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UniPixel delays InTouch sensor production to Q2, shares -5.4% AH

  • UniPixel (UNXL) has delayed the "manufacturing ramp" for its InTouch metal mesh sensors to Q2 2014. The company once promised InTouch production would start in Q4.
  • UniPixel says it provided "hundreds of [InTouch] samples and demonstration units to key potential customers" in 2013, but didn't fulfill any "commercial production orders." The company declares the planned arrival of testing/measurement equipment in January will accelerate its manufacturing efforts.
  • The announcement comes a week after UniPixel announced the resignation of CEO Reed Killion and COO Peter Shin.
Comments (65)
  • LindonT
    , contributor
    Comments (207) | Send Message
     
    ... "didn't fulfil any commercial production orders" .... what a surprise! NOW will the longs except that those 3 PO's couldn't be fulfilled because the UniBoss, Copperhead or whatever fancy name they want to call the process has NEVER worked & the yields were crap? Will they now accept they HAVE been lied to, not just by UniPixel but also by Kodak? Will they now accept that the windows 8 delay was pure BS? Will they now accept that despite sending out hundreds of samples & demo units & building production lines like there is no tomorrow... that nobody wants a 6 micron sensor?
    6 Jan, 06:12 PM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    Note the sentence in the 4th paragraph of today’s release announcing a new InTouch production timetable: “UniPixel's customers have indicated that InTouch Sensors remain their leading choice for alternative touch solutions.”

     

    Is new management lying? With the SEC looking over their shoulders and monitoring every word?

     

    The SEC inquiry may now be a plus, because its existence may lend credibility to UNXL’s announcements, something the markets seem to have yet to catch on to.

     

    I believe attention should be paid when management is replaced. Could new management now be underpromising to offset the overpromising of the past? It’s something to consider. After all, if the product can ultimately be produced in high volume and is the leading choice of UNXL’s customers (including Intel and reportedly Dell), it matters not what quarter it ramps in. It costs new management nothing to underpromise, as new management has no reason to gear its statements to promises made by the former management.

     

    In fact, the preferred tactic of new management is to sweep with a new broom and divorce itself from the sins of the past. In this instance, that could mean adding a margin of safety to an extended timetable, a delay new management can blame on the unrealistic planning and execution of its predecessors.
    6 Jan, 11:56 PM Reply Like
  • libertyfree
    , contributor
    Comments (32) | Send Message
     
    Don't bet against this guy who is now in charge:

     

    http://bit.ly/JF0LKW
    7 Jan, 03:28 AM Reply Like
  • RyanJoe555
    , contributor
    Comments (48) | Send Message
     
    Surprise surprise surprise
    6 Jan, 06:35 PM Reply Like
  • Ivan Jimenez
    , contributor
    Comments (400) | Send Message
     
    "The company says that the switch from producing sensors in “lab-based” volumes to broader production has taken longer than it initially estimated."

     

    The SEC is forcing UNXL to be more transparent, now the ugly truth is coming out and the law suits will follow. At last this fiasco is coming to a conclusion.

     

    6 Jan, 06:36 PM Reply Like
  • ouijaman1
    , contributor
    Comments (247) | Send Message
     
    It is becoming clearly obvious that mass producing this technology is a formidable feat, and not even the great expertise of bankrupt EK can solve it. All the rebranding is evidence that they are desperately reformulating the recipe to try and get better results. All the promises were based on laboratory results that couldn't be duplicated in the fab.
    8 Jan, 10:06 AM Reply Like
  • pahrah
    , contributor
    Comments (277) | Send Message
     
    Is it finally time to write an eulogy and put this "Stephen King" novel to rest? I kind of feel sorry for Chris Hoffman, giving consideration to his bulldog persistence and herculean due diligence effort.
    6 Jan, 06:54 PM Reply Like
  • Richard X Roe
    , contributor
    Comments (1042) | Send Message
     
    Intel and Dell just gave up on UniPixel today. Who needs the faulty, super-expensive InTouch sensor and module, when you can have the cool gesture recognition for free (built into the webcam)?

     

    "Intel Brings Immersive, Human Interaction to Devices in 2014:" http://intel.ly/1ab6ORG

     

    INTERNATIONAL CONSUMER ELECTRONICS SHOW (CES), Las Vegas, Jan. 6, 2014 – In an effort to make interaction with technology simpler, more natural and immersive, Intel Corporation today outlined how it, in collaboration with other companies, is bringing human-like senses to Intel-based devices in a new family of hardware and software products called Intel® RealSense™ technology.

     

    "For decades, people have had to learn new languages, techniques and commands to get our devices to do what we want," said Mooly Eden, senior vice president, general manager of the Perceptual Computing Group. "Our vision with Intel RealSense technology is to reverse that, and make our devices learn and understand us. By equipping them with technologies that mimic human senses in a more genuine way, our everyday experiences such as learning, communication and gaming are transformed; and entirely new ones are possible."

     

    The Intel RealSense 3D camera will be integrated into a growing spectrum of Intel-based devices including 2 in 1, tablet, Ultrabook™, notebook, and all-in-one (AIO) designs. Systems with the new camera will be available beginning in the second half of 2014 from Acer, Asus, Dell, Fujitsu, HP, Lenovo and NEC. On stage, Intel showcased seven different devices with the integrated camera from Dell (YES, D E L L !!!), Lenovo and Asus.
    6 Jan, 07:15 PM Reply Like
  • SoldHigh
    , contributor
    Comments (1000) | Send Message
     
    So when's the b/k filing? It looks like the stock will be around fv in 8 points. OTOH, it might be due for a decent short squeeze. But long-term this looks done unless a positive major change occurs.
    6 Jan, 07:27 PM Reply Like
  • alpha ray
    , contributor
    Comments (23) | Send Message
     
    There won't be anything to sue them for and no the longs are wed to this stock and won't stop believing. To their peril
    6 Jan, 08:08 PM Reply Like
  • alpha ray
    , contributor
    Comments (23) | Send Message
     
    Lol what do the longs have to say now? Stock will get below 1.00
    6 Jan, 08:13 PM Reply Like
  • 11137741
    , contributor
    Comments (193) | Send Message
     
    Wow, know what I am doing at 7am
    6 Jan, 09:21 PM Reply Like
  • LindonT
    , contributor
    Comments (207) | Send Message
     
    Buysider2... what new management? It's essentially the same BOD with a different mouthpiece, they have all been in the same boat together up to now. Why have they re-branded? Is it just a name change or have they had to change to a different printing process because UniBoss didn't work? If it did work as they have been claiming since last Aprils earnings call when they said it was fully validated & volume production ready.... where is the proof & why change the name? If it didn't work what does that say for the BOD & how come they can KEEP coming up with a revolutionary new printing process to replace the one that doesn't? If in fact they HAVE done that.... then given all the prior form over so many of of these supposedly world beating technologies.... how do ya know the latest version is going to work? OF COURSE the majors are gonna want something that's high quality & cheap as chips!!!! they ain't gonna say they DON'T want it!!! The 'sins of the past' have supposed to have been done away with yonks ago!!!! Are you saying they have in fact those sins have STILL been continuing over the last 18months or so & ONLY now are they TRULY going to be done away with? How many times have we heard THAT before? As the old saying says.... You can fool all of the people some of the time, you fool some of the people all of the time, but you'll never fool all of the people all of the time! Killion went because UniBoss didn't work & they have been lying to you that it did right up to the last call!!! Now they are gonna try something else and its name is Copperhead... dunderhead would have been more apt!!
    7 Jan, 08:24 AM Reply Like
  • Chris Hofmann
    , contributor
    Comments (755) | Send Message
     
    LindonT,

     

    You clearly have no idea what the function of a CEO vs. a BoD is.

     

    You also don't seem to realize that UniBoss (now Copperhead) is very different than InTouch.

     

    I actually agree with Buysider2's hypothesis. But I also readily admit that it is just that - a hypothesis. Will new management under promise? Will they issue aggressive timelines?

     

    With Reed Killion at helm, we knew that a "Q2" deadline meant June 20th at the earliest, and potentially much later. With new management, does "Q2" mean April 1st? or even earlier? or should we still be expecting June or later?

     

    Unfortunately, we don't know yet.
    7 Jan, 09:17 AM Reply Like
  • Richard X Roe
    , contributor
    Comments (1042) | Send Message
     
    Chris, thanks for keeping us all informed. Now, can you please tell us who told a lie - was it you or was it Kodak's IR?

     

    "Hi Chris. Thank you for your inquiry. We are not aware of any issues that would alter or delay our joint activities with Uni-Pixel and we stand by the previously announced schedule that we will begin commercial production of initial orders in the 4th quarter of 2013 and ramp up production in the 1st quarter of 2014"
    7 Jan, 09:27 AM Reply Like
  • Chris Hofmann
    , contributor
    Comments (755) | Send Message
     
    RxR, I only posted what I was emailed, verbatim. Clearly Kodak IR was misinformed in some way.
    7 Jan, 09:34 AM Reply Like
  • Richard X Roe
    , contributor
    Comments (1042) | Send Message
     
    Chris: Really? Well, then, who exactly at Kodak emailed you that lie? Don't tell me it was Mr. David Bullwinkle!
    7 Jan, 09:41 AM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    LindonT: COME ON, give it up, of course it's new management.

     

    Did you read my post? The CEO and COO have "resigned." Berg hired from Flextronics last February to run sales (and a valued employee there) and quoted yesterday morning in UNXL’s release about its new web site and Rusenko hired last April from Scientific Games, Dupont, Allied Signal, and GE to run manufacturing and obviously the author of UNXL’s new, more realistic timetable announced last night, are now effectively running things.

     

    Look at the management roster on UNXL’s new web site at: http://bit.ly/K0r3a6 (re Berg, Multek is a unit of Flextronics). What do you see? Two members of the board are sharing acting CEO duties while UNXL looks for a new CEO. There’s the CFO, the Sr. VP Engineering and R&D, the Chief Technology Officer, and then there’s Berg running sales and Rusenko running manufacturing.

     

    In the absence of a new CEO, who do you think are running things? It’s the guy running sales and the guy running manufacturing – Berg and Rusenko. They aren’t part of the old management, they’ve been there less than a year.

     

    Go to the new website and read the background and experience of Berg and Rusenko in the February and April 2013 announcements of their hirings.

     

    The pros are in charge now. It’s a new ball game.
    7 Jan, 11:35 AM Reply Like
  • LindonT
    , contributor
    Comments (207) | Send Message
     
    "Clearly Kodak IR was misinformed in some way" ha ha!!! So Kodak haven't had a clue what's been going on all this time & have simply relied on what UNXl have told them!!! You really couldn't dream this comedy up if you tried could you? Or could you!!! Mind how you go.
    7 Jan, 10:12 AM Reply Like
  • LindonT
    , contributor
    Comments (207) | Send Message
     
    Chris... inTouch is the name of a sensor previously called UniBoss that couldn't be produced... UniBoss then became the name of the process that cant mass produce InTouch other than prototypes no matter how much the majors might want it so they re-named Copperhead in the hope that a new name might make a difference to the yields! The BS template stays the same but they like to keep re- branding every so often... It's something they are good at & keeps the longs happy with timeline hypothesis.
    7 Jan, 10:40 AM Reply Like
  • LindonT
    , contributor
    Comments (207) | Send Message
     
    Buysider2; yes I'm aware of the merry-go-round, I'm also aware that these same guys have been involved in this project for nearly a year.

