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David Crosetti
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I was born and raised in California. I worked in the family business for a number of years and then decided to spread my wings and try working for someone else. My first significant job was with Frito Lay. After a stint in the salty snack business, I transitioned to the beverage industry,... More
  • Free Advice: It's Worth Exactly What You Paid For It 58 comments
    Jan 9, 2012 10:56 AM
    My daddy used to say, "Advice is worth exactly what you pay for it."  He was referring to "free advice" which you can get a lot of right here at Seeking Alpha.  How much is it worth?  Depends.

    The easiest way to get an article published is to write one about any stock that comes to mind.  Pick one at random.  Say, Applied Materials (NASDAQ:AMAT).  Now, if you run a screen with PE's, ROE, and the other financial criteria, you will find that AMAT will show up, as it has many of the attributes that both DG investors and Growth Investors seem to love.  By the same token, it is a stock that both DG investors and Growth investors can find reason to criticize.

    So there you have it.  How to become a successful author.  Basically, all you need to do is select a stock.  Share your criteria as to why you believe it is a stock to either go long with or that you think one should short.  Submit it and it will be published.

    Here's the problem, though.  Hardly anyone will read your article.  Even fewer people will leave comments about your article.  But, you will get published.  I will prove it to you later this week.  That's when I am going to submit an article about two stocks that I absolutely love and that I feel will make money for both growth investors and DG investors.  These two stocks can't fail to make money, because my crystal ball told me so.  There you have it.  I bet you can't wait to see what two stocks I am going to write about!

    This time of year, it seems as if people are thinking that some kind of new season has started, in this game we call  investing.  Everything looks brighter in January.  The investing season starts anew!  The previous year's activities don't mean anything anymore!  You see, the slate has been wiped clean--after all it's January!

    An unknown, until now, paradigm has taken place.  The market has stopped what it has done in the past and is now set to change direction in some kind of mythical 90 degree tangent--away from the trends it was following in 2011.

    At least that's the only conclusion that you can possibly come to, when you read the articles that are being published lately.  There's why MSFT is a buy and why it's a short.  And every other stock in between, receiving the same dissertation.

    In most activities, there is only one truth.  I fly my own plane.  I know with absolutely no question, that if I am flying and my propeller stops turning, I have a serious problem.  I can try to start the engine again, but if I'm out of gas, guess what?  Gravity and the laws of gravity will bring me and my plane to a meeting with terra firma.  Just a fact.

    The stock market is a place of conjecture.  There are no facts, until you look backward.  Looking forward, we have no idea as to what's going to happen--only what we hope is going to happen.  No one can tell you that a given stock is going to go up or down.  Not consistently, at least.  Hell, even a broken clock is right twice a day.

    But here's what I can tell you.  If you continue to do nothing in regard to your investments; if you fail to have a plan and work that plan; if you fail to set aside money for investing--they you are not going to prosper.

    But then again, those aren't the kind of topics they like to publish at Seeking Alpha.  They prefer the churn and burn articles (one author actually published five articles in one day, touting various stocks--and hardly anyone has even read his touts or posted a commentary.

    I don't write tout sheets.  That's not me.  I write about common sense investing.  I write about long term ideas for your success.  I try to share my country ways and twisted sense of humor about the way I see things.  There isn't much call for that, it seems in SA.  Instead, the instablog gives me the chance to say what's on my mind and what's in my heart.  A man has to do what a man has to do. 

    Instablogs will be my main course of communication moving forward.  I don't give a rat's patootie about "page hits" or any sense of "stardom."  What I choose to do is to talk stocks, talk investing, talk life.  If that appeals to you, visit the instablog.  If it doesn't, then I'll continue commenting in other people's articles.

    From my way of thinking, the instablog allows me to bypass editorial bias and at the same time reach those who would like to read and comment on what I have to say as opposed to me being forced to write articles that some editor feels warm and fuzzy about, while I think the article is crap.

    No crap in 2012.  Just straight talk and open conversation.  Have a great day!

    Dave
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Instablogs are blogs which are instantly set up and networked within the Seeking Alpha community. Instablog posts are not selected, edited or screened by Seeking Alpha editors, in contrast to contributors' articles.

