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Trade stocks by day, and at night am writing a historical epic about the ancient Mayan civilization. "Maya: Spirits Of The Jaguar" is a sweeping saga set in the ancient and magical Mayan landscape where a wronged family struggles against prophecy, power, treachery and forbidden love,... More
  • Axion Power Concentrator 60: Beginning Feb. 2, 2012, Axion Power Direct Offering Part Three 154 comments
    Feb 2, 2012 2:59 PM
    The Axion Power Concentrator series has now surpassed 10,000 comment milestone!

    Axion Power Announces Registered Direct Common Stock Offering of up to $10.0 million

    NEW CASTLE, Pa., Feb. 1 , 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Axion Power International, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: AXPW) ("Axion" or "the Company"), the developer of advanced lead­carbon PbC® batteries and energy storage systems, today announced that it has entered into definitive agreements to sell an aggregate of not more than 28,571,429 shares of common stock, par value $0.0001 per share (the "Shares"), at a price per share of $0.35 for gross proceeds up to $10 million, before deducting placement agents' fees and estimated offering expenses. The share price for this transaction was pre-determined by calculating a 10% discount to market using the Company's volume weighted average price for the trailing 40 day period (VWAP).

    (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20100119/AXIONLOGO)

    The Shares are being offered directly by Axion pursuant to an effective shelf registration statement previously filed with, and declared effective by, the Securities and Exchange Commission on July 14, 2011. The Company anticipates that the net proceeds from the offering will be used for working capital, capital expenditures and general corporate purposes. The closing of this offering is expected to occur on or about February 3, 2012, subject to the satisfaction of customary closing conditions.

    Philadelphia Brokerage Corporation and Emerging Growth Equities, Ltd served as co-placement agents for the offering. When available, copies of the prospectus supplement and the accompanying base prospectus relating to the offering may be obtained from the Securities and Exchange Commission website at http://www.sec.gov.

    This press release does not and shall not constitute an offer to sell, or the solicitation of an offer to buy, any of the securities, nor shall there be any sale of securities in any state or jurisdiction in which such offer, solicitation or sale would be unlawful prior to registration under the securities laws of any state or jurisdiction.

    About Axion Power International, Inc.

    Axion has developed and patented a next generation energy storage device that won the prestigious Frost & Sullivan Technology Award for North America in the field of lead-acid batteries. According to Frost & Sullivan, Axion's new PbC batteries have "the potential to revitalize the lead-acid battery industry by breathing new life into an established technology that is not well suited to the requirements of important new applications like hybrid electric vehicles and renewable power."

    Axion Power International, Inc. is the industry leader in the field of lead-acid-carbon energy storage technologies. Axion believes this new battery technology is the only class of advanced battery that can be assembled on existing lead-acid battery production lines throughout the world utilizing Axion's proprietary carbon electrodes. Axion's future goal, after filling their plant's lead-carbon battery production capacity, is to become the leading supplier of carbon electrode assemblies for the global lead-acid battery industry.

    For more information, visit www.axionpower.com

    Forward-looking Statements

    Certain statements in this Press Release are "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements are based on our current expectations and beliefs and are subject to a number of risk factors and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in the forward-looking statements. Such risks and uncertainties include the risk for the Company to complete its development work, as well as the risks inherent in commercializing a new product (including technology risks, market risks, financial risks and implementation risks, and other risks and uncertainties affecting the Company), as well as other risks that have been included in filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, all of which are available at sec.gov. We disclaim any intention or obligation to revise any forward-looking statements, including, without limitation, financial estimates, whether as a result of new information, future events, or otherwise.

    ####

    This is a troll free zone. Any disruptive comments will be removed.

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Comments (154)
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  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Last comment in the previous Concentrator fro D-inv:

     

    AXPW's share price crashed yesterday in wake of the announced $10 million share placement.

     

    XIDE's share price jumped more than 9% without any XIDE news.

     

    Anyone besides me wondering if there is a cause-effect relationship there?
    2 Feb 2012, 02:58 PM Reply Like
  • tonys23
    , contributor
    Comments (96) | Send Message
     
    I too track and own XIDE. I think the price increase in the past week is more related to pre earnings, which are supposed to be reported next week. I call it the "wishful thinking" effect. I agree with JP that this stock has been unduly crushed in the past six months, and has good prospects. I can't comment on any cause and effect relationship with AXPW's price or prospects ... don't know enough about their relationship today.
    3 Feb 2012, 07:34 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I can't see even a remote connection between the two.
    3 Feb 2012, 08:46 AM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (2298) | Send Message
     
    Yea.... I noticed that too regarding XIDE.

     

    Added 10k at .43.... still lurking. Things look to be stabilizing.
    2 Feb 2012, 03:04 PM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (707) | Send Message
     
    OR

     

    Grabbed my additional shares at 45 this morning..Have a GTC order sitting out there hoping for a fat finger move !!!

     

    I have a feeling this still has some more downward movement...
    2 Feb 2012, 04:08 PM Reply Like
  • Occam's_Razor
    , contributor
    Comments (2298) | Send Message
     
    Don't forget to thumbs up this concentrator. Maya is having to put 2 concentrators up per day!
    2 Feb 2012, 03:06 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Thanks, Occam's. There's still a glitch in the system that won't allow me to put the thumbs up request in right after I draw in the last comment from the previous Concentrator.

     

    Strange.

     

    Thanks again.
    2 Feb 2012, 03:10 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13581) | Send Message
     
    It may be running afoul of one of the spam filters. Same identical cut and paste content as an earlier post by the same person. Try modifying it a little each time...
    2 Feb 2012, 03:29 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Ah! Okay. Thanks, Trip! For the~~~~tip :-)
    2 Feb 2012, 03:31 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Since everybody needs to loosen up after a couple days of tension I'll share the ultimate ethnic joke.

     

    An Englishman, a Scotsman, an Irishman, a Welshman, a Latvian, a Turk, a German, an Indian, several Americans (including a southerner, a New Englander, and a Californian, an Argentinean, a Dane, an Australian, a Slovakian, an Egyptian, a Japanese, a Moroccan, a Frenchman, a New Zealander, a Spaniard, a Russian, a Guatemalan, a Colombian, a Pakistani, a Malaysian, a Croatian, a Uzbek, a Cypriot, a Pole, a Lithuanian, a Chinese, a Sri Lankan, a Lebanese, a Cayman Islander, a Ugandan, a Vietnamese, a Korean, a Uruguayan, a Czech, an Icelander, a Mexican, a Finn, a Honduran, a Panamanian, an Andorran, an Israeli, a Venezuelan, a Fijian, a Peruvian, an Estonian, a Brazilian, a Portuguese, a Liechtensteiner, a Mongolian, a Hungarian, a Canadian, a Moldovan, a Haitian, a Norfolk Islander, a Macedonian, a Bolivian, a Cook Islander, a Tajikistani, a Samoan, an Armenian, a Aruban, an Albanian, a Greenlander, a Micronesian, a Virgin Islander, a Georgian, a Bahaman, a Belarusian, a Cuban, a Tongan, a Cambodian, a Qatari, an Azerbaijani, a Romanian, a Chilean, a Kyrgyzstani, a Jamaican, a Filipino, a Ukrainian, a Dutchman, a Ecuadorian, a Costa Rican, a Swede, a Bulgarian, a Serb, a Swiss, a Greek, a Belgian, a Singaporean, an Italian, a Norwegian and 47 Africans walk into a fine restaurant.

