Hershey to give 3D printing a try


Hershey (HSY) announces a collaboration with 3D Systems (DDD) to explore ways to use 3D printing capabilities to create food products.

The companies are early in the innovation process, but think that 3D printing holds some potential in the food manufacturing process.

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Comments (25)
  • KevinRemde
    , contributor
    Comments (564) | Send Message
     
    The eventual ability to create (or one day mass-produce) items of any shape and size, and out of any shapeable material is going to open up so many possibilities that haven't even been thought of yet.
    Shaping chocolate or sugar into wild little statue figures? Absolutely! And even in the short term, using 3D prints to create the objects that shape the molds is going to be huge.
    I have small positions in DDD and SSYS, but I can see adding more during pullbacks this year.
    16 Jan 2014, 09:25 AM Reply Like
  • Dave DeWitt
    , contributor
    Comments (53) | Send Message
     
    For 3D Printing in biological materials there is also ONVO . Quite a bit riskier. I'm long there for now.
    16 Jan 2014, 09:58 AM Reply Like
  • Esekla
    , contributor
    Comments (4317) | Send Message
     
    While I agree with the general sentiment of the first statement, this is exactly the sort of thing that's best left ignored. The technology can't possibly be cost effective for large runs; the only possible application here is essentially expensive customized one-offs, probably done at Hershey Park, and few other such locations. It's hard to see that as being a very big market. This announcement has about as much significance as the contemplated products do nutrition.

     

    The real TAM and growth is for high tech industry, where rapid prototyping and multi-material capability will expand what can be done with traditional CNC processes:

     

    http://seekingalpha.co...
    16 Jan 2014, 10:20 AM Reply Like
  • theturnerestate
    , contributor
    Comments (4) | Send Message
     
    they said the same thing about computers which at the on-set filled a room and that they will NEVER be mass produced...IMPOSSIBLE. Ditto for the cell phone and so forth. You get the point.
    16 Jan 2014, 06:16 PM Reply Like
  • Lonnie Starr
    , contributor
    Comments (318) | Send Message
     
    Using white chocolate and other food colorings, a Chocolatier will be able to print Orchids, edible floral bouquets, the bakery or other business, like florists, who can offer edible bouquets will probably get lots of business, eh? And the bigger the edible bouquet the better, since there are many stars and movie moguls, and plenty of other people who would like to make a big newsworthy splash at their events.
    17 Jan 2014, 01:00 PM Reply Like
  • Lonnie Starr
    , contributor
    Comments (318) | Send Message
     
    I remember those early cell phones hahaha. I was on the subway when a news reporter and her crew got on the same subway car as I was. They had one man there just to carry the cell phone, it was about the size of a salesman's sample case, looked to weigh about 50 lbs, and that's just the workings, the handset looked like it weighed about 10 lbs. it too was a huge 10" by 15
    by 4", the cost was 3 dollars a minute, incoming or outgoing made no difference, so few people had them, and even those people probably didn't like them, but their work required it.

     

    Overtime the phones grew smaller and air service more cheap. Today no one thinks of leaving the house without one.
    17 Jan 2014, 01:11 PM Reply Like
  • Sum02006
    , contributor
    Comments (455) | Send Message
     
    This is awesome. It's like a real life Star Trek food replicator...."Hot, plain tomato soup!"

     

    http://bit.ly/1b5S7Mo
    16 Jan 2014, 09:27 AM Reply Like
  • Dave DeWitt
    , contributor
    Comments (53) | Send Message
     
    It won't be long now! Love the post
    16 Jan 2014, 09:52 AM Reply Like
  • Dave DeWitt
    , contributor
    Comments (53) | Send Message
     
    This is very exciting news. Seeing high volume product applications of 3D Printing, additive manufacturing, start to come on line will be great for the industry as a whole. We post stories daily on 3D Printing here http://bit.ly/QVHrvI and here http://bit.ly/1anmwYt . Hope these prove helpful for those interested in investing in 3D Printing technology opportunities.
    16 Jan 2014, 09:50 AM Reply Like
  • pcaflisch
    , contributor
    Comments (262) | Send Message
     
    dave dewitt...thanks for the links!
    16 Jan 2014, 11:49 AM Reply Like
  • Lonnie Starr
    , contributor
    Comments (318) | Send Message
     
    People love to see their names in print, so now Hersey can create the molds to make chocolate and/or confection names, which can sell to bakeries and retail like those little license plates. Plus they're sure to find a whole lot of other things they can do that wasn't cost effective before.