Comments (58)
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  • bluesmoke
    , contributor
    Comments (795) | Send Message
     
    Sounds like a good new year's resolution; it makes perfect sense to me. I've been reading SA for many years and yet only follow 39 authors, many of which no longer contribute. Probably for the same reasons you articulate. Good articles and analysis are few and far between. Whatever your style, please keep them coming.
    9 Jan 2012, 12:34 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Blue: My committment is not to blow smoke. So many articles are just that. In my opinion, many of these articles do a diservice to people who are new to investing, because they tout some very risky and dangerous stocks, without any ethical notion of steering people wrong. I think that touting a stock because you own it personally is just flat wrong. I had mentioned Hasbro and Harris Corp in one of my articles and lately, it seems that everybody is on the bandwagon for Haris and Hasbro. They meet my goals, but may not meet yours and I used them as illustrations and not as recommendations.

     

    Dave
    9 Jan 2012, 04:16 PM Reply Like
  • Norman Tweed
    , contributor
    Comments (7463) | Send Message
     
    Thanks David Crosetti for a real life image. It's a good thing SA has the Instablog feature. Politics are dangerous and stock pumping is not. You have a forum and SA gets page hits without liability.
    9 Jan 2012, 01:06 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Norman. There are authors who publish five articles a day, touting various stocks. Many of these stocks shouldn't be in anyone's portfolio. They are not for the Joe average like you and me. My style is more oriented toward a bunch of guys sitting around drinking coffee and discussing investments. I'm not a tout, but a thinker. Often I get more from my readers than I get from the article. I just refuse to write the kind of crap that is out there, for the express purpose of getting published. I just don't think that's what I want to do, and I'm just not going to do it.

     

    I never started this to get famous or to be seen as some kind of genius. I'm just an average guy trying to fiqure all of this out and I think there is room for my kind of article and room for yours (which I enjoy reading).

     

    But, I can't write an article only to be told that I have to tout 4 or 5 stocks to make it worthy. Sometimes it's the content of the article that is more important than any specific stocks being mentioned.

     

    Dave
    9 Jan 2012, 04:21 PM Reply Like
  • Norman Tweed
    , contributor
    Comments (7463) | Send Message
     
    Dave--I understand your point. Many authors that I have known in the past have stopped writing for SA for similar reasons. Other commentators take a sabbatical for awhile to cool down. It comes down to what you as an author want to do. You have made a decision and it is right for you. Congratulations on your principles!
    9 Jan 2012, 04:29 PM Reply Like
  • giorgiolb
    , contributor
    Comments (6172) | Send Message
     
    You mean I can't even give you one cent for my two cent's worth? Hardly seems fair.
    9 Jan 2012, 01:14 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » For you, it's going to......be a buck! The old adage is a "penny for your thoughts." Well, I have about 600 bucks running through my head!

     

    Dave
    9 Jan 2012, 04:22 PM Reply Like
  • giorgiolb
    , contributor
    Comments (6172) | Send Message
     
    And if you're like me, you're trying to figure out ways to turn those 600 bucks into 1200 bucks...
    9 Jan 2012, 04:53 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Giorgiolb: That is exactly what I am trying to do. Call it investing for profit. Not speculation. In my free advice, I think many of the traditional stocks that DG investors love and have loved over the last 5-10 years are beginning to be overpriced. Time to hold--not buy more.

     

    There is a second tier, if you would, of stocks with all of the qualities of a JNJ, ABT, KO, PEP, etc. that are out there and they are like minor league players.

     

    These are precisely the kind of stocks that I am looking at for 2012. Harris (HRS), Illinois Tool Works (ITW), Aflac (AFL) and many more. These are companies that their prices have fallen over the last 12 months, but when you look at what they have done over the last 6 months and last 3 months, you see that they are cutting their downward price run and going the other direction.

     

    In my opinion, these are the companies you want to be adding to your portfolio in 2012. Some would call that momentum investing--I call it value investing. What I mean by that is this: if these companies were household names, you'd be on them like paint on a wall. But, how many people on the street have ever even heard about Harris Corp? Emerson Electric? Nucor Steel? Illinois Tool Works? And many others? When you find companies that are Dividend Champions that have historically low PE's, great ROE's, good cash balances, and great management--why do you ignore them? Because you haven't heard of them?

     

    There are lots of values out there and lots of overvalue. I love MCD. Have owned it forever. Maybe it goes to 200 some day. I don't think it will. Personally, I'd rather move my gains in MCD someplace else. Taking it off the table. Market tanks and MCD drops to 75, I'm on it big. Not now.