     

    "I'm sorry," says the maître d', scrutinizing the group one by one and barring their entrance, "you can't come in here without a Thai! "
    2 Feb 2012, 04:33 PM Reply Like
  • bazooooka
    , contributor
    Comments (3686) | Send Message
     
    =)
    2 Feb 2012, 04:53 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    The Oldest Profession

     

    A surgeon, an architect, and a lawyer are having a heated
    barroom discussion concerning which of their professions is
    actually the oldest. The surgeon says, "Surgery is the
    oldest profession. God took a rib from Adam to create Eve,
    and you can't go back further than that."

     

    The architect says, "Hold on! In fact, God was the first
    architect when he created the world out of chaos in seven
    days, and you can't go back any further than THAT!"

     

    The lawyer puffs his cigar and says, "Gentlemen, gentlemen
    -- who do you think created the CHAOS?"
    2 Feb 2012, 05:01 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    LoL! ... OOPS! I mean <*groan*> I love a good pun.

     

    HardToLove
    2 Feb 2012, 05:02 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    Mahatma Gandhi walked barefoot most of the time, which produced an impressive set of calluses on his feet. He also ate very little, which made him rather frail and with his odd diet, he suffered from bad breath. This made him (oh, man, this is so bad, it's good):

     

    A super-calloused fragile mystic hexed by halitosis.
    2 Feb 2012, 05:11 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    LOVE IT
    2 Feb 2012, 05:19 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    VERY NICE
    2 Feb 2012, 05:20 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    WINNER, WINNER, CHICKEN DINNER
    2 Feb 2012, 05:21 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Blue Ribbon winner!

     

    HardToLove
    2 Feb 2012, 05:32 PM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (346) | Send Message
     
    A priest, a rabbi and a minister walk into a bar. The bartender says, "What is this, some kind of joke?"
    2 Feb 2012, 05:53 PM Reply Like
  • Bylo-
    , contributor
    Comments (426) | Send Message
     
    ROTFLMAO!!!
    3 Feb 2012, 11:43 AM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2743) | Send Message
     
    A deep from the diaphragm GROAN!
    3 Feb 2012, 02:27 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4073) | Send Message
     
    a) posting an apology for my cranky fest on the day of the offering announcement. was a long week being sick and tired (of being sick) before the offering. not my best moment. sorry for the personal nature of my irritation, particularly to JP.

     

    b) a joke from Mrs. Enslein's 1st grade class in Florida

     

    "If you're American before you go to the bathroom, and American after you go to the bathroom, what are you when you go to the bathroom?"

     

    "You're a pee'in!" (European)
    4 Feb 2012, 06:38 PM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1960) | Send Message
     
    I don't think any apologies are necessary (I can't speak for everyone) we all felt saucy or weren't sure what to feel that day. However, I did take notice of you not commenting for the past couple days I think and I must say I am glad to have you back as I have followed you on Mongolia and the REE's as well and your investing prowess is noted.
    4 Feb 2012, 08:22 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I agree that no apologies are necessary. It's natural to feel a little resentful when somebody else gets in at a lower price and that's straight from the mouth of the $1.25 Kid. I've been there often enough over the last three decades that I've gotten to a point where I simply pray they make a fortune.

     

    If the stock is in the hands of people who respect it and understand what they've bought, it's all good for us because the new guys just erased the biggest item on my worry list.
    5 Feb 2012, 12:09 AM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    I sent my mother in law to Atlanta last week on SW Airlines.
    Didn't cost me a cent.
    You know. Bags fly free.
    2 Feb 2012, 05:25 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    LoL! That's just sick! :-))

     

    HardToLove
    2 Feb 2012, 05:32 PM Reply Like
  • Tampa Ted
    , contributor
    Comments (2652) | Send Message
     
    Got the best chuckle out this one, lol.
    2 Feb 2012, 11:19 PM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (6282) | Send Message
     
    A man got food poisoning after his dinner and was sick all night. Next day he asked his wife what was for dinner? She answered... leftovers.
    2 Feb 2012, 05:41 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    FPA,
    My wife got a kick out of that one.
    2 Feb 2012, 05:48 PM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (707) | Send Message
     
    FPA

     

    I hear this was a true story...

     

    map
    2 Feb 2012, 10:49 PM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (6282) | Send Message
     
    LOL... you got it... my wife can be quite funny at times.
    2 Feb 2012, 11:09 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    Not to callously hex the fragile fun here... ;) But I was just curious... did anyone who attempted to contact the company yesterday ever hear anything back? If the answer is a collective negative, that could be intriguing...
    2 Feb 2012, 05:52 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    Well, shoot. Is this now a content-free zone? ;) These crickets are telling me that neither TG, nor anyone else at Axion or their IR firm called back or replied in email? If so, what does everyone make of that? Are they still digging out? Or is an upcoming announcement about to silence all the questions? ;)
    2 Feb 2012, 09:12 PM Reply Like
  • D-inv
    , contributor
    Comments (4809) | Send Message
     
    :-) '086, me thinks calls and emails from existing shareholders flagged to TG & co. that reaction to the capital raise terms signaled some risk of deflating the souffle in the oven if opening or closing of oven door is ill-timed or done carelessly.

     

    TG may have elected to postpone any response until after closing on the direct placement which I believe is due tomorrow
    2 Feb 2012, 10:11 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    Ah... I hadn't thought of that. A mini quiet period, as it were. Thanks, D.
    2 Feb 2012, 10:31 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    Ben Bernanke and Ron Paul were having dinner at an exclusive dinner club in D.C.
    When the check came Ron asked " How are we going to handle this?". Ben said, "If you use your Wells Fargo credit card it is free." Ron asked , "Why is that?"
    Because no one is paying Wells Fargo, anymore, replied Ben."
    "I am ", said Ron.
    "That's why you will never be president", said Ben.
    " When you quit paying the bankers, it is much easier to quantify how to pay the rest of the bills".
    2 Feb 2012, 06:03 PM Reply Like
  • Renzo
    , contributor
    Comments (346) | Send Message
     
    A dumb blonde was really tired of being made fun of, so she decided to have her hair she would look like a brunette.

     

    When she had brown hair, she decided to take a drive in the country.

     

    After she had been driving for a while, she saw a farmer and a flock of sheep and thought,
    "Oh! Those sheep are so adorable!"
    She got out and walked over to the farmer and said,
    "If I can guess how many sheep you have, can I take one home?"
    The farmer, being a bit of a gambler himself, said she could have a try.
    The blonde looked at the flock and guessed, "157."
    The farmer was amazed - she was right! So the girl picked one out the cutest and most playful of the sheep and got back into her car.
    Before she left, farmer walked up to her and said.

     

    "If I can guess the real color of your hair, can I have my dog back?"
    2 Feb 2012, 06:19 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    Renzo,
    I liked it. And I am not a fan of Blonde jokes.
    2 Feb 2012, 06:25 PM Reply Like
  • KirkTierney
    , contributor
    Comments (97) | Send Message
     
    Then you really won't like this one, Futurist.

     

    A blonde walks into a shoe store, and approaches the manager.
    "There's a hole in these, and I just bought them yesterday", she says. The manager examines the stylish new shoes. He looks carefully, feeling inside them. As he looks up, somewhat confused, the blonde says "Oh! Now I get it ... the hole is where I should have put my foot."

     

    kt
    2 Feb 2012, 08:32 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    KT,
    Your right. Didn't like it much. However, I give you the A for effort.
    2 Feb 2012, 08:44 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    We must be feeling better, based on the change in "humor" here.

     

    The winners laugh and tell jokes while the losers say shut up and deal!

     

    HardToLove
    2 Feb 2012, 06:28 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    Not sure about anybody else but I think John was right. It was time to move on. Laughter, being the best medicine for everyone to take, is a great relaxant.
    Thanks all for the humor.
    2 Feb 2012, 06:35 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    Yes, tension relief is a great idea. My contribution:
    Q. What can a goose do, a duck can't, and a lawyer should?
    A. Stick his bill up his a$$.

