Ford issues F-150 recall


Ford (F +1.2%) has issued a recall on 5,675 F-150s after discovering a power steering problem. The company suspects a motor position sensor magnet was installed incorrectly.

No accidents or injuries connected to the defect have been reported.

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Comments (27)
  • smurf
    , contributor
    Comments (5801) | Send Message
     
    If this was GM, they'd be stonewalling the issue.
    25 Jun 2014, 11:01 AM Reply Like
  • Edgar3332
    , contributor
    Comments (15) | Send Message
     
    It seems to me that Ford and GM and other auto makers continue to have serious quality control issues. Why can't they get their acts together and install programs that are as effective as those of their German competitors? German auto designers and engineers perform at a level that is beyond the ken of their counterparts at Ford and GM.
    25 Jun 2014, 11:05 AM Reply Like
  • Chuck--Z
    , contributor
    Comments (15) | Send Message
     
    UAW is the common denominator...alcohol +drugs at break time allows for poor quality manufacturing
    25 Jun 2014, 11:18 AM Reply Like
  • Robin Hewitt
    , contributor
    Comments (5152) | Send Message
     
    Read an interesting article on this, Edgar3332. The author suggests we should expect more and larger recalls as auto manufacturers change how they make cars. The change makes sense -- modular units that can become more than one model -- but increases the chances of mass recalls. I think with time, the manufacturers will learn better QA techniques for their new technologies.

     

    Meanwhile, I do like Ford's policy of proactively recall-fixing even smallish problems quickly. Much better than the cover-up culture at GM.
    25 Jun 2014, 11:26 AM Reply Like
  • RicJensen
    , contributor
    Comments (2999) | Send Message
     
    Germany has a positive outlook (both politically and institutionally) on union(s) and company working together. Germany also has incredible employment/unemployment benefits. This creates a deep pool of senior management and workers working TOGETHER.

     

    In the US unions are always in conflict with management and strikes are common (compared to Germany).

     

    In Germany, IG Metall, the union, works very well with management and keeps senior workers on both sides in a positive working relationship.

     

    Due to the decades of Union vitriol in the US and a history of car companies fixing finacial problems with layoffs, we are WAY behind on getting unions and management to work together
    25 Jun 2014, 11:30 AM Reply Like
  • cbroncos
    , contributor
    Comments (2694) | Send Message
     
    999 times out of 1000 hundred it is a design flaw and has nothing to do with the workers - who are the ones that spot most of the problems. If you had bothered to read what Ford said on the issue you would not have blamed the UAW, oh wait a minute that is what you wanted to do as you hate unions.

     

    Ford said that it was a supplier issue with a part that was outsourced. Does that sound like a UAW job site?
    25 Jun 2014, 11:34 AM Reply Like
  • cbroncos
    , contributor
    Comments (2694) | Send Message
     
    I don't think we are that far away as the UAW has worked well with Ford on many issues.
    25 Jun 2014, 11:35 AM Reply Like
  • phxcrane
    , contributor
    Comments (733) | Send Message
     
    Look at how Nucor works with their employees. There is no union but employees have a big say in how things are run. Nucor also has a history of not laying off any employees. U.S. unions have gotten way out of step with their members. The unions have become a funding mechanism for the democratic party.
    25 Jun 2014, 11:40 AM Reply Like
  • Robin Hewitt
    , contributor
    Comments (5152) | Send Message
     
    "issue with a part that was outsourced"

     

    Must have been that infamous Chinese arm of the UAW.
    25 Jun 2014, 11:51 AM Reply Like
  • RicJensen
    , contributor
    Comments (2999) | Send Message
     
    cb....I agree. Long time in coming. But still major difference between Germany and Ford/(american companies). But closing the gap, another reason Ford is my single largest holding.
    25 Jun 2014, 11:52 AM Reply Like
  • cross
    , contributor
    Comments (1370) | Send Message
     
    Edgar, I can see you've never owned a Volkswagen. If the fuse for the overhead lights blows in my Jetta, power to the doorlocks/windows mysteriously disappears.
    25 Jun 2014, 08:35 PM Reply Like
  • cross
    , contributor
    Comments (1370) | Send Message
     
    I think it's more than the UAW. I think the trouble stems from Obamacare, which, of course, has it's origins in the Bengahzi/Solyndra/IRS/... certificate scandals.
    It's all connected.
    25 Jun 2014, 08:38 PM Reply Like
  • Tdot
    , contributor
    Comments (8049) | Send Message
     
    It is not unusual for automakers to have one fuse serve several accessories. Just like you might have one fuse or circuit breaker that serves several wall outlets in your living room, or those in the kitchen, or perhaps a couple of bedrooms together. A blown fuse that takes out your microwave in one corner of the kitchen just might also take out the coffeemaker in the other corner.