     

    I don't suscribe to the idea of wishful thinking. If you want to have some fun, just look at the articles written about MCD over the last two weeks. There are more opinions about the company out there than you can imagine. There's no consensus on the stock at all. Everyone who came late to the dance is all jazzed up about MCD. Hey, this is the last dance, the last chance, for romance tonight.

     

    Look at the stocks that are bargain priced. Over the next five years, you will thank me--if I'm still alive.

     

    Dave
    9 Jan 2012, 05:05 PM Reply Like
  • giorgiolb
    , contributor
    Comments (6172) | Send Message
     
    We think alike on some of these names. I also think some of the "blue chips" are overpriced at this time. I sold my MCD, KO, MRK and BMT recently, and have sell orders in for CL, TRV and COP. I hate to see some of them go, but I can find better values which will increase my cash flow.

     

    I sold my EMR as well, but also sold some puts and hope to get it put back to me at a much lower price. I've also owned HRS for several years, and it exhibits odd trading patterns, it will occasionally drop or rise unexpectedly for no good reason other than some rumor of the day.. The dividend is okay, not great, but I also sell covered calls to juice the return.
    9 Jan 2012, 06:00 PM Reply Like
  • Rev. Keith
    , contributor
    Comments (50) | Send Message
     
    For those of us new to investing, what's the best way to search for 'bargain prices' on stocks? Is there a simple/quick way to discover this? Are P/E ratios the best test?
    9 Jan 2012, 10:17 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Rev: PE's are one metric. What you need to look at is the PE relative to his historical number. In a nutshell, when a stock has a PE ratio of 19, you are (for all intents and purposes) paying $19 for every $1 in earnings that a company has.

     

    Screens are a good thing to run. Charles Schwab has a relatively easy one to use. You can, if you have an account with them, run a screen by say a category of stocks--like pharmaceuticals. You would ask the screen for PE ratios, plus the other criteria you want to use and then compare one pharmaceutical against another.

     

    Don't be in a big hurry to invest money. Start off by taking the time to read investing books. There are a number of them to look at. Spend some time looking at what people here write about various stocks and look for the kind of criteria they use to explain why they think a stock is a value or not.

     

    In the meantime, talk to the people where you invest and see what kind of analyst reports are available to you for free. At Schwab, you can select a particular stock and then read reports on that stock, written by Argus Research, Ned Davis Research, Reuters, Standard and Poors, or Credite Suisse. These reports are narratives as to the relative value of a particular company.

     

    Good luck!

     

    Dave
    9 Jan 2012, 11:50 PM Reply Like
  • Rev. Keith
    , contributor
    Comments (50) | Send Message
     
    Thanks so much--I appreciate you taking the time to reply. I've been reading a lot of articles on here, especially those who subscribe to the dividend growth model, which seems pretty attractive to me.

     

    I'll keep reading--always looking to learn, no matter what the subject.

     

    Thanks again.
    10 Jan 2012, 06:42 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Rev: I try to make it a habit to respond to people who take the time to comment. You don't know how much I appreciate you stopping by and taking the time to do so. There are a number of good books to read:

     

    1. The Dividend Growth Investment Strategy – RoxAnne Klugman

     

    2. The Little Book of Value Investing – Christopher H. Browne and Roger Lowenstein

     

    3. The Coffeehouse Investor: How to Build Wealth, Ignore Wall Street, and Get On With Your Life – Bill Schultheis

     

    4. The Neatest Little Guide to Stock Market Investing – Jason Kelly

     

    5. Learn to Earn: A Beginner’s Guide to the Basics of Investing and Business – Peter Lynch

     

    Dave
    10 Jan 2012, 08:41 PM Reply Like
  • Dividend Dynasty
    , contributor
    Comments (1128) | Send Message
     
    David, I agree with you. The SA editor process can twist an article into something you don't even want to publish. Yes, they want you to list 5 stocks. Then the comments are all about the stocks instead of the topic that you feel strongly about. Notice, I have also discontinued writing articles. I have also slowed down my comments to try to only post comments that would be valuable.