     

    To good to pass up JP!
    2 Feb 2012, 08:50 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    Bang takes the final applause with a three curtain standing ovation.
    ( You knew it would go to the one comedian using profanity in his joke)
    2 Feb 2012, 08:58 PM Reply Like
  • eggwis
    , contributor
    Comments (756) | Send Message
     
    LMAO! ....and the crowd goes WILD!
    4 Feb 2012, 11:03 PM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    Glad to see the humor back in this group...thanks for the jokes all :)
    2 Feb 2012, 09:07 PM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (707) | Send Message
     
    ONE MORE GUYS!!!!

     

    WHO IS JACK SCHITT?

     

    For some time many of us have wondered just who is Jack Schitt?

     

    We find ourselves at a loss when someone says, 'You don't know Jack Schitt'!

     

    Well, thanks to my genealogical investigation research, you can now respond in an intellectual manner.

     

    Jack Schitt is the only son of Awe Schitt.

     

    Awe Schitt, the fertilizer magnate, who married O. Schitt, the owner of Needeep N. Schitt, Inc. They had one son, Jack.

     

    In turn, Jack Schitt married Noe Schitt. The deeply religious couple produced six children: Holie Schitt, Giva Schitt, Fulla Schitt, Bull Schitt, and the twins Deep Schitt and Dip Schitt.

     

    Against her parents' objections, Deep Schitt married Dumb Schitt, a high school dropout.

     

    After being married 15 years, Jack and Noe Schitt divorced.

     

    Noe Schitt later married Ted Sherlock, and because her kids were living with them, she wanted to keep her previous name. She was then known as - Noe Schitt-Sherlock.

     

    Meanwhile, Dip Schitt married Loda Schitt, and they produced a son with a rather nervous disposition named Chicken Schitt.

     

    Two of the other six children, Fulla Schitt and Giva Schitt, were inseparable throughout childhood and subsequently married the Happens brothers in a dual ceremony.

     

    The wedding announcement in the newspaper announced the Schitt-Happens nuptials.

     

    The Schitt-Happens children were Dawg, Byrd, and Horse.

     

    Bull Schitt, the prodigal son, left home to tour the world.
    He recently returned from Italy with his new Italian bride, Pisa Schitt.

     

    Now when someone says, 'You don't know Jack Schitt', you can correct them.

     

    Sincerely,
    Crock O. Schitt
    map....
    2 Feb 2012, 09:54 PM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (707) | Send Message
     
    So when us newbies ask a stupid question, or the question actually carries some merit. Just remember that most of us are still guessing, meaning we still don't know Schitt about what Axion will become.

     

    Just thought this levity would help some. JP..iS THAT YOUR BEST JOKE?? If so please stick to writing intelligent articles for us...
    2 Feb 2012, 10:14 PM Reply Like
  • KentG
    , contributor
    Comments (368) | Send Message
     
    One more short joke, sorry in advance.

     

    "in-expensive, long range, EVs"

     

    Just read the headline "Chevy Volt sales plummet in January"

     

    I'll go away again. 8-)
    2 Feb 2012, 10:22 PM Reply Like
  • pianomanshl
    , contributor
    Comments (306) | Send Message
     
    Regarding Chevy Volt, interesting story from Ottawa, Canada.

     

    http://hgm.me/x1IV2C

     

    Don't miss the comments below the article, author has some updated info + other people's opinion too.
    2 Feb 2012, 11:43 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    The cleanest joke of the 20th century:

     

    Q: What did one wall say to the other?
    A: Meet ya at the corner!

     

    Not to worry everybody. I do have my F-A-C-U-L-T-I-E-S intact... ;)
    2 Feb 2012, 10:33 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4819) | Send Message
     
    > One APC now dedicated to football, another to jokes .... what's next ... are we going to trade BBQ cooking tips and recipes in the next?
    2 Feb 2012, 10:36 PM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (707) | Send Message
     
    DRich

     

    Come on, you gotta have one!!! Tomorrow we are back to business.

     

    map
    2 Feb 2012, 10:44 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4819) | Send Message
     
    >MAP ... Sorry to disappoint but I'm terrible with jokes. I'm not bad with improv sometimes. My humor is mostly reality based, often political, because there is so much that is really funny and reality. I'll pass one on that I read in the last week. I thought it hysterical, my ubber-conservative trading buddy (the Tea Party is leftist to him) was offended. With that, I'll leave to you whether you want to read this link I found to be the best joke of last week.

     

    http://bit.ly/wzI476
    2 Feb 2012, 11:10 PM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (707) | Send Message
     
    DRich

     

    Someone posted this last week!!! No wonder Taco Bell had a new flavor to their burrito...

     

    map
    2 Feb 2012, 11:46 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    I'm familiar with "regression to the mean" but had forgotten all about to "regression to childhood".

     

    What did the mother cannonball say to the father cannonball?

     

    I think we're going to have a BB.

     

    For us (NC) southern folks ...

     

    Why did the chicken cross the road?

     

    To prove to the 'possum it could be done.

     

    HardToLove
    3 Feb 2012, 11:32 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    Well, we could devote it to chilli! :-))

     

    HardToLove
    3 Feb 2012, 11:33 AM Reply Like
  • eggwis
    , contributor
    Comments (756) | Send Message
     
    No offense HTL, I'm voting for the Bar-B-Q. I do love chili though and I make a bad ass 7-pepper chili. Not sure that I can remember how to make it though ;-)

     

    ....next up Bar-B-Q cookin'! Chili on deck.
    4 Feb 2012, 11:40 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    Nah, I think y'all already covered thems a while back with that exhaustive chili pepper soliloquy... ;)
    2 Feb 2012, 10:40 PM Reply Like
  • pascquale
    , contributor
    Comments (143) | Send Message
     
    Any physicists?

     

    Heisenberg gets pulled over for speeding. Cop asks 'Do you know how fast you were going?'
    Heisenberg replies 'No, but I know where I am.'
    2 Feb 2012, 10:56 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3221) | Send Message
     
    Ah, a man of principals.
    2 Feb 2012, 11:18 PM Reply Like
  • f-kru
    , contributor
    Comments (263) | Send Message
     
    Anyone share some Neutrino jokes as well ;-)
    3 Feb 2012, 05:49 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    Nah, nobody ever gets those.
    3 Feb 2012, 09:16 AM Reply Like
  • Mathieu Malecot
    , contributor
    Comments (1288) | Send Message
     
    two atoms are walking across the road. one says to the other, " i think i lost an electron." the other says "are you positive?"
    3 Feb 2012, 09:24 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    Very funny. I'm sure somebody will get a charge out of that.
    3 Feb 2012, 09:38 AM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (6282) | Send Message
     
    Relatively funny :)
    3 Feb 2012, 09:41 AM Reply Like
  • eggwis
    , contributor
    Comments (756) | Send Message
     
    Yes, I got a charge out of that one and I give you bonus points for content relevance. By far the best Axion related joke!
    4 Feb 2012, 11:43 PM Reply Like
  • KirkTierney
    , contributor
    Comments (97) | Send Message
     
    Fave lawyer joke for JP.

     

    You are waiting for an elevator in a downtown business tower. The door opens, and the one man in it -- a lawyer -- waves his hands and shouts "Watch out, there's a tiger in here!". You are alarmed, as an actual tiger springs out of the door. As you back away, you reach in your pocket for a pistol with only two bullets. The tiger prepares to pounce.

     

    Q: What do you do next?

