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  • QuickChat #221, January 16, 2012 160 comments
    Jan 16, 2012 12:19 PM
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Instablogs are blogs which are instantly set up and networked within the Seeking Alpha community. Instablog posts are not selected, edited or screened by Seeking Alpha editors, in contrast to contributors' articles.

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  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    Re: an article I read over the weekend surprised me.( I know that Ahmadinejad is not beloved by the Ayatollah.)
    Here's the article, and it gives us a little insight into the fragility of Ahmadinejad's position, imo.

     

    http://wapo.st/yw9k2E
    16 Jan 2012, 12:54 PM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    Hat tip to much respected John Lounsbury for including this article in his excellent internet publication Global Economic Intersection. Please go down to the comments for the web address if you wish to sign a petition and advise your federal representatives that you object to the passage of these bills.

     

    We've got to do what we can to protect our freedom of speech on the internet, imo. Our rights are diminished daily.

     

    http://bit.ly/zxL8gf
    16 Jan 2012, 01:01 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    Query to the QC.

     

    Two articles on China from 1/13/11:
    1) Their currency reserves dropped for the first time since 1998 http://bloom.bg/A3YEOy
    2) China's imports of gold are at record high http://bloom.bg/wAY9OM

     

    Related news items?
    16 Jan 2012, 02:22 PM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    Jon: Gold is still a small portion of Chinese soverign investment.
    The article stated:
    <Much of the decline may be due to a lower value of the reserves held in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, said Cui Li, a Hong Kong-based economist at Royal Bank of Scotland Plc who previously worked at the International Monetary Fund.>
    That sounds plausible, imo.
    16 Jan 2012, 02:47 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    OG: Thanks...

     

    A bit distracted trying to get my weekly update done, and coming across things like this...

     

    "South Korean customs officials say they have arrested eight men over a scheme to allegedly smuggle gold out of the country by hiding it in their rectums.

     

    The Korea Customs Service said Monday the men allegedly transformed $260,000 in gold bars into small beads and smuggled them in their rectums to Japan two times in 2010 to avoid import taxes."

     

    http://wapo.st/wOmP6Y
    16 Jan 2012, 02:57 PM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4605) | Send Message
     
    I thought Obama just said last week that he was not going to pass the internet bill as it was?
    16 Jan 2012, 04:37 PM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    Vote on PIPA is scheduled next week.
    <Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR), who considers PIPA a threat to free speech and technological innovation, placed a hold on the bill last May. In a statement, he said that “until the many issues that I and others have raised with this legislation are addressed, I will object to a unanimous consent request to proceed to the legislation.”

     

    However, Sen. Wyden’s hold only lets the Majority Leader know of that Senator’s wishes, and Sen. Wyden doesn’t have the ability to prevent a vote on PIPA – which is happening Jan. 24.>
    Tell Congress what you think!!
    http://on.mash.to/A04FiW
    17 Jan 2012, 06:25 PM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    Prophecy's BNN Market Call Q/A Submission

     

    Dear Prophecy Investor,

     

    Tuesday, January 17 at 1:30est, James West, publisher and editor of the Midas Letter, will once again be a featured guest on BNN’s Market Call where he will be offering his top picks as well as providing his usual insightful commentary on the current market. As always, viewers are invited to call in and we would invite investors of both Prophecy Coal and Prophecy Platinum to take advantage of this opportunity to ask an independent expert pertinent questions about our projects, stock and company. Mr. West is very familiar with Prophecy and it should be a very interesting and informative segment.

     

    The toll free number to call is: 1-855-326-6266 or email questions to marketcall@bnn.ca

     

    About Prophecy Coal
    Prophecy Coal Corp. is a Canadian listed company engaged in developing energy projects in Mongolia. The company has over 1.4 billion tonnes of surface minable thermal coal resources on two coal properties in Mongolia. Prophecy Coal's Ulaan Ovoo coal mine is in production and its Chandgana mine mouth power plant has been permitted. Prophecy Coal is the controlling shareholder of Prophecy Platinum Corp (TSX-V: NKL). Mineral resources that are not mineral reserves do not have demonstrated economic viability. Further information on Prophecy Coal can be found at http://bit.ly/pCqn2J
    About Prophecy Platinum

     

    Prophecy Platinum Corp. is a Canadian based Nickel PGM exploration company with projects in Canada, Argentina and Uruguay. Prophecy Platinum’s flagship Wellgreen PGM-Cu-Ni project is in Yukon Territory, Canada and the Lynn Lake project is located in Manitoba, Canada. Further information can be found at http://bit.ly/x3MRW6.

     

    For more information about Prophecy, please contact
    Chris Ackerman
    Manager, Investor Relations
    1-800-459-5583
    cackerman@prophecycoal...
    http://bit.ly/pCqn2J
    Mineral resources that are not mineral reserves do not have demonstrated economic viability. Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.
    16 Jan 2012, 09:03 PM Reply Like
  • RainH2O
    , contributor
    Comments (1354) | Send Message
     
    So....trying to figure out if Greece will give me a good buy-in opp in coming days or if I am a fool for sitting this "rally" out. Few people seem to care. Am I overweighting it? Keep watching stocks I like go up, up, and away...
    Opinions?
    17 Jan 2012, 10:51 AM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    I did a quick Google search on secular markets vs. cyclical markets. I found this from 2009 which seemed like an interesting time perspective to review: http://bit.ly/wq8BTC

     

    There are cyclical bulls within secular bears
    And
    There are cyclical bears within secular bulls

     

    This is a wee rally yet to even call it a bull... but if it is... is it cyclical, or secular? if its cyclical, how long can it last? if its secular, how long until the next cyclical bear?

     

    My spare change from my lame brain... its a cyclical bull in a secular bear (in the U.S. and Europe; Asia's status is different in my opinion) and it could last 2 to 20 months.

     

    Sometimes, the important question is, will you sleep better if you change your investments or leave them the same?
    17 Jan 2012, 01:16 PM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4605) | Send Message
     
    Here is an article by Doug Kass that seems reasonable. Remember, when he says "the market will reach a crescendo in the 3rd quarter" that is near election time.
    He gives some good reasons to believe the rally will continue.
    IMO, he is probably right, but after march or april it will be a bumpy ride. I don't plan on owning much after that thru the summer.
    http://bit.ly/xVlt5D
    17 Jan 2012, 01:32 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2099) | Send Message
     
    Jon S: I can't help but think that this mini-bull will be slaughtered when Greece finally defaults. It's going to happen soon. Probably the next significant debt payment. March, IIRC.

     

    Sure there might be a US equities rally later in the year, but first the trough. I'm betting on it. :-)
    17 Jan 2012, 05:08 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    At this point, Greek default may actually be bullish for markets. Everyone is waiting for it; relief and rally after the default is more likely the longer this drags on.

     

    I suspect the spin will be:
    - that Europe found a (long and lazy) path to an "orderly" Greek default, and everything will be fine now.
    - or perhaps, we'll just say Greek default was "already priced in"

     

    Greek default could even be taken as "the beginning of the end" of Europe's problems... for a while... until a "surprise event" in another European country.

     

    Just some guesses for a different perspective.
    17 Jan 2012, 11:48 PM Reply Like
  • RainH2O
    , contributor
    Comments (1354) | Send Message
     
    Below is Reuters article referencing rating's agency stating Greece will default...and soon.

     

    So my question is...if Greece defaults and/or there is something likened to problems with the haircut/agreements/etc... is the presumed effect on markets here???

     

    http://bit.ly/y1c2zN
    17 Jan 2012, 01:57 PM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/ymNc4x
    17 Jan 2012, 02:51 PM Reply Like
  • JeffLeach1986
    , contributor
    Comments (229) | Send Message
     
    The US ITC may be ruling soon regarding China's unfair competition of solar products:

     

    http://tinyurl.com/7r4...

     

    "The Chinese supervision uses money grants, raw-materials discounts, favoured loans, taxation incentives and banking strategy to boost exports of solar cells, according to SolarWorld’s Oct. 19 censure to a ITC and a U.S. Commerce Department. SolarWorld, a builder of solar modules, is seeking duties to equivalent a practices."

     

    Noticed late last year that a Chinese company purchased near where I live a former IBM plant for the initial distribution of solar panels and later manfacture of them:

     

    http://tinyurl.com/7af...

     

    Some of the key words from this article are:

     

    "The company will first set up an office and warehouse to distribute PV modules to fulfill existing contracts. The second phase calls for establishing a PV panel factory and a facility for manufacturing glass tubes....."