     

    Short runs or long, when mold making becomes as simply as scanning and printing, creativity is set loose.
    16 Jan 2014, 10:42 AM Reply Like
  • PChan444
    , contributor
    Comments (514) | Send Message
     
    i just 3d printed myself a doughnut. was tasty but i've got diarrhea now. next time i'll try chocolate
    16 Jan 2014, 11:05 AM Reply Like
  • ddennisradio
    , contributor
    Comments (26) | Send Message
     
    Don't underestimate the potential of the consumables industry. How many of those thousands of grocery items could be "printed" in the future? What happens if Hershey or any other vendor for that matter decides to put one of their "printers" into a grocery store so that the items never need to be shipped. There goes most of the factory and the shipping industry. Another scenario would be to have a local or regional warehouse of many "printers" from several vendors staffed with trained professionals who can operate them.. The product would be distributed from there much the same way that many items are now, but the product would not arrive at the warehouse by traditional shipping. This results in higher margins for companies who orchestrate this correctly and lower prices for consumers. The postal industry should watch out for this as well as they could see some impact down the road.
    16 Jan 2014, 12:09 PM Reply Like
  • Esekla
    , contributor
    Comments (4317) | Send Message
     
    <Sigh>

     

    > How many of those thousands of grocery items could be "printed" in the future?

     

    Virtually all of them.

     

    > What happens if Hershey or any other vendor for that matter decides to put one of their "printers" into a grocery store so that the items never need to be shipped.

     

    Then materials need to be shipped instead, spoilage and costs go through the roof, and the company has to backtrack from a very expensive error to avoid going out of business.
    16 Jan 2014, 12:30 PM Reply Like
  • PChan444
    , contributor
    Comments (514) | Send Message
     
    i fear you may have an extra chromosome ddennis
    16 Jan 2014, 12:32 PM Reply Like
  • StepUp
    , contributor
    Comments (548) | Send Message
     
    Maybe some day HSY will be able to mass produce chocolate shaped like real bunnies. oh wait... they can already do that.
    16 Jan 2014, 01:29 PM Reply Like
  • ekka
    , contributor
    Comment (1) | Send Message
     
    Tea, Earl Grey, Hot!
    16 Jan 2014, 03:50 PM Reply Like
  • Oldeman
    , contributor
    Comments (13) | Send Message
     
    I see this as fantastic news for DDD investors. We have long heard of printable food in theory but for a major volume producer like Hershey to take an interest moves this several notches from novelty niche to something serious. I also think that anything to do with Hershey will be volume driven and that benefits will flow to other printable materials. I am long DDD and well pleased with this news.
    16 Jan 2014, 04:50 PM Reply Like
  • FyrFytr
    , contributor
    Comment (1) | Send Message
     
    After reading the comments above, wouldn't Hershey's play in this be to produce the chocolate "ink" consumables that caterers, bakers, etc use in their DDD food printers?
    16 Jan 2014, 07:27 PM Reply Like
  • Manxbuilder
    , contributor
    Comments (238) | Send Message
     
    This technology is great for many reasons but for mass producing candy I don't see it. Maybe for molds but not for production.
    16 Jan 2014, 07:28 PM Reply Like
  • psychological-dividends
    , contributor
    Comments (820) | Send Message
     
    Fascinating. I am a HSY shareholder, and I admire the company for its relentless brand innovation compared to Mars. I am curious how the 3D printing space will alter our capacity to feed ourselves and the world.
    16 Jan 2014, 08:07 PM Reply Like
  • Lonnie Starr
    , contributor
    Comments (318) | Send Message
     
    Chocolate floral bouquets with orchids, yummie!!!
    17 Jan 2014, 01:20 PM Reply Like
  • Oldeman
    , contributor
    Comments (13) | Send Message
     
    The more I think about this the more I like it. I used to think like Esekla in his first comment but that is too narrow a perspective. Just think of a smallish, low resolution, colour printer using printable chocolate supplied by Hershey and sitting on the counter of any middle or up market confectionery store. With the sort of software that DDD is developing it could be preloaded with all sorts of designs, or you could design your own. An Easter egg with a surprise inside, a valentine chocolate heart with entwined initials. Hershey supply the materials and DDD supply the machines, possibly on a pay per go. 10c every time an item is printed. And another benefit is that if 3D Systems printers were on every sweetshop counter the public awareness would be sky high and this would build a brand image that would have value at all levels of the market place. Now I understand why they have Will I Am on board. He has the imagination to get the most out of this idea. I think they have the right idea, at the right time, with the right people on board.
    18 Jan 2014, 09:47 AM Reply Like
  • pcaflisch
    , contributor
    Comments (262) | Send Message
     
    Oldeman...IMHO you are correct in view of the too narrow perspective. The development of the internet and the personal computer industries took the imaginations of thousands of people to come up with applications we use and rely on everyday. Virtually everyone you interact with (under the age of say 60) on a daily basis has experiences using both. By contrast, I speak with people all the time and ask them if they are familiar with the 3d printing industry. The vast majority of them have not. As more and more people get involved with the industry you'll see the development of hundreds if not thousands of uses similar to the Hershey example in this story. New materials, bigger and faster machines, and newer, easier to use software speak to the proof of this growth.
    18 Jan 2014, 12:07 PM Reply Like
  • Lonnie Starr
    , contributor
    Comments (318) | Send Message
     
    Best yet is that unlike yesterday, today help is online 24/7. Thus learning curves are shortened.
    19 Jan 2014, 10:05 AM Reply Like
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