General Electric Company declares $0.22 dividend


General Electric Company (GE) declares $0.22/share quarterly dividend, in line with previous.

Forward yield 3.25%

Payable July 25; for shareholders of record June 23; ex-div June 19.

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Comments (29)
  • dpluchin
    , contributor
    Comments (79) | Send Message
     
    Waiting for that idiot GE board to bring the Div. back to what it was in 2008. Remember? The lie?
    6 Jun 2014, 12:19 PM Reply Like
  • wizwor
    , contributor
    Comments (144) | Send Message
     
    We'll get a nickel in December.
    6 Jun 2014, 12:34 PM Reply Like
  • tribefan
    , contributor
    Comments (5) | Send Message
     
    dpluchin - While I can understand your bitterness, I don't understand why you are continuing to punish yourself? Get past it, you'll live longer.
    What's done is done. What would you prefer, a bankrupt GE or, a company that is fighting it's way back and, for the share holders benefit I might add. At the time you had a choice to keep or sell your shares. It seems like you chose to keep. When it comes to my money I follow my instincts. I do what I feel is right. You apparently concurred with what G.E. was saying at that time. If you want to rag on someone, blame the bloody people that brought the collapse of the market about. It was certainly not GE's fault.

     

    Now put this behind you and go forward, there's money to be made.
    6 Jun 2014, 01:09 PM Reply Like
  • mydogmoe
    , contributor
    Comments (1320) | Send Message
     
    Very narrow minded view. Almost every financial institution slashed or eliminated dividends during the financial meltdown. Remember GE was primarily a financial institution with over 60% profits being generated by GE Capital. It is a different company now and a more diversified one..
    7 Jun 2014, 10:20 AM Reply Like
  • Mikie713
    , contributor
    Comments (546) | Send Message
     
    Meanwhile since the meltdown, nearly ALL financial institutions have recovered - handsomely - with the help of the federal government - including $GE, some have even prospered, including $GE ... some have avoided some of their or all of their corporate taxes including $GE ... some have hoards of that cash sitting offshore ... including $GE ... but I dare anyone here to find me another "financial" institution the size of $GE that slashed its dividend by 2/3, and will not even come close to returning to that level projected out over a decade after they recovered. And here's what makes that even worse -- these "financial" institutions have all but eliminated an investors option a getting a return on their money except through dividends. The system is more and more rigged against the investors of the likes of $GE ... and all you people can do is shrug your shoulders and say "very narrow minded view". Very narrow minded indeed.
    7 Jun 2014, 11:25 AM Reply Like
  • mydogmoe
    , contributor
    Comments (1320) | Send Message
     
    Simple plan Mikie, sell GE when you can see disaster like everybody else. You could have picked up new shares for $6. Nobody's fault but your own. You may not have the guts for the stock market...
    7 Jun 2014, 11:50 AM Reply Like
  • True North_
    , contributor
    Comments (20) | Send Message
     
    Can we all say "Bank of America"?
    7 Jun 2014, 05:23 PM Reply Like
  • Chris McLeod
    , contributor
    Comments (56) | Send Message
     
    DPLUCHIN, You need to leave the past behind you...If you don't trust the board you should probably not invest in this stock. I'm sorry you have a bad taste in your mouth but it seems like the board is currently making some good decisions.
    6 Jun 2014, 12:49 PM Reply Like
  • A Newell
    , contributor
    Comments (508) | Send Message
     
    What did this guy expect in the economic melt down that ensued? The company has emerged and looks very healthy...a little blip in the dividend should be too much of a concern.
    6 Jun 2014, 12:55 PM Reply Like
  • Mikie713
    , contributor
    Comments (546) | Send Message
     
    A little blip? They slashed it from .31 to .10. Two thirds. Factoring in inflation and what not, at the current pace, you won't see the dividend at that same rate until 2021, while GE hoards tax free billions off shore. Investors have to stop worshiping the robber baron criminality that has become commonplace and get their heads out of their asses. But let's put the past behind us, shall we? The current board is making some good decisions. Yeah.
    6 Jun 2014, 01:09 PM Reply Like
  • gkarpeck
    , contributor
    Comments (45) | Send Message
     
    chill
    6 Jun 2014, 01:18 PM Reply Like
  • mjs_28s
    , contributor
    Comments (1981) | Send Message
     
    "while GE hoards tax free billions off shore."