     

    Wonder if they will ever make it to phase two of this project. The article also says the Chinese company plans on eventually investing about 100 million into the facility and manufacturing plant. Will be interesting to see if they follow through on this as well....
    17 Jan 2012, 04:22 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2099) | Send Message
     
    JeffL: The second phase calls for establishing a PV panel factory and a facility for manufacturing glass tubes....."

     

    That sounds like solar thermal collector, as in Hot Water Heaters. Could be the ol' bait and switch routine. Keep us posted on what actually goes on in the plant, please.
    17 Jan 2012, 05:22 PM Reply Like
  • RainH2O
    , contributor
    Comments (1354) | Send Message
     
    OG: Thanks. The Machine has always tried to force things that the natural market wouldn't support. Only the natural market when left to act on it's own will produce a sustainable enterprise.
    17 Jan 2012, 03:49 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9584) | Send Message
     
    I'm looking forward to see how the Italy and Spain bond auctions come out, on Thursday, after all these downgrades.
    17 Jan 2012, 05:22 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13441) | Send Message
     
    I believe we will see more of the same (lower interest rates). The ratings are secondary issues at this point.
    17 Jan 2012, 07:06 PM Reply Like
  • robert.b.ferguson
    , contributor
    Comments (10803) | Send Message
     
    Maya: Greetings. Short term paper sold well yesterday so apparently what those ratings agencies do is now meaningless.
    17 Jan 2012, 05:29 PM Reply Like
  • RainH2O
    , contributor
    Comments (1354) | Send Message
     
    Apparently it is all meaningless according to US markets...all of a sudden.
    17 Jan 2012, 08:19 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    Last market index peaks were in 2000 and 2007. About 5 years since a top. Is it time to retest?

     

    Seems reasonable to retest the highs of 2000 and 2007 before retesting the lows of 2002 and 2009... *if* we're still in a secular bear market.

     

    History of U.S. markets says its time for us to find a way out of this and for markets to move up and beyond their 2007 highs. History of global markets says things could get worse from here. (for examples, looking at S&P & Nikkei charts... Nikkei went down & up past 18,000 four times between 1994 and 2007)

     

    Agnostics sometimes talk more because they don't know what to believe ;-)
    18 Jan 2012, 12:35 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13441) | Send Message
     
    Jon, I've always held (as an agnostic) that I believe in God, but don't trust churches, or the ability of man to explain god.

     

    When it comes to markets, the analogy would be that I believe in capitalism, but don't trust manipulated markets, or the ability of pundits to explain them to me.
    18 Jan 2012, 09:55 AM Reply Like
  • RainH2O
    , contributor
    Comments (1354) | Send Message
     
    I understand, based on markets current reactions to Euro news (in contrast to in the Fall) why Jon(thanks for the comments btw) and others above feel Greece may not carry that much near-term weight. The only thing which makes me leary of that is basically a fear/view similar to the one Pok and some others in financial columns discussed last week related to fallout in banks,etc (here included) if Greece has problems with creditor agreements and or defaults. I don't see how that issue has/can be settled and why it is no big deal all of a sudden.
    I know I keep repeating myself, but can someone try to respond to Pok's post last week, which coincides with some mainstream (financial) press opinions and seems to warrant a closer look? I am specifically referring to real ripple effects even here due to a system shock, not market reaction/ripple effects.
    18 Jan 2012, 01:04 PM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    We don't know that so we have to be skeptical. Remember when we were reassured that subprime debt fall out would be limited to a small market?
    Right now, the news from Europe is being ignored.
    18 Jan 2012, 01:16 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    Rain,

     

    I agree there may be major ripple effects, but there may not. I was simply trying to present both sides as being a doomsayer that's long-term correct but short-term wrong can be a very losing proposition.
    18 Jan 2012, 02:50 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    One other thought Rain. Read Joseph Shaefer's Why 2012 Will Be Way Better Than 2011, good stuff and good perspective http://seekingalpha.co...
    18 Jan 2012, 03:30 PM Reply Like
  • RainH2O
    , contributor
    Comments (1354) | Send Message
     
    Thanks, Jon...and OG...
    ...much appreciated!
    18 Jan 2012, 07:49 PM Reply Like
  • robert.b.ferguson
    , contributor
    Comments (10803) | Send Message
     
    When Greece defaults it won't be that alone which will become problematical. It will be the CDS instruments that are triggered causing major problems.
    19 Jan 2012, 10:10 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4605) | Send Message
     
    That is what is taking so much time to finalize the deal....the "haircut" in default % has already been agreed to, the new interest rate is within 1/2 of 1%....the time is to do this all without triggering the default swaps....That is the only threat the bondholders have over a government.
    Personally, I think derivatives and Credit Default Swaps (CDS) should all be banned except in 1:1 deals like Berkshire & Florida Bonds. I should not be able to place a Las Vegas style bet on anyone else's debt without having an insurable interest in the transaction. Just like I can't buy life insurance on one of you guys or buy property/homeowners insurance on your house.
    19 Jan 2012, 05:30 PM Reply Like
  • robert.b.ferguson
    , contributor
    Comments (10803) | Send Message
     
    The new owners of the bonds are trying to delay any haircut until after the March roll over. That's when they expect a big payday.
    20 Jan 2012, 09:44 AM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    The next big bank scandal?!This is a very interesting story, getting no press attention.

     

    http://bit.ly/ArmWht
    18 Jan 2012, 12:57 AM Reply Like
  • Stilldazed
    , contributor
    Comments (2093) | Send Message
     
    Thanks for the link. Scary but not surprising. The total lack of integrity and the extent of fraud is amazing. With all parts of the government selectively enforcing law and trying to legislate around the Constitution, who is left to be trusted?
    18 Jan 2012, 02:51 AM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    January 18, 2012. Ivanhoe Mines (IVN) shares not moving much (today's the day part of the poison pill against a Rio Tinto buyout expired). This is the big news of the day on the company. http://yhoo.it/wLVaWV

     

    (this will post on the Mongolia blog too; so those of you following both can ignore the indicator that there's one new message over there)
    18 Jan 2012, 02:39 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    Ivanhoe Mines (IVN) - push that date to May 11th...

     

    "Ivanhoe will recommend investors vote to end the rights plan at its annual meeting on May 11, the Vancouver-based company said yesterday in a statement. Rio has been restricted to holding a 49 percent stake in Ivanhoe by a standstill agreement, which was set to expire yesterday, Ivanhoe said."

     

    Full article: http://bloom.bg/A6aacz
    18 Jan 2012, 11:55 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13441) | Send Message
     
    I have noticed that Maya and JP are now requesting that participants hit the Recommend thumbs up at the top of the instablog page for the AXPW Concentrator. Assuming that this is something that will potentially do us some good, I am asking that we do the same for all of our similar Concentrators and articles.
    18 Jan 2012, 02:56 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    Its a good way for commenters and silent followers to vote for their appreciation. "Recommend" will help with SA (in the SA world where "likes" on instablogs are not counted); and +1 will help with Google search (more so on specific concentrators like Rare Earth and the Stability of the Euro than the QC). Lastly, I'm hopeful at some point that heavily trafficked blogs will be monetized at some point by SA, and thus for their moderators as well; something the recommend clicking would help too.

     

    My two cents.
    18 Jan 2012, 03:01 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9584) | Send Message
     
    Good comment, Jon. That's part of my plan.

     

    Trip: I learned that I'm now ranked 23rd in the Top Instabloggers category. What I don't understand is how you're not ranked higher, considering you run both QC and your REE trheads. You're not even on the list of top 100 Instsabloggers. I don't get it.

     

    SA must have decided Quick Chat is a different animal. But your REE thread should count as Instablogging.
    18 Jan 2012, 03:07 PM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (5806) | Send Message
     
    The QC's are published under the Quick Chat handle.
    18 Jan 2012, 03:10 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13441) | Send Message
     
    The QC is under the "QC" identity, separate from my own.

     

    I had not noticed the "instabloggers" link. LOL, it would appear that the ranking is entirely based upon the gross number of follwers a blogger has... Not sure what that means, really.

     

    Since "My Feed" often doesn't work at all (and was dead as a door nail for months on end last year) I have to think that the follower system is a weak measuring tool at best (and not as valuable as it should be for SA members). Maybe its fixed now, I have been ignoring it for the last year or so...
    18 Jan 2012, 03:10 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    The instablogger rankings are odd. If I understand
    - you have to post at least 2 instablogs every 7 days (why? and what about?)
    - and then you're ranked by the number of followers you have

     

    I'd think the number of clicks on the author's instablogs should be relevant somewhere in there, but seems not. Again, no understanding why clicks on instablogs are not tracked like clicks on articles - would seem useful.
    18 Jan 2012, 03:19 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9584) | Send Message
     
    Understand that TB & FPA. But then why isn't Quick Chat listed, as well as Trip's REE threads?

