In response to the possible presence of a prohibited fungicide, U.S. regulators have halted...


In response to the possible presence of a prohibited fungicide, U.S. regulators have halted shipments of imported orange juice from all countries, and plan to destroy or ban products if tests find even low levels present. Orange juice futures surged higher yesterday on the initial contamination report.

Comments (7)
  • wyostocks
    , contributor
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    Add OJ to the list of things the middle class won't be able to afford thanks to our "regulators" looking out for our welfare.
    I guess this is another way to get campaign funds.
    11 Jan 2012, 04:54 PM Reply Like
  • ConstantLearner
    , contributor
    Comments (28) | Send Message
     
    Have you ever considered that the fungicide is ACTUALLY unsafe? I mean, I don't really know one way or another but if is do you really want to be consuming something that is unsafe?
    11 Jan 2012, 05:13 PM Reply Like
  • wyostocks
    , contributor
    Comments (9115) | Send Message
     
    If the rest of the world deems it "safe" are they all stupid?
    I think not. Brazil uses the "banned" substance and they are not exactly a backwater country. Brazil produces one sixth of all the OJ consumed in the US.
    11 Jan 2012, 05:20 PM Reply Like
  • ConstantLearner
    , contributor
    Comments (28) | Send Message
     
    Again - I haven't read enough to know whether its truly safe or unsafe, but I've been to Brazil and wouldn't exactly hold it as the measuring stick for food safety. Other parts of the world ban US beef imports due to our use of hormones. I assume the FDA isn't dropping the ball on that one...
    11 Jan 2012, 06:26 PM Reply Like
  • wyostocks
    , contributor
    Comments (9115) | Send Message
     
    "wouldn't exactly hold it as the measuring stick for food safety."

     

    I also have been there. Depends where you go. I've eaten in places in the good old USA that I am sure a visitor would say the same thing about the food here.
    But, know what? I lived and the food sure was good.
    11 Jan 2012, 06:30 PM Reply Like
  • Jackson999
    , contributor
    Comments (471) | Send Message
     
    Imported juice that tests at concentrations of 10 parts per billion or higher will be refused or destroyed, DeLancey said.

     

    For products on the market, the benchmark is below 80 parts per billion because the Environmental Protection Agency's risk assessment says they don't have safety concerns at that level, said Dale Kemery, a spokesman for the agency. This level is 1,000 to 3,000 times lower that the levels that would indicate a health concern, he said in an e-mail.
    -----------
    Say what? If a product is on the market, then 80 parts is good enough but for imported juice, the standard is 10 parts or greater is too much? Why the 70 part difference?
    11 Jan 2012, 06:31 PM Reply Like
  • Poor Texan
    , contributor
    Comments (3527) | Send Message
     
    "Why the 70 part difference?"

     

    Vigorish!
    11 Jan 2012, 10:53 PM Reply Like
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