     

    A: Shoot the lawyer twice, you'll be safer that way.

     

    kt
    3 Feb 2012, 12:44 AM Reply Like
  • CO3
    , contributor
    Comments (253) | Send Message
     
    Not sure the "joke concentrator" is the right place to share
    this, but I'm going out of town for 10 days & wanted to post before going "net free".

     

    So the UPS guy drops a package at my neighbors (2 houses away).
    Shuts his truck off, starts it, gets to my house, shuts his truck off
    drops my package, goes to my other neighbors house ( 3 houses away) shuts his truck off ..... 20 stop/starts on my block alone.
    Being in the auto industry for decades I know this can't be a good thing for standard type starters, alternators, & BATTERIES ...
    So I run down the block to chat with him. Seems corporate is concerned with pollution, noise, and fuel consumption and all the trucks now have to shut down on EVERY stop, sort of legislated stop-start on a company level. ( I'm sure Fed-ex is getting on board too). I ask him about battery life.... Not good. Every few weeks he's getting a new battery. He says they have pallets (plural) of new batteries at the depot. Now this is VT, a harsh environment for batteries, but they must be changing them a lot even in the warmer climates too.
    My point is, this could be a nice jump start ( pun intended, keeping with the joke theme) for Axion's sales team.
    UPS fleet is huge, add Fed-ex, even US Postal ....
    I doubt they are saving enough money in fuel to cover the battery and starter replacement expenses, but they need the political cover & green points so the policy has been set. These guys are committed to "stop/start" the old fashioned way and have a BIG battery budget. Low hanging fruit for a sales rep with a solution to cut the line item expense.
    3 Feb 2012, 01:16 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    So I believe we previously established you couldn't just drop in a PbC battery for an AGM one in a car.

     

    But how much design, time, effort, and expense would it take to alter the truck or alternatively develop a "system that included a PbC battery" that was "plug compatible?"

     

    Are there likely severe size/volume constraints?
    3 Feb 2012, 08:57 AM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3221) | Send Message
     
    You're hired!

     

    Regards,

     

    Vani
    3 Feb 2012, 11:14 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    "I ask him about battery life.... Not good. Every few weeks he's getting a new battery. He says they have pallets (plural) of new batteries at the depot."

     

    Wow. Words just fail...
    3 Feb 2012, 01:43 AM Reply Like
  • CO3
    , contributor
    Comments (253) | Send Message
     
    And from my 6 y/o neighbor ....

     

    Why do seagulls fly by the sea shore ???

     

    Cause if they flew by the bay shore, they'd be Bay-gulls ......

     

    (Sorry guys .... but it IS a good joke if you're only 6 )
    3 Feb 2012, 01:45 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    BACK TO REAL ISSUES:

     

    I've spent the last couple days trying to put myself in Tom's shoes as the financing came together. The longer I think about it the more impressive the terms become.

     

    In mid-November Tom was in a pretty good place. He'd been working on pulling together a financing transaction for several months and was probably most of the way through the due diligence and investor meeting process. The stock had stabilized in the $0.50 range and he knew that the Viridity-PJM announcement was coming by Thanksgiving. He probably knew about the Navy Yard sale too. Under those circumstances I'd have expected the price to get a nice bump before year end setting the stage for an up round closing in February or March.

     

    The one thing he couldn't have known was that a couple of legacy shareholders would start slamming stock into the market and drive the price down to $0.27 by New Years. Were I a potential private placement investor, that kind of precipitous price drop would have scared the bejesus out of me. It doesn't matter how good you are at happy talk, keeping a deal from falling apart in the wake of a 50% price collapse over 45 days is pretty miraculous. When the price promptly turned and jetted 100% to the upside in January, the private placement investor in me would have been more concerned rather than relieved.

     

    The two overriding character traits that I've seen in private placement investors over the years are (a) a last-in-first-out mentality where they don't worry about the feelings of legacy stockholders, and (b) a rabid determination to avoid losses.

     

    While getting a good return on capital is desirable, getting an assured return of capital is essential. These guys simply don't invest on terms where they think they can lose money. When they're ready to write a check, they won't accept an answer that says "Let's put this off for a few weeks so that I can charge you 50% more per share."

     

    Financing transactions always take three to six months from start to finish. The due diligence investigations drag on forever and then the investor meetings and price negotiations start in earnest. When the placement agent has herded all his cats into the same room and is ready to write a check, delay is not an option because cats have very short attention spans. It's literally a situation where the choice is "take the money now from this herd of cats or go out and start the process over from square one with another placement agent."

     

    A couple years ago Tom watched in horror as Firefly Energy rejected a couple term sheets and decided to go out looking for another herd of cats. Firefly left a check sitting on the table and then couldn't find somebody else to write a check. That decision cost the decision makers and their investors everything.

     

    My first successful IPO was priced at $1 in 1989. The deal was so hot that the underwriter was willing to raise the price to $2 if the company would stand down for 45 days. Since the same team had an offering crater in October 87 because they wanted a couple more weeks for the road show, they made the sensible choice and took the money at $1 even though they might have done better with a 45-day stand down.

     

    I went through the same drill on a $100 million debt offering a few years later. The underwriters promised a rate between 7.5 and 8 percent. When the roadshow was done and the commitments were in hand, the rate came in at a little over 11%. Once again the choice was take it or leave it. There was nothing to negotiate.

     

    I hate seeing the stock go off at $0.35 because I believe Axion is worth far more. If I put on my investor hat, however, I'd be screaming bloody murder if a company expected me to pay a 30% premium to the one-month low for a block of stock that would take months to liquidate if things went south. When I put on my CEO's hat it would be darned near impossible to walk away from the herd of corralled cats in the hope that I could start over and round up another herd of cats before I ran out of money.

     

    Hard times make for hard decisions, but the longer I think about the choices that Tom could have made, the more convinced I am that he made the right one. We all hate the pain of seeing somebody get a lower price than we wanted them to pay. Mercifully pain is fleeting. Otherwise we'd all be an only child.
    3 Feb 2012, 02:01 AM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1960) | Send Message
     
    Thanks for the summary, John. I was thinking about this as well and one thing I read in the press release was that, "The share price for this transaction was pre-determined by calculating a 10% discount to market using the Company's volume weighted average price for the trailing 40 day period (VWAP)."

     

    "Pre-determined" tells me the 40-day VWAP was probably decided way back in Nov. along with the date of Feb, 1st, which would have been the start of negotiations to get cats corralled or at least to come to the farm. My only criticism, with the benefit of 20/20 hindsight, of course, is; why didn't he set the date for Feb 15th. It would have put all 40 days of the VWAP into the new year without accounting for all that end of year selling.

     

    Alas, what is done is done and I don't think anyone in Nov. expected the last week of last year to do what it did. Now, we must move on and say in the long run our core goals are still very much in tact and making it to the finish line never looked better.
    3 Feb 2012, 07:33 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    jak...the maximum price probably would not have changed...yes, the moving average would have been higher...but they are going to stop at a certain price and I bet you that price was .35 no matter what the stock was trading at.
    3 Feb 2012, 08:04 AM Reply Like
  • Mercy Jimenez
    , contributor
    Comments (2710) | Send Message
     
    John,
    I very much appreciate this summary of your seasoned perspective.

     

    Perhaps you can also help me reconcile a couple of thoughts you have expressed. Above you mention:

     

    "The two overriding character traits that I've seen in private placement investors over the years are (a) a last-in-first-out mentality where they don't worry about the feelings of legacy stockholders, and (b) a rabid determination to avoid losses."