     

    Something's not right.
    18 Jan 2012, 03:16 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13441) | Send Message
     
    Followers. QC has very few, and I don't have as many as you do.

     

    Of course, how this measures Instablogs is beyond me.
    18 Jan 2012, 03:20 PM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (5806) | Send Message
     
    I don’t think SA's valuation system is congruent with the way members value information. Members don't care if information comes from articles or Instablogs.

     

    We now know that the instablog readers are responsible for buying significant quantities of a companies stock. This is well established on the Axion and RE concentrators. So people are making investment decisions on the basis of the information and discussions in those concentrators.

     

    To me, that is the ultimate recognition of the value of the instablog format. I am sure some articles might have a short-term effect on a stock. But the concentrators are long-term sources of focused relevant information under continuous peer review.

     

    As a result, I would think the concentrators have a stronger influence on buying and selling behaviour than one-off articles. The only thing comparable with the concentrators would be an article author that is covering the same subject over time. John is one of those rare people that can pull that off.
    18 Jan 2012, 05:29 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9584) | Send Message
     
    David Jackson wrote to me yesterday that Seeking Alpha is on the verge of transitioning to a new host, a "massive project," he added. It goes without saying that he's frustrated just as we are about all the quirks, the tempermental My Feed button, the Gremlins with the comment alerts, the slow downloading times, spell check not working properly, etc.

     

    Also, don't expect Quick Chat or any Instablogs we QuickChatters run to be monetized anytime soon. Though back of the napkin computations show that the Axion Power Concentrator may have as many as 60,000 page views in less than half a year, it's not "carefully monitored," and ad agencies such as AdSense would not generate significant revenue even from the larger running Instablogs.

     

    David wrote that he's not yet sure what the solution is. But right now, he has bigger pot stickers on his plate, with the coming transition.

     

    ####

     

    Folks interested in maybe coming to the 12/21/12 Ending of the World Fiesta. My Honduran pal, David Sedat, called me last night. He's second in command in the Copan Chamber of Commerce for the 12/21/12 event. He says Honduras is pouring in lots of money to showcase Copan, which, David added, will be the "world epicenter" for the 12/21/12 event. It will be an event spectacular and unprecedented. I attended the Gobal Mayan Summit in I believe 2007. It was high tech incredible stuff for a third world country. I was lucky enough to receive the VIP treatment, and was drinking Glen Livet on Honduras' dime! This event will far surpass 2007, which blew me away.

     

    Hotels are selling out at a brisk pace. Many, the better ones, are already sold out.
    20 Jan 2012, 10:13 AM Reply Like
  • pokalolo
    , contributor
    Comments (318) | Send Message
     
    Sears, 49 bucks ! Best S&P stock in 2012

     

    Could have been had for 28 an change !
    20 Jan 2012, 04:19 PM Reply Like
  • eggwis
    , contributor
    Comments (769) | Send Message
     
    Maya,

     

    Is your group going down in Dec likely to get the VIP treatment as well?
    24 Jan 2012, 12:35 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9584) | Send Message
     
    eggwis: I just sent credit card info to book my room from Dec. 6 to the 23rd. I expect that my pal, Dr. David Sedat, will have something up his sleeve. I will be talking more with him about this once-in-a-lifetime, hell... five thousand year, event, and will be posting updates here (a blog I created dedicated for this event):

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...
    24 Jan 2012, 01:25 PM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1909) | Send Message
     
    At marketwatch the breaking news headline at 10am said, "Jan. Philly Fed index 10"

     

    At 10:02 The breaking headline says, "Jan. Philly Fed index less-than-forecast 7.3"

     

    Just too much "good" news today with the jobs reports so someone who was not supposed to got and reported the wrong numbers so soon. In feb. it will probably be mysteriously revised to 10, when something else will fill in the "bad" news for the month.

     

    Its all such baloney.
    19 Jan 2012, 10:19 AM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9584) | Send Message
     
    China beginning to turn against Iran, adamantly opposes Iran developing nuclear weapons, says Chinese premier:

     

    http://tgr.ph/y58zo7
    19 Jan 2012, 03:11 PM Reply Like
  • RMF - Rethinking Modern Fin...
    , contributor
    Comments (165) | Send Message
     
    Bob the Bear predicts S&P 1,000 or maybe lower
    http://bit.ly/xxRFxv
    19 Jan 2012, 07:10 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2099) | Send Message
     
    Siliconhillbilly the Agnostic predicts the markets will fluctuate :-)

     

    Well run, innovative battery stocks increase revenue, stock price and, eventually, dividends.

     

    Oh yeah, their stock also fluctuates.
    20 Jan 2012, 01:16 AM Reply Like
  • RainH2O
    , contributor
    Comments (1354) | Send Message
     
    What are likely effects if bond deal is reached in Greece...markets will react favorably, it is supposed?
    20 Jan 2012, 10:00 AM Reply Like
  • JeffLeach1986
    , contributor
    Comments (229) | Send Message
     
    My guess is it is situational. Remember last year when it was announced that there was to be a deal, the market reacted favorably and the equity market took off. But the equity market at that particular point had been beaten down. If a bond deal is reached with the equity market near its highs, then it may go unfavorably.
    20 Jan 2012, 10:08 AM Reply Like
  • Mercy Jimenez
    , contributor
    Comments (1890) | Send Message
     
    Jon Springer suggested I re-post here my comment in Stability of the European Union:

     

    MJ: EU banks are now hoarding cash. Here is a good perspective on possible scenarios when 40% of €650bn of bank debt coming due this year rolls over before the end of March:
    http://bit.ly/wXPu8v

     

    RBF: So who wins the heddgies or the banks?

     

    MJ: Robert, great question. IMHO -- the line between the banks and the Sovereigns is fuzzier than ever. Since the banks are now primarily buying new bond issuance and the ECB can only buy on the secondary market -- a formula exists for a very cozy relationship favoring the banks and the Sovereigns. Add to the mix the fact that the ECB balance sheet growth has plenty of room to run (when compared to growth at our friendly Fed) -- and it leads me to believe that the game of kicking the can down the road is alive and well. As Marc Faber unexpectedly suggested yesterday -- we should all enjoy the dance until the music stops: http://bit.ly/AftPaY
    20 Jan 2012, 11:47 AM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    Brilliant parody of the debt situation in the U.S. -
    http://bit.ly/yr3WCz
    20 Jan 2012, 04:55 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9584) | Send Message
     
    Fantastic! Thanks, Jon.
    20 Jan 2012, 06:40 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    GMO thesis that emerging markets are a significant driver of the price of gold. Interesting chart on page 3.

     

    http://bit.ly/zObZP8
    20 Jan 2012, 05:00 PM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    Here is the petition for the Keystone Pipeline:
    http://bit.ly/xqxqvL
    20 Jan 2012, 06:14 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9584) | Send Message
     
    I'm 100% positive the Keysone pipeline will be built. Voldy's playing it this way: He'll say he wasn't satisfied when he was first asked to sign on the deal. He'll say the delay was necessary to make sure he protected Nebraska's aquafer. He'll then, maybe in August, trot out that he has examined the new route, and is completely confident the extra measures HE put in place, will protect the environment.

     

    He'll come out looking like he's really concerned for all parties, the treehuggers, the people who are just sick of buying oil from our enemies, and those local communities who stand to get a huge jobs jolt.

     

    Voldy did not sign on to this bill this time around because it's a huge chip in the political agenda, and he's going to steal this chip from the republican nominee.

     

    Further, I read yesterday that this delay will not affect the 2014 completion date.
    20 Jan 2012, 06:32 PM Reply Like
  • jpau
    , contributor
    Comments (714) | Send Message
     
    As unpopular as I'll be for this, let's stop pretending this is simply O playing politics. The people who wanted this pipeline spent more than 50 million dollars trying to push it through before anyone could fight back. This thing will eventually get worked out.

