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  • How White-Collar Criminals Exploit Your Vanity – Beware of Compliments 37 comments
    Jun 12, 2010 1:19 AM

    Career criminal, master charmer Sam E. writes about his speaking engagement in Portland, where we met and I gathered material for part II of the No Redemption. The most fascinating aspect of Sam’s story is it teaches us about human nature. But on a more practical level, understanding fraud and the techniques used to commit white collar crimes can give investors insight into the integrity of the companies they invest in. Companies built on fraud tend to implode under the weight of their own lies, eventually – can we find these companies early, before their business comes crashing down?  (Stay tuned for part III) – Ilene 

    How White-Collar Criminals Exploit Your Vanity – Beware of Compliments

    By Sam Antar of White Collar Fraud 

    Artwork by Marta Dahlig

    Last Friday, I was the key note speaker at the Oregon Health Care Fraud Working Group Training Seminar, sponsored by the United State Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon. I explained to the group that while emphasis on effective oversight and internal controls are important factors in preventing or deterring white-collar crime, not enough emphasis is given to the underlying psychology used by white-collar criminals to prey on their victims and effectively commit their crimes.

    I have said many times that, "White-collar criminals consider your humanity as a weakness to be exploited in the execution of their crimes" and as the cold-blooded and ruthless criminal CFO of Crazy Eddie, I learned that you can steal far more with a smile than you can with a gun.

    White-collar criminals use a combination of charm and deceit to achieve their objectives. The more likable and charming that I was as a criminal, the easier it was for me to successfully lie to my victims and deceive them. People are far less skeptical of people who they like and the white-collar criminals know it and exploit it.

    Rabbi Dr. Abraham Joshua Twerski, author of several books and a psychiatrist specializing in substance-abuse, once said:

    Self-esteem is based on the realization of one’s capacities, of what can do. Vanity is the feeling that admiration and exaltation should be expressed for what one has done" 

    Self-esteem is a positive character trait and unfortunately vanity helps build self-confidence and self-esteem. As a criminal, I took advantage of the vanity of my victims to make myself more likable to them, increase the likelihood that they would believe my lies. After all, who does not like a nice compliment, now and then?

    For example, please watch the final scene of the movie "The Devil’s Advocate," where Lucifer, played by Al Pacino, convinces attorney Kevin Lomax, played by Keanu Reeves, to do an exclusive newspaper story and afterwards, proudly exclaims "Vanity, definitely my favorite, sin." Link here.

    Like Lucifer, vanity is the favorite sin of the white-collar criminal and vanity is part of everyone’s humanity.

    My friend Ilene (syndicated blogger, editor at Phil’s Stock World, and attorney) attended the Oregon Health Care Fraud Working Group Training Seminar and interviewed me. Her article can be read here.

    After attending the lecture and having dinner together, she wonders:

    As the prisoner in The Lady and The Tiger conundrum, I’m left wondering whether Sam’s telling the truth, and he’s still a criminal, or lying and is really on the path to redemption.

    I am sorry Ilene, but Antar does not give closure.

    To the rest of you, beware of smiles and compliments. You never know the true intentions behind any person’s charm.

    I will never be able to get a date with anyone again, after this blog post!

    Written by:

    Sam E. Antar

    Special thanks to the United State Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon, Tricia Leishman (Department of Justice) and Toni Slocum Regence (BlueCross Blue Shield). I donated my services and paid all travel, lodging etc. out of pocket as an accommodation to the Department of Justice.

    Recommended Reading from my Blog:

    12/28/08: A New Year’s Message from a Convicted Felon: While you hope, criminals prey

    12/25/06: The Art of Spinning: How to Identify Possible White Collar Criminals or at Least Unethical and Deceitful People Who You Should Avoid 

    Recommended Art:

    Marta Dahlig – All Genre Gallery

    Marta Dahlig’s blog

    Disclosure:

    I am a convicted felon and a former CPA. As the criminal CFO of Crazy Eddie, I helped Eddie Antar and other members of his family mastermind one of the largest securities frauds uncovered during the 1980′s. I committed my crimes in cold-blood for fun and profit, and simply because I could.

