Seeking Alpha

Jobless Claims at 297K

  • Initial Jobless Claims: -24K to 297K vs. 317K consensus, 321K prior (revised) (319K prior).
  • Continuing claims -9K to 2.66M.
Comments (23)
  • BruceInKY
    , contributor
    Comments (437) | Send Message
     
    We have always been at war with Oceania.
    15 May 2014, 08:46 AM Reply Like
  • GaltMachine
    , contributor
    Comments (1464) | Send Message
     
    In 1984, George Orwell wrote, "Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past."
    15 May 2014, 08:59 AM Reply Like
  • Moon Kil Woong
    , contributor
    Comments (11564) | Send Message
     
    Nice quotes all. Another ballyhooed statistically insignificant change people will trade out of sheer ignorance. A market made out of 6 year olds is perfectly efficient but can be equally devoid of rationality. Sorry this isn't a quote.
    15 May 2014, 09:06 AM Reply Like
  • IgnisFatuus
    , contributor
    Comments (2163) | Send Message
     
    Moon, <A market made out of 6 year olds is perfectly efficient but can be equally devoid of rationality. Sorry this isn't a quote. >

     

    But it will be one day....
    15 May 2014, 09:31 AM Reply Like
  • David at Imperial Beach
    , contributor
    Comments (4375) | Send Message
     
    "A market made out of 6 year olds is perfectly efficient but can be equally devoid of rationality." --Moon Kil Woong

     

    It is now!
    15 May 2014, 10:45 AM Reply Like
  • bbro
    , contributor
    Comments (10428) | Send Message
     
    And number of people quitting their jobs has hit a 68 month high....(this number
    does not include someone retiring or a job transfer)....
    15 May 2014, 08:58 AM Reply Like
  • bbro
    , contributor
    Comments (10428) | Send Message
     
    And...Twenty-four (24) percent of all small business owners reported job openings they could not fill in the current period.....a 6 year high....
    15 May 2014, 09:14 AM Reply Like
  • GaltMachine
    , contributor
    Comments (1464) | Send Message
     
    Maybe the answer lies in the fact that extended benefits discourage people from working. Perhaps they make more after tax income by not working which would be a horrible incentive if true.

     

    It certainly is a bizarre state of affairs.
    15 May 2014, 10:30 AM Reply Like
  • mrdirt
    , contributor
    Comments (636) | Send Message
     
    The Last Sentence from the NFIB sums up the Optimistic view.
    "Maybe it's real this time?" http://bit.ly/1nSmzSE
    15 May 2014, 10:56 AM Reply Like
  • IgnisFatuus
    , contributor
    Comments (2163) | Send Message
     
    bbro, thoughts on why small business owners have so many job openings they can't fill?
    15 May 2014, 09:34 AM Reply Like
  • David at Imperial Beach
    , contributor
    Comments (4375) | Send Message
     
    Small businesses typically require an individual to have lots of expertise in lots of different areas because they are trying to replace an old-timer who learned all those things on the job over the years as the company gradually became more complex. They typically won't be able to find a single person who will have nearly all the listed skills, and the small business will not have set aside funds for training a new person on the job.

     

    My father, for instance, worked in a small John Deere farm equipment dealership when I was growing up. When we moved to the city and he quit, they had to replace him with three employees because they could not find a single person to do all the things he had taken on over the years.

     

    Big businesses, in contrast, want very specialized employees with great depth in their chosen field, and good communication skills so they can work well on a team. They also have bigger employee education budgets so they can more easily fill in the gaps of a prospective new employee's skill set.
    15 May 2014, 10:53 AM Reply Like
  • marloo
    , contributor
    Comments (17) | Send Message
     
    Unemployment claims has nothing to do with real unemployment, except the number of workers who still qualify to receive benefits. The fact that people are still being laid off is the real issue. America has one of the planets worst education systems, and does not teach work ethics. That may be the reason qualified help cant be found.
    15 May 2014, 10:07 AM Reply Like
  • OptionManiac
    , contributor
    Comments (3392) | Send Message
     
    Worst education system and lack of work ethics? I think not. We work more hours per week than any other western nation - take fewer vacation days - have a higher productivity rate - and our education system is not dreadful. It is in certain areas, of course, but I had two ids go through the public school system and both are doing remarkably well.