     

    Is it only me, or is everyone slowing down on SA? They better get their IPO out soon! The value of their eyeballs is dropping fast.
    9 Jan 2012, 04:39 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Rodger: They only seem to want to publish stock touting articles. There is one author that writes almost 3 times a week. He writes all opinion pieces, with no action plan and often times, not serious effort to say anything of value. His initials are.....never mind. But he has a lot of followers, so, I guess that makes what he has to say more important, albeit worthless information. My last article was rejected because I didn't tout five stocks. I resubmitted with some stocks in therre and the entire article as a result sucked. I'm not willing to compormise. So, if I publish anything at all, it will be on the insta blog. People can read it or not. I refuse to become a shill or a pimp for stock selections.

     

    Dave
    9 Jan 2012, 04:43 PM Reply Like
  • Dividend Dynasty
    , contributor
    Comments (1128) | Send Message
     
    Roger that! If you know what I mean . . . just clowning around!
    9 Jan 2012, 04:46 PM Reply Like
  • giorgiolb
    , contributor
    Comments (6172) | Send Message
     
    Dave, Does anyone even read those "5 Stocks With Catchy Tiltes" articles? There are dozens published on SA every day.
    9 Jan 2012, 04:59 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » It doesn't appear as if they comment very often at these articles, but I would imagine they get a lot of looks. That's why people write them. Although there are a few guys that write these articles all the time and they are nowhere to be found on the "ratings" page for top 50 in Quick Pics or whatever. Hard to say. I don't read them, other than to be my contrary self.

     

    There was one of interest that was titled "McDonalds Will Never Break $100" (paraphrase). I wrote that he had great analysis, but since December 23rd, MCD has gone over $100 on 9 seperate days. The author didn't reply to my post.

     

    Dave
    9 Jan 2012, 11:54 PM Reply Like
  • giorgiolb
    , contributor
    Comments (6172) | Send Message
     
    For all the abuse passive investment guys like Lawrence heap on us stockpickers, it's ironic that individual stocks make up such a large a part of SA.

     

    But you're right, most of those articles seem to be written by faceless authors who churn them out daily and never respond.
    10 Jan 2012, 09:26 AM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Rodger that, Rodger. (Airplane?)

     

    Dave
    9 Jan 2012, 04:47 PM Reply Like
  • Smarty_Pants
    , contributor
    Comments (2901) | Send Message
     
    Crystal balls, 90 degree tangents, rats patooties, broken clocks, twisted humor, and a Plan.

     

    As long as it works, I'm good with that.
    9 Jan 2012, 04:53 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Some times you feel like a nut, some times you don't.

     

    Dave
    9 Jan 2012, 11:55 PM Reply Like
  • Smarty_Pants
    , contributor
    Comments (2901) | Send Message
     
    Nutty or not, I agree completely with your assertion. The articles and postings which are the useful to the individual investor are the ones which instruct them on some aspect of investing.

     

    You could give people the list of the 5 best performing stocks for 2012 and they would still have a good chance of holding them too long and losing a significant portion of any gains they receive in 2013 if they don't get a second timely article telling them when to sell each stock. It's the knowing, not the doing, that counts.

     

    To paraphrase a well worn adage: Give a man a stock, feed him for a year. Teach a man to invest in stocks, feed him for a lifetime.

     

    It's a pity if the SA editors don't realize that principle and make it a significant part of their offering. Until then, instablogs will need to serve as cake to the stock-touters' frosting.

     

    If you DO start the Just Investin' website, be sure to let us know so we can add it to our bookmark menus.
    10 Jan 2012, 08:42 AM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » I think the website idea would be a great one. It would be more about teaching people how to identify good stocks to purchase; it would be about how to manage your portfolio, consident with your strategy of investing (growth/value/income etc); it would teach people money management and how to manage their portfolio like a business, not a hobby.

     

    Look at the number of outstanding writers who for whatever reason have evidently stopped contributing. These same authors don't even comment anymore. They're gone or on some hiatus, it would seem.

     

    Maybe things will improve after the January pump and dump articles are starting to slow down--maybe not. All business go through cycles and SA looks like it is going through a cycle as well.

     

    Who knows.

     

    Dave
    10 Jan 2012, 08:49 AM Reply Like
  • Guitar Man
    , contributor
    Comments (228) | Send Message
     
    Ugh, those multiple-stock-touting articles make me nuts. Dave, Norman, Rodger, you guys all "get it," and you represent a large percentage of the small number of contributors whom I follow. I'm part of the crowd who knows about NUE, ITW, et al - and I consider myself to be a dividend zealot.