     

    I'm also aware that Kodak were not just brought on board to provide space... but for all their knowledge & world leading expertise with film & were equal participants in developing & manufacturing the sensor, including the installation of extra production lines operated by their own staff. They still can't produce anything other than prototypes. THEY were supposed to be the Pros!!!!!

     

    Totally ignoring how many times this position has been reached in the past & UNXL's previous 'form' for abject failure on so many occasions, EXACTLY the same promises have been made this time round too, virtually word for every single word issued over the last 12 months, about how they are coming to market with orders won, shipping commencing, major tier ones on board... you name it... It's ALL been said before... despite ALL the promises that the mistakes of the past have been learned. The last 12 months right up to recent weeks has been no different whatsoever EVEN with these PROS involved PLUS Kodak's world leading expertise on board. The re- design of the web site is just another typical example of all show & no substance!
    7 Jan, 03:50 PM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    To Richard Roe: UNXL and Kodak appear to be on the same page. The article on UNXL pasted in later is from this morning’s (1/7/14) issue of the Rochester newspaper, the Democrat & Chronicle. Note the following statement from a Kodak spokesman: "Our [Kodak’s] focus in the next several weeks will be on finalizing a highly reliable, high-volume manufacturing process to enable shipments of commercial volumes of InTouch Sensors in the second half of 2014."

     

    UNXL’s 1/6/14 release put it this way: “The company's [UNXL’s] focus in the next two quarters will be on finalizing a highly reliable, high-volume manufacturing process to enable shipments of commercial volumes of InTouch Sensors in the second half of 2014.”

     

    The following is the complete article from today’s (1/7/14) Democrat & Chronicle:

     

    “Eastman Kodak Co.'s joint venture with a Texas-based firm to produce touchscreen sensors at Eastman Business Park has been delayed until the second quarter of 2014, Uni-Pixel Inc. said Monday.

     

    In April, Kodak and Uni-Pixel announced a deal to install equipment at Building 326 to produce Uni-Pixel's flexible InTouch Sensors on film stock. Uni-Pixel officials said in May the company expected to have products containing its sensor film on store shelves by the end of 2013.

     

    But in its Monday release, the company acknowledged that installation of the equipment at Eastman Business Park was not completed until December. "The scaling from lab-based volumes to fully automated, roll-to-roll production of InTouch films has proven to take longer than initially planned," the release noted.

     

    In a statement, Kodak spokesman Christopher Veronda said, "Our focus in the next several weeks will be on finalizing a highly reliable, high-volume manufacturing process to enable shipments of commercial volumes of InTouch Sensors in the second half of 2014."

     

    Uni-Pixel stock was down 4.6 percent early Tuesday, trading at $9.07 a share. Kodak stock, on the other hand, was up 3.7 percent to $35.55.

     

    Last week, Uni-Pixel announced that CEO Reed Killion resigned "to pursue other interests" and appointed Bernard Marren and Carl Yankowski as interim co-president and co-CEO, respectively.

     

    In a joint statement, Marren and Yankowski said "the UniPixel and Kodak teams remain confident in the market potential for InTouch Sensors."

     

    To Richard Roe: There seems no question the Kodak effort is continuing and no question the agreement is “material.” Given Kodak’s reported investment of $12 million in the project in 2013, Kodak’s dedication of 100,000 square feet of plant to the project, Kodak’s assignment of several dozen Kodak employees to the project, pictures of the project’s plant that have appeared in the Rochester Democrat & Chronicle, the continuing periodic announcements from Kodak about the project (including some from Kodak’s CEO), and the fact that the bulk of the product UNXL plans to sell will have to come from the Kodak plant, isn’t it time you gave up questioning the existence of a “material” agreement with Kodak, a question you again raised in your replies to comments to your January 3 SeekingAlpha article?
    7 Jan, 03:58 PM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    To Lindon T: I understand what you’re saying in your last post, but I think you are ignoring the fact the previous promises were made by the previous CEO, a person who had made many overly optimistic forecasts in the past long before Berg and Rusenko arrived on the scene, and whose tendency to be too optimistic seemed more extreme than most.

     

    We don’t know what Berg and Rusenko were thinking when the CEO made his overly optimistic and failed projections for volume production in 2013 after Berg and Rusenko were newly arrived on the scene. We do know that for even the most skilled and experienced manufacturers (such as Kodak), the installation of production and testing equipment for a new product or a new process, the production, testing, and qualification of prototypes, and the ramp-to-volume-production for a new product or a novel production process can take months or even years, so we should not be surprised that all of those steps could not be accomplished in the relatively short time frame forecast by the prior CEO, who again was known for being more optimistic in his forecasts than most CEOs.

     

    I believe it’s dangerous to assume that Berg and Rusenko will continue the forecasting errors of the prior CEO, particularly with the SEC watching their every move while presumably making inquiry into the overly optimistic forecasting that had gone on previously. Does that make sense to you?

     

    Perhaps UNXL’s new forecast published yesterday reflects what Berg and Rusenko originally thought (with safety margin built in), which thoughts the prior CEO blithely ignored. Such caution would be characteristic of the large-company culture Berg and Rusenko had been accustomed to for most of their careers. We don’t know. I just think it’s dangerous for those betting against the company’s success to assume that’s not the case.

     

    Incidentally, the February 19, 2013 release from UNXL announcing Robert Berg’s hiring as VP of Global Sales includes the following paragraph:

     

    “Prior to joining UniPixel, Berg held several management positions of increasing responsibility at Multek, an $800 million manufacturer of specialty printed circuits, coated film materials, LCD displays, and touch sensor assemblies. He began at Multek as senior director of sales and marketing, and was soon promoted to vice president and general manager of the company’s $30 million specialty materials, where he led the start-up of a newly created touch-sensor materials business. He was eventually promoted to vice president of sales, marketing and strategy, where he spearheaded strategic business development and marketing initiatives for the printed electronics business group.”

     

    Neither that UNXL release nor UNXL’s current website mentions that Multek is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Flextronics (http://bit.ly/1ekjBA5), the second largest electronic manufacturing services (http://bit.ly/1ekjBAa) company in the world with LTM sales of $24 billion, and arguably one the most skilled electronics manufacturers on the planet. According to Flextronics executives, Berg was a valued employee and will be missed.

     

    To your last point, the redesign of the website seems more than cosmetic. To me, it’s suggestive and symbolic of rapid and important change at UNXL, and seemingly deliberately so. Many companies leave website redesign to the last, or never get to it at all. That’s sloppy thinking, as the website is an important portal to customer and shareholders, and attention to detail in the website content and design suggests to customers and shareholders similar attention to detail in the company’s operations. For that reason, I was delighted to see yesterday morning’s mention of the new website, which was only one of several important changes announced yesterday, a mere 3 working days after the resignation of the CEO and COO. That’s fast work indeed and augers well, in my opinion.
    7 Jan, 05:18 PM Reply Like
  • Richard X Roe
    , contributor
    Comments (1042) | Send Message
     
    Buysider2: If UNXL and KODK were on the same page, then why is KODK selling touch sensors to Taiwanese module makers, as announced today, while ditching the "Powered by Kodak" figment of your imagination? Don't you remember - at the April 2013 annual shareholder meeting, UniPixel, with the Board of Directors present and accounted for, promised that Kodak will be producing in the July-August timeframe (that's July-August 2013, not 2014, by the way).

     

    I will give up questioning the existence of a “material” agreement with Kodak as soon as the SEC gives up investigating this fraud. Deal?
    7 Jan, 05:33 PM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    To Lindon T: I understand what you’re saying in your last post, but I think you are ignoring the fact the previous promises were made by the previous CEO, a person who had made many overly optimistic forecasts in the past long before Berg and Rusenko arrived on the scene, and whose tendency to be too optimistic was more extreme than most.

     

    We don’t know what Berg and Rusenko were expecting when the CEO made his overly optimistic and failed projections for volume production in 2013 after they were newly arrived on the scene. We do know that for even the most skilled and experienced manufacturers (such as Kodak), the installation of production and testing equipment for a new product or a new process, the production, testing, and qualification of prototypes, and the ramp-to-volume-production for a new product or a novel production process can take months or even years, so we should not be surprised that all of those steps could not be accomplished in the relatively short time frame forecast by the prior CEO, who again was known for being more optimistic in his forecasts than most CEOs.

     

    I believe it’s dangerous to assume that Berg and Rusenko will continue the forecasting errors of the prior CEO, particularly with the SEC watching their every move while making inquiry into the overly optimistic forecasting that had gone on previously. Does that make sense to you?

     

    Perhaps UNXL’s new forecast published yesterday reflects what Berg and Rusenko originally thought, which thoughts the prior CEO blithely ignored (with safety margin built in). Such caution would be characteristic of the large-company culture Berg and Rusenko had been accustomed to for most of their careers. We don’t know. I just think it’s dangerous for those betting against the company’s success to assume that’s not the case.

     

    Incidentally, the February 19, 2013 release from UNXL announcing Robert Berg’s hiring as VP of Global Sales includes the following paragraph:

     

    “Prior to joining UniPixel, Berg held several management positions of increasing responsibility at Multek, an $800 million manufacturer of specialty printed circuits, coated film materials, LCD displays, and touch sensor assemblies. He began at Multek as senior director of sales and marketing, and was soon promoted to vice president and general manager of the company’s $30 million specialty materials, where he led the start-up of a newly created touch-sensor materials business. He was eventually promoted to vice president of sales, marketing and strategy, where he spearheaded strategic business development and marketing initiatives for the printed electronics business group.”

     

    Neither that UNXL release nor UNXL’s current website mentions that Multek is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Flextronics, the second largest electronic manufacturing services company in the world with LTM sales of $24 billion and arguably one the most skilled electronics manufacturers on the planet. According to Flextronics executives, Berg was a valued employee and will be missed.

     

    To your last point, the redesign of the website seems more than cosmetic. To me, it’s suggestive and symbolic of rapid and important change at UNXL, and seemingly deliberately so. Many companies leave website redesign to the last, or never get to it at all. That’s sloppy thinking, as the website is an important portal to customers and shareholders, and attention to detail in the website content and design suggests to customers and shareholders similar attention to detail in the company’s operations. For that reason, I was delighted to see yesterday morning’s mention of the new website, which was only one of several important changes announced yesterday, a mere 3 working days after the resignation of the CEO and COO. That’s fast work indeed and augers well, in my opinion.
    7 Jan, 05:43 PM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    To Richard Roe on your latest post: Oh come on Richard, don’t you think you're being ridiculous? You think the Kodak spokesperson this morning was lying? You think UNXL is Kodak's only customer, and because Kodak does business with another company it has dropped UNXL? You think Kodak invested millions of dollars, allocated 100,000 square feet of its plant, and assigned dozens of skilled employees to this project without an agreement?

