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The 4G Cloud: Next Enemy of the State?

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The 4G cloud, a giant project where Web meets Mobile, is rapidly becoming the next big thing. Will it also become the next enemy of the state?

You're probably familiar with the fact that Web and Mobile have historically been two very different concepts that have tried to make an impact on each other. The Web aspect ultimately wants to make the mobile aspect redundant, and vice versa. The 4G cloud is kind of a compromise, where the Web aspect takes care of the content and the mobile aspect takes care of the network capacity.

As Verizon Wireless rolls out its nationwide 4G LTE network in the years ahead, the carrier intends to let major content players take advantage of their network capacity. Google has played a key role in shaping the Web aspect of the 4G cloud to date, while Verizon Wireless has taken care of building the 4G network. As part of this effort, Google has also entered the OS stage.

Android smartphones and tablets will play a leading role in taking advantage of LTE networks. Also, when Chrome notebooks (and possibly tablets) will be commercially available sometime in 2011, we imagine 3G connectivity will primarily serve as the fallback option in areas where there's no LTE coverage. A large part of Google's OS effort in general is related to LTE connectivity and the emerging 4G cloud.

That said, Google is increasingly seeing the price the company has to pay for trying to merge the Web and Mobile worlds. The United Nations earlier this year indicated that the 4G cloud is an evil effort that needs to be controlled by governments.

Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg earlier this year enthusiastically described how the 4G cloud one day will make the world as a whole a better place. Of course, Facebook aims to take part in that effort, but it won't be easy for Zuckerberg to take a lead role if the UN gets to decide how everything should play out.

That said, while we aren't convinced Facebook would be able to take the lead role in driving the world forward, we however strongly believe the UN's split and conquer strategy will only make the organization, if possible, even less relevant. If you ask us, it's most likely a matter of scoring desperately needed points with world leaders that are searching for the next enemy of the state - the 4G cloud.