     

    And over the last couple of days, you have mentioned often how the new 35 cent shareholders in this recent issuance -- share the "Axionista mindset" e.g. you mentioned "A placed direct deal like this one is usually pretty good for the market ... While you invariably have a few flippers sneak in the back door, most buyers take a much more Axionista approach to timelines and expectations."

     

    It would appear to me that many Axionistas on this Concentrator have not taken a "a last-in-first-out mentality" and many more have been willing to weather paper losses as they have averaged down in price per share for the long haul.

     

    Since most of the new 28 million shares held by 35 cent buyers are still being held after two days -- I am just trying to get a better sense for what potential drivers of price trend will be. I am sure there is something I am missing in what I have pointed out above.

     

    Thanks in advance for your time.

     

    mj
    3 Feb 2012, 09:13 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    So John, if you had been in TG's shoes, could you have legally called either Spec Sits and/or Quercus and explained even in general terms that AXPW had disclosed its need to raise money in a short time frame and thus they were shooting themselves in the foot and leaving a LOT of money on the table with their behavior at the time? You would expect that investors of that type would understand how these financing deals work.

     

    Really dynamic (and rare?) leaders might have the kind of power of persuasion that might have affected one or the other entity, but I don't know if he was allowed to legally. If it was legal, do you think he made either call?
    3 Feb 2012, 09:16 AM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3221) | Send Message
     
    "The two overriding character traits that I've seen in private placement investors over the years are (a) a last-in-first-out mentality where they don't worry about the feelings of legacy stockholders, and (b) a rabid determination to avoid losses."

     

    Regarding your part (b), I was a priv placement investor in off-the-radar micro-cap stocks. My approach, as well as the group I was with, was to breakdown our expectations into a group of five investments: one home run, two blahs and two total losses. In other words, you tried to more than make up your losses with one huge return. Losses were an unavoidable part of the high risk/high reward game.

     

    Regarding part (a)--at least regarding the empathy part, oh boy, as soon as you let empathy for other investors guide your investing decisions, look out below. Because that's where you're headed.

     

    Regarding TG's decisions about the financing, well, he did good enough. The big pic is, for the time being, business/product items are now more important. Nice when a businessman can focus on, well, products and customers, lol.
    3 Feb 2012, 10:29 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I would have made the calls, but I wouldn't have expected my calls to make a difference.

     

    Special Sits changed managers and the new guy was adjusting its portfolio to fit his style. In the context of an $800 million fund the amount of money Special Sits left on the table by selling quickly was meaningless. Axion simply wasn't a big enough piece of the pie to make a difference, particularly after Special Sits had most of its bait back.

     

    Quercus sold because it had to sell or the $200+ million it had invested in weaker companies could become a total loss. If I have to choose between making your life miserable and saving a huge pile of money I've invested in other companies, my needs win.

     

    I would not be surprised to learn that Tom made calls, but it would be improper for me to speculate about whether he did.
    3 Feb 2012, 11:11 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I want to apologize for the first-in-first-out reference because it does seem confusing in 20/20 hindsight.

     

    In general, direct offering investors come in two classes.

     

    The first type of investors are deal flipping specialists who want to buy stock today and pound it into the market tomorrow with no risk exposure. The flippers invariably want to buy the entire offering because they don't want to have competitors at the pay window.

     

    The second type of investors are smaller funds and HNW individuals who know they're buying shares that can't be liquidated quickly. The conventional wisdom is that direct placement investors can't account for more than 10% of reported trading volume without hurting a stock price. Investors who understand that rule and know how the game is played will look at a company like Axion that traded 78 million shares last year and figure that an orderly sale of their investments will take 18 months even if you assume a 100% year on year compound growth in trading volume.

     

    The most important thing for both classes ls loss avoidance. I have a high degree of confidence that the bulk of the new investors are in the second class and know that they're in for at least 18 months unless trading volumes just go crazy. That's getting pretty close to an Axionista mentality in its own right. I also know the kind of time and effort the second class put into making decisions. They climb exactly the same wall of worry, but do it with amounts that would leave many of us gasping for air.
    3 Feb 2012, 11:25 AM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1960) | Send Message
     
    Mr Investor,

     

    What do you think the investment horizon is for the new investors? I think you are saying a 30% gain as soon as next week is not going to cause these guys to flip, if it looks like a winner they stick with it until the 5 -10x pay-off, but did you have any rules that you stuck to for an exit strategy when entering into a placement similar to this?
    3 Feb 2012, 11:25 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Many thanks for adding the perspective of somebody who's been on the investor side in these kinds of deals.
    3 Feb 2012, 11:26 AM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3221) | Send Message
     
    Hey jk,

     

    I don't know--we invested in private placements, often with warrants, and always with lockdown periods. Buying registered shares at a price that currently allows a flip for 25%-30% gains? My guess is some investors would find that an irresistable return, but what actually happens depends on a lot of other things, in my experience, such as the placement agents' desires (sometimes, in IPOs and secondaries, they would tell us, "hey, it's your money, but if you flip you're out of any more deals." Other times, they'd let their best clients make an easy buck) and the ability of the selling to be adequately absorbed, and, of course, the investor(s)'s goals. Since these are registered shares, I assume the investor(s) didn't have access to non-public info about Axion. If that's true, that's a factor in their 'hold vs flip' decision, too. Some of them might be even more tempted to flip since they have no better info about the future than we do (e.g., no ability to time the selling around a specific big PbC order), so why not take a nice sure gain now?

     

    In any case, I'd think and hope there is a nice floor at 35 cents.
    3 Feb 2012, 12:29 PM Reply Like
  • Mr Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (3221) | Send Message
     
    No problemo. Sounds like you were involved in way more deals than me, but my thoughts and experiences on the buy side might help someone here.

     

    My favorite period was the early to mid '90s, because pricing and deal flow was favorable. As the tech bubble inflated, I backed off a lot. Silly-bad pricing. Overall, as I begin to look around at today's micro & small-cap investing landscape again, I see a return to much more reasonable pricing. AXPW at 35 cents looks like an excellent deal to me. Anyone here try to get in it?
    3 Feb 2012, 12:45 PM Reply Like
  • D. McHattie
    , contributor
    Comments (1844) | Send Message
     
    Thanks for the explanation, John.

     

    But what kind of suit does each group where?

     

    I'm thinking that a true Axionista wears a birthday suit only.

     

    D
    3 Feb 2012, 01:09 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    No, pajamas.
    3 Feb 2012, 01:19 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I think I've made my last comment ever on the topic of sartorial splendor.
    3 Feb 2012, 01:37 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13581) | Send Message
     
    It all depends on the type of investment:

     

    "Buy and Hold forever" is formal wear only. Having worn ties every day in a prior professional existance, I am immune to this social disease and therefore cannot accurately be characterized as a "suit".

     

    An "Investment" is something which, like Axion, I find has a compelling narrative, sound business opportunities, good management, and the potential to make yours truly mucho money. I tend to dress "casual" for these occassions.

     

    A "Trade" is a stock which, like many of the junior explorers among the rare earth miners, is just too raw to consider as a serious investment. These can get to be really bumpy rides, so I have been known to rush to the command center "commando" when seeking to squeeze profits from these turnips.

     

    Then we have my current favorite option, ie, trading around a core "investment". This is where the tin hats come into their own...
    3 Feb 2012, 01:39 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    If the deal was well placed, there's a good chance that may have already seen the bottom. The FINRA market maker short data would suggest that there's been some flip trading, but the price hasn't fallen like you'd expect if the practice was widespread.
    3 Feb 2012, 01:41 PM Reply Like
  • Mercy Jimenez
    , contributor
    Comments (2710) | Send Message
     
    John, that's funnier that most of the entries on the joke concentrator.
    3 Feb 2012, 01:50 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Mark Twain said "The cat, having sat upon a hot stove lid, will not sit upon a hot stove lid again. But he won't sit upon a cold stove lid, either." I know the feeling.
    3 Feb 2012, 01:55 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    Excellent summary John,

     

    Never having been in that situation it is always good to hear first hand accounts of what really happens in those situations.

