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Russia condemns new EU sanctions

  • Russia has responded angrily to the EU's new additional sanctions saying they will hamper cooperation on security issues and undermine the fight against terrorism and organized crime.
  • The new agreement imposes the first European economic sanctions on Russia, but stops short of including technology restrictions on the country's gas sector.
  • Russia's Foreign Ministry also accuses the U.S., which has already imposed its own sanctions on Moscow, of adding to the Ukrainian crisis by supporting the pro-Western government in Kiev.
  • ETFs: RSX, RUSL, RSXJ, ERUS, RUSS, RBL, RUDR
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Comments (37)
  • june1234
    , contributor
    Comments (3147) | Send Message
     
    Which sanctions. The French just sold Russia 2 mistral class destroyers
    27 Jul 2014, 08:26 AM Reply Like
  • mKiwi
    , contributor
    Comments (727) | Send Message
     
    Mistral-class amphibious assault ship (helicopter carrier - not exactly destroyers)

     

    http://bit.ly/TYihPV
    27 Jul 2014, 06:50 PM Reply Like
  • 3for5spotshooter
    , contributor
    Comments (18) | Send Message
     
    Semantics - France approved the sale of military hardware to the Soviets right?
    27 Jul 2014, 09:00 PM Reply Like
  • rambler1
    , contributor
    Comments (616) | Send Message
     
    There French ships might as well have been Peugeot's or Renault's. It's all junk anyway.
    27 Jul 2014, 10:18 PM Reply Like
  • Matthew Davis
    , contributor
    Comments (4367) | Send Message
     
    the ship is just a platform for the Russians to retro fit it with their own high tech weapons and computer systems. Do you think they are going to put them into service as is?
    28 Jul 2014, 11:01 AM Reply Like
  • jaginger
    , contributor
    Comments (669) | Send Message
     
    Yes not exactly destroyers. Twice as big.
    29 Jul 2014, 10:29 PM Reply Like
  • al roman
    , contributor
    Comments (9688) | Send Message
     
    Soviet Union lasted over 40 years one side bankrupted themselves the other nearly.
    Just keeping wasting time and money on same old with a new coloration.
    27 Jul 2014, 08:39 AM Reply Like
  • Austin Newsom
    , contributor
    Comments (61) | Send Message
     
    Anyone following the "buy what is most hated" strategy? Surely that would have to be Russian equities right now.
    27 Jul 2014, 09:35 AM Reply Like
  • robgra
    , contributor
    Comments (455) | Send Message
     
    RSX still ~20% above it's March lows. Nowhere near enough hatred yet. European's still paying lip service only to sanctions.
    27 Jul 2014, 09:39 AM Reply Like
  • Grant Payne
    , contributor
    Comments (324) | Send Message
     
    yep. I'd buy RSX again if it fell to ~22 and sell at 26 or so. At 22 it yielded 3%, not bad for an index ETF
    27 Jul 2014, 12:28 PM Reply Like
  • permanent
    , contributor
    Comments (210) | Send Message
     
    European´s depend on Russian gas imports. If there will be no Russian gas it will be a very cold winter in Europe. I don´t think that would go over well.
    Russia is part of Europe and not far away from most countries.
    27 Jul 2014, 12:27 PM Reply Like
  • Alan1967
    , contributor
    Comments (238) | Send Message
     
    Rule #1 of digging a hole.
    If you are digging a hole, STOP.

     

    This also applies to buying gas from Russia.
    If they are drilling a hole, make them STOP.

     

    The oil sector is a capital intensive industry, and in a corrupt society like Putin has create in Russia, capital (both foreign and domestic) will naturally want to flee. So what we need to do both the EU and US is stop supplying Russia with the expertise and capital needed to drill.

     

    When Russia has a non-corrupt leadership then we start investing with them again.

     

    I'm not going to support a corrupt society and thus will never buy any Russian investments as long a Putin is a leader in Russia. I hope the EU will get a backbone on this.
    28 Jul 2014, 04:22 AM Reply Like
  • phildevoyd
    , contributor
    Comments (148) | Send Message
     
    Sadly, the way out out our impasse with Russia is the price of oil and natural gas. Russia would bankrupt if Brent went below $90.00. And if WTI got back in line with Brent, the world economy would boom.
    While I would not like to see world leaders legislate the price of energy, merely encouraging production would have great political benefits.
    Link to lead story in this week's Economist magazine:
    http://econ.st/1lJV1fb
    27 Jul 2014, 01:04 PM Reply Like
  • phildevoyd
    , contributor
    Comments (148) | Send Message
     
    Cytrus Vance was right:
    "You have to listen to adversaries and keep looking for that point beyond which it's against their interests to keep on disagreeing or fighting."
    27 Jul 2014, 01:10 PM Reply Like
  • P.Jakubovs
    , contributor
    Comments (12) | Send Message
     