     

    It was a challenge, in my early days of reading SA, to filter through all the hype that many produce. However, I've now "mastered" my settings page and have also whittled the number of contributors down to those who, as the Wendy's commercial used to say, "show us the beef": thoughtful, insightful, intelligent, fact-based material written for the purpose of sharing useful information with others.

     

    Keep it up, guys (and gals - that's for you, Five+!); you're all doing a fantastic job.
    9 Jan 2012, 07:52 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Guitar:

     

    Thanks for stopping by. Like you, I am filtering the articles that I want to read.

     

    Dave
    9 Jan 2012, 08:14 PM Reply Like
  • Dividend Dynasty
    , contributor
    Comments (1128) | Send Message
     
    Guitar said "thoughtful, insightful, intelligent, fact-based material written for the purpose of sharing useful information with others."
    Thanks G! I do my best to stay positive and provide that type of info. That is my new motto. To post ideas that are worth reading, not to get into long conversations that go nowhere so you need to filter out the garbage from the valuable information.

     

    Here is the value in this post . . .

     

    The "Rev" above asked . . . "For those of us new to investing, what's the best way to search for 'bargain prices' on stocks? Is there a simple/quick way to discover this? Are P/E ratios the best test?" David gave a great reply. I will add value by giving you a Google Finance screen that pretty much narrows the 7000 stocks down to the 100 or less that I would consider purchasing. Here is the link to the screen. http://bit.ly/y3944N;
    Save this screen to your favorites to use it again in the future.

     

    This screen brought back 72 stocks when I ran it. I would say that these are the 72 best values in the stock market. Why do I say that? Because the screen includes the stocks in the best half of each of these criteria. Market Cap, P/E, Dividend Yield, Debt/Equity, Interest Coverage, Beta, Cash Flow. Now to narrow it down some more, look for the companies from this list in David Fish's CCC list and I don't think you could go too wrong in buying those selections.

     

    How's that for an easy way to find the best 20 or so companies to invest in? Remember, Free advice is worth what you pay for it and please do your own due diligence. Five of my 30 stocks show up in this list of 72 and if you expand the PE to 16, a bunch more of my stocks show up. I would say there are a dozen or so that are in David Fish's list. Those dozen would probably make a nice list of companies to consider buying.

     

    P.S. You need to tweek this screen each time you use it. The market is constantly changing. So slide the slidebars in the Google Screen to include the best half of each criteria. The best half would start from the peak in the distribution. Align the bar to the peak.
    10 Jan 2012, 03:58 AM Reply Like
  • Dividend Dynasty
    , contributor
    Comments (1128) | Send Message
     
    I'm sorry but the link will not work right in SA. I'll try to type it out for you. You need to remove the spaces in the following.

     

    http: // www. google. com/ finance #stockscreener?c0=Mark... &min0=1090000000 &c1=PE &max1=15 &c2=DividendYield&... &max2=6.09 &c3=TotalDebtToEqu... &max3=112&c4=A... &min4=5.65 &c5=Beta &max5=1.72 &c6=Dividend &min6=84.22&re... &sector=AllSectors &sort=Beta &sortOrder=-1&

     

    It still may not work. I'm sorry. I tried.
    10 Jan 2012, 04:23 AM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Rodger: Thank you for the comments. This was very nice of you and very helpful! Thanks so much!

     

    Dave
    10 Jan 2012, 07:00 AM Reply Like
  • Willy95
    , contributor
    Comments (41) | Send Message
     
    Thanks for the screen Rodger, much appreciated, I clicked your link and copied out the screen then just set it up manually works!
    11 Jan 2012, 09:50 AM Reply Like
  • astarr66
    , contributor
    Comments (235) | Send Message
     
    Dave, the link did not work for me either, nor removing the spaces in the address.

     

    What criteria for the google stock screener did you use to arrive at the 100 stocks you mention you would consider?

     

    Thanks! A newbie.
    12 Jan 2012, 05:37 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » astarr: The Google link was from Rodger. I think what he does is use the basic screener and add his various criteria to it to generate the stocks. I use Schwab's screening tool. What I do is pick the Index (SP 500), Dividend Yield, PE ratio last full year and full year forward, ROE, Debt to Equity, and Dividend growth rate. Then I run the screen. From that, I do one on one analysis for each stock by looking at the financials that Schwab provides through Argus Research, Credit Suisse, and Reuters.

