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What role do America's lazy pupils and grossly underachieving school system play in shaping the...

What role do America's lazy pupils and grossly underachieving school system play in shaping the economy? "They still find it hard to believe that all those Chinese students, beavering away at their books, will steal their children's jobs." (The Economist)
Comments (37)
  • Market Sniper
    , contributor
    Comments (668) | Send Message
     
    Excellent analysis of the foibles and short falls of the American education system. All part of the on-going "dumbing down" and the constant hunt for the lowest common denominator. We expect any other result?
    13 Jun 2009, 07:04 PM Reply Like
  • Market Sniper
    , contributor
    Comments (668) | Send Message
     
    Anybody else notice that this trend really got underway when the Federal government decided to get involved in the education business? Think maybe Department of Education needs to be abolished. Could be a good first step. Thowing money at the situation seems to have only made it worse. Typical.
    13 Jun 2009, 07:30 PM Reply Like
  • htex
    , contributor
    Comments (36) | Send Message
     
    What about the fact that we are at the tipping point as a nation? We have examples plenty ahead of us. We are tripping down the same path. We will be footnotes in history books if we don't start producing more than we consume. Just a thought.
    13 Jun 2009, 07:55 PM Reply Like
  • Machiavelli999
    , contributor
    Comments (829) | Send Message
     
    Lol, this is so predictable. It is kinda sad that so many people do the following when thinking about problem.

     

    Problem presented.

     

    Is government in anyway involved? If yes, obviously, the problem is with the government. No more thinking involved. Facts, evidence, analysis? Not necessary. How do other countries with national educational systems do better? Does not matter.

     

    For that matter, how is healthcare, far from a hot political issue, not even a concern or even thought about in countries with supposedly horrible socialized healthcare systems? And in our country it is one of the biggest issues we talk about? See what happens if you tell all the elderly people in this country that we are getting rid of that horrible socialized medicine program called Medicare and changing them to the supposed "best healthcare system" in the world? See how they react. It would be funny to see 70 year old people riot.

     

    Oh and by the way, summer vacations trace their roots much farther back than 1979 which is when DOE was created.

     

    But why think about that?
    13 Jun 2009, 08:02 PM Reply Like
  • al-shaf
    , contributor
    Comments (12) | Send Message
     
    Apparently a lot of the statistics in this article regarding the Swedish and Korean school systems are incorrect (read the comments posted to the article). In my opinion the author of the Economist piece is just creating data to vent his anti-Americanism.
    13 Jun 2009, 08:05 PM Reply Like
  • The Geoffster
    , contributor
    Comments (4013) | Send Message
     
    When the lights go out, who will be able to turn them back on?
    13 Jun 2009, 08:11 PM Reply Like
  • James Quinn
    , contributor
    Comments (1016) | Send Message
     
    The Chinese have 267 million children under the age of 14, and they want to succeed.

     

    theburningplatform.com...
    13 Jun 2009, 08:16 PM Reply Like
  • anarchist
    , contributor
    Comments (1416) | Send Message
     
    I guess I am a little slow today, whats this got to do with "education in the United States"?

     

    On Jun 13 07:56 PM roogde wrote:

     

    > In the past month, the price of a barrel of oil has risen $15; it
    > now stands at $72 per barrel. Prices have moved upward more or less
    > steadily since hitting a bottom in February. Average gasoline prices
    > have already risen $1 per gallon off lows hit in December.--This
    > is absurd. Prices should b much lower, especially in a recession.
    >
    >
    > one of my favorite new websites urlcut.com/1rpqs
    13 Jun 2009, 08:20 PM Reply Like
  • Market Sniper
    , contributor
    Comments (668) | Send Message
     
    I understand, Machiavelli. Government is a good thing. Government can solve problems, government should lead us out of the wilderness we find ourselves in. Typical cradle to grave statist viewpoint. Government is a necessary evil. The job of government is to expand its power at the expense of the individual's liberty. Government should NEVER do anything that the voluntary association of free citizens can do, even IF they chose NOT to do it! Liberty thrives where government doesn't!

     

    On Jun 13 08:02 PM Machiavelli999 wrote:

     

    > Lol, this is so predictable. It is kinda sad that so many people
    > do the following when thinking about problem.
    >
    > Problem presented.
    >
    > Is government in anyway involved? If yes, obviously, the problem
    > is with the government. No more thinking involved. Facts, evidence,
    > analysis? Not necessary. How do other countries with national educational
    > systems do better? Does not matter.
    >
    > For that matter, how is healthcare, far from a hot political issue,
    > not even a concern or even thought about in countries with supposedly
    > horrible socialized healthcare systems? And in our country it is
    > one of the biggest issues we talk about? See what happens if you
    > tell all the elderly people in this country that we are getting rid
    > of that horrible socialized medicine program called Medicare and
    > changing them to the supposed "best healthcare system" in the world?
    > See how they react. It would be funny to see 70 year old people riot.
    >
    >
    > Oh and by the way, summer vacations trace their roots much farther
    > back than 1979 which is when DOE was created.
    >
    > But why think about that?
    13 Jun 2009, 08:27 PM Reply Like
  • anarchist
    , contributor
    Comments (1416) | Send Message
     