     

    I do not blame teachers and educators for pitfalls in education - I blame parents who do not step on their kids at home and make sure they are doing the work required outside of class.
    15 May 2014, 10:39 AM Reply Like
  • David at Imperial Beach
    , contributor
    Comments (4375) | Send Message
     
    The fact remains that a high proportion of young people "graduate" the education system in this country each year without some or all of the basic skills they will need in a work environment. You as a responsible parent can blame irresponsible parents if you want to, but that doesn't help all the skill-less kids that should be contributing members of the workforce and are not.

     

    Personally, I think we pay our educators enough that we are entitled to expect better performance from our schools. Somehow one room schools in Africa are able to teach their students to read and write and add and subtract without a calculator. Don't tell me that the same can't be done in the more comfortable school environments provided here in America.
    15 May 2014, 11:05 AM Reply Like
  • Aristotle2k
    , contributor
    Comments (261) | Send Message
     
    Have you even been to any of these public schools? I highly doubt you have with your last statement.
    15 May 2014, 12:07 PM Reply Like
  • OptionManiac
    , contributor
    Comments (3392) | Send Message
     
    $30,000 a year? And you want the best?

     

    My kids took the same calculus in high school that I had in college. Trust me, kids learn to read and write. Yes, parts of our system are broken. An acquaintance is a 1st grade teacher in a local city school. He has 35 kids - some who act up and disrupt the class (one threw a chair at him). He does his best. Here in Ohio our income taxes have been lowered, but so has money to the school system. Sometimes you do get what you pay for.
    15 May 2014, 11:20 AM Reply Like
  • Paulo Santos
    , contributor
    Comments (24957) | Send Message
     
    $30k a year must be below entry level, in the U.S.
    15 May 2014, 12:47 PM Reply Like
  • OptionManiac
    , contributor
    Comments (3392) | Send Message
     
    The average entry level is $33,227.

     

    http://bit.ly/RHSM3E

     

    Only social workers and journalists start off with less.
    16 May 2014, 07:18 AM Reply Like
  • Paulo Santos
    , contributor
    Comments (24957) | Send Message
     
    Yes, as I said, $30k has to be below entry level...
    16 May 2014, 07:32 AM Reply Like
  • OptionManiac
    , contributor
    Comments (3392) | Send Message
     
    Yet those we entrust to educate our children are among the lowest paid.
    16 May 2014, 08:22 AM Reply Like
  • Paulo Santos
    , contributor
    Comments (24957) | Send Message
     
    That's somewhat to be expected, on two grounds:
    * First, teachers are very numerous - there's a lot of them. If you were to pay them handsomely, it would get incredibly expensive;
    * Second, teaching at K12 level is not a rare skill. You just have to pay enough to get enough decent teachers.

     

    It might not be the case with the U.S., but usually teacher's salaries are actually set artificially high because they avoid a free market by being paid by State authorities.

     

    Also, these are entry-level salaries we're talking about. They don't stay there. http://bit.ly/1gaCD1N
    16 May 2014, 08:27 AM Reply Like
  • GaltMachine
    , contributor
    Comments (1464) | Send Message
     
    Two points on this discussion:

     

    - doesn't take into account pensions/benefits which for teachers are substantial and on a cash-adjusted basis valuable.
    - $33k for a starting job that only requires about 3/4 of a year's work or less is pretty good in my book especially right out of college for someone in their early 20's.

     

    So I don't think they are underpaid nor overpaid but I do think competition in teaching would be a very good thing just like competition in everything else.
    16 May 2014, 10:52 AM Reply Like
  • Hendershott
    , contributor
    Comments (1619) | Send Message
     
    They don't have the skills? Like what skills are we talking about? Ability to follow instructions?, spread sheets, ability to read? run a CNC machine? What? What skills can anyone expect to get for $10 an hour anyway? Hire a kid right out of high school or with a two year college degree with 4-5 years experience at sales or programming or something else for $10/hr or $12? Where would anyone find someone like that?
    15 May 2014, 06:36 PM Reply Like
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