    If it weren’t for the efforts of the FBI, SEC, Postal Inspector’s Office, US Attorney’s Office, and class action plaintiff’s lawyers who investigated, prosecuted, and sued me, I would still be the criminal CFO of Crazy Eddie today.

    There is a saying, "It takes one to know one." Today, I work very closely with the FBI, IRS, SEC, Justice Department, and other federal and state law enforcement agencies in training them to identify and catch white-collar criminals.

    Recently, I exposed financial reporting violations by Overstock.com (NASDAQ: OSTK) as an independent whistleblower. The Securities and Exchange Commission is investigating Overstock.com and its CEO Patrick Byrne for securities law violations (Details herehere, and here).

    I do not own Overstock.com securities long or short. My exposure of financial reporting violations by Overstock.com was a freebie to securities regulators to get me into heaven, though I doubt that I will ever there.  I do not seek or want forgiveness for my vicious crimes from my victims. I plan on frying in hell with other white-collar criminals for a very long time.  

    Disclosure: none
    Sam at Seeking Alpha: http://seekingalpha.com/author/sam-e-antar
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Comments (37)
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  • This was a great read! Thank you Ilene.

     

    I am going to cite the entry at Rx Investors.

     

    Justin M. Hall
    rxinvestors.com//
    12 Jun 2010, 01:34 AM Reply Like
  • Author’s reply » Thank you very much, Justin!
    12 Jun 2010, 01:08 PM Reply Like
  • Sam Antar is in my opinion an unmitigated pragmatist. By his own admission, he defrauded people knowingly and willingly. Then when faced with prison, he turned states evidence against his co-conspirators. Now he parlays all of this selfish behavior into a career as a "former felon". He now fights the good fight, not for the sake of the good fight, but because it is the only reasonable option left to him -- a pragmatic and value neutral choice in my opinion.

     

    I say all of this not as a challenge to Mr. Antar's character. I believe Sam himself knows that this perpetual dance of self preservation is all he has ever known or done. Sam Antar is all about Sam Antar. The important thing here is that, like a "reformed" hacker, he can reveal to the rest of us some of the tricks of the trade - in this case how someone like him thinks and acts. This intimate knowledge he has with his own scoundrelous nature is a marketable product and he is selling it to make a legal living. But he is probably not as charming as he thinks he is and should not assume that we are all blind to his self serving career choices.

     

    This sounds like more of a criticism than I intend it to be. Some folks have a gift for acting in their own self interest even in high risk environments. This self interest knows no law or morality since by definition these are things concerned with others. I put Sam Antar in this class. Class A dyed-in-the-wool pragmatist.

     

    If you think I'm being harsh or reading too much into this, check out more of Mr. Antars writings and comments elsewhere on Seeking Alpha. I'm not sure he would disagree with my characterization of his career... At least not privately.
    12 Jun 2010, 02:02 AM Reply Like
  • Author’s reply » DM, I think Sam would completely agree with you. In fact, I tend to be less harsh in my own analysis, and for example, if I write that I think Sam is not going to burn in Hell, he'll delete that because he insists he will. By being pragmatic, he may realize that he gains more credibility by being as cold-bloodedly honest in his evaluation of himself as he was cold-blooded in committing his crimes. Sam may be correct in insisting he will never change, or perhaps he's wrong, and people like Sam can and do change. It's a fascinating question, but you cannot trust those who know the answer to tell you the truth. - Ilene
    12 Jun 2010, 01:05 PM Reply Like
  • Author’s reply » <This intimate knowledge he has with his own scoundrelous nature is a marketable product and he is selling it to make a legal living.>

     

    I agree, and believe Sam would say the same thing.

