Seeking Alpha

Tesla completes its own Cannonball Run

  • Tesla Motors (TSLA) has 80% of the U.S. population covered with the expansion of its Supercharger network, according to Elon Musk.
  • Over the weekend, a driving team completed a trip from New York to Los Angeles using only the Supercharger network. The 3.6K-mile jaunt took 6 days at no gas expense.
  • A team from Tesla is on the road right now attempting to smash the U.S. cross-country electric vehicle speed record.
  • Closer to home, Musk say he will take his family on a New York-to-L.A Spring Break trip via the Supercharger network.
Comments (91)
  • Quoth the Raven
    , contributor
    Comments (1820) | Send Message
     
    Badass.
    26 Jan, 09:28 PM Reply Like
  • surferbroadband
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    Real real Badass.
    27 Jan, 02:42 AM Reply Like
  • Stone Fox Capital
    , contributor
    Comments (5577) | Send Message
     
    no gas expense, but electricity isn't free. Is Musk a cheapskate taking a spring break trip letting the company pay for all these expenses of charging up the car?
    26 Jan, 09:36 PM Reply Like
  • Monja
    , contributor
    Comments (66) | Send Message
     
    The electricity was free for the people using the Superchargers, I think that's the point here...
    26 Jan, 09:56 PM Reply Like
  • berylrb
    , contributor
    Comments (2178) | Send Message
     
    @ Stone, what are you __tching about, you can't conceive that he actually owns one of his own cars? He's like the number one share owner, he can drive whatever he wants on vacation.
    26 Jan, 10:21 PM Reply Like
  • EV Lover
    , contributor
    Comments (4) | Send Message
     
    You only paid once and you own all Tesla Superchargers for no additional fee.

     

    If you bought 85kWh battery pack car, the cost is built-in, no need to worry forever.

     

    If you bought 60kWh pack, you can pay $2,000 once at the beginning and all Tesla Superchargers are yours forever.

     

    Just think as if you fly and your luggage are "free" (which is actually built-in with airline ticket.)

     

    Or you paid once and the hotel soap is "free."

     

    It's the same concept.

     

    Wouldn't you be mad at a hotel if your toilet paper is not "free" after you paid them the night?

     

    Just think as if you paid for a BMW once and all the fuel fill ups are yours for no additional charge.

     

    So how can you tolerate the current gasoline model of paying for each fill up?
    26 Jan, 10:34 PM Reply Like
  • omarbradley
    , contributor
    Comments (966) | Send Message
     
    so will the rest of us soon...
    http://bit.ly/19WA54s

     

    here's the whole album actually:
    http://bit.ly/19WA54u
    26 Jan, 10:46 PM Reply Like
  • idkmybffjill
    , contributor
    Comments (1498) | Send Message
     
    Do you not understand that recharging at super charge station is free? Do you not think a man with over a $5B+ net worth can afford to refuel his own car (if it actually DID cost $ to do that)?
    26 Jan, 10:48 PM Reply Like
  • omarbradley
    , contributor
    Comments (966) | Send Message
     
    these prices are gonna start dropping...and quite possibly dramatically.

     

    the amount of capital flowing into the USA right now is simply unprecedented.

     

    Probably the biggest ever seen in human history actually.

     

    http://bit.ly/19WAt2R
    http://bit.ly/19WAt2S
    26 Jan, 10:53 PM Reply Like
  • IncomeYield
    , contributor
    Comments (1419) | Send Message
     
    Aside from the laws of thermodynamics (which the dot-bombers turned alt energy investors refuse to acknowledge), the laws of economics will soon kick-in.

     

    A big chunk of the price of a gallon of gas is taxes. In part to pay for the same roads that electric cars use but don't help to pay for.

     

    The tax man cometh some day.
    26 Jan, 11:23 PM Reply Like
  • chickensevil
    , contributor
    Comments (555) | Send Message
     
    "A big chunk of the price of a gallon of gas is taxes. In part to pay for the same roads that electric cars use but don't help to pay for."

     

    Wrong... But it's cool.
    National Average currently 3.63 (premium... which this car would be using if it was an ICE)
    State Tax average 27.2 cents.
    Federal 18.40 cents

     

    Here in VA, I actually pay 63$ for an EV for that exact reason. assuming an ICE car that gets 30MPG and drives the 12,000 miles a year average. VA taxes is 19.9 (lucky us) + federal = 38.3 cents per gallon. 12,000 miles on 30 MPG is 400 gallons. This comes out to $153.20. So they pay 2x as much. If you get something that is even more fuel efficient, then it pays out for you even better.

