     

    This on Power ETrade Pro.

     

    HardToLove
    6 Jan 2012, 10:47 AM Reply Like
  • Mercy Jimenez
    , contributor
    Comments (2710) | Send Message
     
    Posting this am on cnet added to good highlights of Granville interview: http://bit.ly/wTd3Vr

     

    This am in PM the Ask price dropped from 40 cents to 39 cents. I expect any bargains on share price to come in near end of day. This SA entry today after the positive NFP may provide some perspective on general market past patterns:

     

    8:50 AM "Not to over-complicate things," tweets one experienced trader, "but the last 7 NFPs in a row has been fade to red." He reminds that when the employment report beats expectations, the high of the day is often set near the open, when it disappoints, the low of the day comes then.
    6 Jan 2012, 09:18 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    MJ....nice to have you and your market insight here. I welcome you & hope you stick around.
    6 Jan 2012, 09:21 AM Reply Like
  • Mercy Jimenez
    , contributor
    Comments (2710) | Send Message
     
    Thanks, LT, trust me I am sticking around. My starter position on AXPW is far from where I eventually want it to be!
    6 Jan 2012, 09:31 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    (AXPW): 1/5/2012 EOD stuff I've been tracking.

     

    ADVFN had another data loss, 12 EOD trades. So my ratio is a close approximation.

     

    Buy, sell and unknown ended at 605,515 (estimated), 282,935 (estimated) and 0 respectively, giving total volume for the day of 888,450 (corrected). Buy:sell ends at 2.14:1 (would be 2.306:1 without estimations) and buy:(sell+unknown) is the same, of course. Both are nice improvements from recent ratios.

     

    The daily FINRA-reported short sales give concern but I can't determine exactly how I feel about them because the other times we've seen transition from very low to high percentages were during the time we had distressed sellers operating, maybe tax-loss selling, others JP suggested exiting their positions, ...

     

    I've begun adding price and b:s history to my records and a cursory examination shows nothing useful yet, AFAICT. Incomplete and I didn't start tracking b:s until November, so data is limited in that area.

     

    Anyway, here's a couple of cycles worth in case it's useful.

     

    1201 TotVol 0304750, Sht 00113950 37.39% LHC 0.37 0.40 0.40 b/s 1.191:1
    1202 TotVol 0114099, Sht 00040049 35.10% LHC 0.38 0.40 0.40 b/s
    1205 TotVol 0790577, Sht 00134087 16.96% LHC 0.33 0.47 0.37 b/s 1:2.9
    1206 TotVol 0923239, Sht 00221009 23.94% LHC 0.32 0.37 0.32 b/s 1:1.85
    1207 TotVol 1074969, Sht 00452620 42.11% LHC 0.30 0.34 0.33 b/s
    1208 TotVol 0140689, Sht 00043843 31.16% LHC 0.31 0.35 0.34 b/s 3.81:1
    1209 TotVol 0193569, Sht 00128829 66.55% LHC 0.32 0.35 0.35 b/s 1.683:1
    1212 TotVol 0364751, Sht 00160051 43.88% LHC 0.32 0.36 0.34 b/s 1.36:1
    1213 TotVol 0164344, Sht 00082245 50.04% LHC 0.33 0.35 0.33 b/s 1.683:1
    1214 TotVol 0411401, Sht 00084400 20.52% LHC 0.31 0.36 0.34 b/s 1:2.214
    1215 TotVol 0324683, Sht 00113909 35.08% LHC 0.31 0.35 0.33 b/s 1:1.39
    1216 TotVol 0604796, Sht 00082990 13.72% LHC 0.30 0.32 0.31 b/s
    1219 TotVol 0626525, Sht 00060821 09.71% LHC 0.27 0.32 0.29 b/s
    1220 TotVol 0171087, Sht 00011207 06.55% LHC 0.28 0.31 0.30 b/s
    1221 TotVol 0281522, Sht 00117627 41.78% LHC 0.28 0.31 0.28 b/s
    1222 TotVol 0244924, Sht 00086179 35.19% LHC 0.28 0.31 0.29 b/s
    1227 TotVol 0999992, Sht 00386219 38.62% LHC 0.29 0.31 0.29 b/s
    1228 TotVol 0233822, Sht 00059184 25.31% LHC 0.28 0.29 0.29 b/s
    1229 TotVol 1278042, Sht 00098935 07.74% LHC 0.25 0.30 0.27 b/s
    1230 TotVol 1220038, Sht 00195752 16.04% LHC 0.25 0.28 0.27 b/s
    0103 TotVol 0340713, Sht 00099149 29.10% LHC 0.28 0.31 0.30 b/s
    0104 TotVol 0699563, Sht 00200313 28.63% LHC 0.30 0.33 0.32 b/s
    0105 TotVol 0888450, Sht 00436805 49.16% LHC 0.32 0.40 0.39 b/s