     

    <Some folks have a gift for acting in their own self interest even in high risk environments. This self interest knows no law or morality since by definition these are things concerned with others. I put Sam Antar in this class. Class A dyed-in-the-wool pragmatist.>

     

    Sam would probably agree with you too. So why is this? If it's a combination of genetics, human nature, and environment - then are we really needing to see that there are many people who may share this psychological make-up and it's not a rare condition. There may be more than one kind of sociopathy with spectrums of genetic vs. environmental influences being primary or secondary. In the right environment, a whole society can become sociopathic and commit horrible acts of genocide. But yet the actors may claim to love their wives and children, and will sacrifice themselves for them.

     

    <If you think I'm being harsh or reading too much into this, check out more of Mr. Antars writings and comments elsewhere on Seeking Alpha. I'm not sure he would disagree with my characterization of his career... At least not privately.>

     

    I don't think you're being too harsh, and I don't think Sam would think so either.
    12 Jun 2010, 01:27 PM Reply Like
  • Thanks for your comment. I was trying to make an observation and was worried it was sounding like an attempt at character assassination.

     

    The fact is that we are all human beings and are all mixtures of these kinds of tendencies and other impulses. One of the reasons crime shows are so popular is that we all wonder about the impulse to act outside the barriers we observe in our daily lives.

     

    But folks like Sam Antar -- at least from what is observable in his writings -- are good examples of distilled self interest. Cynic or strategist might be other good characterizations. And it is probably important that those who have more hopeful or charitable tendencies recognize that some of the folks they come into contact with in the world not only don't share this charitability or hopefulness, but will also seek to exploit it. Yet the irony here is that it is difficult to take your instructor at face value when he is telling you that lesson one is never take anything at face value...
    12 Jun 2010, 02:07 PM Reply Like
  • "Sam Antar is in my opinion an unmitigated pragmatist.... Class A dyed-in-the-wool pragmatist."

     

    It's about the best thing anyone said about me in 25 years :-).

     

    All the best,

     

    Sam
    13 Jun 2010, 10:17 PM Reply Like
  • I admire clear thinking strategists. I play a ruthless game of Diplomacy (once having double crossed everyone at the table and yet lasting the whole game without being attacked once myself), but in real life my decision making is more muddled.
    14 Jun 2010, 02:14 AM Reply Like
  • Diplomacy? I'd rather play poker using a marked deck - but that's another story :-) I still have the same instincts. Sometimes you have to draw from the Devil's arsenal to destroy the demons - but that's another story, too.

     

    Regards,

     

    Sam
    14 Jun 2010, 03:10 AM Reply Like
  • Author’s reply » Thank you DM, your comments are great and do not sound like character assassination attempts. It sounds to me like you're trying to make sense of human nature, and I agree with you. For instance, I really like this:
    "The fact is that we are all human beings and are all mixtures of these kinds of tendencies and other impulses..." And your conclusion, "And it is probably important that those who have more hopeful or charitable tendencies recognize that some of the folks they come into contact with in the world not only don't share this charitability or hopefulness, but will also seek to exploit it. Yet the irony here is that it is difficult to take your instructor at face value when he is telling you that lesson one is never take anything at face value..."
    12 Jun 2010, 02:19 PM Reply Like
  • Make no mistake, people like Sam can change. And all evidence suggests that he has, in fact, changed. Whether others can / will accept that he has changed is the question.

     

    From my view, his persistence that he'll burn in Hell is a way to keep himself in check. Similar to the character John Constantine.

     

    "The world is a vampire . . ."
    13 Jun 2010, 03:26 AM Reply Like
  • Or he could be playing on your hope that people really do change.

