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  • Jameson Stanford Resources Corp. (JMSN) Expands Interests Beyond Gold, Silver, Copper 0 comments
    Jul 1, 2013 3:58 PM | about stocks: JMSN

    Jameson Stanford, a Nevada-based metals and minerals exploration, development, and production company, is known for its work with copper, gold, and silver, with its current focus on projects in central and southwestern Utah. But the company also has active exploration interests in other lesser known metals, including the following:

    • Palladium - Palladium is a rare and soft silvery-white metal that is part of the platinum group. It has similar chemical properties to platinum and other metals in the group, though it has a lower melting point. Its primary application is in automotive catalytic converters, where it acts as a catalyst in the conversion of harmful gases to gases that are innocuous. However, palladium has a number of other important applications, among which is its use in fuel cells where hydrogen and oxygen are combined to produce clean energy. The biggest deposits of palladium are in South Africa, with other important deposits in Canada and Russia. In the U.S., current significant deposits are found in Montana. Palladium is highly valued due to its many applications and its relative rarity.

    • Molybdenum - Molybdenum is a dark silvery metal with a very high melting point, and it is valued for its importance in the production of high-performance steel alloys, with its compounds used in the production of durable pigments and other applications. The metals ability to withstand high temperatures is of special value for materials used in the military and for other applications where extreme heat is a factor. The major producer of world molybdenum is China, with the U.S., Chile, Peru, and Mexico also being important sources.

    • Uranium - Uranium is of course best known as a source of nuclear fuels. In spite of concerns regarding the use and disposal of nuclear fuels, over 13% of all electricity generated around the world still comes from uranium based fuels, generated by over 400 operating nuclear power plants in 30 different countries, with many more still planned. The U.S. alone has over 100 nuclear reactors, and gets approximately one fifth of its electricity from them.

    Natural resources require a balance of corporate and environmental responsibility. Jameson Stanford is pioneering new extraction and exploration methodologies to ensure minimal impact and maximum return on investments.

    For additional information, visit the company's website at www.JamesonStanford.com

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    Stocks: JMSN
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