     

    However all of this is a flawed argument, because it is not you or I driving our personal vehicles that does all the road damage but rather commercial trucks. They disproportionately are not covering the damage they do to the roads. We pay for about 60% of the road taxes but do around 20% of the damage. So please direct your hate toward Big box retail and companies like Amazon.
    26 Jan, 11:56 PM Reply Like
  • surferbroadband
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    No, Musk is a Badass.
    27 Jan, 02:42 AM Reply Like
  • Ford Prefect 1969
    , contributor
    Comments (2282) | Send Message
     
    @Stone Fox Capital

     

    You do realise that Musk does not even let Tesla pay him a salary, neither does he sell any shares. Check the SEC filings.

     

    So far Musk has donated $75 Million to Tesla personally in return for a $1.00 salary and no doubt pays interest on the money he borrowed to buy another $100 Million in shares.

     

    Cheapskate what?
    27 Jan, 03:50 AM Reply Like
  • gen3
    , contributor
    Comments (291) | Send Message
     
    Yes that is true. But he takes a big load of money as CEO of SPACEX and their biggest client is NASA. Where does NASA get their money. So where does his personal money come from ? That said Ross Perot made his money from a no tender contract with the Federal Government and did nothing for society. Elon is building an infrastructure across North America and Europe in four years that is equal to what was built for the ICE in the first 30yrs of petrol cars.
    27 Jan, 04:00 AM Reply Like
  • Ford Prefect 1969
    , contributor
    Comments (2282) | Send Message
     
    @gen3

     

    Musk will make money out of NASA by saving NASA money (a lot of money) vs NASA having no choice but to pay vastly more into the Boeing and Lockheed Martin pork barrel, not to mention the Russians for ISS crew transport.

     

    Same will go for US Military missions.

     

    It is also crucial to understand that both the commercial export business of SpaceX and Tesla is a massive income stream for the US. A huge profit for the treasury on any and all support these companies have received.
    27 Jan, 06:37 AM Reply Like
  • MovingMagic
    , contributor
    Comments (69) | Send Message
     
    Are you saying he should not take government contracts? Do you realise the cost per launch by SpaceX is the lowest in the industry so taxpayers pay less money per launch? So taxpayers benefit. Do you not applaud Elon's efforts with the grasshopper project to bring cost per launch even further down? That will benefit you as a taxpayer even more. If it's the taxpayer you are concerned about, you should compare SpaceX with the pricing of the ULA. You will love SpaceX.
    28 Jan, 01:10 PM Reply Like
  • Tom in Texas
    , contributor
    Comments (352) | Send Message
     
    Took 6 days? Cannonball Crawl.
    26 Jan, 09:46 PM Reply Like
  • wipster
    , contributor
    Comments (159) | Send Message
     
    Seriously? Do you realize the type of weather they had to drive though once they got past the Rockies? This is one of the hardest winters they've had for decades. I'm amazed they could do it in six days! This would be hard in any type of vehicle they were driving. Score for Tesla and these drivers, great job... too bad they didn't have a Model X.
    26 Jan, 10:19 PM Reply Like
  • berylrb
    , contributor
    Comments (2178) | Send Message
     
    Right on, Wipster, most sane people would not make that drive in the middle of winter. Hats off to the driver and his daughter copilot. By the time he got to Salt Lake City they probably had to pry his hands off the steering wheel!

     

    Does anyone know if he had to use chains or did he stop driving waiting for the snow plows to clear the roads? Also, How much ice would he have encountered?
    27 Jan, 10:33 AM Reply Like
  • Surf Dog
    , contributor
    Comments (786) | Send Message
     
    It was not a race, just a road trip.
    27 Jan, 07:13 PM Reply Like
  • Bret Kenwell
    , contributor
    Comments (458) | Send Message
     
    Man, that is seriously awesome.
    26 Jan, 09:54 PM Reply Like
  • User 15026902
    , contributor
    Comment (1) | Send Message
     
    Electricity is generated either by coal , oil or natural gas. It is generated at about 65% efficiency, and then at most possibly 90% while charging a car battery. So that efficiency sucks!! So why not power the car directly off of natural gas at much higher efficiency? Also you do not have bother with all of the battery waste. It is all bullcrap to think that electric cars are the answer with such low efficiency compared to natural gas.
    26 Jan, 09:57 PM Reply Like
  • deytrader
    , contributor
    Comments (4) | Send Message
     
    The superchargers generate electricity using solar panels. So in that sense it is indeed free.
    26 Jan, 10:03 PM Reply Like
  • Monja
    , contributor
    Comments (66) | Send Message
     
    You've obviously done a significant amount of research on the matter and have much experience with the subject, no need for a quick google search or anything then...
    26 Jan, 10:16 PM Reply Like
  • doubleE
    , contributor
    Comments (792) | Send Message
     
    Combined cycle natural gas power plants can achieve about 61% efficiency. Natural gas internal combustion has 25% efficiency. It is way more efficient to convert natural gas to electricity than to burn it in an ICE. Even after factoring transmission and charging losses.