     

    There is no doubt his BEHAVIOR has changed, and that's important in and of itself.
    13 Jun 2010, 12:30 PM Reply Like
  • Author’s reply » Hi Justin and DM, perhaps Sam's "change" is such that there are elements of both change and non-change. For instance, he compares his criminal thinking patterns to an alcohol or other drug addiction - "recovered" means you're not taking the drug, but you are still an addict, still susceptible to losing control to the abused substance, suggesting that there's an internal struggle going on. Also, I don't think he's playing on the hope that people change, because he says he has not changed. I think he wants people to understand that--whether that's to do us a favor or to do himself a favor, he won't say and I don't know. Maybe this quote is relevant: “He wears a mask and his face grows to fit it." George Orwell.
    13 Jun 2010, 08:39 PM Reply Like
  • Constantine: That's one of my favorite movies.
    13 Jun 2010, 11:33 PM Reply Like
  • Ilene, there is no mistake that you are a lawyer! That is a compliment as I appreciate your analysis.

     

    Several things came to mind after reviewing these recent comments.

     

    1. I like Sam. He is very bright.

     

    2. DM, it appears you may fear someone like Sam based on your comments collectively. You are also very bright, a rational mind and even tempered. To you, Sam is not unpredictable and thereby you would not dare chance trusting him, which is understandable and predictable. I enjoyed reading your comments.

     

    3. Judge a man for his actions and his enemies.

     

    4. I firmly believe that Sam never wants to serve time. Never. He fears that more than that which is not yet known, Hell.

     

    5. Would he be more interesting if he told us that he is praying for forgiveness and will never do XYZ again and thereby implying he's reformed? Absolutely not. Ambiguity makes him more interesting.

     

    6. What company might employ him and enable him to relapse? None.

     

    7. What is his objective: prison or freedom? Look at his actions.

     

    8. He argues that if he was never caught that he would likely be doing the same things. On the other hand, if he knew, without doubt, that he would be caught prior to committing the acts, then would he have committed XYZ. Doubtful. While aware of the risk, he never believed he would be caught and thereby never fully appreciated the risks he was taking. Today, he is well aware of the risks. He was very fortunate that he was able to mitigate his personal loss, i.e. prison time, and he knows this.

     

    9. Today, he is making the best out of a bad situation. He is interesting and has an interesting story - one that very few, if any, can tell while enjoying freedom.

     

    10. We would all be much wiser to learn from him. Ignore the ambiguity and pay closer attention to his work.

     

    ---> The OSTK CEO alleged there was a conspiracy b/t a few Wall Street short sellers and well-known media personalities, who questioned his numbers, to send his company into b/k. Many bought into his claims. This seems to have successfully deflected the attention away from him for a period of years. Now, it looks like his time as a free man may be limited. For this, I applaud Sam's work. As he says, it takes one to know one.

     

    CONCLUSION
    I am willing to bet that Sam will never spend one day in prison.

     

    MY VOTE
    Relapse is highly unlikely.

     

    NOTE TO SAM
    Regarding Constantine, I suspected this would be the case. I watch very few movies, but I liked it. 1 Thumb+
    14 Jun 2010, 07:55 AM Reply Like
  • Author’s reply » "there is no mistake that you are a lawyer! That is a compliment as I appreciate your analysis."

     

    LOL, you're the only person who has ever said that to me AND meant it as a compliment! Thanks! :-)

     

    I'll have to see the movie Constantine.

     

    I know a number of men who would rather die than go to prison, but I think the problem with the white collar criminal type is that - prior to being caught - they don't consider prison as a likely outcome and don't worry about it. Not sure why, I probably would think of nothing but that. I'm paraphasing Sam so if that's wrong he might correct me.
    14 Jun 2010, 04:29 PM Reply Like
  • You nailed it Ilene.

     

    "I know a number of men who would rather die than go to prison, but I think the problem with the white collar criminal type is that - prior to being caught - they don't consider prison as a likely outcome and don't worry about it. Not sure why, I probably would think of nothing but that. I'm paraphrasing Sam so if that's wrong he might correct me."

