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The U.S. economy may suffer from high unemployment, mediocre productivity gains and stagnant...

The U.S. economy may suffer from high unemployment, mediocre productivity gains and stagnant earnings for households, but George Mason University's Tyler Cowen provides five indicators that "the future is starting to brighten." These are: an increase in high-school graduation to 78% in 2010, the most since 1974; the falling cost of further education; slowing healthcare inflation; the "new era of cheap energy;" and the increasing ability of innovators around the world to supply new technology to the U.S.
Comments (13)
  • positivethoughts
    , contributor
    Comments (2017) | Send Message
     
    Most kids who graduate highschool cant perform even at a basic level. They are essentially babysat and their grades and performance are inflated. Most people I hired during my ownership of a dollarstore couldnt do basic math when the register encountered interruptions or data errors. My math, even when i was in grade 8, was superior to what most highschool kids possess today.

     

    Slowing healthcare inflation? In Canada, is is growing faster than the economy!
    26 May 2013, 08:37 AM Reply Like
  • bgold1955
    , contributor
    Comments (2284) | Send Message
     
    Healthcare costs are just shy of 18% of entire GDP (2011 number) in US. Not sure what Canada % of GDP but it is lower. Extreme waste and neglect in US healthcare so the decrease due to financial incentives to do it right the first time or not get paid for the second time is having a profoundly consumer friendly impact. Deaths by infections via hospitals has dropped dramatically in the last 3 years by primarily changing the "process". Better outcomes for health related issues is better for the consumer and now the industry is beginning to believe "quality over quantity".
    26 May 2013, 10:39 AM Reply Like
  • positivethoughts
    , contributor
    Comments (2017) | Send Message
     
    In Canada, we spend approximately 12% of GDP on healthcare. That is because we restrict access to healthcare and create bottlenecks to reduce spending. This results in people dying while being denied care that they paid for. This is not the definition of efficiency.
    27 May 2013, 07:56 AM Reply Like
  • al roman
    , contributor
    Comments (5994) | Send Message
     
    Just Empirically this does seem to be the trend.
    26 May 2013, 08:38 AM Reply Like
  • nasdaq99
    , contributor
    Comments (114) | Send Message
     
    needed a good laugh this am and got two:

     

    educators like this are just a symptom of what ails this country and unfortunatley we have the ability to stay in denial for a much longer time.
    26 May 2013, 08:56 AM Reply Like
  • bdarken
    , contributor
    Comments (499) | Send Message
     
    The "falling costs of further education?"

     

    The student loan debt burden is higher than it's ever been: Tuition at the country clubs we call "college" is the price of a four-bedroom house.

     

    But for those with a $200 computer built in China and a curious mind, learning IS cheaper than ever!
    26 May 2013, 08:59 AM Reply Like
  • Joe2922
    , contributor
    Comments (436) | Send Message
     
    What is that guy smoking? The energy here is overstated, as it always is. College grads work at McD. Stocks are on fluffy clouds, sell into the next rally before the June Swoon:
    http://bit.ly/WpVqYk
    26 May 2013, 09:30 AM Reply Like
  • marketwatcher23
    , contributor
    Comments (1354) | Send Message
     
    " the falling cost of further education; slowing healthcare inflation; the "new era of cheap energy;"

     

    LOLOLOLOLOLOLOL
    26 May 2013, 09:01 AM Reply Like
  • PR Conservative
    , contributor
    Comments (38) | Send Message
     
    We need to cut imports, we need to stop immigration, we need to stop giving incentives for not working. Until then, the economy would keep on a slow death trajectory.
    26 May 2013, 09:10 AM Reply Like
  • positivethoughts
    , contributor
    Comments (2017) | Send Message
     
    Immigration is not the probelm. Social services which incurr costs when immigrants come and access those services is the problem. Few social services will cause only contributing and self-sufficient immigrants to come. Just like in the early 1900s.
    27 May 2013, 08:22 AM Reply Like
  • Agbug
    , contributor
    Comments (1165) | Send Message
     
    Seems no one is buying this load of BS. The Nuns would have made me stay after and do the work over if I tried to turn in the garbage my kids got away with in public high school. The school system has also figured out how to skew the graduation rate, much like other numbers we are familiar with, kid disappeared from the district, not counted as a drop out.
    26 May 2013, 09:16 AM Reply Like
  • nasdaq99
    , contributor
    Comments (114) | Send Message
     
    you can scan either side of this page to take a look at the healthcare layoffs and school closings. the "educator" should do the same:

     

    http://bit.ly/cBqSqC
    26 May 2013, 10:07 AM Reply Like
  • Herr Hansa
    , contributor
    Comments (3085) | Send Message
     
    He got two out of five wrong.

     

    http://bit.ly/11jwWjP

     

    Higher education has greatly increased over the last decade. Health care costs have yet to show significant declines.
    26 May 2013, 03:28 PM Reply Like
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