     

    If you honestly believe any ICE engine can achieve over 65%, you have no business posting on technical issues.
    26 Jan, 10:26 PM Reply Like
  • IncomeYield
    , contributor
    Comments (1419) | Send Message
     
    Has anyone really looked at the environmental cost and $ cost of disposing/recycling these batteries.?
    Makes you want nuclear power again in comparison.
    26 Jan, 11:25 PM Reply Like
  • fiwiki
    , contributor
    Comments (359) | Send Message
     
    So how's that going to work for Tesla sales to reach critical mass ? How many " solar powered " super chargers will be required to charge electric cars @ 20 -30 min. each. Inquiring minds want to know ?
    26 Jan, 11:55 PM Reply Like
  • chickensevil
    , contributor
    Comments (555) | Send Message
     
    "Has anyone really looked at the environmental cost and $ cost of disposing/recycling these batteries.?"

     

    Ummm yes, there is nothing harmful in the batteries. They are appropriate to be disposed of in the trash can... However should you choose, you could also turn around and recycle out all the chemicals, fix the chemical balance back, and turn it into another perfectly workable battery (no chemistry is changed when the battery "loses charge").

     

    Although, I wholly support nuclear power too. I mean the sun is just a giant hydrogen fusion reactor... and the earth's core is a thorium reactor. So why wouldn't we want to just copy nature here, and make our own power using the same process?
    27 Jan, 12:00 AM Reply Like
  • Pavlof
    , contributor
    Comments (113) | Send Message
     
    "Electricity is generated by coal, oil or natural gas."

     

    Yeah, and you haven't a clue what you're talking about. Here in Seattle 96% of electricity comes from hydro and wind. None comes from oil or natural gas and less than 1% comes from the one coal plant in Washington state that is due to be shut down.

     

    Just because you live in a backward part of the country doesn't mean the rest of the world does. Why don't you work on changing where your electricity comes from instead of wringing your hands saying there is no hope? I know, it is easier to complain.
    27 Jan, 01:18 AM Reply Like
  • justaminute
    , contributor
    Comments (581) | Send Message
     
    Nice to see people in Seattle are so polite.
    27 Jan, 02:15 AM Reply Like
  • surferbroadband
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    Most people will recharge at home, since most people do not drive more than 50 miles from where they live. Supercharging is for long range travel.
    27 Jan, 02:57 AM Reply Like
  • gen3
    , contributor
    Comments (291) | Send Message
     
    Even where the superchargers are not able to have solar on site that is okay.
    The solar can be made anywhere as over all annual offset.
    27 Jan, 04:02 AM Reply Like
  • chfp
    , contributor
    Comments (500) | Send Message
     
    It's clear that there are some posters here (User 15026902, IncomeYield) who post such misleading information that they sound like shills for Big Oil lobbyists.

     

    Examples:

     

    User 15026902 "Electricity is generated either by coal , oil or natural gas. It is generated at about 65% efficiency, and then at most possibly 90% while charging a car battery. So that efficiency sucks!!"

     

    Electricity is also generated by nuclear, hydro, wind, solar and biomass. Even if we compared with the baited coal argument, EVs win out in total pollution emitted.
    59% efficiency from a fuel (65% x 90%) is quite high, a dream-come-true compared to ICE cars which net less than 12% efficiency.

     

    IncomeYield " Has anyone really looked at the environmental cost and $ cost of disposing/recycling these batteries.?
    Makes you want nuclear power again in comparison."

     

    Yes many people have and it's tame compared to mining of copper, gold, platinum, tar sands. Why aren't you complaining about the copper wiring you use every day, or the platinum in your catalytic converter?
    Nuclear power is a non-sequitur. If you must, nuclear can power EVs, but it most certainly can't power gassers. Nice try at distracting.
    27 Jan, 04:09 AM Reply Like
  • GeoffHiker
    , contributor
    Comments (96) | Send Message
     
    The internal combustion engine has only 20 - 30% efficiency.
    27 Jan, 06:13 AM Reply Like
  • fiwiki
    , contributor
    Comments (359) | Send Message
     
    Diesels, are able to reach an efficiency of about 40%
    27 Jan, 09:05 AM Reply Like
  • fiwiki
    , contributor
    Comments (359) | Send Message
     
    http://seekingalpha.co...
    27 Jan, 09:27 AM Reply Like
  • fiwiki
    , contributor
    Comments (359) | Send Message
     
    http://seekingalpha.co...
    27 Jan, 09:45 AM Reply Like
  • John Bingham
    , contributor
    Comments (741) | Send Message
     
    fiwiki,

     

    You can check for yourself as it happens!

     

    This is a thread from a Tesla forum and I'm sure it will be regularly updated. Many posters have said that they'd like to see the Hawthorne Supercharger Dashboard live so we may have it soon. There's a photo about halfway down the page.