     

    An interesting SA article concerning investment strategy:
    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    Forget the part about what this guy is writing about NetFlix. The key to his article is his dissertation on investment theory. Very interesting stuff. I like being reminded once in a while to look at my self ( and my investments) in the mirror
    3 Feb 2012, 05:03 AM Reply Like
  • f-kru
    , contributor
    Comments (263) | Send Message
     
    John, thank you for sharing your experience and explaining this stuff to a layman like myself. What makes Axion such a great investement for me is that I can understand the technology, the market potential and thanks to you also the financial side.
    I'm guessing that when Tom told one of use (I think Rick) on the phone that financing is not an issue, he was already in negotiations. It might have become a short term issue for the stock price, but not for the survival of the company.
    Two weeks ago, some here on the list were hoping for a pull back to .45 to buy more. No here we are at almost .45 with the finance round behind us and the survival of the company secured (at least for a while), a product ready for sale and a sales team ready to do the job.
    3 Feb 2012, 05:46 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    My guess is that Tom was well into the due diligence and investor presentation process when he told Ricknplano that financing would be "no problem."

     

    It's important to remember, however, that the conversation occurred on November 15th, right before things went to hell in a handbag.

     

    I'll bet dollars to donuts that Tom would have been a good deal less sanguine if the conversation had happened in mid-December.

     

    Things change very quickly in the capital markets and sometimes other people zig when you expect them to zag. At times like those all an investor can do is judge the reasonableness of a forecast when it was made.
    3 Feb 2012, 06:54 AM Reply Like
  • Mathieu Malecot
    , contributor
    Comments (1288) | Send Message
     
    nice article futurist. i got slammed for saying i would wait until financing to buy more. now the stock is getting slammed because the business can maintain operations through the year.

     

    ask yourself why you are investing in something, then invest appropriately. today axpw's future is more clear than it was before financing. if the stock traded higher i would have bought the news. fortunately it traded lower and i am STILL buying the news.
    3 Feb 2012, 09:12 AM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    If anyone's still reading this old concentrator, I wanna second Futurist's recommendation. It's a worthy read, especially for those of us still climbing the lower, most treacherous slopes of Mount Wisdom...
    5 Feb 2012, 01:17 AM Reply Like
  • jlyleluce
    , contributor
    Comments (247) | Send Message
     
    John,
    Thanks for your thoughts.
    3 Feb 2012, 06:10 AM Reply Like
  • Frrat
    , contributor
    Comments (76) | Send Message
     
    Thank you John for putting us into TG's shoes.
    I also want to share something from my perspective - for last 3 days I have been reviewing my buying decisions of last 6 months, and I found that I confused three different concept of value - fair book value short term fair market value, and long term market value, and the result is - I could have use my investment chance and capital much better. You bar tender analogy is absolutely right when used to evaluate Axpw's book value, but not so for its short term market value. Actually, for a speculative stock like AXPW, you don't have better clue on this (short term market value) than any of us ( you cannot deny your track record).
    So my question is - how could I have better idea about AXPW's short term fair market value since my next buying decision will be based on it, and my belief is - the recent 0.35 shelf offering gives us a very good clue. To me, 20% appreciation from 0.35, namely, 0.42 is a good reference point for short term fair market value.
    Only my thought for this moment, anyway, just try to be cool and patient from now on....
    3 Feb 2012, 07:07 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    My track record in predicting short-term market value is dismal, which is why my investment philosophy is to buy very slowly and only when I know more than anybody on the planet about the people I'm investing in. The great thing about my profession is I get a chance to understand what the business opportunities are at a far deeper level and I also spend enough time to get inside the manger's heads and understand how they'll respond to future challenges. My knowledge of the business details becomes dated with time. My understanding of how people think and act doesn't.
    3 Feb 2012, 08:51 AM Reply Like
  • Mercy Jimenez
    , contributor
    Comments (2710) | Send Message
     
    FYI -- last week Seeking alpha requested questions for an Alan Mulally interview -- which has now been posted and may interest some of you. I sent in two questions -- one of which was used but unfortunately the one about start/stop technology did not make the cut. Here is the interview transcript out today: http://seekingalpha.co...
    3 Feb 2012, 08:24 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13581) | Send Message
     
    Thanks, Mercy. I also asked about stop/start. It occurred to me later that I should have explained what stop/start is (for the jury reviewing the questions for submission, who probably had no idea what it was and skimmed right past it).

     

    My other questions was even more arcane, though it was the sort of thing that could make a big difference to many people's investment decision as regards Ford.

     

    For the record I really like the man and think he does an excellent job.
    3 Feb 2012, 08:58 AM Reply Like
  • Mercy Jimenez
    , contributor
    Comments (2710) | Send Message
     
    I hear you TB. I tried to explain a little and ran the question past Maya -- but they still didn't bite. Here is what I sent in:

     

    "Mr. Mullaly, while the auto industry is generally focused on expensive and new heavy batteries for electric cars, some argue that the low lying fruit resides with stop/start technology for internal combustion engines. For example, the Axion PowerCube is currently being tested by BMW and others for modestly cutting fuel use 5% to 10% for a modest incremental cost. Is Ford considering this kind of shorter-term strategy to serve an immense market immediately and more cost effectively?"
    3 Feb 2012, 09:51 AM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (6282) | Send Message
     
    I also asked about stop/start and specifically mentioned Axion.
    They did ask my question about when the credit rating would be expected to improve into investment grade. Of course, the answer side stepped the issue...
    3 Feb 2012, 10:10 AM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (707) | Send Message
     
    FPA

     

    Did you get the impression they had no idea about Axion??

     

    map
    3 Feb 2012, 10:24 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    He may have not answered the question because of the specific mention to Axion. Without it, he should have addressed SS
    3 Feb 2012, 10:46 AM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (6282) | Send Message
     
    SA did not select the start/ stop questions from the three of us...
    I am sure Ford knows about Axion, I suspect the SA folks conducting the interview are not aware of the importance of start/ stop in future automotive sales. Mercy brought up the "immense market" for Hybrids, but I suspect the significance of her point was not fully appreciated, so the question was not asked.

     

    What I learned from this is it's important to establish the context for a question so everyone can appreciate its importance/ relevance.
    3 Feb 2012, 10:49 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    SA may not have selected the question because of the mention of AXPW.OB ... you can't write about it specifically except on instablogs right now due to being < $1, correct?
    3 Feb 2012, 11:02 AM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    Mercy,
    Thanks for trying. My guess would be that the moment the question involved a specific battery company and a named competitor of Ford there was no way it was going to get through the screening process. Both would have taken away the focus from Ford. IMHO
    3 Feb 2012, 01:44 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13581) | Send Message
     
    My query made no mention of Axion, or even batteries. I assumed someone else would make it a more precise query, so I tried one about start/stop plans for north america and europe in general...
    3 Feb 2012, 01:45 PM Reply Like
  • rastros
    , contributor
    Comments (41) | Send Message
     
    F-kru made an excellent point. Had the market declined gradually over a period of weeks, then 0.43 would have been viewed as a "bargain". But, with a sudden downdraft, and a 0.15 drop, panic and anger set in. The end result, however, is the same, and it's simply a matter of interpretation.
    The use of humor was a brilliant strategy--gets us away momentarily from the "fear factor", and allows us to regroup. The resilience on the Board is rather amazing.
    Assuming nothing is materially different with the "product", in a matter of months we may be able to look back at this with a "legitimate" sense of humor.
    3 Feb 2012, 08:28 AM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    I wasn't trying to be brilliant but that silly joke hit me as funnier than it should have been when I got it. It occurred to me that if I needed to lighten up a bit some others might feel the same way.
    3 Feb 2012, 08:53 AM Reply Like
  • Nicholas Chen
    , contributor
    Comments (2770) | Send Message
     
    Actually I would have regarded a slow decline as much more negative as it shows less enthusiasm. A quick one just meant a few holders were scared into selling.

