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Herb Greenberg, ever the skeptic, requests a copy of the full Nielsen report which has shares of...

Herb Greenberg, ever the skeptic, requests a copy of the full Nielsen report which has shares of Herbalife (HLF +7.3%) surging (previous). According to Greenberg, the company's response was: "No, sorry."
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Comments (18)
  • jeezuz30
    , contributor
    Comments (362) | Send Message
     
    Herberg must be in bed with Ackman
    12 Jun 2013, 11:05 AM Reply Like
  • ksu
    , contributor
    Comments (73) | Send Message
     
    Agree, why he spent 10 months to investigate HLF and came up with the same timing with Ackman?
    12 Jun 2013, 12:03 PM Reply Like
  • ksu
    , contributor
    Comments (73) | Send Message
     
    If his comment/evidence on HLF is true, HLF should be shut down long ago. Instead, HLF stock price is much higher than his comment.
    13 Jun 2013, 09:22 AM Reply Like
  • bernard_k50
    , contributor
    Comments (160) | Send Message
     
    Herby at it again. The slave of every short, who is willing to pay for his corrupt comments. Should be in jail, sharing a cel with Bubba. He has a long history of blatently valse publishings.
    12 Jun 2013, 11:57 AM Reply Like
  • DoowopDave
    , contributor
    Comments (252) | Send Message
     
    I wouldn't give Greenburg the time of day, never mind giving him the report so he can try to find something, anything to complain about. Tell him to go back to complaining about GMCR. How'd that work Herb? (ha, ha)
    12 Jun 2013, 01:33 PM Reply Like
  • CrimeBustersNow
    , contributor
    Comments (2603) | Send Message
     
    Not so fast. When the hype clears you may find that insightful individuals and institution investors (responsible for investing other people’s money) may have accepted Ackman’s thesis or figured out on their own that $HLF is an unsustainable pyramid scheme and simply keeping “mum” looking for a the right time to exit the stock for a profit.

     

    After all, can institutional investors run the risk to their reputations (not to mention the millions they stand to lose) if, after all we now know about Madoff, the S.E.C. and all the warning signs and red flags that have been written about with respect to pyramid/Ponzi schemes, that, heaven forbid, they get caught in yet another debacle they once again failed to recognize as a pyramid? The alternative…. could they justify knowingly holding onto to stocks of an alleged pseudo corporation they recognized or even suspected was an illegal pyramid scheme for profit, especially if the profits don’t materialize???

     

    There exists enough stocks out there without playing with one this controversial, which could, according to Herbalife’s own admission in their SEC filings “blow up.” So, each time the stock surges perhaps they sell at a profit or break-even point, not to mention additional short seller who jump in.

     

    Could happen just like that. So the question …. How are institutional investors playing $HLF?

     

    David Thornton
    12 Jun 2013, 02:45 PM Reply Like
  • S & S
    , contributor
    Comments (35) | Send Message
     
    Powershake

     

    That is a Very Interesting Piece
    13 Jun 2013, 12:08 AM Reply Like
  • CrimeBustersNow
    , contributor
    Comments (2603) | Send Message
     
    It seems this article by Charles Schwab earlier this afternoon supports the part of my thesis about the problem of institutional investors messing with “controversial” stocks.

     

    Quoted from the article.

     

    The headline: Even if Herbalife is legit, its stock is nothing but trouble.

     

    Quote - I’m of the mind that even if Herbalife can prove its sales numbers are accurate and its business honest, that doesn't change the fact that HLF is a bad buy right now. -

     

    http://bit.ly/14YLc3W

     

    And this from Motley Fool.

     

    Quote- “The battle has become personal and investors need to decide if Herbalife is a value at current levels or just a time bomb with more downside...

     

    An FTC investigation would certainly act as a catalyst for shorts, but it does not appear imminent either. With a lot of the hedge funds that went long and drove the shares up over the past month likely taking profits, it is probably best to stay on the sidelines at this time.”

     

    http://bit.ly/14YLeZF

     

    David Thornton
    13 Jun 2013, 01:31 AM Reply Like
  • CrimeBustersNow
    , contributor
    Comments (2603) | Send Message
     
    "just2look" again.....

     

    Crime: "... insightful individuals ..."

     

    For any "insightful individuals" looking for insight into why Crime keeps up all the negative comments:"
    *****
    "Depends on which side of the fence you're on. Stopping a pyramid/Ponzi scheme contributes positively to the economy and prevents losses by more victims. It would have been in no one's interest except that of Madoff and his accomplices for his scheme to continue. That point of view is neither negative nor irrational.

     

    BTW the links you continue to provide have little to do with subject.at hand. That person was dealt with through the S.I.F.I.U. (Central Bank Solomon Islands) and police authorities there on information supplied by our organization.