     

    http://bit.ly/1aXKYB7
    27 Jan, 10:04 AM Reply Like
  • Surf Dog
    , contributor
    Comments (786) | Send Message
     
    The ICE engine is only about 37% efficient at best.

     

    http://bit.ly/1i5iLKT

     

    http://bit.ly/1i5iMyo

     

    "Most steel engines have a thermodynamic limit of 37%. Even when aided with turbochargers and stock efficiency aids, most engines retain an average efficiency of about 18%-20%.[9] Rocket engine efficiencies are much better, up to 70%, because they operate at very high temperatures and pressures and can have very high expansion ratios.[10] Electric motors are better still, at around 85-90% efficiency or more, but they rely on an external power source (often another heat engine at a power plant subject to similar thermodynamic efficiency limits)."

     

    Why is it that people feel the need to make statements that seem like they know what they are talking about, when they actually have no idea what they are talking about?
    27 Jan, 07:25 PM Reply Like
  • Surf Dog
    , contributor
    Comments (786) | Send Message
     
    No where near the cost of Chernobyl, Three Mile Island and Fukashima.

     

    The cost of dealing with plant safety, accidents, and spent fuel storage is, and will become the biggest debacle in human history.

     

    We have not built a nuke plant since 1975, and it should stay that way.

     

    No Nukes!!!
    27 Jan, 07:30 PM Reply Like
  • fiwiki
    , contributor
    Comments (359) | Send Message
     
    Not taking sides here, but don't ICE engines require an external source, requiring at least one additional " heat engine " subject to similar thermodynamics ?
    27 Jan, 11:18 PM Reply Like
  • IncomeYield
    , contributor
    Comments (1419) | Send Message
     
    I would re-think the suggestion that potentially 100's of thousands of lithium or nickel-metal hydride batteries can be "thrown in the trash".

     

    Show us the environmental impact of mining the materials, making the batteries, recycling the batteries and/or disposing of the batteries.

     

    My point is that this is not simply bio-mimicry of photosynthesis.
    That get's you a small veg garden in your backyard, but not from home to work and back.

     

    Investors need to look at the laws of physics and thermodynamics and ignore Moore's law here.
    29 Jan, 11:38 AM Reply Like
  • Dan Fichana
    , contributor
    Comments (1743) | Send Message
     
    Surf Dog,
    I will admit the Uranium reactors are not the way to go. That was actually a military decision for fuel enrichment to create nukes. The better nuclear reactor is a Thorium reactor, of course, then you can't obtain radioactive weapons from it.

     

    Leave it to the human race, to pick the more environmentally damaging option so that they can make weapons to destroy each other. (If there are dieties, aliens or whatever, they are shaking their heads at our choice of uranium for reactors... because of the level of stupidity exhibited by building uranium reactor).
    22 Feb, 01:19 PM Reply Like
  • Dan Fichana
    , contributor
    Comments (1743) | Send Message
     
    Income yield

     

    That is what life cycle assessments are for. Now in terms of impact, it looks like the battery becomes environmentally green after it avoids 10,000 miles.

     

    It is kind of weird, but most of the metals in the Tesla batteries, sans lithium, are mined together.
    in terms if nickel, on a per weight basis, the Model S has the same amount of Nickel as an older prius.
    Aluminum- well, we use it all the time, aluminum cans
    Cobalt- that used to be a nuance metal in nickel and copper mining (copper needed for other things), it is not actively mined for itself.
    Lithium- Well that is a very benign process. Simplified version, you pump brine, let it air dry, evaporate, react to get lithium carbonate.
    22 Feb, 01:30 PM Reply Like
  • Zelaza
    , contributor
    Comments (545) | Send Message
     
    Almost 140 years ago in 1876 (June 1 to June 4) the Jarret and Palmer Special Lightening train went from New York to San Francisco in under 84 hours (3 1/2 days):
    http://bit.ly/1d4eXUG
    26 Jan, 10:02 PM Reply Like
  • wipster
    , contributor
    Comments (159) | Send Message
     
    Wonder what they could have done in the dead of winter? I'm sure they stopped a lot as well. I'm sure it was a very ecologically friendly vehicle as well...
    26 Jan, 10:24 PM Reply Like
  • 15560722
    , contributor
    Comments (28) | Send Message
     
    where can i find the locations of these Supercharger network? I want to drive to Alaska to visit Sarah Palin to watch her kill a few more moose and turkey.
    26 Jan, 10:03 PM Reply Like
  • chickensevil
    , contributor
    Comments (555) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/QpV8An

     

    Sorry, no direct route to Alaska yet...
    27 Jan, 12:02 AM Reply Like
  • surferbroadband
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    I would like to do something else with Sarah Palin, but I can't give the details here.
    27 Jan, 03:00 AM Reply Like
  • Charliepetit
    , contributor
    Comments (10) | Send Message
     