     

    Hope that helps.

     

    Dave
    12 Jan 2012, 06:03 PM Reply Like
  • Dividend Dynasty
    , contributor
    Comments (1128) | Send Message
     
    Here is my criteria using Google Finance screener that I tried to put the link above so you can manually enter the screen.

     

    The key is the upper half on the graph, not necessarily the number(s) listed below.

     

    1) Market Cap greater than 1 billion (upper half of market cap).
    2) P/E ratio below 16 (lower half of P/E)
    3) Dividend yield between 2% and 6% (middle half of dividend yield)
    4) Total debt/equity (Recent yr) (%) between 0 and 112 (lower half)
    5) Interest Coverage 5.65 to 2.22 million (upper half)
    6) beta -3.28 to 1.72 (lower half)
    7) Div from cash flow 84.22 to 9917 (upper half)

     

    The result should be the intersection of the top half of companies in each category. In other words, All my stocks are "above average". With this screen, the 100 stocks that are above average in all categories are found.

     

    Some of my stocks don't show up after I bought them because the P/E gets too high or the Dividend yield gets too low. I don't sell them when they fall off the list because my dividend yield and earnings yield were set at purchase. Now if they fall off the list because of #4, #5, or #7, that would be more concerning and may be a reason to sell.
    12 Jan 2012, 08:24 PM Reply Like
  • astarr66
    , contributor
    Comments (235) | Send Message
     
    Roger,

     

    The link did not work for me either, nor removing the spaces in the address.

     

    What criteria for the google stock screener did you use to arrive at the 100 stocks you mention you would consider?

     

    Thanks! A newbie.
    12 Jan 2012, 08:52 PM Reply Like
  • astarr66
    , contributor
    Comments (235) | Send Message
     
    Thanks Dave. I"ll ask Roger directly.

     

    How do you come up with your preferences for Dividend Yield, ROE, Debt to Equity, and Dividend growth rate?

     

    Thanks again....
    12 Jan 2012, 08:54 PM Reply Like
  • Robert Allan Schwartz
    , contributor
    Comments (15246) | Send Message
     
    "All my stocks are "above average"."

     

    They're from Lake Wobegon? :-)
    12 Jan 2012, 09:42 PM Reply Like
  • Dividend Dynasty
    , contributor
    Comments (1128) | Send Message
     
    RAS, I wanted to add that to my comment, but I didn't know how to spell Wobegon! Thankfully, there are some teachers on here to help us finance geeks out.
    12 Jan 2012, 10:20 PM Reply Like
  • Robert Allan Schwartz
    , contributor
    Comments (15246) | Send Message
     
    My wife won't play Scrabble with me unless I give her a 40-point handicap, because I can spell better than she can. :-)
    12 Jan 2012, 11:11 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » RL: Ditto.

     

    Dave
    13 Jan 2012, 08:03 AM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Ras: My wife makes words up. She claims that they are "southern" words. When she's on a roll, she would have to spot me 500 points.

     

    Dave
    13 Jan 2012, 08:04 AM Reply Like
  • Smarty_Pants
    , contributor
    Comments (2901) | Send Message
     
    ""All my stocks are "above average"." ... They're from Lake Wobegon?"

     

    Sounds like a nifty title for another SA article Rodger. 'The Lake Wobegon Portfolio' (where the stocks are always above average).
    13 Jan 2012, 07:23 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Smarty: That is PURE genius.

     

    Dave
    13 Jan 2012, 09:00 PM Reply Like
  • Dividend Dynasty
    , contributor
    Comments (1128) | Send Message
     
    David, go for it if you want to write the article.
    13 Jan 2012, 09:07 PM Reply Like
  • Just Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (118) | Send Message
     
    David,
    So that's why there are soooo many articles on 'five stocks for the new year' or '10 stocks insiders are buying' or.... Thanks for sharing a little about the process of publishing articles here. I thoroughly enjoy yours and glad to hear that your not giving up on your thought provoking writing...just changing your angle of attack?

     

    9 Jan 2012, 08:02 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » In the future, I will submit an article for publication ONE time. If the editors do not publish it, then I will post at my Instablog. I don't have the desire to constantly rewrite an article and have the whole idea of the article be watered down with meaningless additions of stock as "picks". The article stands on its own merits or it doesn't. If it doesn't, we go to instablog.