     

    I think it's safe to buy now - of course, I say that now that I have picked up shares.
    3 Feb 2012, 11:49 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Terrific, Mercy. Thanks. Great to see old SA pal Mark Bern getting in there, too.
    3 Feb 2012, 08:38 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13581) | Send Message
     
    Mark was a good choice. Kudos to Mark.
    3 Feb 2012, 08:59 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » FWIW: Over the four years or so I've been on "total immersion stock watch mode," I've noticed that usually it's the third day after an offering that is the best day to buy.

     

    In other words, today "should" be the last day of the knee jerk sellers selling.

     

    Next week AXPW should start back upward. Even if no news is released.
    3 Feb 2012, 09:31 AM Reply Like
  • jlyleluce
    , contributor
    Comments (247) | Send Message
     
    Still bottom fishing. Price is up early.
    3 Feb 2012, 10:00 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » JLL: I probably should have written that the third day after an offering is the "safest" day to buy.
    3 Feb 2012, 10:17 AM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    I think the bargain sales days on AXPW stock have very little time left. Been wrong on this stock before and maybe wrong now, but I'm in agreement with you Maya. I still have one more bottom fishing bid in the water and if I get it great, but if I don't that's ok too. I'm in a good position for the moment.
    3 Feb 2012, 12:53 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » bang: That's why I jammed more shares in the brokerage account the day before yesterday, and yesterday.

     

    Now I'm looking at 52.5 cents and 70 cents as resistance, if my sell at half house money, and then others selling at full house money theory holds up.

     

    Holding nicely at the mean of the shares I bought at 46 cents. Guessing we'll not see 42 cents again.
    3 Feb 2012, 01:21 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    I believe we will.

     

    HardToLove
    3 Feb 2012, 01:33 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    My experience with direct placement investors is that 2x and 4x are the sweet spots, but it's been a while since I've done a deal like Axion's.
    3 Feb 2012, 01:44 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    Maya,
    At this point I hope you are wrong. I'm still waiting on a check to clear before I'll have any more dry powder. If I've got to watch the stock go down in price over and over it would at least be nice to buy some of it when it is down. Maybe next week.
    3 Feb 2012, 01:48 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » HTL: You may be correct. We'll see. 42 cents is only 4 cents down from here. And it looks like selling volume is outpacing buying volume by a lot so far today.

     

    But with today's volume what it is, I'll stick to my guns on this call ;-)

     

    Just canceled my QuoteMedia service, so I will no longer have Level 2 data available. My day trading days are pretty much over for the next year or three. The first baby step into switching hats has been completed.
    3 Feb 2012, 01:50 PM Reply Like
  • Poul Brandt
    , contributor
    Comments (254) | Send Message
     
    Maya

     

    I also have noted the 3 days. Actually my experience is 2-3 days.

     

    And this applies to both good and bad news.
    (The AXPW news apparently being bad news :-) ).

     

    What I think happens is:
    On the first day may people see the news more or less immediately. They react to the news (in this case sell).

     

    However not all investors are in "Axionista mode" i.e. chekking the instablog several times a day. So many people first realize what has happened during the evening on the day of the news release.Or on the morning of the 2nd day. These people will be trading on the 2nd day. Especially in the first hours of trading!

     

    The same applies to the 3rd day. Just these people realize the news on the 2nd days evening (or 3rd day morning).

     

    An indicator for the fact that this may be an accurate description is that the volume is highest on the 1st day, lower on the 2nd day and getting close to normal on the 3rd day.

     

    Also a very interesting consequence is that in the morning on each of these 3 days there are a lot of more or less unlimited sales orders. These are executed during the first 1-2 hours of trading putting a lot of pressure on the price. But later in the day the price starts to increase again, as these "scared" investors have gotten "rid" of the shares they had.
    3 Feb 2012, 02:15 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Lab: The old waiting for the check to clear thingy. ;-) Dag gum banks! I'll never forget last year when it took 17 days for the two checks I wrote to close on this home to clear. 17 days! Recall writing a few rants on that subject.

     

    For your sake, I hope I'm wrong, too.
    3 Feb 2012, 02:43 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Poul: Yep. The Axionistas angle definitely could affect this idea.

     

    Big selling the first hour of the first day, and the second day...I've noticed exactly that numerous times. And it happened with Axion this time around, too.

     

    But looked what happened this, the third morning. Buying right off the bat.

     

    I look at this as now we have even more shares in strong, long hands.

     

    No Edward Scissorhands jokes, please!
    3 Feb 2012, 02:51 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    Well, in this case I can't blame a bank. I'm moving money from an old Money Market 403B to a new IRA with a different company. Basically I'm at the mercy of the 403B account managers, since they don't seem to have any rules that require them to liquidate my assets in a timely manner from their accounts and send a check to the new company that holds the IRA. So I just sit and wait while they tell me my request is being "processed".
    3 Feb 2012, 03:48 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (19491) | Send Message
     
    LabTech: it may be faster if you get the receiving side to make the request. Less paperwork, I think.

     

    And don't forget that the liquidation instituted by you needs to be offset with a new deposit to your new account on the IRS tax return - they won't catch it automatically if you liquidated and then deposited the way they would if it was a transfer.

     

    HardToLove
    3 Feb 2012, 03:57 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13581) | Send Message
     
    Bureaucrats. In a perfect world, all such would be physically "processed". I'm a meat hunter (I only kill what I will eat), but for these guys I'd make an exception and go for "trophies".
    3 Feb 2012, 11:15 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    Methinks the result would be an awfully fatty sausage.
    4 Feb 2012, 12:28 AM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (3699) | Send Message
     
    And a scary trophy on the wall. Not much worse than a grinning bureaucrat. At least we would know what was between the ears.
    4 Feb 2012, 12:45 AM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (958) | Send Message
     
    so...late into our weekly "family dinner night"..my 4 adult kids...and daughter in law...future son in law...and my wife of course...finished our dinner...celebrating my son and daughter in law's offer being accepted to buy a house...then my daughter and daughter in law decide to open a couple of bottles of wine...and then some...

     

    ...so...as the night wore on and the bottles emptied...the chatter became incessantly repetitive...incessantly boring...
    ...so...I mosey on over to the kitchen counter...log on to my laptop...catch up on emails, and come across a string of levity from AXION Power Concentrator...

     

    ...so...boredom or levity?...(and AXPW updates of course)

     

    My mommy always taught me to be productive..."don't just stand there with your hands in your pocket"...work!

     

    Yes...I "participated" when warranted in the family banter...but had to multi task!

     

    Signed,

     

    a grateful father!...and an AXPW JP/Maya "follower"
    3 Feb 2012, 11:02 AM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    LT recently mentioned the need (and cost) to "certify" the gen2A and gen3 lines.

     

    Can someone elaborate/speculate on who does this certification, how long it takes, how expensive it might be, what's involved, and which contracts might depend on it and thus be delayed until it happens?