     

    And that link for the Dick Morris site, really? He claims it will cost hundreds of thousands of jobs - I think that's a bit inflated, and I'm not alone - http://bit.ly/y7geIJ
    21 Jan 2012, 12:32 AM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    Do you know who sponsors the Cornell report you linked?
    Trade unions.
    This report is a political document not an impartial fact driven product.
    21 Jan 2012, 03:52 AM Reply Like
  • jpau
    , contributor
    Comments (714) | Send Message
     
    Sorry OG, I don't agree. Cornell is a Ivy league university, very well respected, as is the ILR school. Clearly they are not a conservative bastion, I'll grant you that.
    21 Jan 2012, 07:04 PM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    You don't agree after you were furnished with the link? Here is what the website says
    "About the Cornell Global Labor Institute
    The Cornell Global Labor Institute was established in 2005 to work with trade unions in the US and internationally..."
    I'm not responding to this anymore. You are free to believe what you want, fact or fiction.
    21 Jan 2012, 09:14 PM Reply Like
  • jpau
    , contributor
    Comments (714) | Send Message
     
    I'm not disputing the purpose of the GLI; I disagree with the way you smear the work of serious academics as 'a political document not an impartial fact driven product'. If you have some proof that their methodology is flawed, then please do go on.

     

    In fact, what they (GLI) are doing is applying the high standards that peer-reviewed research entails to dispute numbers put forth by the Perryman Study, which was done by The Perryman Group and funded by TransCanada. If you want to question the veracity of a report,or it's academic rigor, common sense suggests you should start looking a little closer to home.

     

    And, by the way, even the state department says only 5k to 6k jobs will be created, and once the pipeline is finished, they will be gone too.
    http://bit.ly/zFrqiz
    22 Jan 2012, 09:44 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4605) | Send Message
     
    Jpau...I have to side with you on this subject. I think ultimately it gets built, but not until the states involved approve the plan.

     

    The real kicker is that it "has" been made political. If it created >100,000 permanent jobs it would get more pressure. But it won't create hardly any jobs. Side stepping any revenue to the USA does not help either. IMO the decisions have been made on environmental & economic basis, not political.
    22 Jan 2012, 01:41 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9584) | Send Message
     
    If it's not political, then why has the Keystone Pipeline been mentioned by so many prominent politicians last week? This is definitely political, in my opinion, hugely political.

     

    Plays right into a political theme that's been going on for over two score years; to stop buying oil from our enemies. Every single president since Carter has had oil dependence/reliance as a major campaign theme.
    22 Jan 2012, 02:18 PM Reply Like
  • jpau
    , contributor
    Comments (714) | Send Message
     
    Maya, I agree that politics plays a part in it, I just don't agree that's all there was to it. Everything has become political in the U.S., even our news, unfortunately.
    22 Jan 2012, 05:03 PM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (5806) | Send Message
     
    Out of curiosity, what makes you think the report was peer reviewed? It’s not published in an independent journal, it’s a presentation report by a research group. My guess is someone paid them to generate a report on the subject. Nothing wrong with that as long as they were honest in their presentation. But going through a peer review mostly consisting of attack dogs does tend to be a clarifying experience.

     

    I have not read the report, but I would think sending oil to the West coast would generate jobs independent of the construction, maintenance, and operation of the pipeline. Did the report go beyond the pipeline? I think I read a concluding remark that the pipeline should be built just using a different route. Not sure of that, but that certainly is my opinion. Frankly, the hell with jobs, I would like the see the US a lot less dependent on ME oil. That makes sense to our country. I would be willing to trade off some ecological damage for securing our oil lifeline. Sometimes you have to make tough decisions where some people loose. Political courage happens when you make a decision that is right for the country, but potentially bad for your re-election.
    22 Jan 2012, 07:23 PM Reply Like
  • jpau
    , contributor
    Comments (714) | Send Message
     
    I didn't say it had been peer-reviewed, only that I believe that they applied the level of rigor in their work. I believe this because any time one's work is published in academia, others will often either try to replicate the results, or seek to disprove them if they feel the methodology is flawed. You won't last very long at that level if you embarrass your school by doing shoddy or dishonest research.
    22 Jan 2012, 10:39 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9584) | Send Message
     
    Yikes! I guess Harvard economists are demi-gods.

     

    I like (and trust) "Back To School Economics" far greater than I do Ivy League school economists.

     

    Rare that any of these scholars have ever run a business.

     

    I compare this theme of thinking akin to those failed novelists, reduced to writing and teaching about how to write fiction.
    23 Jan 2012, 01:47 AM Reply Like
  • jpau
    , contributor
    Comments (714) | Send Message
     
    I'm glad you brought that up (Harvard). I didn't get to polish my last answer because I had to stop it short (I have a 19 month old who needs my attention more than this). I'm not totally naive that this crap happens, even at good schools. If you saw 'The Inside Job', there's the part where Mishkin (Columbia) wrote a paper on the soundness of Iceland's banks after being commissioned by the Iceland Chamber of Commerce.

     

    Unfortunately in this world, there is no funding-fairy for research. Researchers and schools get their grants and endowments where they can, which can obviously lead to bad behavior at times. However, that does not make it right to accuse any academic of this behavior, without a shred of evidence, simply because one doesn't agree with their conclusions or affiliations.
    23 Jan 2012, 07:52 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13441) | Send Message
     
    A nostrum adendum:

     

    "Those who can, do, and those who can't, shill for union bosses".
    23 Jan 2012, 08:41 AM Reply Like
  • robert.b.ferguson
    , contributor
    Comments (10803) | Send Message
     
    Like that whole climate gate thing? Sure it's all on the up and up. We can get you any result you want. What's it worth to you?
    23 Jan 2012, 11:53 AM Reply Like
  • jpau
    , contributor
    Comments (714) | Send Message
     
    You mean that climate gate thing where the Oxburgh Inquiry, the EPA, Penn State, the US Dept of Commerce, and the National Science Foundation each investigated and said there was no wrongdoing?

     

    Yes, there was criticism of statistical techniques being used, as well as a lack of openness with sharing of data.
    23 Jan 2012, 01:36 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2099) | Send Message
     
    Following the theme of "Crony Capitalism", this is the latest Bill Moyers video. David Stockman tells it as he sees it, and it's disgusting.

     

    http://bit.ly/x2M2oz

     

    http://bit.ly/wA8lez
    21 Jan 2012, 10:00 PM Reply Like
  • Mercy Jimenez
    , contributor
    Comments (1890) | Send Message
     
    Siliconhillbilly,
    Excellent Stockman interview. The realities long term are indeed disgusting, and its hard to imagine a way out of the "even greater market pain" he expects down the line. Those realities, however, are supportive of how many of us are playing this short-term market rally -- i.e. enjoy the dance until the music stops.

     

    During this election year, I have no doubt the "powers that be" will keep the punch bowl filled, the musicians stocked with a cheap buffet, and the dance floor filled to encourage all to dance the night away!

     

    OK, maybe I am getting carried away with my analogy, but I think that Eric Parnell is right in his latest assessment about how this short-term rally unfortunately/likely has nothing to do with a slowly improving economy:
    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    IMHO this could go on for months, although EU debt roll-overs, bank recapitalization deadlines, and the Greek and French elections around the end of March/April time frames may require even greater agility on our feet!
    22 Jan 2012, 10:03 AM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (967) | Send Message
     
    Great link SHB...
    Now...if the electorate actually listens and learns...I don't see it soon...and I'm a cup half full person!
    22 Jan 2012, 09:19 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2099) | Send Message
     
    mag: The problem is the current system seems to work quite well for the Congress type pols. They get re-elected a high percent of the time and they retire rich, with great pensions. Why would they want, or allow, change?
    There is a very ripe smell about DC and it gets worse with each debacle.
    22 Jan 2012, 11:04 PM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (967) | Send Message
     
    SHB...Sadly...agreed..... there has to be a day of reckoning for the Congress and Senate et al at some point...maybe not in our lifetime!
    23 Jan 2012, 02:03 PM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4421) | Send Message
     
    >optionsgirl ... What's not political about the Keystone pipeline? Farmers were the first to object and had no trouble getting the state government & anti-oilsands environmentalists to help.

     

    http://bit.ly/A8Zvaf

     

    Approval should remain on track for the original 2013 date even with the Republican Congressional members pushing Obama as part of a budget deal. What does a pipeline have to do with a payroll tax extension if it's not for some political gamesmanship?

     

    http://huff.to/zI0xmU

     

    I'm not exactly sure what it was he was supposed to approve anyway. The alternate route is still not fully worked out and the state of Nebraska hasn't finished the preliminary paperwork nor has Canada. I find this hoopla and gnashing of teeth over the federal government not pushing a decision on the states a little odd coming from a group of people that normally don't want the feds messing with state's rights.

