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The nominal price of natural gas dipped below $2 to the lowest price in 10 years, but adjusted...

The nominal price of natural gas dipped below $2 to the lowest price in 10 years, but adjusted for inflation, the price has fallen below its 1994 level. It might be the lowest price ever, suggests Mark Perry, but the EIA's price series only goes back to 1994.
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Comments (14)
  • montanamark
    , contributor
    Comments (1435) | Send Message
     
    so - its a no brainer for the US to take advantage of this, right?
    cheap, plentiful, US produced energy right in front of us
    11 Apr 2012, 04:34 PM Reply Like
  • what do I know
    , contributor
    Comments (1049) | Send Message
     
    but Washington, D.C. has a better idea - expensive renewable energy and why not what will be more profitable to oil companies and gas pumps! Remember Solyndra, what happened to the enquiry?
    14 Apr 2012, 06:37 PM Reply Like
  • Mike Maher
    , contributor
    Comments (2616) | Send Message
     
    Utilities are switching over, and in Southern California several companies with large trucking fleets are starting to switch. As more fueling stations pop up, the economics of switching to natural gas transportation make switching over too good an opportunity to pass on.
    11 Apr 2012, 04:39 PM Reply Like
  • bbro
    , contributor
    Comments (9851) | Send Message
     
    Cost of total gasoline usage year over year is DOWN 1.7%....at the peak in July 2008 it was up 34%
    11 Apr 2012, 04:39 PM Reply Like
  • MadAsHellAnd
    , contributor
    Comments (216) | Send Message
     
    Man, this is too positive an element for Washington to sit idly by. If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidize it. How long until the community organizer and D.C. mess up this great fortune? How about for starters, natural gas displacing most of the gasoline component in the CPI. (Goodness, no, I forgot! According to the BLS we don't pay for energy. Like food.)

     

    Reader, I'm just in a crabby mood, and you're my victim. The article references inflation, a topic that boils my blood.
    11 Apr 2012, 04:42 PM Reply Like
  • kmi
    , contributor
    Comments (4041) | Send Message
     
    There's a few infrastructure related issues to overcome, both public and private sector, and intransigence by entrenched D.C. interests to weed through....

     

    Thing is, supply and demand: at these prices demand is certain to grow. NG is coming into a 60% cost savings BTU for BTU on oil (diesel) now, that's enough of a discount that even Joe the Plumber is gonna stop ignoring it.
    11 Apr 2012, 04:48 PM Reply Like
  • EdCa
    , contributor
    Comments (6) | Send Message
     
    QEs 1,2, 2.5.....3 in the near future.. that is the result of them INFLATION and that is what the FEDS want a hidden tax for every body !!!!
    12 Apr 2012, 04:28 AM Reply Like
  • Buddy Canuspare
    , contributor
    Comments (398) | Send Message
     
    What does that have to do with the price of natgas?
    12 Apr 2012, 08:46 PM Reply Like
  • Conventional Wisdumb
    , contributor
    Comments (1802) | Send Message
     
    The Natgas price is a big reason why manufacturing is rebounding strongly in the US as energy intensive industries start switching to it they drive down costs.

     

    Despite my overall economic bearism, this is an incredibly important competitive development for US industry and the overall economy and long-term will ensure we recapture our competitive leadership especially if we can get LNG everywhere.

     

    Even more interesting is that cheap natgas lowers the production costs of tar sand oil so indirectly it also reduces the price of oil and ultimately gas.

     

    Cheap domestic energy is incredibly bullish for the US. Let's just hope the EPA (Energy Prevention Agency) doesn't kill it in its crib.
    11 Apr 2012, 04:50 PM Reply Like
  • TKO
    , contributor
    Comments (156) | Send Message
     
    We will continue to completely ignore viable alternative energy resources which are both cheaper and cleaner than oil/coal and expel tax dollars to satisfy the social and political infatuation with "renewable resources". Let us ignore the concept of transitionary energy resources while we improve our technologies to make renewable resources a vaiable cost/benefit tradeoff in the future. We MUST invest in expensive, exponentially improving, quickly obsolete renewable energy technologies to build solar farms today so that they may be able to last 20 years to produce electricity at 10-20x the cost of today's going rate!!!
    11 Apr 2012, 04:55 PM Reply Like
  • spald_fr
    , contributor
    Comments (2734) | Send Message
     
    There's an article in the WSJ where a western energy company gave a 35% reduction in gas prices to their customers. The Feds are going to identify that delta as potential "tax revenue".
    11 Apr 2012, 04:56 PM Reply Like
  • betaman1
    , contributor
    Comment (1) | Send Message
     
    The environmental regulatory folks are saying Fracing is causing earth quakes and messing up the water supply. If fracing is shut down the availability of NG will collapse.
    12 Apr 2012, 04:33 AM Reply Like
  • what do I know
    , contributor
    Comments (1049) | Send Message
     
    my two cents in this regard, how much does it cost to dig up this Natural Gas and why the suppliers are not rationing the supply of Natural Gas?
    14 Apr 2012, 06:40 PM Reply Like
  • Mike Maher
    , contributor
    Comments (2616) | Send Message
     
    Because roughly 1/3 of the dry nat gas produced in the country is produced alongside oil or NGLs, which are profitable, so companies keep drilling, and producing the dry gas as almost accidentally. Secondly, most of the mineral rights leases the drilling firms signed have clauses that so many active wells must be on the property, or the lease is terminated. So a large amount of drilling and production that was done in the back half of last year was companies trying to hold onto acreage they had leased.

     

    Efficient operators in places like the Marcellus can get gas out at the ground for about $2. With gas trading below that, I'm not sure if anyone is making money on new dry gas wells.
    14 Apr 2012, 10:41 PM Reply Like
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