VMware responds to Cisco, claims strong SDN momentum


Responding to comments from John Chambers and other Cisco (CSCO) execs suggesting VMware (VMW) has only a handful of paying clients for its NSX software-defined networking (SDN) platform, VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger recently declared NSX's client base has hit 100.

Gelsinger: "Some [clients] are in prototypes, some are in full deployment, but they’re paying customers." He adds two older VMware SDN clients, Rackspace and eBay, are "at dramatic production scale," and that many customers use NSX to create a secure network within a network.

Also: Gelsinger claims Cisco's shots at VMware are good PR. "Cisco declared us public enemy No. 1, so all of a sudden every customer, every purchasing agent, has to say, ‘What’s going on over there?’"

NSX, backed by many Cisco rivals and enabled by VMware's 2012 acquisition of early SDN leader Nicira, can be used to enable networks running on commodity gear, rather than proprietary/high-margin hardware from Cisco and others.

Cisco is countering with its Insieme/ACI platform, which it argues delivers (thanks to hardware/software integration) better network/app visibility and simpler management. VMware and other critics assert it's much costlier.

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Comments (9)
  • gigabob635
    , contributor
    Comments (301) | Send Message
     
    Industry is clearly transitioning to a software dominated business model. While VMware is a software business - the real question is can they master advanced networking before Cisco - who is a strong software provider, can figure out how to transition to a software business model. This one is too close to call, but I like EMC's chances as it endeavors to stay neutral and profit from both sides.
    6 Jun 2014, 08:01 PM Reply Like
  • King Rat
    , contributor
    Comments (1610) | Send Message
     
    Gelsinger was a genius at Intel and is continuing that trend at VMWare. His point about the attack from Cisco being good PR for VMWare is spot on.
    6 Jun 2014, 09:04 PM Reply Like
  • Derek A. Barrett
    , contributor
    Comments (3554) | Send Message
     
    It's a good point

     

    One of the big blunders Microsoft did back in the Vista days was the "I'm a PC" ads.

     

    Why were those bad? Because it was reactive, playing follow the leader and letting your opponent define the tempo and playing field instead acting like a leader.
    6 Jun 2014, 11:01 PM Reply Like
  • Market DJ
    , contributor
    Comments (1099) | Send Message
     
    I think Vista, and other things, marked the end of Microsoft as the leader back then.
    7 Jun 2014, 07:20 AM Reply Like
  • xxavatarxx
    , contributor
    Comments (4801) | Send Message
     
    At the end of the day it's laughable on both ends.
    Vmware payed well over a Billion dollars for their solution and they have "100" customers.

     

    You might as well insert your expletive now.

     

    100 customers. That is it?

     

    That is such a tiny slice of the data center install base around the globe.
    7 Jun 2014, 04:58 AM Reply Like
  • alpine
    , contributor
    Comments (2007) | Send Message
     
    I feel too much credit is being given to Mr. PG, when the guy who really herded the troops at VMW to the possibility of ultimate victory was another ex-Winteler , Mr. Paul Maritz.

     

    Meantime, it is useful to remember that Mr. John Chambers doesn't seem to have been asleep at the wheel. He sounded a lot more confident about his SDN offerings than ever before.
    8 Jun 2014, 02:51 AM Reply Like
  • netstorage.guru
    , contributor
    Comments (2) | Send Message
     
    I want to clarify that, SDN does not completely replace the need for physical switches, because at the end of the day, due to complexity connectivity issues, it is hard to get rid of a physical switch (I know there have been discussions around server based switching,which makes no sense at all). So we are really talking about moving some of the network services to the edge of the network using SDN. I can tell you, having worked on SDN and network services, the software based network services from VMware and/or other software partner is at least about 2 years behind compared to network services that you can get from likes of F5, Riverbed, Citrix, CISCO., etc.,

     

    While short term threat from VMware is low, long term, network vendors do need to justify as to why those services must reside on the physical switch. If physical switch vendor can figure out inter-operability story, fantastic automation and scripting for provisioning, deployment and manageability, the SDN story from VMware might become moot long term.
    8 Jun 2014, 08:51 PM Reply Like
  • alpine
    , contributor
    Comments (2007) | Send Message
     
    Is Arista as "hot" as a superhot barista serving a "hot" Java at a San Francisco cafe?
    9 Jun 2014, 07:38 AM Reply Like
  • netstorage.guru
    , contributor
    Comments (2) | Send Message
     
    I want to clarify that, SDN does not completely replace the need for physical switches, because at the end of the day, due to complexity connectivity issues, it is hard to get rid of a physical switch (I know there have been discussions around server based switching,which makes no sense at all). So we are really talking about moving some of the network services to the edge of the network using SDN. I can tell you, having worked on SDN and network services, the software based network services from VMware and/or other software partner is at least about 2 years behind compared to network services that you can get from likes of F5, Riverbed, Citrix, CISCO., etc., While short term threat is low, long term, network vendors do need to justify as to why those services must reside on the physical switch. If physical switch vendor can figure out inter-operability story, fantastic automation and scripting for provisioning, deployment and manageability, the SDN story from VMware might be a moot.
    8 Jun 2014, 08:51 PM Reply Like
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