     

    Accessory fuses in cars are typically 10-20 amps, or 120-240 watts, and that can serve for a number of interior accessories, including things like dome lights and convenience features like power locks. Usually things related to safety are on separate circuits with more robust wiring and fuses, so a burned out fuse that takes out your power windows due to a water leak short or stuck motor or something doesn't also take out the electric power steering, windshield wipers, and brake lights.
    26 Jun 2014, 06:14 AM Reply Like
  • Robin Hewitt
    , contributor
    Comments (5152) | Send Message
     
    cross, you got me thinking. The Fed might have caused this recall as a way to distract the public from their failed monetary policies....
    26 Jun 2014, 11:05 AM Reply Like
  • cross
    , contributor
    Comments (1370) | Send Message
     
    Tdot. Thanks for the clarification about my Jetta fuse problem. I just wish there were more straightforward guidance from VW itself re: these problems. I had to get the solution from some blog on an obscure website. I think it was called 'myjettasucks.com' : ).
    P.s. I enjoy your commentary on automotive stocks. It is useful.
    26 Jun 2014, 05:22 PM Reply Like
  • Tdot
    , contributor
    Comments (8049) | Send Message
     
    It might be noted that Volkswagen as a brand is consistently in the bottom quarter in the JD Power Initial Quality survey, with 128 problems for every 100 vehicles (http://bit.ly/1pggu27), and in the bottom quarter of the 3-year JD Power Dependability survey with 158 problems for every 100 vehicles (http://bit.ly/1pggu27).
    26 Jun 2014, 08:47 PM Reply Like
  • RicJensen
    , contributor
    Comments (2999) | Send Message
     
    I believe that the majority of these issues are caused by innovation. If Ford had done what the Japanese and others have done with incremental model changes, you would see better reliability/recall numbers.

     

    As with all things newer there is a shakeout period. If this had spanned products over a decade, instead of 3 weeks, I would worry. Not to mention there are units still on the lot and those never got into consumer hands.
    25 Jun 2014, 11:20 AM Reply Like
  • Hansell58
    , contributor
    Comment (1) | Send Message
     
    @Edgar3332 You do understand what you're reading right now right? I do not understand how you can possibly even put Ford and General Motors in the same category. This is Ford's first recall, a recall of 5.675. General Motors on the other hand, which has had car quality issues for many years, has recalled over 15 Million vehicles YTD. The quality issues that you are talking about may very well apply to GM; however, in my mind recalling 6000 vehicles, all of which could have theoretically been sold in one city, is not considered a quality issue.
    25 Jun 2014, 11:28 AM Reply Like
  • Georgerick
    , contributor
    Comments (16) | Send Message
     
    Don't blame the assembly workers. The engineers not only design the vehicles they design the assembly line and assembly processes and quality controls. US workers may or may not be better than the competition but it is engineering talent that makes the real competitive difference.
    25 Jun 2014, 11:30 AM Reply Like
  • Georgerick
    , contributor
    Comments (16) | Send Message
     
    Retired VP Finance - Aerospace and Other Manufacturing Companies
    25 Jun 2014, 11:33 AM Reply Like
  • mikeRetirement
    , contributor
    Comments (811) | Send Message
     
    This recall would likely never happened without the GM recall. All automakers, U.S, German, Japanese are extremely cautious this year on safety issues.
    25 Jun 2014, 12:45 PM Reply Like
  • RSRinehart
    , contributor
    Comments (551) | Send Message
     
    I've never been 'pro-union' but blaming the UAW or any other union employees in this instance is a knee-jerk reaction. This was apparently a supplier provided part, which may or may not be a union shop. Doesn't matter. Ford caught it and responded quickly and appropriately. RSR
    25 Jun 2014, 01:15 PM Reply Like
  • R K
    , contributor
    Comments (259) | Send Message
     
    200+ trucks that were actually delivered , is this a big deal ?
    25 Jun 2014, 02:29 PM Reply Like
  • crazty4tennis
    , contributor
    Comments (1125) | Send Message
     
    Ford fixes holes in the dike and with each fix up popes another hole in the dike for them to fix. C'mon Ford where are your quality control guy(s)/girl(s) on this one? You can't be a number one automotive maker with another hole in the dike to fix. Too fixes will cost you guys customers!
    25 Jun 2014, 04:00 PM Reply Like
  • TooManyToys
    , contributor
    Comments (3) | Send Message
     
    5,675 trucks are less then one shifts production, 60 trucks per hour.
    25 Jun 2014, 07:44 PM Reply Like
  • TooManyToys
    , contributor
    Comments (3) | Send Message
     
    5,675 trucks are less then ten shifts production, 60 trucks per hour.
    25 Jun 2014, 07:44 PM Reply Like
  • cbroncos
    , contributor
    Comments (2694) | Send Message
     
    5675/60 =94 hours that is a loooooooooong shift!
    26 Jun 2014, 08:58 AM Reply Like
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