     

    I remember all of the prior CEO's overly optimistic forecasts only too well. But that's in the past. He's gone now. Two new guys, with good track records at large, well-managed, professional companies and heavy experience with the kinds of products UNXL is offering and the kinds of manufacturing UNXL will be doing, have come on board and are now effectively running things, at least until a new CEO arrives. And it already shows, as evidenced by yesterday's two releases, a mere 3 working days after the CEO and COO resigned.

     

    I'm sorry you have to wait for the SEC's approval to revise your thinking on this. I don't know if the SEC will tell us when it's finished or what it found, as the SEC is not, as far as I know, conducting a formal "investigation," but simply an inquiry. I do know it would seem suicidal for new management or Kodak's management to be making fraudulent claims under the SEC's watchful eye. Don't you agree?
    7 Jan, 07:23 PM Reply Like
  • Richard X Roe
    , contributor
    Comments (1042) | Send Message
     
    Buysider2: Ridiculous? Tell that to the SEC which issued subpoenas concerning the Company's agreements related to its InTouch Sensors.

     

    We know that Kodak has already lied (or condoned UniPixel's lying) in the past: http://bit.ly/KwKDeF

     

    “Given the substantial resources Kodak has applied to supporting our efforts, we remain on track to begin commercial production in the fourth quarter of 2013, and then ramp production volumes throughout 2014. With the unmatched capabilities of our touch sensor technology, and the strength and support of Kodak and UniPixel’s other global partners, we look forward to making the commercial rollout of InTouch Sensors a success over the weeks and months ahead.”

     

    No commercial production began in the fourth quarter of 2013. UniPixel's CEO is out, Kodak's CEO will be out shortly.

     

    And, no, there is no new management at UniPixel - it is the same old Techno Ponzi gang. The Board of Directors approved all the lies of the former CEO, while selling their shares. Did you even read my article?
    7 Jan, 09:22 PM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    To Richard Roe on your last post: You should not assume there is anything sinister, per se, about the subpoenas the SEC issued to obtain copies of the agreements between UNXL and its partners. You should know the agreements likely include confidentiality clauses under which UNXL cannot disclose their contents to any outside party unless under subpoena or court order. That is the usual situation in such matters.

     

    The paragraph you quote is just another of the prior CEO’s overly optimistic and failed forecasts, which forecasts appear to now be in the past. That forecast was in a UNXL release dated 9/25/13. There is no way to know whether it was a deliberate lie or simply a misplaced hope. No matter. The person responsible is gone, and with his departure, the ability of those who hope the company fails to attack the credibility of the company’s new management is considerably diminished.

     

    When you say there is no new management at UNXL, you deny reality. Once again, two board members, who it seems were as much victims of the prior CEO’s overly optimistic forecasts as anyone else, are sharing acting-CEO duties while UNXL finds a new CEO.

     

    Who’s left to make the day-to-day operating decisions, including the new timetable and the planning and actions needed to implement that timetable? Why two experienced, well-thought-of executives from large, well-managed companies who were NOT part of the old management group, as one was hired only 11 months ago and the other only 9 months ago.

     

    One runs global sales and the other runs manufacturing, the two major operating activities of the company. See my prior posts here for the details. They are the core of the new management group, to be completed by a new CEO when one is found. The other executives UNXL's website lists as part of the “Management Team,” including the CFO, are staff, not operating executives.

     

    Do you actually think those two operating executives – Berg and Rusenko – would have interrupted thriving careers at major companies to be part of what you call a “Techno Ponzi” scheme? Or the CEO of Kodak, who once ran the entire consumer products division of Hewlett-Packard as one of HP’s top management group? Or the executives involved at Intel and reportedly Dell? Please!
    8 Jan, 12:01 AM Reply Like
  • libertyfree
    , contributor
    Comments (32) | Send Message
     
    Buyerside2: Thanks for your illuminating comments. I will suggest you give up trying to convince the "shorters" as all you are saying is not in their interest. They will only profit if UNXL fails and any reality to the contrary is not good for them. It is their job to find all the negatives about UNXL and where non exists to invent them.
    Time is not on their side. In about 6 months time, they will not be here to write these comments.
    8 Jan, 09:19 AM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    Thanks libertyfree. I know I won’t change their minds, but I think it’s important for readers of these threads to hear facts and opinions that challenge some of these ideas.
    8 Jan, 11:08 PM Reply Like
  • 11137741
    , contributor
    Comments (193) | Send Message
     
    k
    8 Jan, 08:03 AM Reply Like
  • LindonT
    , contributor
    Comments (207) | Send Message
     
    buysider2; "do you actually think those two operating executives - Berg & Rusenko- would have interrupted thriving careers at major companies to be part of what you cal a "Techno Ponzi" scheme? Err... well yes... that's what they did. If you remember.. the COO who has just walked the plank came with everybody shouting to the roof tops about his prior credentials too!

     

    As for your 'relatively short timescales' this project has been 'on the go' in various guises since 2011. It didn't just start 11 months ago... it was well on the way to falling apart even then but it didn't stop them giving up 'thriving careers at major companies" !!!

     

    But it doesn't matter who is in charge or what their credential are; the printing method they use although cheap... is only used for prototyping & not suitable for achieving high quality yields for mass production. That's why no one else has bothered despite it being around for years, & exactly WHY they now admit that is ALL they have achieved since 2011... (despite them stealing Carclo's ink technology in the hope THAT would make the difference)... is a low volume production run of prototypes!!!

     

    They tried 5 microns & couldn't do it... they then re-stated it at 6 microns give or take one... & have now admitted that they can't mass produce that level either. Meanwhile the rest of the world has moved on to well below 5 microns. If they could do even 5 microns then some OEM's would be interested for the low end of market because its a cheap method of printing... that's why they can claim all the interest in it... the sticky bit is... they can't even do 6 microns. And it is on that important point why KIllion has gone. It wasn't because of any investor pressure or overly optimistic forecasts & missed timelines... it's because he has lied about the ability of their printing process to EVER mass produce sustainable high quality yields at 6 microns. It doesn't matter what the prior credentials of the new leader/s are, giving up thriving careers with major companies to join up with Killion despite ALL HIS previous from tells you all you need to know about them!
    8 Jan, 09:05 AM Reply Like
  • Richard X Roe
    , contributor
    Comments (1042) | Send Message
     
    LindonT: Actually, UniPixel's touch screen project started even earlier. In May 2010, UniPixel was "scaling up the [UniBoss] process for full scale production" with plans to have pilot production quantities available by the end of September 2010. See: http://bit.ly/19dFtQ4 So, UniPixel has been lying about UniBoss/Copperhead/wha... since the start in 2010.

     

    Mr. Yankowski joined UniPixel's Board in May 2006. Since then he has approved every step of the Techno Ponzi and has benefited financially from it.

     

    Mr. Marren has served as a member of the Board since February 2007, and became Chairman in May 2008. He also has approved every step of the Techno Ponzi and has benefited financially from it..

     

    The ousted COO had been in the Techno Ponzi business only since September 2011. Here are his pumped-up credentials:

     

    Mr. Shin had previously held numerous senior management positions at Samsung Electronics Co., lastly serving as a senior vice president of research and development, where he led breakthroughs in new display technology, nano imprinting technology, roll-to-roll process architecture, flexible display development with low temperature process, and low power consumption/high color gamut devices. He was responsible for developing Samsung's next generation panel technology and LED backlight systems, and was noted for innovations such as reducing the number of panel production steps.
    Earlier in his career at Samsung, he was vice president of strategic marketing and sales, where he led Samsung's $3 billion NB LCD Panel business, selling to major customers like Dell, HP, IBM, Apple, Acer, Gateway, Toshiba, Sony, NEC, Fujitsu, and Siemens. He was responsible for introducing new products, and he maintained the highest profit in the history of Samsung's LCD business among all product groups. He also previously served as the vice president of Samsung's notebook LCD panel development team, where he optimized gate IC integration, color filter on array, for thin & light, high color gamut/high resolution, and low power consumption.
    More recently, Mr. Shin helped guide Glonet Systems, a marketer and manufacturer of networking equipment, in the development of its new TCON IC technology, helping to create design flexibility and adoption of its high-speed interface application.
    Before Samsung Electronics, Mr. Shin was founder, president and CEO of Photonage, a developer and manufacturer of a high speed, zero-EMI interface. Prior to Photonage, Mr. Shin served as vice president of the computer technology center at Samsung Information Systems America, where he was responsible for portable systems R&D, from concept to new technology, as well as related business development.
    Mr. Shin also previously served as a director of engineering at Texas Instruments' PPP division, as well as served in an executive capacity with a successful Silicon Valley startup and mobile system R&D center. Mr. Shin earned his Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from Seoul National University, and his Master of Science in Electrical Engineering from San Jose State University.
    8 Jan, 09:33 AM Reply Like
  • Richard X Roe
    , contributor
    Comments (1042) | Send Message
     
    LindonT: Sorry, Mr. Yankowski initially joined the Company effective April 1, 2006 as a Consultant and under the terms of the agreement was supposed to become the Chief Executive Officer and a member of the Company’s Board of Directors upon the Company completing a minimum equity round of $10 million. He became a member of the Board in March 2007.
    8 Jan, 10:11 AM Reply Like
  • LindonT
    , contributor
    Comments (207) | Send Message
     
    Making camera film and making transparent conductive films for computer touchscreens is, conceptually at least, not all that different; it's all specialized materials on a flexible substrate.

     

    Which is one big reason why former photography titan Eastman Kodak Co. is banking a big part of its future on such touchscreen films. But Kodak's touchscreen hopes saw some mixed news this week.

     

    On the plus side, Rochester-based Kingsbury Corp. — which is starting a touchscreen sensor business partially in partnership with Kodak — landed a major sale with touchscreen module maker JTOUCH Corp.

     

    "I've never doubted, but it's always good to have your hopes and aspirations come to fruition," Kingsbury owner Bill Pollock said Tuesday.

     

    But that followed word this week that Kodak's joint touchscreen effort with another company, Uni-Pixel Inc. of Texas, had hit a snag. The two companies had expected to start turning out significant volumes of InTouch sensors this quarter. The two companies announced Monday they now are hoping for the second half of 2014.

     

    Under the JTOUCH agreement, the Taiwanese maker of touchscreen panels agrees to purchase the output of Kingsbury's touch sensor film facility being set up now at Eastman Business Park — though Kingsbury has some options to expand its manufacturing capacity there beyond those volumes, Pollock said.

     

    Kingsbury and Kodak in June announced a joint touchscreen sensor effort, with Kodak providing the raw materials, technical assistance and marketing help as Kingsbury looked both to make sensor film itself and also to make machinery for other touchscreen sensor film manufacturers.

     

    Pollock said that marketing help from Kodak was instrumental in landing the agreement with JTOUCH.

