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Another Abstract at ASCO Highlights Efficacy of CTT's Calmare Pain Therapy System in Cancer Patients

|Includes:Abbott Laboratories (ABT), AFFX, ARIA, ARYX, BAX, BCR, BDX, BSX, CELG, CLDX, CMN, CNMD, CTIC, CTT, CYBX, DCTH, DNDN, ENZ, ETRM, GE, GILD, GNVC, GSK, HAE, IART, IBPI, IRIX, JNJ, KOOL, MAKO, MDT, MLNM, MRK, NVS, PDLI, PFE, PGNX, PHG, PMTI, RDNT, RTN, SOMX, SQNM, STJ, STS, SYK, VOLC, VVUS

 

Another abstract on a study utilizing Competitive Technologies' (NYSE Amex: CTT) Calmare(NYSE:R) Pain Management technology was posted on the ASCO site (asco.org)-- http://abstract.asco.org/AbstView_74_50422.html

Clinical investigators in Italy conducted a 16 month independent clinical study to evaluate the efficacy of the Calmare pain therapy treatment to decrease and manage chronic pain associated with cancer (NYSE:CCP) experienced by approximately 50 percent of cancer patients and up to 70 percent suffering with cancer in its advanced stages. 

As noted in the abstract summary, "Preliminary results have shown the effectiveness of Scrambler therapy, which uses electroanalgesia to neuromodulate cancer-related neuropathic pain. The Scrambler machine is supported by a multiprocessor computer capable of simulating 5 artificial neurons that send out signals identified by the central nervous system as 'no pain.' In this way the Scrambler information can be conveyed through electrodes to nerve fibres involved in the production or transmission of the pain signal."

The results indicated a decrease from an average of 4.7 (on the pain scale) to 2.5 at the end of the second week of treatment. The treatment regimen involved one 30 minute session per day for five consecutive days and repeated for the following week of five days.

The study included testing for duration of results--showing a median VAS score of 2.6 two weeks after the last treatment. Patients with severe pain "showed a decrease at base line from 6.5 to 3.5." An interesting result on a sales and marketing basis for CTT is that 97% of the patients, knowing their results, said they would repeat the treatments.

Obviously, the more clinical data available to the medical community on the effectiveness of CTT's chronic pain therapy, the more the company benefits in both credibility and awareness--which obviously helps with CTT's business plan on building out its distribution network.


Disclosure: Long CTT