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Though gas prices are shooting higher, U.S. demand for hybrid cars is declining, as consumer opt...

Though gas prices are shooting higher, U.S. demand for hybrid cars is declining, as consumer opt for traditional cars that can promise similar gas mileage at a lower price. Hybrids accounted for just 2.2% of U.S. auto sales last year, down from 2.8% in 2009. Meanwhile, demand for fuel-efficient traditional cars such as the Chevy Cruze (GM) and Ford's (F) Fiesta and Focus is surging. (yesterday)
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Comments (6)
  • wyostocks
    , contributor
    Comments (8071) | Send Message
     
    Hybrids are not selling because Obama hasn't pumped enough money into the industry. Another 10 or 20 trillion dollars should cause a real big bump in sales.
    28 Feb 2012, 01:14 PM Reply Like
  • Tony Petroski
    , contributor
    Comments (6373) | Send Message
     
    "Meanwhile, demand for fuel-efficient traditional cars such as the Chevy Cruze (http://bit.ly/zlWDMt) and Ford's (http://bit.ly/pXMU9v) Fiesta and Focus is surging."

     

    (directed at the young copywriter)

     

    People, the world over, not just Americans, want to get from point "A" to point "B" as efficiently and comfortably as possible.

     

    This is the way of the world and (couldn't resist) go ahead and cuddle your "green world" as the real world perks along.
    28 Feb 2012, 01:19 PM Reply Like
  • jimdice
    , contributor
    Comments (10) | Send Message
     
    I get the impression this story has been overplayed by the media and the US Auto industry. Has any journalist realized that these numbers overlook the major fact that Japanese auto sector was haunted by issues last year on a historic scale? All Japanese auto companies suffered shortages of parts and factory production from the Fukushima disaster and flooding in Thailand. The cost of materials to produce these cars also surged, preventing them from providing the 'no money down for 60 month' deals that are currently being flogged at your local GM and Ford dealerships. A friend of mine who manages sales at a Japanese luxury car dealership told me last year, 'we can't compete against the US and German companies.' He said they didn't have enough cars, and not enough new cars, while many competitors offered substantial discounts and credit arrangements that they could simply not afford to offer. Overall, I'm disappointed with the media for missing these facts.
    28 Feb 2012, 01:46 PM Reply Like
  • Gary Jakacky
    , contributor
    Comments (2530) | Send Message
     
    $3500 for a used SAAB that gets 30 mpg, or $35,000 for a volt that gets 35 miles in one charge. YOU MAKE THE CALL!
    28 Feb 2012, 02:25 PM Reply Like
  • Tdot
    , contributor
    Comments (3909) | Send Message
     
    And that gallon of gas to go 30 miles in the Saab (or any other car that cost $35,000 when new) will cost you $4, maybe $5 this summer; while the Volt will cost about $1 in electricity to go the same distance.

     

    Any time you compare the cost a fully depreciated used car versus a new car, the new car looks like a bad deal. Heck - I could compare the costs of my $350 worn out beater that still runs just fine to your overpriced $3500 POS, and make you look like a foolish idiot too.

     

    At least be fair and compare apples to apples.
    29 Feb 2012, 08:54 PM Reply Like
  • itsAme
    , contributor
    Comments (99) | Send Message
     
    I think that is the point, Tdot. A used car and a new car is apples to apples here in America and pretty much everywhere else. Why spend so much money on a new car that is marginally better?

     

    REAL PEOPLE in the REAL WORLD don't do that. They are much better off, and so is the environment, buying that used car. Thats the point
    26 Mar 2012, 10:29 AM Reply Like
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