     

    Such crimes, like all crime, are committed more often by men. Man is and will always be willing to take more risk than woman.
    14 Jun 2010, 06:04 PM Reply Like
  • Author’s reply » Why is this? At the risk of being totally politically incorrect, it seems to me that men (statistically, I don't mean all men or all women etc.) can deviate much further from "average" in many measures (good and bad). I have no proof of this hypothesis - that it has something to do with the XY make up vs. the XX make up, that god is rolling the dice more with the XYs - greater chances for both great success in certain areas and failure as well. However, I haven't searched the literature. Total speculation as to the underlying biological factors.
    14 Jun 2010, 10:20 PM Reply Like
  • Testosterone, which is not at all a bad hormone or treatment, is the driver behind confidence, which fuels risk taking.

     

    Those with higher levels of testosterone are more prone to take risk, i.e. affairs, crime, start businesses, seek political power . . .
    15 Jun 2010, 12:18 AM Reply Like
  • I doubt the 16 year old young woman who just got rescued in the Indian Ocean on her attempt at a solo sail around the world has more testosterone than I did at her age. Yet she has taken on more risk in the last month than I did in the first 20 years of my life.

     

    I don't discount the basic premise of your argument, but I think it is considerably more complicated than you are implying. No one hormone level or one chromosomal pair determines something as complicated as propensity for taking risk. Psychology of risk/reward plays in (including how safe a person feels and how optimistic they may be), as well as dopamine response to thrilling activity.

     

    In a study about 20 years ago, some researchers discovered a potential key to risky behavior in the level of dopamine absorbing chemicals which a body produces. It seems in the freestyle skiers they examined, their body chemistries quickly absorbed the dopamine produced by their thrilling activity. So in order to get the same sense of rush that I might feel standing on the edge of a cliff, for example, they needed to engage in considerably more dangerous activity. In other words we may all enjoy risks in the same way psychologically, but our bio-chemistry may have a lot to say about what our bodies tell us is "thrilling".

     

    The level of these absorbing chemicals, whose name escapes me, was governed by a complicated interplay of hormones, and did not appear to be explained by anything as simple as "more testosterone".

     

    It's an interesting thing to think about. That I might get the same thrill jumping off a chair that someone else does jumping off a ski jump. (That's an exaggeration to illustrate a point -- I'm not THAT boring).

     

    15 Jun 2010, 01:13 AM Reply Like
  • As I indicated below, there is more to risk taking than testosterone.
    15 Jun 2010, 04:10 AM Reply Like
  • DM, I agree with your take above. I do not think you are boring. I have enjoyed reading your comments here. This was a very interesting discussion. Thank you!

     

    Justin
    15 Jun 2010, 04:22 AM Reply Like
  • I'm a little boring :) That's okay, we can't all live on the edge...
    15 Jun 2010, 11:04 AM Reply Like
  • Author’s reply » Justin, do you think it goes beyond that - for instance, greater genetic (or epigenetic) variation in males vs. females, maybe due to testosterone, but maybe there are other causes and factors involved too? What do you think of the ideas expressed touched on here: www.vancouversun.com/o... ? -- on that article, I was thinking there's a problem with the theory because many people with autism are not savants and are not particularly risk takers or aggressive.
    15 Jun 2010, 01:00 AM Reply Like
  • Of course, there is more to this than testosterone. :-)

     

    This is just one bio difference between men and women which might explain, in part, the risk taking issue.

     

    That said, there is more to risk taking than testosterone.

     

    BRAIN (excluding illegal drug use such as cocaine)
    Stimulation - Increased flow of dopamine.
    Impulsivity - Frontal lobe / ADHD
    15 Jun 2010, 01:15 AM Reply Like
  • Author’s reply » "ADHD and autisim are similar in a few ways" - I read a book that suggested that ADHD is on the mild end of autism, as ADHD is seen in autistic kids - it was saying ADHD is the mildest form (can't remember the name of it at the moment)... Kids with ADHD/mild autism may have a hard time focusing on some things, but may be extremely able to concentrate on things they enjoy too. And I've been trying to figure out the dopamine puzzle for a long time. There's also a link, I think, between autism in families and bipolar disorder. It's all very fascinating!
    15 Jun 2010, 01:40 AM Reply Like
  • THE MORE YOU KNOW
    [The title was added last.]