     

    Oh, yeah, it's all about jobs. Well, the Perryman Group put this little political document together for TransCanada to put a happy face on it. This is a pretty remarkable document for what is does not entail and what is glosses over. Estimated project will total 118,935 person years and construction to take ~3-4 years or approx. 30k-40k jobs in total (see page 44) and that is broken down into everything imaginable and not necessarily construction or even if these jobs are going to be American. Most of the steel is going to be Chinese, a lot of trucking will be Mexican and on and on.

     

    http://bit.ly/rTVZ3r

     

    Then there is that "Energy Security" meme. If it weren't so sad that people believe it, I'd bust out laughing. The whole purpose of the pipeline is to transit the USA under bond, refine it under free trade zoning and ship it out duty free. Things that don't happen now. The ability to ship refined product that has never been taxed is the clincher for routing to Texas making that "We'll just pipe it to B.C" a joke. The bonus is that the mid-western refineries will get cut out of refining work they presently get some of.

     

    So, what isn't political about it? It is not really a big immediate economically important project. The real impact is long term and not a big benefit to the US. It's just another frickin' pipeline. Other than politics it's not a big deal.

     

    21 Jan 2012, 10:58 PM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4605) | Send Message
     
    Oil may not be as much of a factor in a few years: Breakthru in Bio-Fuels

     

    http://yhoo.it/xSRmlO
    22 Jan 2012, 06:03 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13441) | Send Message
     
    The primary competition for this source for ethanol is, of course, cellulosic ethanol. It can use ANY source of waste (wood chips, corn stalks, grass clippings, saw grass, etc, etc, etc) which has cellulose. Most cellulose waste currently is a direct drag on our economy, costing money to collect, transport and dump in landfills.

     

    The US and Sweden already have major pilot plants in production, and this is a simple science with a very long industrial background.

     

    The last article I read (interview with the lead researcher running the largest American pilot plant project) indicated that we are near a final result and that the cost for the ethanol produced would be about $.60 per gallon.

     

    The fact that our current infrastructure for collecting, segregating and dumping cellulosic biomass by the megaton every year ALSO occurs with a ready source of free natural gas byproducts (landfill) means that the energy cost to produce the ethanol (about $.20 of the $.60 projected cost) COULD come from the same landfill operation.

     

    For those wondering how this would impact Brazil's famed sugar cane ethanol production, imagine for a moment if, instead of utilizing the valuable sugar juices extracted from the cane, one produced even more ethanol from the waste cellulose...

     

    The primary block to going forward with this concept is, as usual, political. The power of the corn lobby is not to be underestimated, and this idea of using landfill waste to make biofuel (instead of valuable food items) must overcome an entrenched political bias in the U.S. Congress.
    22 Jan 2012, 10:26 AM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2099) | Send Message
     
    LT, trip: It's a good thing that Waste Management (WM) is a big company with lobbyist of their own. They collect an enormous amount of organic waste each day. They also have the resources to explore the new bio-technologies for converting it to fuel.
    They are already using bio-methane from landfills to power some of their vehicles.

     

    My though is that they can make and use a liquid biofuels in house to power those big trucks that collect waste and so leverage down their costs. If the politicians can figure out some way to short circuit this private process, they might look a bit ridiculous to their constituents.

     

    I own WM for the dividend and potential for growth. The fact that they were already making productive use of a resource they have plenty of was a factor in the purchase. Imagine, they get paid to collect and dispose of the raw materials for their future fuel source. I like it.
    22 Jan 2012, 01:17 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2099) | Send Message
     
    It's still just a science experiment.
    But the bioreactor tech and infrastructure to scale it up quickly is already available in hundreds of underused or abandoned corn to ethanol facilities. Interesting possibilities.

     

    Maybe Japan isn't doomed after all. Imagine large bays growing kelp and the bio refineries floating in the water next to the "crop". Just make sure the biobug you use is NOT viable in open waters. Talk about poisoning the oceans!
    22 Jan 2012, 01:25 PM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4605) | Send Message
     
    thanks for the responses, I just threw that out there because I personally found it interesting and wanted to see what you guys had to say. I agree the tech is readily available and could be implemented rapidly if we had the political will and no lobbying.
    IMO, there is no "one" solution to energy,,,it is a combination of everything out there. Some even make sense and are economic.
    22 Jan 2012, 01:59 PM Reply Like
  • RainH2O
    , contributor
    Comments (1354) | Send Message
     
    Did the market get advanced word Friday on Iran backing down? Any other reason for the oil price drop? Looks like good buying/add opp to me...
    22 Jan 2012, 05:27 PM Reply Like
  • RainH2O
    , contributor
    Comments (1354) | Send Message
     
    Also, anyone here who doesn't check in on the REE concentrator may want to look at Lynas and decide how you wish to play. Up 25%+ last week on possibility of POL approval and increased resouce estimate. DD necessary. TB and I both think POL approval not likely to get clean thumbs-up on the 30th but there is definitely an opportunity nearing. Could play the run-up...most of which has already occured...or wait for possibility of dissapointment if POL doesn't come on the 30th and buy the dip (<1.10 and under) for likely POL approval in a month or three.
    Just thought I'd alert you guys who might be interested but fallen asleep on this deal...could understand why you might...;)
    22 Jan 2012, 05:32 PM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (713) | Send Message
     
    Rain

     

    Personally, i am taking the guess that it does not get approved, expect a drop, and then buy on the dip. I owned this beauty before they did the reverse split. I just can't envision ONE DAY it getting approved.

     

    This might be a throw in the sock drawer stock for down the road!!

     

    MAP
    22 Jan 2012, 09:06 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    "Most people have a gut feeling that something has gone terribly wrong, but that doesn't mean that they understand what is happening," he said. "A lot of Americans sense that a massive economic storm is coming and they want to be prepared for it."

     

    "A sense of "suffering and being afraid" is usually at the root of this kind of thinking, according to Cathy Gutierrez, an expert on end-times beliefs at Sweet Briar College in Virginia. Such feelings are not unnatural in a time of economic recession and concerns about a growing national debt, she said."

     

    (from an article that shows people worried about the economy are just a bunch of loons living in the faraway mountains isolated from New York and Los Angeles (I mean... civilization)... of course, I wonder how Kyle Bass' suit and Jim Rogers bow tie would fit into this article)

     

    http://reut.rs/wCxdDi
    23 Jan 2012, 08:34 AM Reply Like
  • RainH2O
    , contributor
    Comments (1354) | Send Message
     
    Jon: I'm of the opinion that most/many people feel something has gone terribly wrong...and it is not an economic condition. Though it does affect economics.
    23 Jan 2012, 10:28 AM Reply Like
  • magounsq
    , contributor
    Comments (967) | Send Message
     
    JS...
    "Most people have a gut feeling that something has gone terribly wrong, but that doesn't mean that they understand what is happening," he said. "A lot of Americans sense that a massive economic storm is coming and they want to be prepared for it."

     

    As with most extreme positions, the truth(?)...reality...lies somewhere in the middle...IMHO

     

    A saving grace...my hope...more people are being forced to watch...look...listen.... for themselves.
    "Necessity if the father of invention"...hopefully thinking.
    Then again, my cup is usually half full.
    23 Jan 2012, 02:11 PM Reply Like
  • jakurtz
    , contributor
    Comments (1909) | Send Message
     
    Self-fulfilling prophecy. Pessimism, bad news and the continuing fear something is going to happen will eventually make it happen. Optimism and hope is the only thing that will kick the can down the road or at least prop us up until the needed changes are put in place, to give a solid foundation tot the modern economy from which it can continue to build.
    23 Jan 2012, 02:46 PM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (713) | Send Message
     
    Rain

     

    I also feel that we may be past the tipping point...Hell, Gander ( gun store ) has a section called Home Protection...Had to buy a shotgun, but being from Upstate NY i use it at the gun range anyway.

     

    But i will tell you if someday someone enters my house unannounced they will leave with a toe tag and i will answer all questions from the authorities they have..

     

    God, i hope that day never happens but when i went to buy those foods that last 30 years or so about 6 months ago they were sold out !!!

     

    SOLD OUT, who would buy and need that much?.. After some prodding it was suggested our government!!! So being an Election year all the stops will be pulled out to make nice nice. It is 2013 i am seriously worried about.

     

    I might add i am a NEW YORKER, and live in a community of a bunch of city cops who tell me stories going on inside the city that go unreported that would make your hair stand up..told to look the other way,,,

     

    So, the feeling of a major problem isn't just in rural areas. We are all preparing in my condo association for a possible problem since we are literally within a short walking distance from the major highway..Don't think this is an isolated feeling. Close to 700 homeowners in a gated community who don't want to get caught looking like a deer in headlights....

     

    Just trying to be a step ahead if needed!!