    Stone Fox, your comment has no substance. Is it his car? If so, he is entitled to the juice free as is every Tesla owner. There also is the difficulty calculating what if anything the recharging cost the company in which he is the largest shareholder. The charging stations have no meters. Much and perhaps all the energy delivered by the system is more than compensated by the solar panels installed for it. Plus, one hears that the supercharging cost is paid for in part or in whole by an added cost of purchase for the car. It would,, in other words, be stupid for him to try to pay for it.
    In short Musk, as a good businessman, may well be a cheapskate but you present no reason to think his family vacation is evidence of it.
    The S is a large and roomy car. Still, if you are simply in a mood to insult the guy a smarter snark than yours would be to wonder whether this trip was much fun, or is an example of Mr. Musk's determination to value Tesla publicity over his family's preferences on how to spend its vacation. Going supercharger to supercharger must be tedious, all interstates and billboards. Maybe however it was a total blast. We just do not know.
    26 Jan, 10:06 PM Reply Like
  • Deja Vu
    , contributor
    Comments (1095) | Send Message
     
    Musk is "the smartest guy in the room"
    26 Jan, 10:11 PM Reply Like
  • surferbroadband
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    Not the smartest, but he is smart.

     

    Smart enough that I got all my money on him.
    27 Jan, 03:02 AM Reply Like
  • Deja Vu
    , contributor
    Comments (1095) | Send Message
     
    I don't think you quite understood my comment.
    27 Jan, 09:28 AM Reply Like
  • SharkDude
    , contributor
    Comments (500) | Send Message
     
    TSLA bulls. you are way over the tips of your skis. Company still is not close to posting a profit and you want to talk about a journey cross country that virtually no one makes. get real people. cool car but not a profitable car.
    26 Jan, 10:20 PM Reply Like
  • Monja
    , contributor
    Comments (66) | Send Message
     
    nevermind that they're guaranteed to sell every car they can produce, have never spent anything on marketing and are approaching 25% margins...
    26 Jan, 10:30 PM Reply Like
  • idkmybffjill
    , contributor
    Comments (1498) | Send Message
     
    I am so glad that a large chunk of SA posters who make comments like this are not leading innovation in our country. If every entrepreneur only went after an opportunity if it could turn a profit from the absolute beginning, we would likely be living in the stone age.

     

    Name one manufacturing-dependent business that turned a profit since day 1.

     

    It's one thing to argue the stock is overvalued. It's another to constantly keep harping on the fact that the company isn't profitable. I guess this is why Elon Musk is Elon Musk, and posters on SA will just be posters on SA who stay crabby about Tesla.
    26 Jan, 10:33 PM Reply Like
  • SharkDude
    , contributor
    Comments (500) | Send Message
     
    margins are not profits
    26 Jan, 10:35 PM Reply Like
  • SharkDude
    , contributor
    Comments (500) | Send Message
     
    you are missing my point. the company years away from a solid profit should not be worth 20 billion dollars. this thing is expensive and you guys think it should be even more expensive.

     

    It's one thing to argue the stock is overvalued. It's another to constantly keep harping on the fact that the company isn't profitable.

     

    Constantly harping. Well profits are the main component to figuring out the the value of the company. $20 billion is expensive for a company that makes no money and needs to spend a lot of money to increase production.
    26 Jan, 10:40 PM Reply Like
  • idkmybffjill
    , contributor
    Comments (1498) | Send Message
     
    I'm not disagreeing with you on valuation, but I just don't get the need to bring it up in every topic, especially considering this is a market current which has nothing to do with the company's profitability.

     

    If you are up in arms about TSLA, you should be picketing AMZN's valuation. How about SalesForce? Yelp?

     

    I think for a profitable company, Google is kind of expensive, considering advertising on search results is still the only thing they actually make money on after 10 years (and they are great at pissing it away by trying a lot of other "experiments")
    26 Jan, 10:46 PM Reply Like
  • arondaniel
    , contributor
    Comments (564) | Send Message
     
    "...a cross country journey that virtually no one makes"

     

    Lol! That's why the other articles on Tesla have multiple 10's of pages of comments arguing back and forth about how Model S is no good for trips over 200 miles.
    26 Jan, 11:25 PM Reply Like
  • IncomeYield
    , contributor
    Comments (1419) | Send Message
     
    The idea and first implementation of electric powered cars dates back to the early 1800's. You call that entrepreneurism?
    26 Jan, 11:29 PM Reply Like
  • Dennis Baker
    , contributor
    Comments (1025) | Send Message
     
    A nit-pick. Companies are valued based on future profits, not current profit. The tricky bit is figuring out when those profits will start rolling in and how big they will be. Without making some assumptions in those regards, it's impossible to value a company.