     

    In all sincerity, I am very impressed.

     

    Over the past decade or so, let's just say I have become intimately familiar with ADHD. :-)

     

    Depending on the issue, ADHD and functional autisim may be treated similarly. Autistic folks tend to be less emotional or unemotional, whereas some with ADHD can sense emotions of others as well as express them easily. Whether done at the appropriate time or not is where issues arise (think: children / teens). More often than not, folks with ADHD tend to be good with people and thereby are often found working as sales executives in all industries. FYI: The feature you mentioned above is hyperfocus.

     

    Those, who fail to manage ADHD appropriately, can be impulsive, fail to recognize risks, as well as the consequences for taking such risks (characteristics of criminal behavior).

     

    When ADHD is harnessed, they can be very disciplined, creative and effective. Many entrepreneurs have ADHD. For example, the founding CEO of Jet Blue (JBLU) admittedly has ADHD. Steve Jobs is believed to have ADHD. If interested, you might do a quick search on ADHD and entrepreneurs.

     

    Bi-polar is a bit different. As I recall, B-P affects different areas of the brain. It is also treated with different combos of Rx. B-P appears to be more emotionally challenging than ADHD and Autism.

     

    At this time, we do not know whether Sam and the imprisoned members of his family have ADHD. Where one member of a family has ADHD, others can usually be identified with ease. In my opinion, it is possible that Sam and maybe his cousins and others he is related could have ADHD.

     

    I just checked out his blog tonight and had NO idea his favorite movies were listed online. Honestly. No BS. After seeing his list, which included Constantine, I was totally blown away. When it comes to movies, Sam and I have a lot in common. Two of my favorite movies include #1 PATTON (I'm a huge fan of the movie and the man) and #2 Scent of a Woman.

     

    FYI: After reading his take on Medifast (MED), I cited it in the forum at Rx Investors. There, I have also added a link to White Collar Fraud. To see the link, visit Rx Investors at the link provided below and scroll down.

     

    Justin M. Hall
    rxinvestors.com/
    15 Jun 2010, 04:08 AM Reply Like
  • Author’s reply » Justin,

     

    <THE MORE YOU KNOW>
    as in the more you know you don't know?

     

    <Depending on the issue, ADHD and functional autisim may be treated similarly. Autistic folks tend to be less emotional or unemotional, whereas some with ADHD can sense emotions of others as well as express them easily. >

     

    Not so sure about people with autism being un- or less emotional. Since there are many types, I'll just say I don't think that's true across the board. It's probably more true for more severe autism as opposed to milder forms.

     

    <When ADHD is harnessed, they can be very disciplined, creative and effective. Many entrepreneurs have ADHD. For example, the founding CEO of Jet Blue (JBLU) admittedly has ADHD. Steve Jobs is believed to have ADHD. If interested, you might do a quick search on ADHD and entrepreneurs.>

     

    Okay, that makes sense though.

     

    <Bi-polar is a bit different. As I recall, B-P affects different areas of the brain. It is also treated with different combos of Rx. B-P appears to be more emotionally challenging than ADHD and Autism. >

     

    Different, but it seems there's significant overlapping with all these.

     

    <In my opinion, it is possible that Sam and maybe his cousins and others he is related could have ADHD. >

     

    Maybe Sam will answer that question...

     

    FYI: After reading his take on Medifast (MED), I cited it in the forum at Rx Investors. There, I have also added a link to White Collar Fraud. To see the link, visit Rx Investors at the link provided below and scroll down.

     

    Thanks Justin and I very much enjoyed this exchange too. These are all areas that I am most interested in.

     

    p.s. here's an interesting abstract:

     

    Neuropharmacology. 2009 Dec;57(7-8):590-600. Epub 2009 Aug 26.
    Genetics of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
    Sharp SI, McQuillin A, Gurling HM.