    I think Obama is correct, the school day and summer holidays were put in place when the US was an agrarian society and now it needs to change. The problem is most school districts are local and more influenced by State law that Federal law. The biggest problem is that no one wants to modernize the system, the teachers don't, the kids don't and the parent's don't so it probably will not change and the U.S. will slowly fade into the sunset as the kids get dumber and dumber (When I had kids in school it was actually "not cool" it excel in school-whats that all about?).
    13 Jun 2009, 08:32 PM Reply Like
  • The Geoffster
    , contributor
    Comments (4013) | Send Message
     
    Government is always the problem. It's only function is described in the Constitution but, We the People, blew it. Health care is not the responsibility of the government. It is the responsibility of the people. Education is not the responsibility of the government. It is the responsibility of the people. I could go on and on and so could you with your socialism. We have given up our freedom for more and more socialism. Freedom is finite. Socialism isn't.

     

    On Jun 13 08:02 PM Machiavelli999 wrote:

     

    > Lol, this is so predictable. It is kinda sad that so many people
    > do the following when thinking about problem.
    >
    > Problem presented.
    >
    > Is government in anyway involved? If yes, obviously, the problem
    > is with the government. No more thinking involved. Facts, evidence,
    > analysis? Not necessary. How do other countries with national educational
    > systems do better? Does not matter.
    >
    > For that matter, how is healthcare, far from a hot political issue,
    > not even a concern or even thought about in countries with supposedly
    > horrible socialized healthcare systems? And in our country it is
    > one of the biggest issues we talk about? See what happens if you
    > tell all the elderly people in this country that we are getting rid
    > of that horrible socialized medicine program called Medicare and
    > changing them to the supposed "best healthcare system" in the world?
    > See how they react. It would be funny to see 70 year old people riot.
    >
    >
    > Oh and by the way, summer vacations trace their roots much farther
    > back than 1979 which is when DOE was created.
    >
    > But why think about that?
    13 Jun 2009, 08:38 PM Reply Like
  • Patient Capital
    , contributor
    Comments (176) | Send Message
     
    I don't think we should worry about our jobs being "lost" to people in some other country... this isn't a zero sum game. If China's employment increases, we will benefit. Yeah, you have a choice of how much you want to study and learn, but everyone has that choice, and I'm not sure the government should be messing around with more and more on a daily basis.
    13 Jun 2009, 08:56 PM Reply Like
  • bricki
    , contributor
    Comments (1099) | Send Message
     
    What a pile of hoo-doo. The fact of the matter is that the variations between pupils is 10, yes that is TEN times greater that the variations between countries, and it always has been.

     

    news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk...

     

    Internal variations

     

    The authors caution that - in line with previous international comparisons - only about one tenth of the variation in student performance on the overall mathematics scale lies between countries.

     

    Most is within countries - between education systems and programmes, between schools and between students within schools.

     

    For example, in Belgium, mean scores on the maths scale for the Flemish community were higher than those in the best-performing OECD countries, Finland and South Korea.

     

    ----------------------...

     

    What is the most important factor is the support and opportunities a nation gives to its high performers after they graduate from secondary schools. What is critical to the future of the US is the excellence of its colleges and the opportunities thereafter.
    13 Jun 2009, 09:10 PM Reply Like
  • James Quinn
    , contributor
    Comments (1016) | Send Message
     
    theburningplatform.com...

     

    theburningplatform.com...

     

    theburningplatform.com...

     

    theburningplatform.com...

     

    theburningplatform.com...

     

    theburningplatform.com...

     

    1 Follower. LOL

     

    On Jun 13 08:20 PM StockCreeker wrote:

     

    > always with the link, huh? lol
    13 Jun 2009, 09:29 PM Reply Like
  • rick flair
    , contributor
    Comments (369) | Send Message
     
    dumber, fatter , lazier, can we add a few more....have any of you looked at the fat slobs coming out of schools? america is on a greased slope to ......
    13 Jun 2009, 10:10 PM Reply Like
  • Windsun33
    , contributor
    Comments (4277) | Send Message
     
    "..They still find it hard to believe that all those Chinese students, beavering away at their books, will steal their children’s jobs..."

     

    Uhm, they are not going to "steal" their jobs - they will simply be far more qualified for them. I see a lot of denial in the comments above, but crappy US education is nothing new, it has been suspected since the 1920's, and confirmed time after time since the 1950's. Is it worse now - probably, but not much worse than 40 years ago.

     

    There are many reasons why this has been so, the author only touched on some of them. Probably the single biggest detriment to American education has been the teachers unions, 2nd is gutless local government, 3rd is clueless parents (mostly raised under the same system themselves). 4th is the attitudes of the kids themselves - fostered especially in the last few decades by a "dumb is cool, nerds suck" attitude.