     

    map
    23 Jan 2012, 07:42 PM Reply Like
  • eggwis
    , contributor
    Comments (769) | Send Message
     
    Jon,
    I think there is little question that "something has gone very wrong" in Washington.

     

    "A sense of "suffering and being afraid" is usually at the root of this kind of thinking,..." Perhaps they fear that, despite their efforts to elect representation that will make necessary changes in Washington, we largely continue down a path of self-destruction.
    24 Jan 2012, 12:06 AM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    Interesting discussion. I was merely posting that article since it seemed to paint people overly concerned about the economy as out of touch people that probably build nuclear bomb shelters in their backyards instead of suggesting that serious concern about the economy is moving toward the mainstream.

     

    If people weren't concerned something was seriously wrong with the economy, we wouldn't have the Tea Party and the Occupy Wall Street folks.

     

    However, the media will say everything's hunky dory until it isn't, and then when things go wrong, they'll say its a catastrophe no one saw coming... like in 2008...
    24 Jan 2012, 08:17 AM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    European Union to ban Iranian oil imports starting July 1st.

     

    I'll have to remember this tactic for child rearing, "If you don't stop that this instant... I'm not going to let you have dessert anymore... in six months."

     

    Truly, a clear message.
    http://bloom.bg/zsTBPc
    23 Jan 2012, 08:37 AM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (5806) | Send Message
     
    (January 23, 2012) Keystone XL Pipeline Seen Moving Ahead on Alternative Route. From: Bloomberg, by: Jim Efstathiou Jr.

     

    Denying the permit pushes a final decision on the pipeline into 2013, safely past this year's presidential election. John Stephenson, who helps manage $2.7 billion for First Asset Management Inc. in Toronto, said he bought 350,000 shares (TRP) yesterday as TransCanada fell the most in 18 months.

     

    "This is clearly the biggest infrastructure project on the continent, and once the election is settled, we believe it will be approved," Stephenson said in an interview. "All the waffling just gives people an opportunity to trade around it."

     

    TransCanada today said it may build U.S.-only pipeline segments, which don't require federal approval, and apply later for permission to connect the pipeline to Canadian oil sands and complete Keystone XL as originally proposed. http://tinyurl.com/7c3...
    ====
    Current price is 41.87
    23 Jan 2012, 10:29 AM Reply Like
  • RainH2O
    , contributor
    Comments (1354) | Send Message
     
    DO you guys (and ladies) think we are seeing or about to see a bursting of the bond bubble? I have been in and out of TBT and still think it looks very attractive. Should have held it in at 17.99 but did not.
    23 Jan 2012, 10:30 AM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (5806) | Send Message
     
    (January 23, 2012) Fifth Street Finance (FSC) plans to offer 10M shares.
    23 Jan 2012, 12:44 PM Reply Like
  • robert.b.ferguson
    , contributor
    Comments (10803) | Send Message
     
    Natural gas is looking at some down side action. While it got some pop today many are forecasting still lower prices this summer. http://bit.ly/wtv5lt
    23 Jan 2012, 05:32 PM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (713) | Send Message
     
    Interested in the metals??

     

    http://bit.ly/AzY3lJ

     

    You might find this interesting !!!

     

    map
    23 Jan 2012, 08:21 PM Reply Like
  • RMF - Rethinking Modern Fin...
    , contributor
    Comments (165) | Send Message
     
    This is worth noting:
    http://reut.rs/ADoUTl
    23 Jan 2012, 08:50 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9584) | Send Message
     
    WARNING: PLEASE READ THE BELOW COMMENT!

     

    A pretty powerful solar flare happened on Jan. 19. Tomorrow this massive space storm arrives. Airline flights over the North Pole have already been diverted. Northern latitudes should get one hell of a light show, and even us middle latitude folks might see some cool, iridescent effects in tomorrow night's sky.

     

    I know I've written that NASA expects no major solar flares to happen for some time. Well, both NASA and I were wrong. This could be a once-in-a-generation solar flare. It's that powerful. NASA is warning of widespread power outages.

     

    The possiblity exists for "catastrophic outages." Already, edge of grid transformers have been shut down.

     

    In all of my 7000 plus comments, I have never once written this, this way: READ THIS BELOW STORY. NOW!

     

    http://tgr.ph/xXnjkf
    23 Jan 2012, 09:02 PM Reply Like
  • eggwis
    , contributor
    Comments (769) | Send Message
     
    Maya,

     

    I didn't see any reference to Jan 19th or 24th in there. Am I missing something?
    24 Jan 2012, 12:24 AM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    Re: Maya's link:That article was a little confusing as to dates, because it was written in 2010 but the images on top are new.
    Here is another source dated 1/23/12 and the article is clear that the solar flare is current:
    http://bit.ly/w8sqyc
    24 Jan 2012, 02:38 AM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    Correction: I Meant to write the concern about a solar flare is current.
    24 Jan 2012, 02:52 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17253) | Send Message
     
    (SPX) futures taking an unusually large beating tonight. Normally see down only 0.5% or so. Tonight down 0.34%, ~$4.30.

     

    I expect it's because BOJ lowered forecast.

     

    Dollar index trying to sneak up - maybe folks finally thinking what happens if there's no greasing the palm of Greece, which was theoretically going to happen today until Greece wanted more grease.

     

    HardToLove
    23 Jan 2012, 11:00 PM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    Look at the 5 day chart for NBL. It closed up 6.12% Monday. (Disclosure: I'm long NBL).
    http://yhoo.it/xknRfd

     

    Look at the analyst price targets:
    http://yhoo.it/xEoQR5

     

    It closed above the one year high today. IMO, it has further to run.
    24 Jan 2012, 02:41 AM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    Uranium crunch projected around 2016.
    Lynas issues bonds to finance Malaysian plant construction.
    Silver projected to rise in 2012, but not to exceed its top last year.
    Norwegian company involved in copper production in Mongolia.
    Wow, so many good articles today:
    http://bit.ly/xeNOJj
    24 Jan 2012, 10:21 AM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    OG...

     

    Is that the article about FLSmidth on the copper production in Mongolia (that was in the 12/26 update item #10) or another one I'm missing ?

     

    Trying to make sure my data's right... and also keep track of how fast/slow things float from site to site around the web.

     

    Thanks !
    24 Jan 2012, 03:28 PM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    Yes the Mongolian FLSmidth is from December.
    The new FLSmidth article is on South America. I read both articles and got the wrong one into the description above!
    Pardon, my bad. Thanks, Jon.
    24 Jan 2012, 10:14 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13441) | Send Message
     
    Lots of investment news in our sector today.

     

    I was just reading where India is accellerating their search for rare earths and Uranium: http://bit.ly/yKgnbC
    24 Jan 2012, 10:23 AM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    There was a Rueter's article yesterday that Toyota now has the technology to build a high tech car without rees, but they aren't tooled up for it and aren't changing over to ree-less
    production.
    24 Jan 2012, 10:26 AM Reply Like
  • eggwis
    , contributor
    Comments (769) | Send Message
     
    OG,

     

    Am I reading correctly that these clowns just bought 28.5% of JAG? It seems to me that I am, just trying to verify. I'm not entirely sure that i like the sound of that.

     

    http://bit.ly/y0Bq4a
    24 Jan 2012, 11:45 AM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    The form states that Senigan (which is a hedge fund I think) owns over 8 Mil shares, 9.5% of JAG.
    24 Jan 2012, 12:00 PM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (713) | Send Message
     
    I will take silver toying around 50 bucks this year !! But maybe i am a little biased..

     

    map
    24 Jan 2012, 12:15 PM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    Here's the kind of consideration that really matters and shows crony capitalism as the reason why the Keystone pipeline was torpedoed by Obama.
    From Bloomberg:
    Buffett’s Burlington Northern Among Winners From Keystone Denial:
    http://bloom.bg/yoAxQB

     

    Here's how Zero Hedge phrases it, wraps it all up and presents it with a bow:
    http://bit.ly/wF2I9G
    24 Jan 2012, 01:16 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13441) | Send Message
     
    Billionaires + politician + kissyface = crony capitalism

     

    Doesn't matter if the politician is a demican, republicrat, socialist or tranzi, the end is the same.
    24 Jan 2012, 01:33 PM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    Israel's nat gas field the Mary-B is running out of gas because the Egyptian pipeline has been bombed 10 times, so the spigot is open at the Mary-B to keep the lights on (so to speak). This gives the speedy opening of Tamar and Leviathan even more importance for energy independence.
    24 Jan 2012, 10:22 PM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4605) | Send Message
     
    re: Toyota and the "non-REE" battery...I read this but can not really get a grip on what they are up to, No talk about bringing it to market. The CEO sorta side stepped the question...
    Either way this is worth following.
    25 Jan 2012, 04:57 AM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13441) | Send Message
     
    The specific elements involved are for the most part not the expensive rare earth metals and are readily available, with current projections by the experts for oversupply in the coming years.