     

    Molecular Psychiatry Laboratory, Research Department of Mental Health Sciences, Windeyer Institute of Medical Sciences, University College London Medical School, 46 Cleveland Street, London W1T 4JF, UK.
    Abstract
    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous syndrome which is comorbid with childhood conduct disorder, alcoholism, substance abuse, dis-social personality disorder, and affective disorders. A small but consistent overlap with autistic symptoms has also been established. Twin and family studies of ADHD show a substantial genetic heritability with little or no family environmental effect. Linkage and association studies have conclusively implicated the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1). DAT1 has also been confirmed as being associated with bipolar disorder. Remarkably, and for the first time in psychiatry, genetic markers at the DAT1 locus appear to be able to predict clinical heterogeneity because the non-conduct disordered subgroup of ADHD is associated with DAT1 whereas other subgroups do not appear to be associated. The second most well replicated susceptibility gene encodes the DRD4 dopamine receptor and many other dopamine related genes appear to be implicated. It is becoming increasingly clear that genes causing bipolar mania overlap with genes for a subtype of ADHD. The key to understanding the genetics of ADHD is to accept very considerable heterogeneity with different genes having effects in different families and in different individuals. It is too early to interpret the new wave of genome-wide association and copy number variant studies but preliminary data support the overlap with affective disorder genes and also with CNS connectivity genes likely to be involved in autism and affective disorders.
    16 Jun 2010, 02:52 AM Reply Like
  • Ok, I just read the rest of your comment and reviewed the info on the link.

     

    While a bit of a stretch (extreme maleness), he's on the right path. Interestingly, ADHD and autisim are similar in a few ways.

     

    The brain ultimately makes it all happen.

     

    By the way, I enjoyed the article. Thank you for sharing.
    15 Jun 2010, 01:23 AM Reply Like
  • Great discussion all! I have enjoyed it.

     

    Thank you!

     

    Justin
    15 Jun 2010, 04:17 AM Reply Like
  • Thanks Ilene!

     

    While genetically similar, I am fairly sure that the effects still vary and affect different areas in the brain. I will continue to research this area. I am glad for whatever the reason that you also have an interest in this as well!
    16 Jun 2010, 09:53 PM Reply Like
  • Author’s reply » Justin, I will too and will let you know if I find anything noteworthy. Thanks for the great discussion! - Ilene
    17 Jun 2010, 03:11 AM Reply Like
  • Ilene, Sam and DM:

     

    While I think Ilene has my email address, I wanted to make it available to all here. I hope you all will keep in touch.

     

    HiRxInvestor@aol.com

     

    I also launched Rx Investors in mid-March 2010. The site is located at: rxinvestors.com/

     

    Thank you again, Ilene!
    17 Jun 2010, 03:19 AM Reply Like
  • Biotech and Pharma is out of my (tiny) area of expertise, but I'll check it out. Certainly is a potentially explosive sector.
    17 Jun 2010, 07:33 PM Reply Like
  • Author’s reply » Hi Justin, DM and Sam, you may find this post interesting, with a video of Michael Shermer talking about beliefs, "patternicity," psychosis and dopamine.

     

    I still don't fully (or partially?) understand the mechanisms regarding dopamine and the variety of "disorders" it's involved with, possibly because it's not as simple as too much or too little (there are different regions and many different dopamine receptors that play a role, plus probably many other factors).

     

    www.philstockworld.com.../
    18 Jun 2010, 03:26 PM Reply Like
  • Interesting and informative article to say the very least.
    Pragmatist, as opposed to corporate con spy, does it matter? I think the question on most minds, why there is no war on similar crooks?

     

    I check seeking daily, yet this is the first time seeking presented it to me. (with 2 emails daily)

     

    glta
    23 Jul 2010, 12:01 PM Reply Like
  • Author’s reply » Thanks, Richard, I find this topic fascinating as well and hope to continue to find more interesting material on the subject.
    23 Jul 2010, 09:35 PM Reply Like
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