     

    Kingsbury and Kodak did not make public financial details of the JTOUCH deal. But while significant itself, the JTOUCH deal could also open the door to further business, Pollock said. "For them to validate the technology is obviously huge," he said. "It's a validation of our product as tested and vetted intensively and them saying, 'This will work.' "

     

    Kingsbury's silver-based metal mesh films are made on a roll-to-roll manufacturing line. According to Kodak, that results in lower production costs and fewer manufacturing steps than the traditional indium tin oxide sensors.

     

    In a statement, Kodak CEO Antonio M. Perez said silver halide touch sensors are "one of the promising technologies enabling Kodak to partner with companies and broaden our participation in the rapidly expanding touch sensor market. This is another milestone in our functional printing business, which represents a major growth area for Kodak."

     

    Kingsbury, which also makes equipment used by manufacturers, expects to hire roughly 50 people this year in its touchscreen business, Pollock said.

     

    Veronda said the UniPixel project currently employs about 25, with the expectation that the number will grow to 65 to 75 in coming weeks, with at least some coming from support personnel already working on the Uni-Pixel/Kodak joint project.
    8 Jan, 10:12 AM Reply Like
  • LindonT
    , contributor
    Comments (207) | Send Message
     
    Richard... That brings back memories! I well remember reading those dear departed Mr. Shin's credentials, they certainly didn't do much for the yields of (as you correctly say) whatever they call it!
    8 Jan, 10:29 AM Reply Like
  • alpha ray
    , contributor
    Comments (23) | Send Message
     
    You guys are crazy arguing about a product that is never going to really exist
    8 Jan, 08:50 PM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    LindonT: Thanks for your post on this thread at 10:12 am today (1/8/14). You didn't say in your post, but what you posted is part of the text of an article in yesterday’s (1/7/14) issue of the Rochester, NY daily newspaper, the Democrat & Chronicle, where Kodak’s main plants are located. The article is mainly about Kodak and Kingsbury Corporation’s 1/7/14 announcement of an agreement under which Kodak and Kingsbury will supply JTOUCH Corporation, a manufacturer of touch screen modules, with touch sensor film based on Kodak and Kingsbury’s newly developed silver-based metal mesh technology.

     

    Those interested can find that Democrat and Chronicle article and also several other articles covering that newly announced agreement by a Google search on the terms JTOUCH and Kingsbury, including a 1/7/14 press release on Kodak’s web site, a Business Wire version of that release, and a 1/7/14 article in the Rochester Business Journal.

     

    However, Lindon, you failed to post the ENTIRE Democrat & Chronicle article. You omitted 5 paragraphs in the middle of that article that include significant positive information about UNXL. Those omitted paragraphs come immediately after the following paragraph in the article: “But that followed word this week that Kodak's joint touchscreen effort with another company, Uni-Pixel Inc. of Texas, had hit a snag. The two companies had expected to start turning out significant volumes of InTouch sensors this quarter. The two companies announced Monday they now are hoping for the second half of 2014.”

     

    Here are the paragraphs you omitted (there are one or two extra blank lines in your post where they fit):

     

    “In a statement, Kodak said the move [by Uni-Pixel] to high-volume manufacturing "has been somewhat slower than expected, as is common in initiating production of breakthrough technology such as the InTouch Sensor product line."

     

    Kodak said a 100,000-square-foot clean room facility at Eastman Business Park was completed in December for manufacturing InTouch products.

     

    Despite the delay, Kodak spokesman Christopher Veronda said, "Both companies [Kodak and Uni-Pixel] remain confident about the path forward on successful commercial production and for the market prospects of this breakthrough technology."

     

    Touchscreens are projected to be a big industry, with the number of screens shipped expected to double between 2012 and 2016 to nearly 3 billion, according to electronics industry market research firm IHS.

     

    And that demand is making for rising fortunes for some New York companies. Southern Tier glass giant Corning Inc., at the massive Consumer Electronics Show being held this week in Las Vegas, has made a series of announcements revolving around its Gorilla Glass product line, which is used in numerous consumer electronics touchscreens. Gorilla Glass is being used in Pebble's new Pebble Steel smartwatch, while Dell is now using it in a number of its touchscreen PCs, including the XPS, Inspiron and Latitude, Corning said this week.”

     

    You DID include the last paragraph of the article, which you might not have noticed has additional positive information about UNXL. I quote:

     

    “Veronda [the Kodak spokesperson quoted earlier in the story – see the omitted excerpt quoted above] said the UniPixel project currently employs about 25, with the expectation that the number will grow to 65 to 75 in coming weeks, with at least some coming from support personnel already working on the Uni-Pixel/Kodak joint project.”

     

    That seems to say the UNXL effort at Kodak, which presumably will compete with Kingsbury for OEM customers, is alive and well and about to ramp. Kodak's forecast that the staff of the UNXL project will increase from 25 persons to 65-to-75 persons in coming weeks seems to say some sort of volume ramp is coming. I note the projected staffing of the UNXL production in coming weeks alone is 30-to-50% larger than the 50 persons Kingsbury is forecasting for all of 2014 (see the portion of the Democrat & Chronicle article quoted by LindonT).

     

    For the entire Democrat & Chronicle article in one piece, go to http://bit.ly/1eId4jl.
    8 Jan, 09:47 PM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    Also, if you go to the January 7, 2014 Rochester Democrat & Chronicle article this week at http://bit.ly/1eId4jl, you’ll see a picture of a clean room in Kodak’s dedicated 100,000-square-foot UNXL space. If you click on the picture to enlarge it, you see it’s labelled: “A 100,000-square-foot clean room facility at Eastman Business Park was completed in December for manufacturing InTouch products. (Photo: Provided photo)”
    8 Jan, 11:18 PM Reply Like
  • LindonT
    , contributor
    Comments (207) | Send Message
     
    buysider2... The only reason I didn't copy the middle bit is because its a long article & that bit in the middle has in recent days has ALL been already posted. Everyone is aware of it! It is NOT new info!

     

    The quote from Veronda is an obvious typo! Kodak's forecast about the 25 already involved should have related to the Kingsbury project, not the UNXL project. They expect that to increase to 65/75 employees for the KINGSBURY project.... some of THOSE are expected to be diverted FROM the UNXL project. I could of said... but didn't.... what does THAT say about Kodak's commitment to UNXL & InTouch as a sensor!!!!! The very fact that Kodak have actually been helping Kingsbury with MARKETING their version of a sensor... says it all!!!

     

    UNXL helped Kodak come out of bankruptcy... Out of loyalty for that they are going to go along with whatever UNXL say for the time being, they WILL keep an involvement just in case anything improves, but the fact that they intend diverting staff from the UNXL project merely shows up that in the meantime & in the background they are rats in the process of deserting a sinking ship!
    9 Jan, 10:51 AM Reply Like
  • Chris Hofmann
    , contributor
    Comments (755) | Send Message
     
    I've been trying to stay out of this argument, but enough is enough.

     

    1. Buysider, keep up the good fight. It is tiring, but somebody has to do it.
    2. LindonT, you're most recent comment about the "typo" in the recent R&D article is completely false. I contacted the author of the article and he clarified that Kodak currently has ~25 FULL-TIME people working on the UniPixel project, and approximately 75 PART-TIME. Over the next few weeks, they are increasing the FULL-TIME workers to 65-75, with many of these coming from the current part-time workers (i.e. support).

     

    Nobody is being diverted away from UNXL, only towards them. Please try to get your facts straight before spewing nonsense.
    9 Jan, 11:38 AM Reply Like
  • Richard X Roe
    , contributor
    Comments (1042) | Send Message
     
    Chris: Didn't you tell us recently that Kodak's Investor Relations know nothing. Specifically, didn't they emailed you this outright lie in November:

     

    "Hi Chris. Thank you for your inquiry. We are not aware of any issues that would alter or delay our joint activities with Uni-Pixel and we stand by the previously announced schedule that we will
    begin commercial production of initial orders in the 4th quarter of 2013 and ramp up
    production in the 1st quarter of 2014."

     

    Kodak cannot help, because UniPixel's process simply cannot work reliably, that is, it is unsuitable for volume production. Ask any flexo print expert!

     

    As my latest article demonstrates, UniPixel is simply a Techno Ponzi, in other words, an outright scam.
    9 Jan, 12:20 PM Reply Like
  • LindonT
    , contributor
    Comments (207) | Send Message
     
    Chris... How strange, they have only just said that ramp up will be delayed until 2Q 2014

     

    They admit that after 3 years of development they can only do a low volume prototype run so they obviously have no idea if the yields will be any better than they have so far achieved in the last 3 years, if they did they could ramp up right now. Why would they want the extra expense of turning part time staff into full time staff in the coming weeks & increasing the pay roll when they will have nothing to occupy them. What they all gonna do with all those staff who will have the employment benefits of full time contracts?

     

    As you appear to have been so mislead on so many occasions in the past by people who you claim to have spoken to in the industry and through the numerous phone calls & emails to the companies you have made & reported on SA including your very latest November one with Kodak... why do you believe them now? You have supported everything Killion has ever said to the hilt, you have backed him up with facts & figures & articles to the nth degree. Not once have you ever admitted that he was lying. Not once have you ever provided any balance & made your readers aware not only that IS what he was doing... but also what the rest of the world IS doing & provide some factual links about that aspect too!! How about contacting them again & ask a REAL question i.e WHY have you only achieved a low volume prototype run after 3 years of supposedly imminent mass production? ask if it might be something to do with the yields of the revolutionary printing process that they keep having to change. Ask them why they ditched embossing & went over to flexo, ask why flexo can only produce prototypes.... then ask what is the difference between their Copperhead & a snake!
    9 Jan, 01:46 PM Reply Like
  • Chris Hofmann
    , contributor
    Comments (755) | Send Message
     
    LindonT,

     

    you realize that all of these employees are KODAK employees, not UNXL employees, and therefore do not cost UNXL a single penny. It just further shows that Kodak is very much invested in UNXL's success.

     

    Of course, if you believe that Kodak is lying about everything as well.....
    9 Jan, 02:07 PM Reply Like
  • Richard X Roe
    , contributor
    Comments (1042) | Send Message
     
    Chris: How do you know that these Kodak "employees," at least some of which are actually Adecco employees, won't cost UNXL a single penny? Have you read UniPixel's joint manufacturing and supply agreement with Kodak?
    9 Jan, 02:32 PM Reply Like
  • LindonT
    , contributor
    Comments (207) | Send Message
     
    Chris... Yes, absolutely I believe Kodak is lying just as they lied to you as recently as November & there is no way you can claim they were 'misinformed' BS! As you so succinctly point out... they are active participants, have their own production lines operated by their own staff! THEY are the experts!!!!

     

    "We are not aware of any issues that would alter or delay our joint activities with Uni-Pixel and we stand by the previously announced schedule that we will begin commercial production of initial orders in the 4th quarter of 2013 and ramp up production in the 1st quarter of 2014".