     

    It woulld seem that the thought process here is for articles that talk about specific stocks or groups of stocks. That's not hard to write as most of those articles are "cut and paste." They have no intrinsic value until you filter out the noise and find specific authors like Carnevale, Van Knapp, Tweed, etc.

     

    You don't need me to tell you that MCD is overpriced at this point, do you? Heck, in the last two days, there are more than 6 articles about MCD. Is it THAT interesting of a company to publish so many articles about ONE stock?

     

    Dave
    9 Jan 2012, 08:14 PM Reply Like
  • Just Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (118) | Send Message
     
    I guess for some it's mostly about being able to tell their current or potential clients how many followers they have or how many articles they've written.
    9 Jan 2012, 08:49 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » It's funny, but some people actually think that someone who wears an expensive suit and has a nice wristwatch is somehow more qualified to handle money. My accountant has never worn a suit in his life and wears a Timex (digital). He is the smartest man I know. His client base is large, because he doesn't make mistakes with your money or your tax situation. My estate lawyer on the other hand......

     

    Dave
    9 Jan 2012, 11:58 PM Reply Like
  • Robert Allan Schwartz
    , contributor
    Comments (15246) | Send Message
     
    Dave, I don't care whether you write articles or instablogs, but please KEEP WRITING! I learn something from you every time I read you.

     

    Robert
    9 Jan 2012, 09:54 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Robert: Thanks. As long as I know you'll read my stuff, I'll write it!

     

    Dave

     

    PS: Thinking about opening my own web site with a similar twist. It would be about investing for dividends and income first and all the other crap later. Same basic format, just no pump and dump articles.
    9 Jan 2012, 09:57 PM Reply Like
  • Dennis Anderson
    , contributor
    Comments (363) | Send Message
     
    Dave: WOW! This is quite a philosophical rant. And, I happen to agree with you; a lot of articles are merely replicating CNBC on the blogosphere. I have only a very few authors that I follow. I want to read from folks who provide tools and ideas, but who also challenge me to think for myself.

     

    Keep it up in whatever forum you decide to use.
    9 Jan 2012, 11:51 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » D: I had a wild hair. I just think that when you have a person like me, who hasn't written a lot of articles, but has a great following and is ranked #2 in Dividend Investing Strategies, that my articles have some merit even thought they don't always tout stocks. It would seem that in some people's mind, common sense investing, and money management is not as important or valuable as being able to construct great charts and cut and paste analyst stories about a particular stock.

     

    Dave
    10 Jan 2012, 08:52 AM Reply Like
  • mostserene1
    , contributor
    Comments (3358) | Send Message
     
    So, Dave, I may nick-name you the Un-Cramer (as a soda man you will find that familiar).
    12 Jan 2012, 05:01 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » JFV: I despise Cramer, but I like Un-Cola.

     

    Dave
    12 Jan 2012, 06:04 PM Reply Like
  • Conair
    , contributor
    Comments (303) | Send Message
     
    Bravo Dave.
    I like the guys on SA who use the Facts to show values and compare 2 stocks with relevant facts. (T) vs (VZ) or (KMP) vs (BWP)
    Back in November the big debate started with (T) the high yielder, vs (MCD), the DG Champion. I enjoyed this immensely.
    I obviously enjoy your articles, but through the commentary I've enjoyed Chowder, Richjoy and MBKelly whom don't write articles.
    Please keep writing, until we all jump ship to Investing 4 Income!
    Thanks, Chris
    18 Jan 2012, 02:31 PM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Chris: Thanks so much. It really tickles me to have my SA friends comment on my articles. It's like Facebook, but better, because you can actually carry on a conversation!

     

    I appreciate your comments and count you in my select group of encouragers! It just makes me proud to have the support from regular people.

     

    Dave
    18 Jan 2012, 02:42 PM Reply Like
  • lone ranger
    , contributor
    Comments (3) | Send Message
     
    Hi,

     

    I really enjoy your writing style, Dave. It is refreshing, bold yet very through and articulate. Thank you!
    LR
    20 Mar 2012, 08:12 AM Reply Like
  • David Crosetti
    , contributor
    Comments (11378) | Send Message
     
    Author’s reply » Ranger:

     

    Thank you. My wife tells me I'm like an off-brand Tequilla.

     

    Dave
    20 Mar 2012, 08:17 AM Reply Like
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