     

    HardToLove
    6 Jan 2012, 11:04 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    I really like the way this stock has performed this week. We'll see if it can hold. again, thanks for your work HTL.
    6 Jan 2012, 11:27 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » HTL: Hit 45 cents, then retreated. Where's my swammy hat?
    6 Jan 2012, 11:41 AM Reply Like
  • jveal
    , contributor
    Comments (644) | Send Message
     
    Just hit $0.42!!!

     

    Is there any news on XIDE? It's up over 15%.
    6 Jan 2012, 11:14 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    (XIDE) Raised to outperform by Wedbush.

     

    HardToLove
    6 Jan 2012, 11:24 AM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1960) | Send Message
     
    jveal,

     

    ACPW has made a move too that past couple days. This energy sector got crushed throughout the latter part of last year and a lot of good companies were in the path. I think we are seeing an attempt to get a little more proper valuation out of some of these.
    6 Jan 2012, 11:30 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    C'mon, you guys are just killing my next article. Mercifully none of you noticed the looming death cross on Tesla.
    6 Jan 2012, 11:55 AM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1960) | Send Message
     
    Ha! I was going to comment on Tesla yesterday, but I thought I would let them tank a little more before vindication :-)

     

    I am sure we all still greatly look forward to your article written eloquently and precise with more facts, charts and more in depth analysis to the market dynamics taking place.
    6 Jan 2012, 12:41 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    (AXPW): Buy:sell 1.689 at 11:05 w/pps $0.41. AFAICT, buy pressure continues to strengthen. Most large trades are at the ask, most at bid or mid-point are smaller.

     

    HardToLove
    6 Jan 2012, 11:24 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    (AXPW) 1.689:1 Sorry.

     

    HardToLove
    6 Jan 2012, 11:26 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » This way to the next Concentrator!

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...
    6 Jan 2012, 11:36 AM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    Day and trend traders cashing out now with drop from .45 to .41. Bull tossing them off.
    6 Jan 2012, 12:16 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3686) | Send Message
     
    I haven't seen anyone in our typical herd mention buying above .40 today so maybe we have a new wave of support to join our ranks.

     

    If indeed it's just traders then .40 will fail by eod. However if it holds and if we see a million shares today then that's impressive (also represents 200k in new buys).
    6 Jan 2012, 01:17 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Bazooka!

     

    Don't forget to go to the next concentrator!

     

    http://bit.ly/wgZKSg

     

    We had a couple of prior stints where ~$0.40 range was so persistent that I dubbed it the "The Dreaded $0.40 are".

     

    *IF* traditional TA holds, that should not offer strong support. *BUT* when there's has bee a large move up there's a "reversion to the mean" that seems to show up a lot.

     

    So, conflicting (apparent) tendencies.

     

    If we do "revert", ~$0.35 +/- a little over/undershoot would be the place where it should settle, consolidate and start a leg buck up (hopefully).

     

    Since we have volume still building on higher highs and lows and found (apparent) support around $0.40 even during today's intra-day re-trace, there's a possibility we won't "revert".

     

    At 13:44, we still have a buy sell of 1.10:1 even after the (apparent) profit-taking earlier today (appeared to get serious from ~11:30 - ~12:29, but buying came back after that and began outdistancing sell