     

    Edit: IMO investing in Tesla is about backing Musk's genius. There are great people in the world who have immense mental leverage and are capable of great things. These people are capable of results which companies with many times their resources cannot. Musk IMO is right up there with Steve Jobs and I think there is a good chance we'll see similar results from his efforts. I wouldn't bet the farm on Tesla, but I think it's a spectacular *speculative* investment.
    26 Jan, 11:44 PM Reply Like
  • idkmybffjill
    , contributor
    Comments (1498) | Send Message
     
    In that case, not many people in the past 200+ years are entrepreneurs since every successful business has more or less taken past ideas and connected them in unique ways or made them more profitable. Why isn't Xerox as large as MSFT or AAPL? After all, Apple copied the GUI from Xerox, and Microsoft copied it from Apple.

     

    IncomeYield, come talk to me after you build another PayPal, SpaceX, and Tesla. Oh that's right, you're probably too busy flirting with your dividend stocks Mr. "Income Yield."

     

    If anything, it won't be liberals, the tea party-ers, or even Wall Street that are degrading our country, but the nation of couch critics that we are today, enabled and armed with high speed internet connections and hiding behind laptop screens.

     

    P.S.
    The proper word is entrepreneurship or even entrepreneurialism, not "entrepreneurism." If you want to be taken seriously, learn proper word usage first.
    27 Jan, 12:19 AM Reply Like
  • Ford Prefect 1969
    , contributor
    Comments (2282) | Send Message
     
    @SharkDude "Company is still not close to posting a profit"

     

    This comment you have made several times needs reporting as misleading.

     

    Tesla has been posting a profit each quarter in 2013 (ever since exiting R&D phase).

     

    Q4 you and the rest of the shorts are going to get a shock in GAAP profit terms.
    27 Jan, 12:36 AM Reply Like
  • surferbroadband
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    Please watch you language. I don't want to report you. Bodily functions are not a topic that should go on Seeking Alpha. There are other sites that are more appropriate.
    27 Jan, 03:05 AM Reply Like
  • EV Lover
    , contributor
    Comments (4) | Send Message
     
    You'll be surprised that many Tesla owners who thought they wouldn't drive much but they ditched their gasoline cars and are now driving much much more than they ever did!

     

    An ordinary father and daughter drove across the US through adverse cold arctic, worst winter from the East and arrived safely in the hot sun of Los Angeles, CA just last Saturday, 01/25/2014.

     

    http://bit.ly/1n6mWct

     

    Come and greet the car that will be charging in Fremont supercharger, CA this Monday, 01/27/2014.

     

    What is so incredible is: It's spontaneous, it's unscripted, it's un-aided, it's grass-root movement, and

     

    That's even before any Tesla employees ever had a chance to test drive a whole cross country trip!

     

    Tesla teams will do that this coming weekend per Elon Musk tweet:

     

    http://bit.ly/1n6mUkM
    27 Jan, 08:02 AM Reply Like
  • John Bingham
    , contributor
    Comments (741) | Send Message
     
    SharkDude,

     

    You've had this explained many times so here it is again in very simple terms:

     

    Make a product and sell it for more than it costs to make and you have gross profit.

     

    Some of that profit goes in running costs like SG&A and R&D.

     

    Now decide what to do with what's left over.

     

    Either stand still on production levels and declare a profit to the company and a nice dividend to shareholders, or plow as much as is possible into future expansion while simultaneously building a small fund (if you can call almost a $billion so far small) for contingencies and times when additional capex is needed.

     

    GM, Ford etc. do the former, Tesla does the latter. Starting from small beginnings, which do you think will be worth more in the long run?
    27 Jan, 10:29 AM Reply Like
  • Majek_eight
    , contributor
    Comments (68) | Send Message
     
    Over the past few years all the Tesla critics were saying the car (and company) would not survive since you could only travel 200-300 miles on a single charge- it is only a "toy" for the wealthy to do local traveling, the auto market and demand for EVs is not big enough for Tesla to survive, competitors will just come out and make a better EV whenever they feel the need to. I can go on , but will stop here.
    So you can now travel across country (for free) in a Model S and all of a sudden it's now a "journey cross country that virtually no one makes" - so TSLA bulls should not talk about.

     

    Tesla has surpassed everyone's expectations and continues to grow. Do you think the first computer IBM made was profitable?- Based on this logic, why even make a computer in the first place, if you can't immediately make money off of it.

     

    Over time, Tesla will be profitable. There are still obstacles, but management has shown to be savvy enough to anticipate and overcome.
    You can continue invest only in companies that are making money- doesn't mean you will make money investing in them. By the time TSLA is profitable, you will have missed the majority of its growth, buy in at the peak and then be complaining that they missed earning expectations.
    27 Jan, 11:32 AM Reply Like
  • Majek_eight
    , contributor
    Comments (68) | Send Message
     
    @IncomeYield,
    No one is disputing that the idea of using electricity to power a car was tried over 100 years ago. The fact that Tesla has found a way to harness and control the energy to propel a car for 200-300 miles on a single charge the battery produces 100 years later is still considered entrepreneurial.

