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Gentex (GNTX) +5.9% premarket on a NYT report the U.S. government will announce that all...

Gentex (GNTX) +5.9% premarket on a NYT report the U.S. government will announce that all passenger vehicles must include rearview cameras by 2014. Government statistics say 228 people, many of them children, die every year and ~17K are injured in backover accidents involving passenger vehicles. GNTX markets displays used in conjunction with rearview cameras in autos.
Comments (6)
  • Let's be realistic... anyone and their mom could put together a camera + LCD system for this purpose...
    28 Feb 2012, 09:29 AM Reply Like
  • You signed up for "free" healthcare. Now you must take orders.
    28 Feb 2012, 09:38 AM Reply Like
  • More laws?

     

    Enough already.
    28 Feb 2012, 09:42 AM Reply Like
  • If you could just doff the neanderthal brain, this could be a cool idea in addition to the safety aspect. If web connected, the camera could be used for so many other things.

     

    Imagine:
    1) Avoiding driveway stuff.
    2) Easier parallel parking.
    3) A camera app could turn this device into another car theft alarm if the imagery were used as a motion detection device.
    4) Accident investigation.
    5) Where is my teenager going?

     

    If the camera was a cell phone quality device this would turn a car into another ecommerce device where the owner could sell the imagery for:

     

    1) Crowd sourced weather/road conditions.
    2) Coupled with GPS, companies could monitor their business sites from crowd sourced street imagery.
    3) Interesting security apps.
    28 Feb 2012, 10:00 AM Reply Like
  • Remember. You're not driving an automobile. You're driving a 6,000lb. computer. Soon, the government will be driving it for you to where they want you to go.
    28 Feb 2012, 12:57 PM Reply Like
  • Evolution is tough. The addition of a camera chip + electronics doesn't add much to what is already there.

     

    From the eetimes:

     

    "Motoring with microprocessors

     

    Jim Turley

     

    8/11/2003 9:00 AM EDT
    Thanks to the magic of microprocessors and embedded systems, our cars are becoming safer, more efficient, and entertaining.

     

    By my estimates, the average middle-class American household includes over 40 embedded processors. About half are in the garage. Cars make a great vehicle (sorry) for deploying embedded processors in huge numbers. These processors provide a ready source of power, ventilation, and mounting space and sell in terrific quantities. Besides, they're cool. Better still, automotive processors add sexy high-profile features that car buyers will pay for. Processors provide better profit margins than leather seats, undercoating, or "convenience lighting groups."

     

    How many embedded processors does your car have? Go ahead, guess. If you've got a late-model luxury sedan, two or three processors might be obvious in the GPS navigation system or the automatic distance control. Yet you'd still be off by a factor of 25 or 50. The current 7-Series BMW and S-class Mercedes boast about 100 processors apiece. A relatively low-profile Volvo still has 50 to 60 baby processors on board. Even a boring low-cost econobox has a few dozen different microprocessors in it. Your transportation appliance probably has more chips than your Internet appliance.

     

    The statistics are startling. New cars now frequently carry 200 pounds of electronics and more than a mile of wiring. Processors and their peripherals have squeezed into the side- and rear-view mirrors, wheel rims, headliner, gas tank, seat cushions, headrests, bumpers, and every other crevice of a modern car. Dashboard electronics such as the radio, air conditioning, and satellite navigation system are just the obvious ones. Even more MIPS and MHz are lurking under the surface."
    29 Feb 2012, 09:49 AM Reply Like
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