     

    Um.....that is a symptom of another problem called over taxation in the US.

     

    You also have to consider that GE is a world wide corporation so how much is supposed to be brought home? All of it? Some of the profits are made from investment, labor, research and development all done off-shore for what could be an entirely off-shore market for some of the products.

     

    Don't be so myopic. This is a global economy with most businesses having some world wide reach.

     

    In the case of GE, less than half of its revenue in 2013 came from the US. Also, less than half of GEs assets are in the US. Less than half of their employees are in the US.

     

    For the taxes, look at page 113 of their 2013 annual report.
    7 Jun 2014, 01:08 AM Reply Like
  • Mikie713
    , contributor
    Comments (546) | Send Message
     
    Mjs, you not only drink the kool-aid, you drink it by the truckload. GE comes in a close second place for having booked the most profits offshore. The company has 18 subsidiaries in offshore tax havens, including three in Bermuda and one in the Bahamas. The industrial giant has so deftly exploited offshore loopholes, and other tax breaks that between 2008 and 2012, despite earning $27.5 billion in profits over those years they paid no federal income taxes. What GE does spend big bucks on is lobbying to protect its tax breaks. GE hired 48 lobbyists – more than any other company – to protect a tax break that helps the company shift billions in profits offshore. In that time $GE threw out a paltry dividend to their shareholders some where in the neighborhood of .12-.15 per share. Granted, US codes aren't corporate friendly, okay? But seriously, $GE is awash is tax free profits and NONE OF THAT COMES BACK TO US! You look at page 113! More lies, more manipulation, and less for those who've invested in this criminal enterprise.
    7 Jun 2014, 02:59 PM Reply Like
  • mjs_28s
    , contributor
    Comments (1981) | Send Message
     
    "Mjs, you not only drink the kool-aid, you drink it by the truckload"

     

    Just because a business has off shore locations does not meant that it is all for tax purposes. Are you sure you are not projecting your kool-aid drinking onto others?

     

    I also already told you exactly where you, and anyone else can see how much they paid in taxes along with their tax rates.

     

    So your comment " and other tax breaks that between 2008 and 2012, despite earning $27.5 billion in profits over those years they paid no federal income taxes. " is just flat out wrong. I think you are parroting what was true at one time but here is some FACT for you, no kool-aid involved.

     

    GECC and GE combinded in 2011 paid a rate of 28.5%; 14.6% combined in 2013; 4.2% combined 2013 (due to GECC getting refund while GE itself came in at 9.8%).

     

    But GE must be lying because you know different. I wonder if the SEC knows?

     

    "But seriously, $GE is awash is tax free profits and NONE OF THAT COMES BACK TO US! You look at page 113!" So if a company has divisions in other countries that do business outside of the US those profits are supposed to come back to the US for what reason?

     

    " In that time $GE threw out a paltry dividend to their shareholders some where in the neighborhood of .12-.15 per share. "

     

    GE pays $0.22 per share right now which is 70% payout ratio. What should it be? 80%? 90%? Heck, all of it so they cannot grow or create new businesses?

     

    Then you close with "You look at page 113! More lies, more manipulation, and less for those who've invested in this criminal enterprise."

