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It was trucks that made up most of the difference between sales for Ford (F -1.2%) and General...

It was trucks that made up most of the difference between sales for Ford (F -1.2%) and General Motors (GM +1.5%) in May, +14% vs. +3%, but that could change quickly. Most of GM's new trucks are just arriving on dealer lots which means the automaker could catch up to its rivals that came to the market earlier with fresh models.
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Comments (5)
  • Looking for the MERGER
    , contributor
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    But truck buyers will remember that Ford is the only independent American automaker... truck buyers appreciate the fact that they struggled and survived on their own... and didn't need to fall back to socialism to steal the company from the investors and give it primarily to the unions... as govt. owned gm did...
    4 Jun 2013, 02:32 PM Reply Like
  • Tdot
    , contributor
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    The thing is, regardless of the "situation", there are still huge numbers of folks buying GM products, in spite of the Governmental / Taxpayer assistance. Ford picked up at best a couple percent of market share during the bailout / Obamaruptcy affair, and GM is buying even that back. Nobody really seems to care anymore. Most of Ford's conquest sales are folks trading in "foreign" vehicles (such as they are or are not). There are not that many folks showing up in Ford dealerships trading in Chevys and other GM products, saying they are disgusted with GM's failed business model and praising Ford for bootstrapping itself out of its brush with bankruptcy. Yes there are random anecdotal examples, but the numbers are not particularly significant in the big picture. Not sure we can keep bringing up this point credibly.
    4 Jun 2013, 07:05 PM Reply Like
  • Tdot
    , contributor
    Comments (4043) | Send Message
     
    Meant to include a % market share chart:

     

    Year . . . GM . . . Ford . . . GM "lead" . . . Ford Y/Y "gain"
    2008 . . . 22.3 . . . 14.1 . . . . . 8.2% . . . . . - - -
    2009 . . . 19.8 . . . 15.1 . . . . . 4.7% . . . . . 3.5%
    2010 . . . 19.2 . . . 16.4 . . . . . 2.8% . . . . . 1.9%
    2011 . . . 19.6 . . . 16.4 . . . . . 3.2% . . . . . (-0.4%)
    2012 . . . 17.9 . . . 15.2 . . . . . 2.7% . . . . . 0.5%
    2013 . . . 18.7 . . . 16.1 . . . . . 2.6% . . . . . 0.1%

     

    2008-2013: Ford gained 2% overall market share, while GM lost 3.6% - suggests that "other" automakers gained at least 1.6% of GM's share.

     

    Arguably Ford "gained" about 3.5% of GM's market share while GM and Chrysler went through bankruptcy back in '09, but has since apparently given about half of it back, while other automakers continue to hold GM's former share.

     

    http://bit.ly/ZMMxyv
    4 Jun 2013, 07:33 PM Reply Like
  • Remford
    , contributor
    Comments (106) | Send Message
     
    GM has a ninety-plus days' supply of old units on the lot, which it's been trying to clear for six months. At $5,000-plus per, it also has one hell of a lot of cash to pull back of its bottom-line before GM's "new" truck versions are no longer competing with the previous ones, volume it needs because dealer simply don't have enough asphalt to park the overstock they already have.

     

    GM's story will continue to be one of using dealer floorplans to absorb unattainable amounts of production and early-cycle revenue and betting the come against inordinate additional weeks of production halts and buying the additional difference it needs in demand. Despite GM's overstocks and fire sales, F-150 has continued to outsell and Ford out-earn GM on the basis of gross margins by a country mile and, within may, come within 6,000 units of the whole of GM altogether.

     

    Any temporary advantage GM may have hoped to enjoy in cadence will be undone by the amounts of old stock it continues to have in the supply chain and product reworkings that seem to be decidedly more evolutionary than revolutionary. By the time it matters, 2015 F-Series will have been both crystallized and revealed.
    4 Jun 2013, 05:50 PM Reply Like
  • rwbrown.bvf@gmail.com
    , contributor
    Comments (80) | Send Message
     
    As a farmer, I've had lots of experience with Chevys, Fords, and even Dodges(don't want to even go there). A Chevy V8 that has sat for a while will almost always miss on one or more cylinders when fired up(if it will even start at all). A Ford will start and run pretty well almost every time. Our Chevy trucks rusted and the doors would sometimes fall off(and never did latch right). I wouldn't buy any kind of light truck but a Ford, no matter how hard Government Motors wants to give them away! My 2012 Supercrew F150(Ecoboost Twin-turbo V6) has been superb. No problems, super quick, smooth, quiet, excellent fuel economy...
    5 Jun 2013, 01:41 AM Reply Like
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