     

    Yep, I realise they will be on Kodak's payroll, I also realise they can therefore be utilised on whatever project Kodak in their infinite wisdom decide on. Same as the new clean room can be put to use for whatever its needed for. It's called hedging your bets... that's exactly what Kodak are doing & the marketing help they've given to Kingsbury which is obviously seriously detrimental to UNXL is the real proof of that. Kingsbury will be highly delighted with their new clean room!

     

    Highly noticeable tho that you NEVER ask or want to ask any awkward questions Chris.

     

    You can't be trying to persuade the shorts to become longs... he he! So what is your motivation in your obvious & blatant lack of balance... the only people you might succeed in convincing is inexperienced investors who know no better. There is a better way, if you start to provide a proper well balanced argument giving equal weight to both sides you might even succeed in getting some new investors on board & driving the sp to a level that will serve your own best interest, after all that's the only reason for your unbalanced pumping of the stock, which has failed so visibly.
    9 Jan, 03:11 PM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    To Chris Hofmann at 11:38 am, 9 January: Thanks Chris for the info on the 1/7/14 Rochester Democrat & Chronicle story from the author of the story, who says the positive info about UNXL in the story is correct and not a misquote. For those who missed the story, here is the link: http://bit.ly/1eId4jl

     

    Christopher Veronda, Manager, Corporate Communications for Kodak and the Kodak spokesperson, says the same thing. The following is an e-mail he sent me this afternoon after I inquired as to whether or not he was misquoted in the 1/7/14 Democrat & Chronicle article (this is the COMPLETE e-mail – nothing has been redacted):

     

    “I'm sure you know that anyone can post anything they want on Seeking Alpha.

     

    The two touch sensor projects, one with Kingsbury and one with Unipixel, leverage different technologies and serve different market niches. The two facilities are completely separate and operate independently. At the same time, they are complementary. The comment about the additional hiring - growing from 25 to 65 to 75, was in relation to the Unipixel project facility in Rochester. If you have not seen the Democrat & Chronicle's full article, you should see it. There is also a photo from the Unipixel project facility in Rochester.

     

    Most of all, you should note the statement that both companies remain optimistic in their view of the market prospects for InTouch sensors and about the ability to produce them in commercial volumes. Here is our full statement on the delay in production:

     

    KODAK STATEMENT REGARDING PRODUCTION SCHEDULE OF INTOUCH SCREEN SENSORS

     

    While UniPixel, Inc. (NASDAQ: http://bit.ly/11QcqNH) and Kodak (NYSE: http://bit.ly/JL33s2) have made significant progress in their joint effort to commercialize and manufacture UniPixel’s next-generation touch-screen sensors, the scale up of high-volume manufacturing has been somewhat slower than expected, as is common in initiating production of breakthrough technology such as the InTouch Sensor product line.

     

    The start of the manufacturing ramp for the InTouch Sensor product line is now expected in the second quarter of 2014. The companies previously anticipated the start of high volume production to begin in Q1, with the manufacturing ramp occurring throughout 2014.

     

    A 100,000 square foot clean room facility at Eastman Business Park in Rochester, N.Y., for manufacture of the InTouch Sensor product line was completed as scheduled last month.

     

    Our focus in the next several weeks will be on finalizing a highly reliable, high-volume manufacturing process to enable shipments of commercial volumes of InTouch Sensors in the 2nd half of 2014. Prospective customers have indicated that InTouch Sensors remain an attractive choice for alternative touch solutions.

     

    Kodak is pursuing several promising technologies that enable it to participate in the rapidly growing touch screen sensor market.

     

    Christopher (Chris) K. Veronda, APR / Manager / Corporate Communications
    Eastman Kodak Company
    343 State St
    Rochester, NY 14650-0103

     

    christopher.veronda@ko... / Phone: 585 724-2622
    http://www.kodak.com"
    9 Jan, 03:55 PM Reply Like
  • Richard X Roe
    , contributor
    Comments (1042) | Send Message
     
    Buysider2: Mr. Veronda is lying to you.

     

    First, the two touch sensor projects, the one with Kingsbury and the one with Unipixel, serve EXACTLY the same market niches and are direct competitors. In fact, Kodak's PEDOT project is also in direct competition with those two.

     

    Second, UniPixel and Kodak previously anticipated the start of volume production in the July-August 2013 timeframe not in Q1 2014, as disclosed at UniPixel's annual shareholder meeting in April (of which I have a recording), with the entire Board of Directors present.
    9 Jan, 04:04 PM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    To Richard Roe at 4:04 PM: Oh please, Richard, why would he do that? Give it up! My separate information, which I can’t and won’t share on this thread, agrees with what Mr. Veronda says about different technologies, different niches, and complementary businesses for Kodak. You are just wrong on that point.

     

    What exactly IS your point in your second paragraph at 4:04 PM? That Kodak and UNXL made a forecast that was too optimistic – that was wrong? If we sold the stock of every company that did that, there’d be nothing left to buy! Yes, prior management made a habit of that, I know only too well. But, as I argued in detail earlier on this thread, UNXL is under new management now. I suggest you not fight the new trend.
    9 Jan, 04:31 PM Reply Like
  • Richard X Roe
    , contributor
    Comments (1042) | Send Message
     
    Buysider2: The technologies are different, but the final products - the touch sensors - address the exact same niche and are direct competitors. The only way I can be wrong on this point is if either Kingsbury or UniPixel (or Heraeus, for that matter) is not making touch sensors, which of course, is not far from the truth, as UniPixel's actual business is perpetuating a Techno Pozni, not making touch sensors. So either Mr. Veronda lied or UniPixel is a scam. You pick!

     

    My point is also that Mr.Veronda is lying about the actual delay. The initial expectation was for volume production in July-August 2013. Then it got delayed, and delayed, and delayed again. Kodak, or at least Kodak's flexo experts because there are no Kodak plating experts, know very well that UniPixel's process simply cannot be commercialized in volume. The same Board members who were present at the annual shareholder meeting in April 2013 when the "projection" was made and when the stock options were granted are now making the same "projection."
    9 Jan, 04:56 PM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    Richard: You said: “So either Mr. Veronda lied or UniPixel is a scam. You pick!” That’s not a choice. Neither is true.

     

    And, yes, there have been several delays. Kodak’s previous forecast, as the Kodak Statement I quoted earlier today CORRECTLY said, was for high volume production to begin in Q1 of 2014. The FIRST forecast for the Kodak facility, which came from the former CEO of UNXL and not from Kodak, was, as you say, for volume production in July-August 2013. Correct. But not for a minute did I believe that forecast. Did you? Just not possible. Way too optimistic, as most of what the previous CEO had previously forecast. I have no idea why he said such things. Given what I know about new product and process ramps, I thought UNXL would be lucky to get volume production by the end of 2013, if then.

     

    But he’s gone now. Clear your head. You have no idea what Kodak “knows.” None of those delays tell us whether or not the product or the process to produce it will work. Those apparently in charge now – Berg and Rusenko – are pros with big company experience and professional backgrounds in the touch sensor and roll-to-roll manufacturing businesses. Kodak is one of the world’s experts in film. I believe it’s Berg and Rusenko who have made the new projections, not the board members and acting CEOs, as it’s unlikely Berg and Rusenko would still be there otherwise. If Berg, Rusenko, and Kodak think the product and process will work, attention must be paid.

     

    It’s a reasonable bet and hypothesis, I believe, that the pros now think they have a margin of safety in the new timetable, that they believe they are underpromising, as pros are wont to do. I think it’s risky to bet against that possibility.
    9 Jan, 05:52 PM Reply Like
  • LindonT
    , contributor
    Comments (207) | Send Message
     
    buysider2... That email to Chris was received in November. It was from Kodak... not Reed Killion or UNXL. Kodak are supposedly the experts, thats why they were brought on board. They have there own production lines operated by their own staff under their own management at their own facility. They knew EXACTLY what was going on. November is slap bang in the middle of 4Q. They CLAIMED to have no awareness of any hold up in commercial production in the 4Q!!!! It was VERY obviously a blatant lie!! On a project like this there is NO WAY they can say everything is fine & ship commercial product in the middle of 4Q & then discover they can only produce low volume prototypes in the middle of 4Q. BS! they have known for a very long time that they had no chance of doing it. They stand as proven liars!!! They also know that flexography CANNOT give mass produced high quality yields any more than their prior embossing attempts which were going to take over the WHOLE global TS space. Flexo NEVER has & It NEVER will, just like embossing never has & never will!!! They continue to lie to you.
    9 Jan, 06:05 PM Reply Like
  • LindonT
    , contributor
    Comments (207) | Send Message
     
    buysider2.. IF we are now in an open & honest world as you claim, get back hold of that guy & ask the real questions, WHAT converted a commercial production run into a low volume prototype run & EXACTLY why. Ask if they are NOW prepared to tell their investors the truth! Get to the TRUTH! The shorts & myself have claimed Killion was lying for nearly all of this year & there would be NO commercial production from their printing process. This event has conclusively proved it!
    9 Jan, 06:27 PM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    To LindonT and Richard X Roe: I’ve been trying to finish this comment since earlier today, but keep getting interrupted by your comments. Again, you seem unable to distinguish between a lie and an inaccurate or misjudged forecast. You are not inside Kodak and have no idea why Kodak misjudged the original timetable that was indicated in the e-mail Chris got from Kodak in November. Perhaps there was an unexpected problem or glitch that needed time to solve. Perhaps the person who sent the e-mail was not up to date. No matter. Kodak acknowledged in its statement I quoted earlier that its previous timetable had been delayed. What’s your point? Delays in such projects are frequent and forecasts that don’t come true are not necessarily lies.

     

    But most important yet. What did Kodak have to gain by lying?

     

    You both seem to have followed UNXL for a long time, as evidenced by your many references to events and company statements of the past. And it’s true, if one reads some of UNXL’s quarterly reports and press releases posted on its web site back to February 2011 and available before that as SEC filings on EDGAR, one is immediately struck by the highly promotional and unrealistic narratives contained within them. I have been bothered a lot by those in the past. And as you say, you have been right about the former CEO all year. But that doesn’t mean, however, that the product and the process to produce it won’t work.

     

    Regarding some examples you cite, such as the former COO’s credentials when he joined the company (see the 9/8/11 release on UNXL’s website, which Richard accurately quotes in his post on this thread at 9:33 am yesterday, 1/8/14) I have no comment, as I never met him and he is no longer with the company. I don’t know what happened there.

     

    What I DO know, as I’ve said, is the person responsible for those statements and events of the past is gone. Still at UNXL, however, are Berg and Rusenko, which I find encouraging, and which together with continuing positive statements from one of the world’s experts on film technology, Kodak, suggests that whatever has happened in the past, something of value exists here. That Berg and Rusenko have not stopped working despite the SEC inquiry and despite the departure of the CEO and COO is evidenced by the two announcements from UNXL on Monday this week (1/6/14), by the article in the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle on January 7, and by the e-mail I received from Kodak’s Manager of Corporate Communications today and posted on this thread a little while ago.

