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For book lovers, Amazon (AMZN) has been great, writes David Streitfeld in the NYT, but its total...

For book lovers, Amazon (AMZN) has been great, writes David Streitfeld in the NYT, but its total dominance of the book market means that no-one knows the "real" price of a book. Take recent hit "Cotton Tenants" - a rediscovered article by James Agee - whose list price is $24.95 but has been sold from $16-19.79. The inconsistency means publishers don't know how to price books so that they can still make money following the Amazon discount, if it comes, and not price out the smaller retailers.
Comments (7)
  • Gary J
    , contributor
    Comments (4185) | Send Message
     
    Why should books be priced any differently than anything else sold online these days i.e., constantly changing supply and demand?
    7 Jul 2013, 11:07 AM Reply Like
  • Workinhard
    , contributor
    Comments (190) | Send Message
     
    Amazon is slowly destroying Main Street America , having a more destructive effect than the Walmarts of the world, yet not a word from those who fight every opening of a Walmart. Maybe they should work a couple of weeks in one of Amazon's sweatbox warehouses.
    7 Jul 2013, 11:27 AM Reply Like
  • seekasp
    , contributor
    Comments (108) | Send Message
     
    Would you care to explain? Amazon is just taking advantage of consumerism that this nation is plagued with. If Amazon didn't exist, something else would've come up in its place. At least Amazon pays employees fairly and is in constant struggle to cut costs to bring competitive prices wherever possible. I don't agree entirely with Amazon, but I think they're doing more good than bad.
    7 Jul 2013, 01:37 PM Reply Like
  • Gary J
    , contributor
    Comments (4185) | Send Message
     
    And bring back full service gas stations so we can all pay more for that too!
    7 Jul 2013, 07:34 PM Reply Like
  • Herb Smith
    , contributor
    Comments (294) | Send Message
     
    New Jersey still has full service gas stations by state law and some of the cheapest gas in the nation.

     

    The question reminds me of a memorable marketing professor I had in college. He had 50+ years in business. He ridiculed anyone who dared suggest that cost of production should have anything to do with product pricing. He expressed utter contempt for one student who suggested that fairness might be an element in product price strategy.
    7 Jul 2013, 10:09 PM Reply Like
  • Gary J
    , contributor
    Comments (4185) | Send Message
     
    Do you think NJ ranking 3rd in lowest gas tax has anything to do with it?
    8 Jul 2013, 08:46 AM Reply Like
  • Herb Smith
    , contributor
    Comments (294) | Send Message
     
    so the lesson from NJ is to combine the tax decreases the Repubs want with the increase in the minimum wage that the Dems want? I agree that it is a waste of resources to have employees pump gas for people who happily do it for themselves, but do we have some other solution for providing work with a living wage to low-skilled people who want to work?

     

    NJ state gasoline taxes are 10 cents per gallon less than the average state. NJ gas prices are also about as low.
    14 Aug, 08:09 PM Reply Like
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