     

    Sounds like you are the kool-aid drinker and since you are you assume that everyone else drinks it too yet you deny the facts that I gave you while citing a news bit. Ok. Report GE to the SEC for a false reports. Clearly you and what ever news feed you get your information from clearly knows more than the audited GE report and SEC do.
    7 Jun 2014, 03:37 PM Reply Like
  • Mikie713
    , contributor
    Comments (546) | Send Message
     
    Too big to fail, but when they do fail -- the stockholders take the hit. To the tune of 67% dividend cut that never returns. Yeah. Chill. $GE is the King Corp of spinning lies and manipulation, earnings that no one ever challenges while pointing fingers at the WH for fudging UE numbers. Chill. Right.
    6 Jun 2014, 01:31 PM Reply Like
  • Chris McLeod
    , contributor
    Comments (56) | Send Message
     
    Mikie713, Investing is a risk.... You can put your money in a money market or bank if you dont' want that risk...
    6 Jun 2014, 01:50 PM Reply Like
  • Mikie713
    , contributor
    Comments (546) | Send Message
     
    Thanks, I ... missed that lesson in school. Parting shot: $GE market cap nearly double that of $INTC. $INTC dividend at .225 ... nearly the same as $GE. Except $INTC was there two years ago and $GE only just arrived. Why?
    6 Jun 2014, 02:04 PM Reply Like
  • JustAnotherOpinionThatCould...
    , contributor
    Comments (143) | Send Message
     
    I don't recall there being a correlation between market cap and dividend when comparing stocks. That's a new one to me.
    6 Jun 2014, 02:35 PM Reply Like
  • User 20118131
    , contributor
    Comments (45) | Send Message
     
    Actually you are looking at the wrong number, instead you need to look at the outstanding shares for your answer. Its a difference in equity.

     

    " $GE market cap nearly double that of $INTC. $INTC dividend at .225 ... nearly the same as $GE. Except $INTC was there two years ago and $GE only just arrived. Why? "

     

    But GE has more than double the shares outstanding as INTC (10B vs. 4.98B) thus diluting its EPS and cash flow for dividends more than INTC. If the shares outstanding was equal then you would have a valid argument. It would also depend on the payout ratio, I believe as well.

     

    Long GE and INTC
    6 Jun 2014, 04:35 PM Reply Like
  • JD in NJ
    , contributor
    Comments (1634) | Send Message
     
    Suggesting that the dividend per share should be correlated directly with the market capitalization while ignoring share count is somewhere between absurd and pitiable.
    6 Jun 2014, 05:31 PM Reply Like
  • Chris McLeod
    , contributor
    Comments (56) | Send Message
     
    I've never seen such a hostile crowd of Owners of a company. GE has some many owners that hate the company...if you hate the company you should sell it and buy honeywell...
    6 Jun 2014, 04:49 PM Reply Like
  • Ken the investor
    , contributor
    Comment (1) | Send Message
     
    I bought g e when it was 10$ a few years back so I feel good with the growth and dividend. Perhaps the rest of you should have done some dollar cost averaging .
    6 Jun 2014, 11:43 PM Reply Like
  • joegillam
    , contributor
    Comments (1084) | Send Message
     
    They could well afford to work the dividend back up at something more than 2 cents at a time. I own it and a lot of it, but that doesn't mean I play golf and have drinks with Jeff and the Board. Everything in this world could be better. GE is no exception, except that it could be a lot better.

     

    Joe In Georgia
    7 Jun 2014, 08:17 AM Reply Like
  • mjs_28s
    , contributor
    Comments (1981) | Send Message
     
    "They could well afford to work the dividend back up at something more than 2 cents at a time"

     

    How much more? They are currently sitting around a 70% payout ratio. Are they not supposed to retain 30% so they can expand markets or develop new businesses? Or did you make that comment without actually knowing how much of their earnings that they give back to the holders?
    7 Jun 2014, 12:57 PM Reply Like
  • joegillam
    , contributor
    Comments (1084) | Send Message
     
    mjs.......

     

    They made a pledge several years ago to return the dividend to its pre Feb 09 level. I just don't think that the company has had the share holder in mind in all of its actions. And troubling is the almost 200 billion in profits that is held outside of the US. I think that they have returned the minimum to shareholders as opposed to a more just amount. The dividend could be brought back quicker and the company still stay within the guidelines of a good operation.
    I'm in at a good share price, hold a bunch and it has done well for me both in growth and dividend return. But, like so many others in the same boat with me I just don't have that warm fuzzy feeling that I have with my other holdings.