     

    David Thornton
    13 Jun 2013, 01:43 AM Reply Like
  • Douglas Brooks
    , contributor
    Comments (48) | Send Message
     
    Herb Greenberg was right to request a full copy of the Nielsen report. In order to evaluate the validity of a survey you need to know exactly what questions were asked, in what order, how the sample was selected, etc. But a bigger issue is why did Herbalife not survey its own distributors and ask them who they sold to? Herbalife requires its distributors to maintain records of retail sales, including the products sold, the prices charged, and the identities of the purchasers. These records are the best evidence of how much Herbalife product is actually retailed to non-distributors. The type of consumer survey that Nielsen apparently conducted is inevitably going to be less accurate than obtaining actual record from Herbalife's own distributors. Herbalife could have spent the same amount of money on surveying its own distributors as it did on surveying a random sample of consumers, and gotten better data. Why did it choose a more difficult and less accurate method? And, by the way, in conducting a survey of its own distributors, Herbalife could also have asked them questions that would have provided some insight into the viability of its distributorships as business opportunities; questions like how much time and money are you spending on your distributorship and how much money are you making, or losing. That Herbalife has thus far failed to ask these questions indicates that they really do not want to know the answers.
    13 Jun 2013, 10:29 AM Reply Like
  • herbs4mike
    , contributor
    Comments (2085) | Send Message
     
    @Douglas... Herbalife does this every month, but nobody wants to believe Herbalife. Herbalife is somehow biased with their information. So they hire Nielsons, and now you're crying that Herbalife should be doing the survey. The fact is if Nielsons says this, than the facts are facts. How Nielsons arrived at this, you can ask them. I'm sure they use a standard procedure for this type of survey. A reputable company like Nielsons is not going to lie and ruin their reputation for Herbalife.

     

    So many Herbalife distributors have a lot of retail customers. YOU AND ALL LIKE YOU ARE JUST PLAIN WRONG! I have sold at nothing but retail for 18 years and I've sold over 1,000,000 retail dollars worth of product. And if I've done it, many more have as well.
    13 Jun 2013, 10:57 AM Reply Like
  • bernard_k50
    , contributor
    Comments (160) | Send Message
     
    "Herb Greenberg was right to request a full copy of the Nielsen report."

     

    Herb is NEVER right. He is a payed basher. Get it?
    13 Jun 2013, 06:49 PM Reply Like
  • Yteeld
    , contributor
    Comments (1149) | Send Message
     
    Is this guy Brooks kidding me? Why didn't HLF conduct it's own survey? I will tell you why, because the first thing Brooks and everyone else would have responded is that it can not be believed. When Nielsen issues other survey results about television, etc. has Mr. Brooks asked for their methodology there? I bet not.
    13 Jun 2013, 11:06 AM Reply Like
  • CrimeBustersNow
    , contributor
    Comments (2603) | Send Message
     
    Douglas Brooks asks...

     

    "Why did it ($HLF) choose a more difficult and less accurate method? And, by the way, in conducting a survey of its own distributors, Herbalife could also have asked them questions that would have provided some insight into the viability of its distributorships as business opportunities;"
    ******

     

    The answer is obvious Doug: For hype and perceived credibility. The "pyramid industry" is noted for these diversionary tactics, and of course relentlessly trying to destroy the "messengers."

     

    Hoping the request by the California congresswoman will move things along or it will be necessary to sit by and watch as the scheme, like Madoff collapses. Difference now is a lot more people watching. Pretty difficult for authorities to say they “didn't see this one coming.”

     

    David Thornton
    13 Jun 2013, 12:19 PM Reply Like
  • Yteeld
    , contributor
    Comments (1149) | Send Message
     
    Hey Thornton, the rip off report speaks volumes about your character. It appears people may need more protection from you than from HLF.
    13 Jun 2013, 03:40 PM Reply Like
  • herbs4mike
    , contributor
    Comments (2085) | Send Message
     
    @Yteeld.....There was never any doubt about that
    16 Sep 2013, 08:34 AM Reply Like
  • Yteeld
    , contributor
    Comments (1149) | Send Message
     
    Thornton, why don't we discuss the issues surrounding the rip off report and how they relate to your credibility? I'm waiting.
    13 Jun 2013, 09:50 PM Reply Like
  • ShihRyanJ
    , contributor
    Comments (348) | Send Message
     
    Herb Greenberg? Please. Complete has been. I remember a long time ago when the Internet first came about, Greenberg used to use his new found medium to bash companies and stocks unsubstantiated. Then some guy said anyone can make an unsubstantiated comment on the Internet, including that Greenberg was a pedophile. Greenberg got all upset, complained to the guy's ISP, threatened to have him banned for life, sued, etc.

     

    Greenberg is basically a guy that can dish it out but rarely can take it.

     

    I like Icahn's description of Ackman as the little Jewish kid that cried foul. Greenberg is cut from the same cloth.
    3 Feb 2014, 09:47 PM Reply Like
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