     

    Now, if they can come up with a magnet that can replace/match the performance of neodymium, dysprosium, and praesodymium, etc, at a cheaper price, that would be news.
    25 Jan 2012, 06:22 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4605) | Send Message
     
    Food for thought with Solar stocks down & out. "Solar cheaper than diesel" in India & they want 10x more solar in next 10 years.

     

    http://bloom.bg/xaN0Bv
    25 Jan 2012, 05:31 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4605) | Send Message
     
    Just wondering how over the next 5-10 years that increased Nat. gas, energy efficiency, alternative energy & all the little energy saving initiatives will effect oil demand?

     

    Oil Trades Below $100 as Rising U.S. Stockpiles Counter Gasoline Demand
    http://bloom.bg/xbSJZD
    25 Jan 2012, 05:38 AM Reply Like
  • eggwis
    , contributor
    Comments (769) | Send Message
     
    LT,

     

    IMO, with the initiatives that CLNE has going right now and the advances that WPRT has been making in the HD/HiHP world of diesel engines, most of the trucking/transportation diesel in this country will be replaced by LNG in 10 years. WPRT is even working with the Canadian gov't. on LNG engines for locamotives. The exact savings is a little hard to quantify as we buy petro fuel by volume and nat gas by the BTU. None-the-less, I can tell you that the savings is pretty significant and as that technology becomes ready for the mainstream, I would expect the government to have a hand in pushing that transition.

     

    There is a statistic that transportation accounts for 70% of the petroleum consumption in the US. I don't know if that is all fuel or
    if that number also includes includes motor oil, grease, etc. My guess is the latter, but regardless it is a big number. Congress has had a hard time getting behing the whole nat gas initiative, but Pickens and Chesapeake are driving the CLNE fueling station infrastructure initiative, so there is plenty of money there to make it happen. As that reality becomes more and more clear, I expect they will have to get behind it.

     

    With all of this talk about being less reliant on foriegn countries for oil, one would think that there would be a push to use the natural gas that is readily available. We have so much NG coming online that prices are at historic lows and Chesapeake recently sold a bunch of its NG assets to China! How that is allowed to happen another issue all together!

     

    I'll let you know as soon as I get the calculation worked out for diesel to nat gas conversion. I got it down to energy density the other night and just haven't had a chance to get back to it.
    25 Jan 2012, 07:52 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4605) | Send Message
     
    thanks for the reply, I had forgotten about WPRT. I will add that to my watch list now, especially after last nights speech. IMO, with the recent production reduction by CHK & one other company with probably more to follow, NG should ease higher still, demand should begin to increase soon.

     

    disclaimer: I still own CHK that I purchased when I first came here. Been a bumpy ride, but looks like I might squeeze out at break even or a small profit soon.
    25 Jan 2012, 08:47 AM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17253) | Send Message
     
    LT: The energy equivalence served as a good conversion ratio in the past, in millions of BTU or therms or something like that.

     

    For a long time that was a good estimate of price correlation, 12:1, 8:1, 6:1 ... but it broke down badly as (over-)supply of NG began to appear with "fraccing" application in the shales.

     

    "Congress has had a hard time getting behing the whole nat gas initiative, but Pickens and Chesapeake are driving the CLNE fueling station infrastructure initiative, so there is plenty of money there to make it happen".

     

    Not bragging, but in comments I posted in several of my NG articles, I suggested that private industry, via mostly trucking demand, would lead the way as private investment built out infrastructure. Once this infrastructure starts to be widespread along the major transportation routes, and to a lesser degree along minor routes, NG for private passenger vehicles becomes viable.

     

    Combined with after-market conversions available (and with lower cost if regulators such as those in Californicate-you reduce their license fees for conversion shops to below $100K, IIRC) we could see NG (especially LNG?) in private passenger vehicles start to make big inroads.

     

    Add in start-stop and other efficiency technologies (after all, even NG is a finite resource) and we eliminate a big drag on the economy, improve air quality at lower cost (NG is inherently cleaner), ...

     

    In a generation or so, we could see the benefits start to accrue.

     

    HardToLove
    25 Jan 2012, 08:50 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4605) | Send Message
     
    thanks HTL...I agree 100%, I think that the production cuts may have caused NG to have seen a bottom for now and the infrastructure buildout is moving along under the radar at a faster pace than we see...
    I think there are low hanging fruits here, but I am always too early ... trying to learn patience.
    25 Jan 2012, 02:02 PM Reply Like
  • RainH2O
    , contributor
    Comments (1354) | Send Message
     
    IMO...another example of how private industry/innovation, not government, turns the real wheels of economic "progress".
    26 Jan 2012, 11:28 AM Reply Like
  • RainH2O
    , contributor
    Comments (1354) | Send Message
     
    Re: nat gas....Friend at CHK said "spickets" at Houston which were built to receive nat gas imports have now been converted for increased exportation..
    25 Jan 2012, 10:30 AM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    So, my theory now is that the Fed will raise rates when the 4,000 day moving average of the Fed Funds rate dips below the Japanese interest rate.

     

    http://bloom.bg/yI6uaZ

     

    http://nyti.ms/zIX5L5

     

    2014... 2014 until rates raised...
    Do I hear 2015?
    Thank you sir. 2015.
    2016? Do I hear 2016?
    Thank you madam. 2016.
    2017? Do I hear 2017.
    2020! The gentleman with the beard bids 2020.
    Do I hear 2021? 2021?
    No interest rates raised until 2020! Sold to the bearded gentleman in the smoky grey suit.

     

    Next up for sale, we have the Greek Isle of Corfu...
    25 Jan 2012, 02:25 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    Some vignettes on what hyperinflation was like in Zimbabwe from a hedge fund manager's visit. A good quick read. http://bit.ly/wX3whK
    25 Jan 2012, 06:41 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17253) | Send Message
     
    Good snippets Jon!

     

    Having never lived through such, I found it interesting.

     

    I liked the end - wondering how it's going to turn out here.

     

    HardToLove
    25 Jan 2012, 07:36 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    meanwhile... Bloomberg's Caroline Baum dubs Ben Bernanke "a fool in the shower" by way of Milton Friedman:

     

    http://bloom.bg/wLZWCB
    25 Jan 2012, 10:02 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9584) | Send Message
     
    JS: As I have been saying for years, make all the money you can now, before it becomes worthless.
    25 Jan 2012, 10:15 PM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (713) | Send Message
     
    Maya

     

    Just got finished shining up my silverware....Toothpaste does make em look real shiny as well...Thanks OG.

     

    MAP
    25 Jan 2012, 10:43 PM Reply Like
  • Joseph L. Shaefer
    , contributor
    Comments (1501) | Send Message
     
    Jon, I was there in 2000 during the hyperinflationary spiral. As a visitor to this beautiful country, the people were friendly and the USD was like 1950. I bought a beautiful hand-carved ironwood walking cane for $4. (I could easily have negotiated that to $1, but there's a bargain and then there's just senseless greed.)

     

    The author of this piece is kinder than I would be to Mugabe (if you go back and read Part I) His two sins were unlimited printing of ZDs and fomenting class -- in this case racial -- warfare.

     

    Not that we'd ever resort to debasing the dollar or have a President who would thrive on creating class warfare just to get re-elected, you understand...
    26 Jan 2012, 11:47 AM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    Re: Nat Gas discussion
    Here's Super fracking!
    http://buswk.co/yiF5K0
    25 Jan 2012, 02:46 PM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (5806) | Send Message
     
    Hi OG - I did not see an explanation as to what Super Fracking was in that article, so I looked it up...
    ------
    Techniques currently being tested focus on three major improvements being conducted by the three leading U.S. petroleum service companies, Schlumberger, Halliburton and Baker Hughes. First up, Schlumberger’s “HIWAY” project adds fibers to the mix designed to hold open the cracks created into the shale. This will increase and prolong the fracture conductivity.

     

    Halliburton’s “Rapidfrac” procedure is a sophisticated operation of sections of pipe able to crack a vast volume of petroleum reserve rock. This procedure has the added benefit of using half the water of current fracking procedures, thus reducing both the amount of time it takes to release the reserve and halving the local surface traffic necessary to service the operation. The use of less water is an important development. Small earth tremors are currently being associated with fracking. But seismologists have recently concluded that the tremors are not caused directly by the frack operation per se, but by the injection underground of waste water which changes subterranean pressures. Less water reduces that risk significantly.