     

    I think it might be wise of you to reduce your focus on past events and think more about why Berg and Rusenko joined the company last year and why Kodak decided to commit significant resources to fit out a 100,000-square-foot facility to produce the company’s products. Those are facts and those events have happened. I can’t speak for Rusenko’s credentials detailed in UNXL’s release of 4/29/13, but I CAN speak for Berg’s credentials, as detailed in UNXL’s release of 2/19/13, because I checked them with Flextronics, who said they were accurate.

     

    The “relatively short time frame” I referred to has to do with the volume production OUT OF KODAK and NOTHING to do with what went before that. The Kodak agreement and planned facility was announced on April 16, 2013, only 9 months ago, and Kodak’s recent statement that in December, it had completed a 100,000-square-foot clean room facility for manufacturing InTouch products, is fast work, in my experience.

     

    LindonT, your argument about Berg and Rusenko makes little sense to me. You say Berg’s and Rusenko’s credentials don’t matter because the fact that they gave up thriving careers at major companies to work for UNXL “tells you all you need to know about them.” But that’s based on your assumption that the InTouch product and the process to produce it won’t work, for which you have little evidence except the fact that Kodak and UNXL have taken longer to ramp production of the product than they originally forecast, which is hardly a rare event for a new product and a new process, is it?

     

    Isn’t it a more reasonable assumption that Berg and Rusenko DO know what they’re doing and that their continued presence at the company and Kodak’s recent statements about UNXL’s potential are positive signs? I wouldn’t bet against it.
    9 Jan, 06:44 PM Reply Like
  • Richard X Roe
    , contributor
    Comments (1042) | Send Message
     
    Buysider2: Don't pretend that you haven't read my article. In it I show how UniPixel, with the approval of the Board, lied on the earnings call in August 2011, with the CTO present, that the company had installed and calibrated 10 million sqft/month sensor manufacturing capacity by the end of June 2011. That was no projection - it was an outright lie.

     

    I am unfamiliar with Mr. Rusenko, but where was he while UniPixel, with the approval of the Board, was misleading investors last year? I am however quite familiar with Mr. Berg. And that is why I have no doubts that UniPixel was and still is a Techno Ponzi.

     

    Regarding Kodak - those are the same people who brought the company to its knees into bankruptcy. I wrote about it in a previous article, and former Kodak employees agree with me - the new Kodak cannot change the laws of physics, despite your hopeful wishes. The evidence that InTouch cannot work reliably in volume is readily available - just ask any flexo print expert!
    9 Jan, 09:09 PM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    Richard: I read your January 3 article and for the reasons I’ve detailed on that comment thread and this thread, I find it not relevant. Again, the man responsible for the past events you detailed, including the August 2011 earnings call you mentioned, is gone, and new management, comprised of Berg and Rusenko, the operating executives running sales and production, respectively, are effectively in charge. As I see it, the two board members who are serving as interim, acting co-CEOs, are not knowledgeable enough in the business to call the shots.

     

    Where was Rusenko when the former CEO made his 2013 forecasts at UNXL’s April 26, 2013 shareholder’s meeting (which event you mention in your 4:56 pm post on January 9)? I don’t know, but Rusenko’s hiring was not announced until April 29, three days later. Following that, I assume Rusenko was busy setting up manufacturing, so UNXL and Kodak could ramp to volume in 2014. I assume Rusenko was not in a position to dictate to the former CEO what the former CEO could say or not say to investors regarding the ramp. We don’t know what Rusenko thought, because he has not spoken with investors, as far as I know.

     

    Your remark about Berg is puzzling. If you know something damaging, you should tell us instead of making snide references to something that makes you think UNXL is a “Techno Ponzi.” You say you are “quite familiar” with Mr. Berg. What exactly does that mean? You should know Berg was a valued executive of Flextronics, a company with $24 billion in LTM sales that is arguably the best manufacturer of electronic products in the world. Flextronics’ management says Berg will be missed. What do you find negative in that?

     

    Regarding Kodak, these are NOT the people that “brought the company to its knees.” These are some of the world’s foremost experts in working with film, a skill for which unfortunately demand is declining owing to the advent of digital technology, a tide Kodak cannot reverse. The CEO of Kodak, a former top officer of Hewlett Packard in charge of HP’s dominant printer business, is saving Kodak from the ravages of creative destruction, not knocking it down.

     

    One final thing I’ve mentioned before, but it bears repeating. UNXL’s January 6 release, in which it laid out new management’s more realistic timetable for the InTouch ramp, was distributed under the watchful eye of the SEC, owing to the inquiry into UNXL’s business being conducted by the local Fort Worth office of the SEC.

     

    One sentence of that January 6 release in particular caught my eye. I quote: “UniPixel's customers have indicated that InTouch Sensors remain their leading choice for alternative touch solution.” Please tell me whether or not you think that statement is also a lie – a lie told under the noses of the SEC.
    10 Jan, 12:49 AM Reply Like
  • Richard X Roe
    , contributor
    Comments (1042) | Send Message
     
    Buysider2: One of the current co-CEO has been a Chairman of UniPixel's Board since May 2008. The other co-CEOs has been a Director since March 2007. They have approved all the actions of the ousted CEO, at least until May 2013 and got rewarded for it with stock options. So, they were well aware that the August 2011 statement by the company was a lie, yet they approved of it.

     

    Mr. Berg was not a valued executive of Flextronics. Whoever is feeding you these lies is just being "polite." Here is some hint about his departure: http://bit.ly/1lHh48L . But, even better, you should ask Mr. Berg to compare current ITO touch module prices with UniPixel's quotes to the OEMs, and you will know all you need to know about him. Of course, he knows that those prices are irrelevant anyway, as UniPixel's manufacturing process simply does not work - both front and back-end yields are atrocious and can't be fixed. More details from me at the appropriate time...

     

    The people who brought Kodak down have nothing to do with film. The current CEO of Kodak you so much admire initiated a bunch of money-losing "repositioning" projects, including the dismal consumer inkjet printer failure, and is now on its way out (his departure is set for the Fall of 2014). Kodak's complete failure in the touch sensor market dates back to the PEDOT co-development with Heraeus, initiated under the current CEO of Kodak.

     

    So, there is no new management at UniPixel and there is no new management at Kodak either. And a Techno Ponzi won't stop just because the SEC is investigating - this company has been lying for more than 5 years with the approval of the same Chairman and Board of Directors - but will once the investigation is concluded.

     

    UniPixel's customers could not have indicated anything to anybody, as UniPixel does not have any customers given that it has no production revenues. Moreover, why would anyone want an alternative touch solution, when ITO solutions are better and at least 20% cheaper?
    10 Jan, 01:21 AM Reply Like
  • LindonT
    , contributor
    Comments (207) | Send Message
     
    buysider2... I know you would want to put the problems of the past IN the past. I understand that, but as Richard has pointed out, the two guys you so much have faith in have been part & parcel for what has gone on (I said 3 years, but its actually 4 with UniBoss & even longer than that overall) so far. You are plain wrong to suggest that they are not equally culpable, in fact for senior BOD members to have sat back for so many years & sanctioned, condoned & agreed the statements that have been issued by the company over the last several years... the whole board should have resigned in shame!

     

    BUT... Ignoring ALL that, there is one thing that they cannot deny... but something that they HAVE always denied & are CONTINUING to deny even now. What Richard had to say about the laws of physics is correct. The latest photos prove that they have given up on embossed printing (AGAIN we have been warning that a mechanical process CANNOT give high yields at 6 microns, THAT has OBVIOUSLY been conclusively proven despite all the denials by the longs over the last 12 months!!) NOW they have swapped over to Flexo printing. Flexography has been around for over a century. The process is well used in the print industry because its a cheap method. It has one severe draw back... it cannot accurately mass produce at anything like 6 microns its 'cheapness' is therefor utilised to produce prototypes at that level, before a more sophisticated, more expensive process is used for mass production. It comes as no surprise to us... that a low volume prototype run is all thats been achieved. We have been warning about that 'law of physics' for a long time & that aspect has been (& CONTINUES to be) totally ignored by yourself (even in the current debate)... and also by Chris & other longs.

     

    The longs have ALWAYS simply quoted Killion parrot fashion & have refused to address the factual weakness in the the arguments we have been continually pointing out.

     

    The same goes for the question I raised. Why did UNXL go to all the legal expenses of claiming the litigation case should be heard in Texas due to a 2010 NDA when they knew full well it didn't exist because UNXL themselves canceled it in 2010. THAT also was sanctioned by the BOD... (It is a major expenditure) NOT just Killion!

     

    But forget it, forget EVERYTHING else... The MOST important far reaching point is.... Flexo CANNOT produce consistent high quality screens to an accuracy of 6 microns... & EVEN if it could a 6 micron line width screen is only suitable for very low end devices now that the the world is demanding ever perfect transparency in touch screens... why on earth do you think the rest of the industry have reduced their TS solutions to well below 5 & are now around 2 microns. Why do you think Rolith have invented a sub micron grid? Why do you think 2 micron solutions are now commercially available? Why do the longs never address those events?

     

    Why do the longs, including you, NEVER inform their readers & other potential investors & include factual links about what is happening in the TS industry?

     

    Why do you & the rest of the longs NEVER answer, ask, or raise the really awkward questions?

     

    Why do you ONLY & exclusively rely on what the company tells you?

     

    It's because you don't want to know the TRUTH & you don't want other potential investors to know the TRUTH!
    10 Jan, 08:24 AM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    To Richard, on your 1:21 am January 10 comment: Not a single comment since LindonT this morning at 8:24 am! We must be boring people to death.

     

    Your first paragraph, Richard, is just what I mean; you made my point better than I did. We don’t know and you don’t know, because you were NOT there, whether or not the two current acting co-CEOs of UNXL “approved” or “approved of” EVERY action and utterance of UNXL’s former CEO and COO, but we DO know the two acting co-CEOs at least tolerated those actions and utterances until last December 30, when the former CEO and COO resigned. That those two board members did nothing to intervene until 2 weeks ago ALONE tells us they don’t know enough about the business to run it. That then leaves Berg and Rusenko to make the operating decisions and run the business until a new CEO is hired.

     

    Regarding Mr. Berg, UNXL’s current Senior VP of Sales and Marketing, a little knowledge on your part is a dangerous thing. Multek, with sales of about $800 million a year, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Flextronics, which had sales of $24 billion the past 12 months. The unit of Multek that Berg was part of is located in Northfield, Minnesota, and is the ONLY part of Multek that has been profitable in recent years (for more on that unit, see http://bit.ly/1ku21kI). That unit of Multek has grown substantially during the past 10 years and gone from being modestly profitable to very profitable during that time. That unit’s business is substantially different from the rest of Multek, all of which has now been restructured and moved to low-cost regions because of competitive pressures from producers located in low-cost regions.

     

    That is why Multek’s Northfield, MN operations were not subject to the $225 million restructuring of Multek that Flextronics announced on January 23, 2013 (a restructuring described in the story you linked to in your comment) and why Flextronics executives I spoke with were not lying about Mr. Berg. You apparently know very little about Mr. Berg, or his excellent qualifications for running UNXL’s global sales effort.

