Gulf researchers spot deep-sea creatures living near Gulf spill site


Aquatic life appears to be flourishing again at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico near the site of the 2010 BP (BP +0.5%) oil spill, according to a team of scientists that concluded a month-long excursion to the area.

A ride in a submersible 5K ft. feet below sea level revealed that eels, shrimp, various fish species, sea anemones and other deep-sea creatures are making a comeback in the region where the group had seen only one crab in a similar seven-hour journey four years ago after the Macando well blowout.

The scientists say they have found no evidence that the chemistry and microbiology under layers of deepwater sediment had changed.

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Comments (10)
  • HedgeFundConsulting
    , contributor
    Comments (23) | Send Message
     
    Perhaps all the "sharks" are onshore suing BP for people who were never damaged by the oil spill.
    6 May 2014, 02:32 PM Reply Like
  • zaq12345
    , contributor
    Comment (1) | Send Message
     
    Just goes to show that "Mother Nature" can handle what "Mother Nature" makes.
    6 May 2014, 02:59 PM Reply Like
  • Derrick Hand
    , contributor
    Comments (37) | Send Message
     
    Oil is a natural substance and has no long term affects. 1000's of BO seep into the ocean from natural outcrops annually. Had this been nuclear power meltdown the consequences would have been very bad!
    6 May 2014, 03:02 PM Reply Like
  • King Rat
    , contributor
    Comments (1610) | Send Message
     
    This is not quite the good news we want.
    From the link:
    (Joye has studied concentrations of hydrocarbons in the sea-floor sediment for years, and has collected samples of earth in which weathered material – similar to crude that has been sun-cooked for weeks – has lingered underneath the surface near the spill like a layer of mulch in a garden. Much of her work focuses on why microorganisms have not eaten away at the hydrocarbons in the four years since the spill.

     

    “There’s really nothing happening in these sediments; it’s just sitting there,” she said. As for the sea life above the ocean floor, things are returning to normal – at least, it appears that way, she said. “Are they there in the same numbers as before the spill? Are they healthy? I don’t know. It’s an improvement, but it doesn’t mean the system is fine.”)
    6 May 2014, 03:49 PM Reply Like
  • BAHAMAS1
    , contributor
    Comments (5120) | Send Message
     
    Should send down "judge" barbier with a snorkel to confirm this abundance of aquatic life.
    Maybe it would clear his head !
    6 May 2014, 05:38 PM Reply Like
  • Chazuu
    , contributor
    Comments (272) | Send Message
     
    What "scientists"? Who funded them? Who is putting out the great news?
    It would be really nice to know where this "news" came from.
    6 May 2014, 07:56 PM Reply Like
  • Chazuu
    , contributor
    Comments (272) | Send Message
     
    Derrick Hand -
    Arsenic is also a natural substance as are lead, radium, mercury, etc. I would prefer not to have high concentrations of any of them or many other natural substances polluting the water where I live or work. I dare say you would prefer to have any oil spills happen far away from where you live, no matter how "natural" oil may be.
    6 May 2014, 10:03 PM Reply Like
  • Derrick Hand
    , contributor
    Comments (37) | Send Message
     
    @Chazuu
    I have been in oil up to my neck and probably ingested some too! In comparison to nuclear fuel and the waste ....oil is very safe especially in comparison to nuclear. Oil wells are practically producing in my back yard currently.

     

    MY POINT...I would rather a barrel of oil being spilled in my yard (temporary mess) but would not like a single gram of nuclear since it could affect your DNA for 1000 years.
    7 May 2014, 09:42 AM Reply Like
  • Chazuu
    , contributor
    Comments (272) | Send Message
     
    Derrick Hand-
    No question oil is safer than nuclear. That isn't really the question. What is concerning is the efforts of oil producers and all other extraction industries to go ahead and pollute and let the public clean up the mess. It is free enterprise when there are profits to be made but very socialistic when the cost of cleaning up the environmental mess is passed along to the public.
    I live in Pennsylvania where for all of my life I have seen the casual pollution of our water table, waterways, erosion of topsoil and acid rain, smog and other environmental problems by our coal industry. The companies do their work, get out and leave their pollution behind. West Virginia is even worse.
    Giant strides are being made in using alternate sources of energy. The company where I work gets 100% of its electric needs from wind power. Two of my friends have their houses heated geo thermally. (I would have it installed too but it costs about $16,000. I'm 83 so I would not likely get a payback in my life time.)
    We will certainly need oil for fuel for a good while, but the need to convert as quickly as feasible to less polluting sources of power is urgent.
    7 May 2014, 10:30 AM Reply Like
  • Derrick Hand
    , contributor
    Comments (37) | Send Message
     
    @Chazuu
    I cannot speak to coal since I was raised in the oil patch but TX, OK, ARK, NM, and LA have had oil production and the associated fracture stimulation for many years and there is very little if any residual pollution. Imagine a life without the fossil fuels......man would be back to the stone age! EnvirionMENTALISTS want control and one only needs to follow the money to see that as per Al Gore.

     

    The giant strides of the alternate energy sources are for the most part incremental at best when one views the various methods constituting less than 2% of our energy needs. Wind is the best of the generators but has many negative aspects and will never totally replace fossil fuels. I live in TX and our ranch has many of these beasts near. My niece asked me why we have those things in TX when we have fossil fuels and my answer was because the Kennedys don't like them on their land. West TX looks like a wind turbine forest!!

     

    All of the alternate energy sources produce less than 2% of our current needs as a country to include Bio, wind, solar, etc.
    8 May 2014, 09:50 AM Reply Like
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