    Where do you get such numbers?! I understand it's a trend now to draw apocalyptic scenarios for Russia but still...
    When planing budget Moscow is using 5 year average price on Urals (somewhere 1-2 dollars less than Brent). This years budget oil price was (if I'm not mistaken) 92 or 94$. + add to USD/RUB devaluation from 31-32 to 35-36.
    Real problems will start if oil price will go somewhere under 70$ for a few years. That will make saudis and even USA oil producers very happy and they will continue pumping the same amount and selling it at a loss... not going to happen, times of cheap carbons have long gone...
    27 Jul 2014, 03:14 PM Reply Like
  • phildevoyd
    , contributor
    Comments (148) | Send Message
     
    I've read articles in Barron's and IBD that support my opinion. But, try this more current link on the subject:
    http://onforb.es/1lKx3jV
    27 Jul 2014, 05:51 PM Reply Like
  • 3for5spotshooter
    , contributor
    Comments (18) | Send Message
     
    World leaders cannot corner a market - supply and demand does the price fixing. Putin is playing a dangerous game with the economic peace, prosperity and stability of Eur/Asia. But he has nuclear weapons - so no invasion like Iraq which took Kuwait while he invaded Crimea. He has economic control of Europe's fuel - and he knows it...
    27 Jul 2014, 09:02 PM Reply Like
  • al roman
    , contributor
    Comments (9688) | Send Message
     
    Global resources eventually will be regulated.Especially if things get worse.
    27 Jul 2014, 01:15 PM Reply Like
  • KJP712
    , contributor
    Comments (454) | Send Message
     
    Go long on European firewood companies.Revenues will be up this winter...
    27 Jul 2014, 01:21 PM Reply Like
  • al roman
    , contributor
    Comments (9688) | Send Message
     
    Better speed up the cove & hub ops.
    27 Jul 2014, 01:23 PM Reply Like
  • phildevoyd
    , contributor
    Comments (148) | Send Message
     
    I remember, back in the day, when Sears would contract with a private company to manufacture some hot product. The contractor would leverage up their production, and Sears would buy more. Then one fine day, Sears would cancel the contract and the supplier would go bankrupt. Sears would then buy the assets out of bankruptcy.
    That reminds me of Putin's strategy with the Ukraine in regard to natural gas.
    27 Jul 2014, 02:44 PM Reply Like
  • James Bjorkman
    , contributor
    Comments (1358) | Send Message
     
    Everything's going down the drain. That means the Dow should be good for another 1000-point pop.
    27 Jul 2014, 03:34 PM Reply Like
  • SoldHigh
    , contributor
    Comments (1013) | Send Message
     
    Someone help the wimpy EU find their dentures so they can have some bite.
    27 Jul 2014, 03:51 PM Reply Like
  • 3for5spotshooter
    , contributor
    Comments (18) | Send Message
     
    Easy to say for us. Russia does not supply our natural gas and keep us warm in the winter... Ever bought fuel in Italy? ouch...
    27 Jul 2014, 09:02 PM Reply Like
  • PalmDesertRat
    , contributor
    Comments (3347) | Send Message
     
    The WSJ is reporting that the Deputy Prime Minister in the UK wants to move the 2018 World Cup from Russia. Maybe that will get their attention-nothing else seems to matter.
    27 Jul 2014, 04:34 PM Reply Like
  • 3for5spotshooter
    , contributor
    Comments (18) | Send Message
     
    Russia is Europe's gas supplier. Ever see Mad Max Beyond Thunder Dome? Putin is the midget in the basement threatening to turn off the gas supply... only with nuclear weapons. Saddam Hussein takes Kuwait - time to invade. Putin takes Crimea - time to talk about it... Solutions anyone?
    27 Jul 2014, 09:03 PM Reply Like
  • Matthew Davis
    , contributor
    Comments (4367) | Send Message
     
    So stop cooperating with them on terrorism and crime. We all know the mob will rule Moscow if we stop feeding them information, and Chechens and other groups will take full advantage if we stop cooperating.
    27 Jul 2014, 09:16 PM Reply Like
  • taxman100
    , contributor
    Comments (326) | Send Message
     
    You know Russia allows over-flights on the way into Afghanistan and our bases in neighboring countries, as well as cooperating with the United States on anti-terrorism?

     

    It's a screwball foreign policy where the U.S. military is now:

     

    1. the collection muscle for the International Monetary Fund in a country no one outside of Russia and Ukraine really cared about until the IMF gave them loans.

     

    2. Trying to be goaded into a war that NATO started in Ukraine in their goal of Eastern expansion, which is Russia's line in the sand, so to speak. NATO now wants to step back and let the United States fight it while they sit in their cafes.

     

    We are on the verge of another totally unnecessary war that cannot be won without a lot of blood and treasure.
    27 Jul 2014, 10:06 PM Reply Like
  • Matthew Davis
    , contributor
    Comments (4367) | Send Message
     
    taxman

     

    We are not on the verge of war. The NATO encirclement of Russia paid off, but Ukraine is the buffer Russia needs before the sphere of influence reaches their border...which it did in the cases of Georgia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia, Romania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Poland, East Germany, ect.