     

    Again, today you made another of my points: In your 1:21 am post today (1/10/14) you said: “The people who brought Kodak down have nothing to do with film.” In your 9:09 pm post yesterday (1/9/14), you said: “Regarding Kodak - those [the persons working with UNXL and other film projects] are the same people who brought the company to its knees into bankruptcy.” Which is it?

     

    This morning (1/10/14), you wrote about “Kodak's complete failure in the touch sensor market.” Yesterday (1/9/14), you and LindonT lauded Kodak’s and Kingsbury’s new agreement to supply JTOUCH with touch sensor film, which agreement Kodak and Kingsbury announced January 7. Which is it?

     

    I’ve explained to you several times why there is new management at UNXL, but you just don’t get it, so I won’t repeat it.

     

    Definition of a customer: “The recipient of a good, service, product, or idea.” You know very well that in this case, when UNXL said in its January 6 release that “UniPixel's customers have indicated that InTouch Sensors remain their leading choice for alternative touch solutions,” UNXL was referring to its FUTURE customers. Don’t play dumb. Your comment that UNXL doesn’t have customers because it doesn’t have production revenues verges on the infantile.

     

    To LindonT, on your 8:24 am January 10 comment: I have no idea what you are talking about in your first paragraph. The two guys I have “so much…faith in,” as you put it – Berg and Rusenko - have been at UNXL only 11 months and 9 months, respectively, not the 3 or 4 years you mention in the first paragraph. As I said to Richard in my first paragraph of this comment, the other two guys you might be referring to, the two board members now serving as acting co-CEOs while UNXL looks for a new CEO, proved by their inaction for several years that they aren’t qualified to be CEOs of UNXL on anything more than an interim basis or to make the day-to-day operating decisions needed to run it.

     

    The last sentence of your first paragraph makes my point – they [the two current co-CEOs] “sat back for so many years & sanctioned, condoned & agreed the statements that have been issued by the company over the last several years.”

     

    Regarding the technical issues of the product and production process you bring up at length, you ask: “Why do the longs never address those events?” I can’t speak for others, but the reason I don’t is that I know very little about the technology of the product or production process and certainly not enough to evaluate what you or Richard or anyone else might say about it. I’m an investment person, not a scientist or film engineer. Also, I have no idea whether you or Richard know enough about the subject to comment intelligently either.

     

    So I rely on the technical expertise of Berg and Rusenko, who I believe would not have given up thriving careers at major companies if what you and Richard say about the product and process were true or could not be successfully addressed or overcome and I rely on the technical expertise of Kodak, which I believe would not have invested $12 million, dedicated and outfitted a 100,000-square-foot section of its plant, and assigned dozens of its skilled employees to this project last year if what you and Richard say about the product and process were true or could not be successfully addressed or overcome.

     

    I don’t rely on what Berg and Rusenko tell me, as they have not spoken with investors. I rely on their continued PRESENCE at UNXL, as indicated by the two UNXL releases on January 6 this week. I don’t rely on what Kodak says, I rely on what it does, which was to invest $12 million and to complete the equipping of a 100,000-square-foot clean room for UNXL production within its Rochester plant in December, in preparation for an announced increase in permanent employees for that facility from 25 persons to 65-to-75 persons during coming weeks, with at least some coming from support personnel already working on the Uni-Pixel/Kodak joint project.

     

    I do know one thing: If “ITO solutions are better and at least 20% cheaper [than an alternative touch solution],” as Richard’s last sentence this morning asserts, there would not be ANY companies vying to provide an alternative touch solution, instead of the many that are currently doing so.
    10 Jan, 06:50 PM Reply Like
  • Richard X Roe
    , contributor
    Comments (1042) | Send Message
     
    Buysider2: Mr. Berg was so great that he was working two jobs, being a Managing Director of Mountain Associates till February 2013 and working in Minnesota's Multek out of New York since 2010 and then was strategically out of work in August 2012. You should ask Mr. Berg about the pricing of ITO touch modules and how does that pricing compare to the pricing of touch modules with UniPixel's sensors offered to OEMs - if you won't do it, UniPixel potential clients will, and UniPixel will never make a sale, even if by some miracle it manages to produce a working sensor.

     

    UniPixel never had any customers and does not have any customers today, using your definition. And, of course, UniPixel cannot have any customers in the future, as UniPixel has no intention to ever manufacture anything functional. UniPixel's only purpose is to prolong the Techno Ponzi as long as possible.

     

    There have been many companies vying to provide an alternative touch solutions - hell, UniPixel claimed to have the capability to replace the entire touch screen market in 2010 - but the fact is that none of those solutions can compete with ITO today. My previous article shows exactly how ITO modules are 20% even 30% cheaper than UniPixel's touch modules offered to OEMs, even assuming that UniPixel gives away its touch sensors for free.
    10 Jan, 07:48 PM Reply Like
  • LindonT
    , contributor
    Comments (207) | Send Message
     
    buysider2... so your willing to invest in something knowing very little about the technology or the production process? Maybe you should have a rethink. An enormous number of people have lost a lot of their UNXL investment in the last 12 months due to that philosophy & by just believing the company & you longs.

     

    Just recently they changed from a mechanical embossing printing process to a flexographic printing process. It probably changed around the time they re-branded the name from UniBoss to InTouch Sensors Powered by Kodak. I did post my opinion at that time that it wasn't just a re-branding exercise & that it was also a complete change in the print process they were using but of course Chris denied it. The production process was a mechanical embossing process, the old web site pictures & various company statements have always made that quite clear. We have been arguing the point that a mechanical embossing process can't mass-produce high quality yields, the point has been argued about & completely denied by the longs for most of 2013. Now the the web site shows they are using flexographic print machines & have re- branded the print process & calling it Copperhead.

     

    It doesn't matter who is, or was in charge, or what their prior credentials are, the production process to produce a 6 micron sensor using an embossing process obviously failed as myself & others have been warning it would. If it had been successful they wouldn't of changed the process. Would they?

     

    Just so's you knows... Flexo can't mass produce a 6 micron sensor either. The first flexo machine was invented in the late 1800's... they've been throwing zillions of dollars at it & trying ever since! Maybe you should carry out a wee bit of research about flexo.

     

    As an investment person your also obviously not in least bit interested in what is happening in the rest of the TS universe outside of UNXL... or the market the company you are investing in are trying to break into.

     

    It's pretty obvious that you don't want to address or question the 'awkward' questions such as the competition or why the majors wouldn't want a less excellent quality of display in say, a high end smartphone, than ITO. Don't you understand the concept that they would want something that is not only cheaper but have at least as good if not a better quality than ITO?

     

    Here is another couple of awkward questions for you; if its not a scam, why did they not finish the prototyping exercise, original testing & qualification/ validation exercises with UNXL's original print line to prove it works before installing loads more print lines?

     

    Why did Kodak with all their supposed prior experience install the same unproven printing process at their own facility?

     

    Why have they now changed to a flexo process which is proven throughout the world printing industry to only be suitable for LOW VOLUME prototypes & incapable of mass producing anywhere near... 6 microns ink lines.

     

    How can the installation of yet even more automated testing equipment (which again is just another example of 'all show & no substance') do anything to improve the yields & the quality of the grid pattern after the rolls have gone through the flexo process & been printed?

     

    I'm not surprised you didn't comment on the legal expenses they have gone to OR the reasons & implications behind them doing so, regarding the 2010 NDA case. Thats just TOO embarrassing... ALL the longs have run away from that one!
    11 Jan, 07:46 AM Reply Like
  • LindonT
    , contributor
    Comments (207) | Send Message
     
    BYW buysider 2... reference your previous comment to Richard;
    To Richard Roe at 4:04 PM: Oh please, Richard, why would he do that? Give it up! My separate information, which I can’t and won’t share on this thread, agrees with what Mr. Veronda says about different technologies, different niches, and complementary businesses for Kodak.

     

    Really buysider2? You have separate information? What may that be then? Unlike yourself I ALWAYS question comments like that.

     

    When I see comments like that I try to do a bit of research to try to discover the truth of what's behind them. That philosophy is EXACTLY why I question UNXL.

     

    I do believe I now know what you know!

     

    Why would you not want to post some information that would undoubtedly be construed as GOOD news for UNXL followers?

     

    Saving your ammo rather than being straight forwardly open & honest? Now why would you want to do that? Surly your not playing a pumper game like Chris are you?

     

    Would you now like to tell the readers the good news about that separate (industrial) niche... or do you want me to tell them?
    11 Jan, 12:27 PM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    To Richard Roe, on your 7:48 pm January 10 comment: Trying to keep up with the misinformation being published on this site is getting tiresome. You apparently know little about Robert Berg, UNXL’s Senior VP of Global Sales and Marketing, except what you read on the internet. The only information you have given us on him, in the first paragraph of the subject January 10 comment, comes from Berg’s LinkedIn profile, which is easily obtained with a simple Google search on his name.

     

    Yet you tell us that: “Mr. Berg was so great that he was working two jobs, being a Managing Director of Mountain Associates till February 2013 and working in Minnesota's Multek out of New York since 2010 and then was strategically out of work in August 2012.”

     

    Berg was NOT working two jobs. Mountain Associates, actually Mountain Associates Consulting, if you check LinkedIn, is a sole proprietorship established by Mr. Berg many years ago as a platform for outside management consulting work he does in the technology field from time to time. Berg is the only employee of Mountain Associates.

     

    From November 2006 to January 2010, Berg worked for Multek’s very profitable Northfield, MN unit near Minneapolis and, as I’ve said before, contributed substantially to the success of that unit, as detailed in his biographical information in UNXL’s 2/19/13 announcement of his hiring, his LinkedIn profile, and as confirmed to me by Flextronics, which owns Multek. Berg was Sales Director and then VP and General Manager of Multek’s $30 million-a-year Sheldahl Materials unit at Northfield and launched a start-up business for specialty touch sensor materials to support the emerging capacitive touch sensor market. For the 3 ½ years he was working in Northfield, he commuted from a home his family has long owned in the Hudson Valley north of New York City.

     

    From January 2010 to August 2012, Berg worked for Multek’s corporate office out of the New York City area and his Hudson Valley home, which move ended his 3 ½ years of long distance commuting until he joined UNXL in February 2013. His new Multek post was a staff job in marketing and strategy development for Multek’s Northfield, MN unit, including printed circuits, specialty flexible film materials, LCD display, touch solutions, and printed electronics. That project ended in August 2012, after which he left Flextronics and pursued his consulting work for a few months (on several projects for several clients) until he was approached by UNXL for his current sales post, an offer he could not refuse. If you look at his LinkedIn profile at http://linkd.in/1kwk5uu, you will readily see why his name rose to the top in UNXL’s search.

     

    Regarding the rest of your comment, Richard, I completely disagree. By my definition (a customer is a recipient of a good, service, product, or idea), UNXL obviously has many customers and potential customers, though its revenue from them is still nominal. Those include: (1) the companies that have received UNXL’s samples and prototypes and expressed an interest, (2) Intel, which is helping market UNXL’s product under a license, (3) UNXL’s PC partner (reportedly Dell), which UNXL announced last November 7 has given UNXL its first purchase order, delivery of which awaits the volume ramp that Kodak and UNXL say will begin in coming weeks, and (4) the two other, unnamed customers that sent smaller orders to UNXL in November.