     

    Baker Hughes are pioneering “DirectConnect” a procedure which concentrates the power of the drilling targets oil and gas in much deeper formations. It’s a system that also does not need a rig to return to the well head to perform a cleaning up operation, something Baker Hughes’ “frack ball’ technique currently requires. The company is also considering a second method that blasts “super cracks” deep into the rock releasing more oil and gas.

     

    JP Morgan Chase estimate that super fracking techniques such as these could reduce well head costs by a staggering 70 percent, from $2.5 million per well down to $750,000.
    http://tinyurl.com/7sq...
    25 Jan 2012, 03:09 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17253) | Send Message
     
    Good article. I hope someone remembers that NG has the lowest cost, in water, of any of our energy sources right now.

     

    If (GSFVF) gains wide acceptance, that might be a solution to concerns about water contamination. It would also lower water use even further.

     

    The "tremors" is a separate issue that bears further investigation - our crust is a system and major disruptions to the integrity of that need to be carefully understood before we just accept the industry's word that all is safe.

     

    Money has a way of skewing views.

     

    Thanks for the post!

     

    HardToLove
    25 Jan 2012, 03:28 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13441) | Send Message
     
    Perhaps one part of the fracking controversey solution might be to include the posting of bonds to protect local water users when these wells are fracked? If indeed the new technology saves $1.75million per wellhead, there would appear to be a lot of potential money available to purchse bonds or setup a new arm of the SuperFund?
    25 Jan 2012, 03:47 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17253) | Send Message
     
    TB: Yeah, but we can't drink a bond and water is rapidly becoming a critical resource in many areas around the world.

     

    I'd much rather see a definitive study and solution, as I'm sure you would also. The bond could help relocate those affected or used in remediation, but leaves the problem unaddressed as it becomes just another cost of doing business buried in the product price paid by consumers.

     

    HardToLove.
    25 Jan 2012, 03:54 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13441) | Send Message
     
    Don't get me wrong, HTL, I'm not proposing gutting the Clean Water Act in any way. This would supplement it rather than supplant it with a cash buyout.

     

    Many businesses have to purchase bonds (or provide bonded protection for their employees) because a level of risk is inherent in what they do. There's no reason why guys that cut down trees should have to be bonded, and oil companies do not.
    25 Jan 2012, 04:06 PM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    There was a law passed to protect them and limit their liability for deep sea drilling. Did that change after the BP oil spill?
    Can you imagine super fracking being insurable if it results in earth quakes? Who'd want to underwrite these risks? Most insurers and their reinsurers don't even want to write home owners in FL!
    25 Jan 2012, 04:12 PM Reply Like
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13441) | Send Message
     
    India has agreed to pay for Iranian oil exports with gold:

     

    http://bit.ly/yUHcKT

     

    Article anticipates China agreeing to do this as well.

     

    OK, my Sandstorm went up really strong today...
    25 Jan 2012, 04:18 PM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    And there we have it, the gold standard. We don't need central banks and the Fed.
    Gold is up over $46 today.
    That's even better than APPL today!

     

    So, the gold goes to Iran. This embargo is going to make Iran rich.
    25 Jan 2012, 04:27 PM Reply Like
  • H. T. Love
    , contributor
    Comments (17253) | Send Message
     
    And the Fed (not to mention or irresponsible Gummit) will make sure Iran can buy our Navy as gold appreciates, the dollar tanks and we have to start selling assets.

     

    Summarizing my take on one his answers to a question, IIRC, "Savers are OK because real inflation is near target and yields savers can get approximate inflation so they aren't really losing any purchasing power".

     

    And the market, of course caring only about nominal yield, lifts on all the Fed promise of 0-rate into the future projected by Jon Springer in his hilarious "Faux Auction".

     

    HardToLove
    25 Jan 2012, 04:42 PM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (713) | Send Message
     
    Meanwhile, percentage wise silver did better than gold!!!

     

    So what is that telling us?? I am confused and happy at the same time..

     

    map
    25 Jan 2012, 06:33 PM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    Anyone know anything about Trinidad Drilling? (TDG)

     

    A friend of mine who is like an adopted younger brother to me is thinking about taking a job as a Floorhand on one of their rigs in North Dakota to get his finances right.
    25 Jan 2012, 08:35 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2099) | Send Message
     
    I just noticed the pattern of (XIDE) stock from Jan 11 to the 25th.
    Move up for some days - pause for a few- another smooth move up.

     

    It makes a pretty pattern. I have NO idea if it portends anything other than foolish optimism on the part of Mr. Market.
    25 Jan 2012, 10:20 PM Reply Like
  • Mayascribe
    , contributor
    Comments (9584) | Send Message
     
    SBH: Exide may be tradeable, but if you're going long, I suggest for you to take a peek at the PDF linked in the newest APC. XIDE risk factors are a nightmare to read. PAGES and PAGES! And then there are two possible plant closings linked in from other sources not mentioned in the annual report.
    25 Jan 2012, 10:38 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2099) | Send Message
     
    Maya: Ouch. I'll check it out. Thanks.
    Unfortunately, I am already long.
    25 Jan 2012, 11:06 PM Reply Like
  • siliconhillbilly
    , contributor
    Comments (2099) | Send Message
     
    Brain fart!! The stock I liked the pattern on is (CPST) . Not (XIDE).

     

    I gotta have that memory wiring checked ;-)
    25 Jan 2012, 11:09 PM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4605) | Send Message
     
    This is what happens when companies to get to big:

     

    Jan 26 (Reuters) - AT&T Inc posted a massive quarterly loss due to a break-up fee for its failed T-Mobile USA merger and a pension-related charge on top of costly subsidies for smartphones such as Apple Inc's popular iPhone.
    As a result, the telephone company posted a loss of $6.68 billion or $1.12 per share, compared with a profit of $1.09 billion, or 18 cents per share in the year ago quarter.
    Revenue rose to $32.5 billion from $31.36 billion and compared with Wall Street expectations for $31.95 billion, according to Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S.
    The No. 2 U.S. mobile provider said it added 717,000 subscribers in the quarter, beating the average expectation for 570,000 from seven analysts.
    AT&T had to scrap its plans for a purchase of Deutsche Telekom's T-Mobile USA in December after regulatory opposition.
    (Editing by Maureen Bavdek)
    Keywords: AT&T/
    For Reuters Top News page click the following link:
    http://bit.ly/xSc0H9
    Copyright (C) Reuters 2012. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Reuters content, including by caching, framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited without t e prior written consent of Reuters.
    26 Jan 2012, 08:39 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4605) | Send Message
     
    They squander shareholder money like it is dust. Egotistical, arrogant, poor customer service and all self serving. (Have you ever tried dealing with them?) They rank at the bottom of customer satisfaction.

     

    The shareholders should oust the entire board & management. I really can't believe lawsuits haven't flown in by the thousands.

     

    disclaimer: I have no position in T nor intend to (unless it drops to $20 where it belongs.)
    26 Jan 2012, 08:43 AM Reply Like
  • Jon Springer
    , contributor
    Comments (4152) | Send Message
     
    Bloomberg commodities now providing Hong Kong gold & silver prices http://bloom.bg/zLlXdJ
    26 Jan 2012, 09:09 AM Reply Like
  • optionsgirl
    , contributor
    Comments (5045) | Send Message
     
    Nucor posts 4th-quarter profit on 25% higher sales

     

    (9:29 AM ET) NEW YORK (MarketWatch) -- Nucor Corp., NUE +1.43% the Charlotte, N.C., steelmaker, swung to a fourth-quarter profit from a year-earlier net loss on 25% higher sales. Earnings were $137.1 million, or 43 cents a share, against a loss of $11.4 million, or 4 cents a share, in the year-earlier period. Sales reached $4.83 billion from $3.85 billion. A survey of analysts by FactSet Research produced consensus estimates of 29 cents a share of profit on $4.75 billion of revenue. First-quarter earnings should exceed the fourth-quarter level, Nucor said.
    26 Jan 2012, 09:41 AM Reply Like
  • LT
    , contributor
    Comments (4605) | Send Message
     
    Time for a new concentrator?
    26 Jan 2012, 09:47 AM Reply Like
  • QuickChat
    , contributor
    Comments (253) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » New QC is this way:

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...

     

    1111111111111111111111...

     

    1111111111111111111111...
    26 Jan 2012, 10:10 AM Reply Like
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