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Young troops leaving Iraq can expect to face a tough time finding work should they return to...

Young troops leaving Iraq can expect to face a tough time finding work should they return to civilian life: the jobless rate for those aged 20-24 averages 30%, over double that of their peers. Reservists also find it difficult, and the situation could worsen, with 1M vets predicted join the work force over the next 5 years.
Comments (16)
  • Jackson999
    , contributor
    Comments (468) | Send Message
     
    Why don't they stay in the military? Are they being kicked out?
    18 Dec 2011, 04:01 AM Reply Like
  • laogao
    , contributor
    Comments (88) | Send Message
     
    Tell them to come to Houston TX.
    Plenty of jobs and we value the skills they have acquired.
    18 Dec 2011, 08:45 AM Reply Like
  • Herr Hansa
    , contributor
    Comments (3084) | Send Message
     
    I live and work part of the year in Houston. I certainly don't see one million open positions here, though it might be a good choice for some leaving the military to try to work in this area. Not all military training can be translated into skills useful in private industry.
    18 Dec 2011, 04:29 PM Reply Like
  • alexbrooklyn
    , contributor
    Comments (93) | Send Message
     
    What happens to veterans when they come back from war? Do they get a pension? Just curious...
    18 Dec 2011, 10:03 AM Reply Like
  • Herr Hansa
    , contributor
    Comments (3084) | Send Message
     
    Nope, not unless they are at retirement. Those who are permanently injured might get some form of disability payment, and medical treatment at low (or no) cost through the Veteran's Administration Medical system. A few might get a final pay check that would be enough to get them through a month or so of bills, for example, if they have vacation time they were unable to take while in service.
    18 Dec 2011, 04:19 PM Reply Like
  • apberusdisvet
    , contributor
    Comments (2952) | Send Message
     
    Connect the dots. The recent fascist law passed by Congress to destroy the last vestiges of the Bill of Rights was to prepare for these returning vets to man the barricades under martial law.
    18 Dec 2011, 10:23 AM Reply Like
  • User 487974
    , contributor
    Comments (1105) | Send Message
     
    Our brave men and women deserve not just our thanks and praise, they deserve all this country has to offer!
    Every single man or woman who comes back and leaves the care of the service should get an automatic "99 weeks" of severance / pay for their sacrifice to this great country!
    We can take it from all the folks who have already exhausted their "99 weeks" of unemployment and now with the unemployment rate falling (due to them rolling off the dole of the 99 weeks) we should be able to transfer their expired benefits over to our vets with ease!

     

    How are we going to pay for this?
    Well since congress is trading insider stock information all the time behind closed doors, we could simply take 75 % of their pay and fund a new vet program, what a great trade! Maybe this would force out the career politicians and let them feel the indignity of trying to find a job in Obama's nightmare economy!
    This great country deserves to stand tall and proud and support its returning war hero's!
    Not the loser "ZERO'S" that are congress and the president!
    Jerry

     

    Thank you to all our brave men and women, may God bless you!
    18 Dec 2011, 12:57 PM Reply Like
  • Jackson999
    , contributor
    Comments (468) | Send Message
     
    Jeez. Had to pull up my waders to make it through your fawning post.

     

    The soldiers VOLUNTEERED to join the military on their own. Most joined up because they couldn't find work elsewhere or they couldn't afford or get into college. They didn't become "brave" because they went to a war zone as ordered and they didn't become "hero's" just because they volunteered for military service too fight two illegal wars. I am confident that "god" doesn't look at them any different that he looks at anyone else.

     

    The soldiers were merely workers who were hired to do a job. As such, I agree that they should get the same unemployment benefits and training opportunities that anyone else would get if they lost their job if their employer (the military) no longer has any use for them. If they were injured, then the military should pay whatever costs are necessary to help them rehabilitate themselves.
    18 Dec 2011, 03:09 PM Reply Like
  • Herr Hansa
    , contributor
    Comments (3084) | Send Message
     
    Unemployment in most states in the US is an insurance fund paid into by workers and employers. If unemployment is 10%, then 9 out of 10 workers are paying in without collecting. This means that states should be making money on unemployment insurance, even if they are extending the benefit time. It's simply another way to generate revenues, and far from a hand-out. It would take severe mismanagement of unemployment insurance for any state to lose money on the system, though considering the ineptitude of certain politicians and states, it would not surprise me that some may be losing money in this system.

     

    A different argument might be to eliminate unemployment insurance entirely, because it functions like a tax. However, I think this is one of the areas in which private industry would gladly step in. So my suggestion would be to privatize unemployment insurance and take it away from state and federal control.
    18 Dec 2011, 04:26 PM Reply Like
  • Poor Texan
    , contributor
    Comments (3533) | Send Message
     
    I think the vets will be able to take care of themselves. They'll be competing against the OWS crowd with their entitlement mentality. Our vets know self-discipline and initiative.
    18 Dec 2011, 04:45 PM Reply Like
  • WMARKW
    , contributor
    Comments (10700) | Send Message
     
    Well, 1 million, that a good start, but it should be done faster. That's only 1/2 the entire active duty and reserve forces. No reason we can't cut active duty by 1/2 in 2 years.

     

    And...yes there is the question about what they will do when they get out.. Too bad we have allowed the economy to deteriorate so badly. That will be a problem, but, I can tell you this....

     

    I'd hire ANY former military member before I would hire an OWS protester. For sure.....no doubt.....hands down.
    18 Dec 2011, 07:09 PM Reply Like
  • Poor Texan
    , contributor
    Comments (3533) | Send Message
     
    Not to disagree but let's be careful about our military strength and not get into the position we were in in 1941. Assess the risks and prepare accordingly and don't just rely on being able to nuke an enemy off the face of the earth ('cause it ain't gonna happen so it's not a deterrent).
    18 Dec 2011, 08:25 PM Reply Like
  • Buddy Canuspare
    , contributor
    Comments (399) | Send Message
     
    PT,
    Wouldn't that require government spending, and thus be inefficient, wasteful and fraudulent?
    18 Dec 2011, 10:06 PM Reply Like
  • Poor Texan
    , contributor
    Comments (3533) | Send Message
     
    Does the name Bataan mean anything to you? Military spending is as useless as police and fire protection, that is, if you don't mind anarchy.
    18 Dec 2011, 10:37 PM Reply Like
  • WMARKW
    , contributor
    Comments (10700) | Send Message
     
    We absolutely need a strong military, but and I say this with some reservation, I think we have enough demonstration that having a super-power military is fundamentally unaffordable. And considering those who would be protagonists in the world today, I question whether there is a single country that can afford to compete with the USA if we spent even 1/2 of what we currently spend.

     

    Yes China has tons of resources, but that does not necssarily make them competitive. Only this week I spoke on my trip back to a consultant helping China build their FIRST airplane manufacturing facility where they will be building low end commercial liners. His stories were amazing at how slow they are to learn.
    18 Dec 2011, 11:55 PM Reply Like
  • Poor Texan
    , contributor
    Comments (3533) | Send Message
     
    OK Mark. I think we're on the same page.
    19 Dec 2011, 10:54 AM Reply Like
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