     

    Please don’t respond that the 3 companies that have ordered from UNXL are not customers because they have not received any final product yet. We are not playing word games here or dealing in legalese. Common sense should reign.

     

    Your statement that: “UniPixel cannot have any customers in the future, as UniPixel has no intention to ever manufacture anything functional. UniPixel's only purpose is to prolong the Techno Ponzi as long as possible” is so divorced from reality it seems akin to the conspiracy theory that NASA’s moon landings were a hoax.

     

    And again, the idea that: “none of those [alternative touch sensor] solutions [being pursued today, including UNXL’s] can compete with ITO today” assumes that hundreds of technology executives involved in programs to bring alternative touch solutions to market are victims of a simultaneous mass delusion that their costs will be lower than the current ITO product cost.

     

    I’m sorry if these facts don’t jibe with your notion of what is going on at UNXL. I can’t do anything about that.

     

    To LindonT, on your 7:46 am and 12:27 pm January 11 comments: Yes, absolutely, I don’t know the technical details of the products and production processes connected with MOST of the companies I follow or invest in. There are only 24 hours in the day. I rely on others for that. There is no other way to do a professional job of managing a large portfolio. One has to outsource.

     

    As to short-term losses in UNXL, stocks fluctuate. In this case, UNXL has fluctuated partly because of misinformation being posted on the SeekingAlpha website. If my information is correct, those losses will be erased and more, in time.

     

    An example of misinformation would be your comment at 10:51 am on January 9, in which you erroneously said, and with no evidence, that the final paragraph of the article on the Kodak, Kingsbury, and UNXL touch sensor projects in the 1/7/14 issue of the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle was “an obvious typo,” and that the information was NOT about UNXL, as the paragraph said, but actually about Kingsbury. You even said some of the full-time UNXL employees were to be transferred to the Kingsbury project and cited that as evidence Kodak was winding down the UNXL project, a detail that was not even in the story.

     

    You cited no sources for what you said, and all of it was false, as almost immediately pointed out by Chris Hofmann, who talked to the author of the D&C story, and by me later, after I heard from the Kodak spokesperson, Christopher Veronda, whose e-mail I posted IN FULL and who said that the article had correctly reported what he had said.

     

    Regarding your lengthy reiteration of technical reasons UNXL’s product and production process won’t work, I have little to add to what I said in my previous post at 6:50 pm on January 10. It is clear that if UNXL can make the product in volume at a competitive price, the stock has a reasonable chance of moving up multiples of its current price. The longs believe UNXL can and the shorts say it can’t. Berg, Rusenko, and Kodak believe UNXL can. I’d rather go with them than with shorts who have virtually no professional qualifications in the technology.

     

    I’m sorry, LindonT, I’m not convinced you know any more about the product or production process than I do. I haven’t seen you disclose your sources. Again, if what you are saying is true, Berg and Rusenko would not have joined the company or would not still be there and Kodak would not have spent $12 million to complete the Kodak/UNXL 100,000-square-foot clean room by the end of December and be planning to increase the number of full-time employees for the Kodak/UNXL plant from 25 now to 65-to-75 during coming weeks to prepare for a ramp-to-volume in the 2Q of 2014.

     

    All you seem able to say about that is: “They’re lying,” and tell us that what one of the world’s experts in film technology proposes to do won’t work. That’s apparently because you know more about it than Kodak, but what your credentials are or for what reason anyone should believe you, we have yet to see. You don’t tell us your sources and you post newspaper articles without attribution, leaving out parts of the story that don’t support your case (e.g. your 10:12 am post on January 8, which quoted all but 5 paragraphs of an 1/7/14 article on Kodak, Kingsbury, and UNXL without indicating it was a newspaper article or a quote. Three of the 5 paragraphs you omitted had favorable things to say about UNXL).

     

    As for UNXL’s legal expenses, they don’t get mentioned because they won’t be a major issue if UNXL is successful and it won’t matter if UNXL is not successful. It’s not what will move the needle. In my opinion, the many duplicative lawsuits that question whether UNXL’s agreements with its PC partner, with Intel, or with Kodak are “material” are so wide of the mark as to be ludicrous. The current SEC inquiry should confirm that.

     

    This might be a good time to repeat my thesis that a benefit of the SEC inquiry is that it tends to lend credibility to disclosures, releases, or conference calls from UNXL, as one would think management would be extra cautious with the SEC looking over its shoulder. I believe that regarding UNXL’s new timetable disclosed last Monday, January 6, investors could well find the company has UNDERPROMISED. It might well be a FIRST! We’ll see.

     

    Regarding competition, there are virtually no companies in the world that don’t have competition, so unless one company has a big competitive edge, the existence of competition is usually not a fatal flaw. From what I know, UNXL should be competitive in the touch sensor market. In any case, the touch sensor market is so large it has room for many competitors.

     

    Regarding my separate information about market niches for touch sensor film, I refuse to be drawn into a debate about that, which could go on forever. It’s not the important part of the story. Besides, some of my information is proprietary. Why should I give it away on SeekingAlpha? The rest of the information has been openly and widely discussed by a number of sell-side analyst reports on UNXL. I suggest you read them.

     

    You say I’m pumping by WITHHOLDING positive information I know. That’s curious logic. In the next breath you ask: “Why would you not want to post some information that would undoubtedly be construed as GOOD news for UNXL followers?” In other words, you ask me: “Why aren’t you pumping?” The answer is: I don’t.

     

    My interest in posting here is NOT to pump the stock. If the facts as I know them don’t change, the stock should go up in due course; it really doesn’t matter if it goes up now or later.

     

    My interest in posting is to correct the misinformation being posted on this site by folks who want the stock to go down. To manipulate stock in that way is wrong. It hurts folks who because of what they read on this site get discouraged and sell at low prices, perhaps taking a large loss that might have been avoided had they not been shaken out of the stock by misinformation posted on this site.

     

    I’m not saying any or all of the misinformation posted on this site is deliberately posted to make the stock go down (or up). Legitimate errors occur all the time. But those who inadvertently post misinformation should want to see it corrected, should want the facts to be known.

     

    I’m also not saying everything is great with UNXL. Not at all. It’s an extremely speculative stock with huge potential upside, but lots of downside risk as well, as we have already seen.

     

    What I AM saying, to quote our President, is that investors “should get a fair shake.” Investors’ decisions should be based on the best information available, and not on misinformation (either positive or negative) published on a website or by other media (including overly promotional and overly optimistic timetables from a company, as correctly pointed out by the shorts in UNXL has happened with UNXL in the past).

     

    In the past, the shorts were right to question the timetables disclosed by the former CEO. Perfectly right. As I said in my posts at 5:52 pm and 6:44 pm on January 9, I questioned them myself – felt strongly they could not be met. But the shorts went overboard. Some of the shorts characterized what are normal delays in starting up production on a new product using a new process as natural disasters and sure evidence the management of UNXL were a pack of liars and con artists. Some began questioning whether the product and process would even work, when the available evidence, including the involvement of Berg, Rusenko, and Kodak, suggests strongly that it will work, and some even claimed the company was nothing but a fraud, a Ponzi scheme, and a scam, which is clearly not the case. That’s what I object to. Legitimate criticism is fine. Let’s keep it fact-based, legitimate, and sane.
    12 Jan, 10:21 AM Reply Like
  • LindonT
    , contributor
    Comments (207) | Send Message
     
    My interest in posting is to correct the misinformation being posted on this site by folks who want the stock to go down. To manipulate stock in that way is wrong. It hurts folks who because of what they read on this site get discouraged and sell at low prices, perhaps taking a large loss that might have been avoided had they not been shaken out of the stock by misinformation posted on this site.

     

    In the past, the shorts were right to question the timetables disclosed by the former CEO. Perfectly right. As I said in my posts at 5:52 pm and 6:44 pm on January 9, I questioned them myself – felt strongly they could not be met. But the shorts went overboard. Some of the shorts characterized what are normal delays in starting up production on a new product using a new process as natural disasters and sure evidence the management of UNXL were a pack of liars and con artists.

     

    busider2... the mechanical printing process known as UniBoss didn't fail because of missed timelines or unrealistic targets. It failed because it was a scam. The poor souls who have lost so much over the last 12 months didn't lose due to those reasons either or a fluctuating sp. They lost so much because Uniboss was a scam. There hasn't been any misinformation posted by the shorts about UniBoss. We claimed it was a scam & didn't have a hope in hell of working, EVER. Low & behold... it failed, completely!

     

    THAT is the evidence that the management ARE a pack of liars & con artists!

     

    Now, here we go again, a new scam is starting up... now using flexo printing machines instead of the UniBoss embossing machines & they've given the scam a nice new name... Copperhead.

     

    Potential investors are now being invited to part with their money & so keep the BOD in the style to which they have become accustomed & just like the last scam, the one before, the one before that & the one before that... going back donkeys years... they are being encouraged by the longs not to be concerned about the product or the process required to bring it to market... rather just believe what your told. Don't do any research or DD... the CEO has great credentials so all will be fine!
    Oh... btw. The head guy now at Kodak? Nothing has changed, he's the same guy that took them into bankruptcy. But even worse than that.... If you listen to him, if you listen to his tone, if you listen to his words.... you'll know something with a certainty that's truly awesome... (even scary)... Killion lives on.... he's been cloned!

     

    Now THAT'S what I call a REAL printing process!
    12 Jan, 07:25 PM Reply Like
  • Buysider2
    , contributor
    Comments (174) | Send Message
     
    LindonT, I'm sorry you believe all that. You have yet to disclose either your credentials to have an informed opinion on these matters or the source of your data. Show us the research you have done. Please write an article on SeekingAlpha detailing the findings behind your many posts discussing UNXL's technology.

     

    No matter what you might think or write on this thread, UNXL is under new management, comprised of two men who know far more about the subject than you apparently do and who have spent years working in related fields with major companies before joining UNXL in 2013. As I’ve detailed, they are Mr. Berg, who joined UNXL 11 months ago and runs global sales, and Mr. Rusenko, who joined UNXL 9 months ago and runs manufacturing. Sales and manufacturing are where the operating decisions are being made. Berg and Rusenko will be joined by a new CEO before too long.

     

    The two board members who are serving as acting co-CEOs while they search for a new CEO have no desire to run the company, and the operating decisions are now being made by Berg and Rusenko. As a result, you will see major changes in the way UNXL is run, changes that began last Monday, January 6, with the two releases the company issued that day. You are dead wrong if you think things are going to be like they were under the former CEO, which your most recent post at 7:25 pm, January 12, seems to indicate you believe.

     

    As I said before, the pros are in charge now. It’s a new ball game. I’d rather go with professional managers who have long experience in fields related to UNXL's technology and with one of the world leaders in film technology, Kodak, than with shorts who have virtually no qualifications to offer opinions on the subject.
    13 Jan, 12:56 AM Reply Like
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