     

    What to do we know about the existence of, and development of, gen3 lines? Where do we think they are in the "process?"
    3 Feb 2012, 11:22 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (5783) | Send Message
     
    WTB...Labtech here & Indelco on the other board can help you more on who does the certification....there has been much discussion there on certification...it was a big deal to some. Any way the short version is that AXPW has already certified the lines in place now ...they just never formally announced until the last cc I think...So this time it will be much simpler, faster & cheaper (most of it probably carries over).

     

    Basically they run a batch of batteries or product at say 80% capacity run rate and then they are sent for testing to assure quality control by both AXPW & their customer..a customer like say GM must know that they can mass produce a high quality product at a reasonable cost...The first time is a big deal, but this should be a piece of cake and should not slow down any new developments.
    3 Feb 2012, 02:33 PM Reply Like
  • 481086
    , contributor
    Comments (3431) | Send Message
     
    Although... I believe they've said they're not ready to cookie-cutter the lines until Gen3... .so I'm thinking an additional line right now would be Gen2a...which yes probably(?) could have streamlined certification, but it could be Gen3 too, which I would suspect would take a bit more to certify because perhaps it has higher throughput(?) or otherwise features significantly upgraded machines. A lot of uninformed conjecture and qualifiers in there I know, but I do doubt they would purchase another strictly identical copy of the gen2 line right now..
    3 Feb 2012, 03:09 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    As I recall Tom's description during the Q3 call, the Gen 2A merely involved adding a couple workstations to the Gen 2 line.

     

    The Gen 3 line will supposedly be the final commercial production version that's ordered in multiple line quantities as needed.
    3 Feb 2012, 03:32 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    Appears the 424B5 was refiled/amended?

     

    Has anyone detected the differences?

     

    http://bit.ly/wO0KmE
    3 Feb 2012, 11:48 AM Reply Like
  • CoryM
    , contributor
    Comments (79) | Send Message
     
    Looks to me like it's just stating that the minimum number of shares offered (22,857,142) had been met. I think the offering would have been cancelled if they didn't get their minimum.

     

    "At the close of business on February 2, 2012, subscriptions had been received for in excess of the minimum number of shares offered hereby. "
    3 Feb 2012, 12:52 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    Closing time! Get 'em while you can.
    3 Feb 2012, 01:33 PM Reply Like
  • LabTech
    , contributor
    Comments (1778) | Send Message
     
    They also seemed to have fleshed out the background information on the PbC and the potential of the start-stop industry. But mainly it seems to be an affirmation that they've reached the minimum sales point for the transaction so that all the buyers know that they aren't getting their money back and the sale will go forward.
    3 Feb 2012, 01:54 PM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1960) | Send Message
     
    Deal must have closed for the full amount. On Axion's quote chart it shows 115M shares outstanding.

     

    And the company is currently trading for nearly the exact same price they were trading for on Monday when they did not have $9M in cash.
    3 Feb 2012, 01:55 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    The market cap is the same but the price is about 25% lower.

     

    It really is a shame when you consider that fair value is theoretically the risk weighted discounted present value of expected future returns.

     

    In my view the post-money risks are lower than they were pre-money and the timeframe to expected future returns is shorter. I wouldn't want to try and quantify either but reducing risk weighting should increase value and accelerating future returns should have the same effect.
    3 Feb 2012, 02:01 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4819) | Send Message
     
    Off Topic & FYI ... but I think that the next big thing in batteries will be graphene and will start to show about 2023-2030. I think it will have other higher uses before that happens before that (2015-2017) in semiconductors, vapor dep high value power batterie and communications. The problem is production in quantity. Cheap production would find it's way into composite material. I believe that graphite (Northern Graphite is my choice for source) is that solution. To that end, I'm just throwing out this link for consideration.

     

    http://bit.ly/wYqcy5
    3 Feb 2012, 11:51 AM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    Graphene is going to be really big in the "nanotech" world when we can figure out how to mass produce it cheaply.

     

    It has supercapacitor properties (for your battery tech) and some amazing molecular level properties, like passing water molecules through a graphene membrane while other molecules get retained. On a more macro structural level it has incredible strength, and will improve our composite materials. I think your timeline estimates are reasonable.

     

    http://bit.ly/zn59Hc
    3 Feb 2012, 12:10 PM Reply Like
  • Futurist
    , contributor
    Comments (2109) | Send Message
     
    I invested in one of the first solar cells companies back in the late 70s. Nasa was their only customer. I learned then that being to early is not profitable.

     

    Graphene is extremely interesting. But who, how, and When?

     

    I have similar questions about other clean tech companies. Clean water, copper substitution materials, etc. The world will be exploding with great investment ideas. Hope I have a little extra to use when Axion finally breaks through.
    3 Feb 2012, 12:22 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    I don't know anything about this company (http://bit.ly/yP7OSQ), but a quick look at their website reveals connections to the materials engineering team in Austin that reported the graphene "ultracapacitor" work in 2008.

     

    That is at least one "who," but the how and when are very big questions.
    3 Feb 2012, 12:29 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4819) | Send Message
     
    >Futurist ... Right now there is no good way to invest. Northern Graphite (NGPHF.PK) is the only remote possibility (justified by Jack Lifton in this link)\

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    because of way production methods seem to be progressing with MIT. Graftech and Zoltek are leading suspects in the pure play. I tend to think that it will become commercial to energy storage & semiconductors about 2015-17 in high value application because of what IBM, Stanford & Intel are working on. Else from that, it's just a fun thing to follow & track. I don't think it will displace Axion's battery (might enhance it) but it could be trouble for Li-on.
    3 Feb 2012, 12:45 PM Reply Like
  • John Petersen
    , contributor
    Comments (30629) | Send Message
     
    In another of those one degree of separation things Graphene Energy got its seed funding from the Quercus Trust and David Anthony's company 21 Ventures. http://bit.ly/wUaQEy
    3 Feb 2012, 01:49 PM Reply Like
  • SMaturin
    , contributor
    Comments (2268) | Send Message
     
    It's a nano world!
    3 Feb 2012, 04:00 PM Reply Like
  • wtblanchard
    , contributor
    Comments (2410) | Send Message
     
    Must. Not. Hum. That. Song.
    3 Feb 2012, 04:07 PM Reply Like
  • bangwhiz
    , contributor
    Comments (2240) | Send Message
     
    I'm in a good mood today! Feel like I'm posting my "status" on Facebook! Why? As most people know I cashed my mother's 15K shares of Axion out at .62 recently with a small profit after she had been down almost $5K at the worst. Most know she's 92, blind, bed-ridden widow, but still of sound mind. Since then I've bought her 5K shares with 1K at .60, 1k at .425 and 3K at .46 today.

     

    That gives her an average price of .488 with commissions thrown in. Much better than .60 with 15K shares in her circumstances. She doesn't have forever for a good payday. Axion has a year to bring home some bacon and make this more reasonable bet pay off for her. Unlike betting $10K of her money the stakes are more reasonable now.

     

    If I play it safe I think I've got 6 months for Vani, Rosewater or somebody to hit one out of the park. For her she needs a big payoff to bother with it at all. I think where she's sitting right now is the perfect seat in the ballpark and all I'm waiting for is hearing is that magic bat sound - CRACK! Time to sit back with a beer and a bratwurst and enjoy the game!

     

    EDIT: Well, if she lets me handle her money I'm not totally sure she's of sound mind. :<D
    3 Feb 2012, 12:04 PM Reply Like
  • Nicholas Chen
    , contributor
    Comments (2770) | Send Message
     
    Strong close and stable day. Should portend a good week ahead, as "day 3" of news ends.
    3 Feb 2012, 04:03 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (11198) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » This way to the next Concentrator:

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...
    3 Feb 2012, 04:19 PM Reply Like
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