     

    Unfortunately this same international relations philosophy does not translate in the Arab world. People do not realize that wars are fought in an effort to align the destroyed country with us. Hence creating that sphere of influence to which we can trade and open new economic markets. Iraq was one such experiment, it could have worked if we stayed there, however the destiny of the region is now up in the air because they are finally undoing 100 years of colonialism.

     

    The European powers in the early 20th century drew the borders of Iraq, Jordan and others with total disregard for ethnic and cultural differences. After the Ottoman Empire was dissolved, the ignorant victors cut off Kurds in 4 separate parts, Shiites and Sunnis were placed in the same confines (Iraq) and now we have the mess to deal with. However, getting involved now, against the tide of revolution is absolutely insane. Our window to act has shut, so we must allow them to reorganize and create their so called caliphate. We won't know what we are dealing with until the dust has settled. One thing is certain though, as far as my own thoughts are on this, that this new caliphate and new countries that evolve from this will ally and square themselves up directly against us and the allies.

     

    It could take years, but the culture there has shifted and the people do not fight against it with sincerity.
    28 Jul 2014, 11:10 AM Reply Like
  • James Bjorkman
    , contributor
    Comments (1358) | Send Message
     
    Create a caliphate? LOL, that's pretty funny. I am amused.
    30 Jul 2014, 10:27 AM Reply Like
  • Matthew Davis
    , contributor
    Comments (4367) | Send Message
     
    ThSlayer

     

    Yes because of your deep knowledge of International Relations and the Middle East correct? Tell me, what are your qualifications on the matter? What do you know, that the rest of us do not? I want you to educate me about what is amusing about a Caliphate, which ISIS has already announced? It has constructed one, with 1/3 of Iraqi territory?
    30 Jul 2014, 10:37 AM Reply Like
  • James Bjorkman
    , contributor
    Comments (1358) | Send Message
     
    A "caliphate" is a Muslim empire. A caliphate represents a sovereign polity (state) of the entire Muslim faithful. There is nothing remotely like that in the works, none ever has existed, none likely ever will.
    30 Jul 2014, 10:42 AM Reply Like
  • Matthew Davis
    , contributor
    Comments (4367) | Send Message
     
    Slayer,

     

    Glad to see you can use Google.

     

    The Caliphate does not have to exist as a utopian entity, its the same exact principle as Zionism for Jews. They simply need to declare it a Caliphate, and ally themselves with the other extremists that have taken over Libya, Tunisia, Egypt, Syria, Iraq and you will have a new empire. I find it hard to believe you can take something so lightly, when 9/11 was thought to be impossible, you are of this same mindset.
    30 Jul 2014, 11:37 AM Reply Like
  • James Bjorkman
    , contributor
    Comments (1358) | Send Message
     
    A caliphate is a mythical ideal. 1/3 of Iraq is not a caliphate, it is not the start of a caliphate, it has nothing to do with a caliphate. Even the entire Ottoman Empire was not a true caliphate. Whether or not "extremists" take over the entire Middle East, there will be no "caliphate." I can call my yard an "Empire" and that does not make it the Roman Empire.

     

    You can next explain the difference between Sunni and Shia for us and explicate why their joint existence precludes the existence of a "caliphate" in modern times.
    30 Jul 2014, 11:41 AM Reply Like
  • Matthew Davis
    , contributor
    Comments (4367) | Send Message
     
    First of all, I am not going to write a thesis on the matter. I also have no desire to go into the disagreements of the interpretations of the two religions. That's like explaining in 30 words or less the split between Catholics and Protestants.

     

    Just because you don't want to acknowledge an abstract concept such as Zionism and Caliphate does not preclude the fact that it is going to exist. It doesn't have to be a roman empire. Saudi Arabia and Jordan are kingdoms as well, does that mean they are not imperial in nature?

     

    Come now, I agree with you on many things, but a Caliphate, even in the abstract will eventually come to pass from Tunis to the border of Iran, that I think is highly evident. All these bad guys have to do is come to some sort of agreement. Which presently is a long shot, however out of conflicts sometimes strong leaders emerge.

     

    We will watch an see, good talking to you!
    30 Jul 2014, 11:56 AM Reply Like
  • James Bjorkman
    , contributor
    Comments (1358) | Send Message
     
    "It is going to exist." Well, it does exist, every night in fact, when Muslim terrorists lay down to go to sleep. A caliphate is a romantic notion, and almost any Muslim who knows what the term means would corroborate that. It is somewhat akin to "heaven" or King Arthur, the once and future king, returning with his knights of the Round Table to set things right. It is not a possibility in the modern world, where Muslims are as apt to fight each other as anyone else.
    30 Jul 2014, 12:00 PM Reply Like
  • Matthew Davis
    , contributor
    Comments (4367) | Send Message
     
    Slayer, now you are thinking abstractly...which is what I have been trying to get you to do. :)
    30 Jul 2014, 02:58 PM Reply Like
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