     

    In the late 1870's, Thomas Edison improved on a invention that had been around for 50 years- he improved the light bulb- made the light last longer, using less electricity. Is this not being entrepreneurial since light bulbs were already around?
    Anyone taking on an initiative and risk, no matter how old the technology, is considered to be an entrepreneur.
    27 Jan, 11:59 AM Reply Like
  • Beacon Hill Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (46) | Send Message
     
    What's your view on Amazon? No "solid profit" and valued at $175 billion.
    27 Jan, 01:26 PM Reply Like
  • Ford Prefect 1969
    , contributor
    Comments (2282) | Send Message
     
    "the company years away from a solid profit should not be worth 20 billion dollars"

     

    A Rolex that just tells the time should not be worth $100,000 - try arguing that one with the Rolex retailer. If you kept coming back daily with that argument he's have every reason to call security if not the nut house to come and take you away.

     

    The market says $20bn - take it or leave it. Your opinion is of no consequence and neither is mine.

     

    A prediction may have some value and that can be discussed, but "I'm angry it's too expensive" has zero merit. Can't afford it? Just buy something cheaper.
    27 Jan, 08:25 PM Reply Like
  • gen3
    , contributor
    Comments (291) | Send Message
     
    Oh I am sure that Stasi Amazon has some profit from their $600 million data storage deal with the CIA .
    29 Jan, 04:34 PM Reply Like
  • Bouchart
    , contributor
    Comments (726) | Send Message
     
    So does this mean that TSLA is profitable now? I'm guessing not.
    26 Jan, 10:27 PM Reply Like
  • idkmybffjill
    , contributor
    Comments (1498) | Send Message
     
    Does it matter? Do you run a multibillion $ business....at all? Talk afterwards.
    26 Jan, 10:34 PM Reply Like
  • Bouchart
    , contributor
    Comments (726) | Send Message
     
    Elon Musk is the P.T. Barnum of the automotive industry. It's all showmanship and PR buzz with that man.
    26 Jan, 10:54 PM Reply Like
  • IncomeYield
    , contributor
    Comments (1419) | Send Message
     
    Like PayPal, to disrupt and disintermediate the traditional dealer/franchise auto biz is not a bad idea.

     

    And like Apple, to "own" 10% of a market and maintain monster margins paid by the fanboys is also not a bad idea. :)
    26 Jan, 11:31 PM Reply Like
  • sam050787
    , contributor
    Comments (5) | Send Message
     
    I can't think of many companies like Tesla who have the aura of innovation and has a product that has redefined "cool"
    27 Jan, 08:02 AM Reply Like
  • Miro Kefurt
    , contributor
    Comments (608) | Send Message
     
    It took me in 1984 total of 45 hours to drive YUGO from Los Angeles to New York.

     

    About as exciting as saying instead of taking a jet, you can take a balloon and not use any jet fuel.

     

    You can also walk and take better part of the year to do it !!!!
    26 Jan, 11:26 PM Reply Like
  • chickensevil
    , contributor
    Comments (555) | Send Message
     
    Most new technology that has the potential to be great, starts off on the level or worse than what it is replacing. The theories are there, and the science is there, to support a recharge in under 5 minutes for a battery at least this size. Work is being done to make this happen. The only other game they have to figure out, is bumping the range up just a little bit more (say 400-500) and we will be perfect for EVs to totally replace ICE. After that it will only be the sky as the limit to where you can go after.
    27 Jan, 12:09 AM Reply Like
  • Twest
    , contributor
    Comments (135) | Send Message
     
    This thread is almost the lowest quality I have read yet on Tesla. Sad to see that fellow SA members are dishing such trash.

     

    Here's what we need to do - it's time to be rational. What Tesla is doing is worthwhile and it is improving the world for the long term for all of us.

     

    What Elon Musk has done is practically unimaginable. I seriously doubt that many people believed he could achieve what he has done to get to 80% coverage of the US in supercharging stations or produced a beautiful, high quality car that is selling so well.

     

    Here's the analysis we ought to be doing: It would be very nice to see what the total cost to drive a mile is for electric vehicles now and over time as compared to gas vehicles. Figure total costs over five years and a 10% opportunity cost on your money. That is challenge number one for all of us.