     

    Joe In Georgia
    7 Jun 2014, 02:43 PM Reply Like
  • mjs_28s
    , contributor
    Comments (1981) | Send Message
     
    "And troubling is the almost 200 billion in profits that is held outside of the US."

     

    that is symptomatic of government and tax policy. In addition, not every dime that GE makes comes from US production and sales so why would all of it come back to the US?

     

    GM has auto manufacturing in China making cars for China from China source materials. Should all that money come back to the US as well for taxation on top of what was already paid in China for Chinese produced cars? Same issue with GE or any number of other businesses that do business world wide. Add in the financing that they also do all over the world from divisions they are not located state side, no need to bring those dollars out of the area from which they were created in.

     

    " I just don't think that the company has had the share holder in mind in all of its actions." 70% dividend payout ratio and spinning off the finance arm soon. They will be leaner and meaner going forward without a huge part of their revenue being volatile and tied to financial division.

     

    I understand the not trusting them, but give the spin-off time to work.
    7 Jun 2014, 03:46 PM Reply Like
  • joegillam
    , contributor
    Comments (1084) | Send Message
     
    mjs..........The money is profit that should be put to work or distributed to the share holders. If it's going to be reinvested out of the US then fine, it can stay where it is going to be used. But, like the rest of the company profits, a portion should be returned to share holders. Don't think that is happening in every case.

     

    And, since the "recover" and in current day business the financial division is not a drain on the company, but a profit making division.

     

    See you later, I'm going out to dinner.

     

    Joe In Georgia
    7 Jun 2014, 07:02 PM Reply Like
  • mjs_28s
    , contributor
    Comments (1981) | Send Message
     
    "mjs..........The money is profit that should be put to work or distributed to the share holders. "

     

    Did you miss the part about GE having right around a 70% payout ratio? Does that not say something about how much money they are returning to share holders? That also means that 30% is being retained for the business. In 2013 GE returned over $18 billion to share holders.

     

    "And, since the "recover" and in current day business the financial division is not a drain on the company, but a profit making division." Ok. what is your point? Who said it was a drain on the company? I didn't. I did say that GE as a whole can be swung around by issues with volatility from the finance arm. Oi. Remember the banking and finance crisis six years ago? In 2013, 30% of GEs total revenue came from GE capital. Seems like a pretty good reason to spin that off.

     

    Seems like the company needs to spin off the finance arm as most of the company is about manufacturing, aviation, healthcare, R&D, power generation and distribution,and sales. The finance arm is not related to the core businesses.

     

    You seem mad at them and mad at me for trying to point out the reality. They are making strides and doing what they said they would do. Maybe not to the extent that you think is right, but since 2009 the dividend has been increased over 20% per year since they said that they wanted to get it back to previous levels. Even if they had a 100% payout ratio, they would be just a little short of the pre-cut dividend.

     

    Give them time for crying out loud. The PE is 22, even after an over 400% climb back from the lows. The dividend is up and the payout ratio is high, they have restructured some of their businesses and are going to spin-off another business.

     

    For now I will sit on my 1,000 shares at a recent cost of $26.11. If the news changes, I could sell out or I could add. But as of this moment, I see no reason to make any moves.

     

    Since you don't have a warm-fuzzy feeling like with your other holdings, then why take increased risk on purpose? The way you speak to it you would not buy it right now and that should tell you that you shouldn't own it now. If you are willing to buy a stock (beyond just a price issue) then you shouldn't own it and you clearly have problems with how they are doing business and how they are supposedly treating their share holders poorly, which the data does not support. You need to sell it.
    7 Jun 2014, 09:02 PM Reply Like
  • benjense
    , contributor
    Comments (12) | Send Message
     
    They're paying out significantly more as a percentage of earnings per share than most companies do.
    8 Jun 2014, 03:40 AM Reply Like
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