     

    I've made a number of comments on Tesla over the past two years and I am cheering for what is happening at Tesla. I'm a not a shareholder right now but I have been at various times in the last two years.
    26 Jan, 11:34 PM Reply Like
  • jackl1956
    , contributor
    Comments (105) | Send Message
     
    The shorts arguing every Tesla milestone, advances the electrification of transportation. Free marketing. Thanks guys.
    27 Jan, 12:05 AM Reply Like
  • bsbomber
    , contributor
    Comments (10) | Send Message
     
    If you choose to write a negative comment about Tesla, it is obvious that you have not driven a Tesla Model S. They are earthshattering incredible!!!
    27 Jan, 01:18 AM Reply Like
  • surferbroadband
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    Man that was a lot of comments. Gotta hit the sack. Blew my mind on everything.
    27 Jan, 03:09 AM Reply Like
  • themodfather360
    , contributor
    Comments (30) | Send Message
     
    Why is it 3.6k miles. Should be 2800. They put the superchargers in the wrong place.
    27 Jan, 04:06 AM Reply Like
  • Dan Fichana
    , contributor
    Comments (1743) | Send Message
     
    That's not bad, kind of makes the Ford electric one they did a few years ago a joke.

     

    6 days is reasonable for a cross country trip, i mean you have to eat, sleep, and use restrooms, not to mention if there was bad weather, dealing with snow and such.

     

    600 miles a day- that is completly reasonable.
    27 Jan, 05:14 AM Reply Like
  • JRP3
    , contributor
    Comments (7363) | Send Message
     
    The level of commentary from the bear argument is quite encouraging from the bull perspective.
    27 Jan, 08:59 AM Reply Like
  • Andy Zelenak
    , contributor
    Comments (281) | Send Message
     
    This is a historic event. I'd put it on par with the first flight across the Atlantic, or completion of the transcontinental railroad.
    27 Jan, 09:32 AM Reply Like
  • Pairs Perfect
    , contributor
    Comments (60) | Send Message
     
    Tesla's safety record is an under appreciated factor in the bullish argument.

     

    There are many families who will pay a premium for the peace of mind of driving in the only brand of car not associated with a fatality or even a serious injury.

     

    I assume that the law of big numbers will one day remove this claim, but by then the statistical safety advantage will be established as part of the brand's equity.

     

    ( Long stock and Model S)
    27 Jan, 10:49 AM Reply Like
  • DSurber
    , contributor
    Comment (1) | Send Message
     
    I think the best analogy is to June 28, 1939 when the Dixie Clipper, a Boeing 314 flying boat operated by Pan Am, left Port Washington, NY for the first regularly scheduled transatlantic passenger service. What John and Jill accomplished this past week was not a stunt. It was a normal road trip by a normal Model S owner. It was noteworthy not because it was special, but rather because it was routine.

     

    There have been many coast-to-coast road trips in EVs and in Model Ss. But all required substantial perseverance. They were not routine. John and Jill's trip was special because it demonstrated that coast-to-coast travel in an EV is now routine. Anyone with Model S (and a modicum of sense) can do the same.

     

    Lindbergh's flight was a stunt. It wasn't something that just anyone could duplicate. But after June 28, 1939, anyone with the not inconsiderable sum of $375 could fly from Port Washington to Southhampton. It was routine.

     

    Stunts are extraordinary. They demonstrate what is possible but they don't change the day to day lives of ordinary people. Scheduled transatlantic passenger air service and routine coast-to-coast travel in an electric automobile did and will change the lives of ordinary people. True relatively few people will ever drive coast-to-coast in an EV, but many people will routinely take other long road trips. John and Jill's trip is a milestone because it vividly illustrates that road trips in a Model S are ordinary. And that's a great thing.
    27 Jan, 11:47 AM Reply Like
  • azgog
    , contributor
    Comments (145) | Send Message
     
    As the reality of the Supercharger network sinks in and more people realize that they can now purchase a high performance car whose fuel costs between 25% of gas (at home) and zero on long trips, the reservation list is going to explode.

     

    As will the heads of the Big Oil industry owners.
    27 Jan, 03:52 PM Reply Like
  • JRP3
    , contributor
    Comments (7363) | Send Message
     
    "Two days after completing the first ever coast to coast crossing of the United States in a Model S relying only on Superchargers, John Glenney walked into the Tesla factory in Fremont, CA, to a standing ovation."

     

    "Two years ago, he drove his Roadster from Washington DC to San Francisco, charging the car at campgrounds along the way. He documented the experience on a website called PluginRoadTrip. Later, he traded in the Roadster for a Model S and has since bought two more of the vehicles using earnings from Tesla stock he had bought when it was priced at $22 a share."

     

    "After 2,500 miles on the road, Glenney declared on the forum that the Model S was a five star touring car, singling out its comfort, space, and entertainment system for praise. And once the trip was complete, he was just as impressed. In 46 years of driving, he has owned a lot of cars. But this one? "It's better than any other touring car I've ever had.""

     

    http://bit.ly/1fun2oO
    28 Jan, 05:55 PM Reply Like
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