     

    The DOE is a minor factor - 95% of what schools and teachers do is governed locally. All the DOE does is pour money into mandated mostly useless programs and feed the bloated school bureaucracy. It does little, if anything, to actually educate anyone.

     

    There is a reason why so many US companies try to get the H1B visas - it is because 2/3 of Americans are so undereducated. We have a small business, and we find it extremely difficult to hire anyone with even minimul basic skills in math or even computers (despite the fact that the current generation has grown up on computers, it is amazing how little they actually know about them).

     

    I could go on for hours about all the flaws, but like the thousands before me, just beating a dead horse. Nothing will get done unless a true total meltdown occurs.
    13 Jun 2009, 10:17 PM Reply Like
  • Windsun33
    , contributor
    Comments (4277) | Send Message
     
    It has nothing to do with losing jobs to other countries - it has to do with complacent fat 3rd generation+ fat American kids losing out to immigrant kids. Ever notice how there is a much higher percentage of Asian kids in Universities than there are in high schools compared to other races? There is a reason why for many years the fastest growing jobs are low-skill fast food & car wash type jobs.

     

    On Jun 13 08:56 PM Ankit Gupta wrote:

     

    > I don't think we should worry about our jobs being "lost" to people
    > in some other country... this isn't a zero sum game. If China's employment
    > increases, we will benefit. Yeah, you have a choice of how much you
    > want to study and learn, but everyone has that choice, and I'm not
    > sure the government should be messing around with more and more on
    > a daily basis.
    13 Jun 2009, 10:23 PM Reply Like
  • Illusional Delusion
    , contributor
    Comments (346) | Send Message
     
    I agree with you on the overview, but the government can only do so much frankly before it loses its effectiveness (not that there is a high level of effectiveness to begin with). If we are convinced that the government will always print more money for us to spend, on ourselves or our kids, everyone will get complacent. I rather want the government to do what they are supposed to do, stick to the constitution and break away from their current bailout stance. When you can change the rules of the game, no one will bother to play by your rules in the future. Banking, policies, education, whatever...

     

    On Jun 13 10:23 PM Windsun33 wrote:

     

    > It has nothing to do with losing jobs to other countries - it has
    14 Jun 2009, 01:00 AM Reply Like
  • Danny Furman
    , contributor
    Comments (1002) | Send Message
     
    How about demented parenting??? Baby boomers care more about their Blackberries than their kids and current high schoolers are children of hippies, who smoke weed with their kids. My girlfriend and I went to Disneyland this today and there is a HUGE culture of teenage rainbow-bead-wearing, red-eyed, stumbling wannabe hippies. These kids have no responsibility and, whether they're popping their parents Prozac or smoking legal weed, their single goal in life is to not be associated with American society. No goals+no direction+lots of drugs=....

     

    U-S-A, U-S-A, U-S-A!!!!

     

    Remind anyone of 1970?

     

    PS. I know California has become our nations pooper, but everyone will feel it when the world's 6th largest economy needs a bailout.
    14 Jun 2009, 01:07 AM Reply Like
  • Angel Martin
    , contributor
    Comments (1311) | Send Message
     
    A nation at Risk was published in 1983.

     

    www.ed.gov/pubs/NatAtR...

     

    Things have only gotten worse since then. The institutions that need to change are incapable of change on their own.

     

    On Jun 13 10:17 PM Windsun33 wrote:

     

    > "..They still find it hard to believe that all those Chinese students,
    > beavering away at their books, will steal their children’s jobs..."
    >
    >
    > Uhm, they are not going to "steal" their jobs - they will simply
    > be far more qualified for them. I see a lot of denial in the comments
    > above, but crappy US education is nothing new, it has been suspected
    > since the 1920's, and confirmed time after time since the 1950's.
    > Is it worse now - probably, but not much worse than 40 years ago.
    >
    >
    > There are many reasons why this has been so, the author only touched
    > on some of them. Probably the single biggest detriment to American
    > education has been the teachers unions, 2nd is gutless local government,
    > 3rd is clueless parents (mostly raised under the same system themselves).
    > 4th is the attitudes of the kids themselves - fostered especially
    > in the last few decades by a "dumb is cool, nerds suck" attitude.
    >
    >
    > The DOE is a minor factor - 95% of what schools and teachers do is
    > governed locally. All the DOE does is pour money into mandated mostly
    > useless programs and feed the bloated school bureaucracy. It does
    > little, if anything, to actually educate anyone.
    >
    > There is a reason why so many US companies try to get the H1B visas
    > - it is because 2/3 of Americans are so undereducated. We have a
    > small business, and we find it extremely difficult to hire anyone
    > with even minimul basic skills in math or even computers (despite
    > the fact that the current generation has grown up on computers, it
    > is amazing how little they actually know about them).
    >
    > I could go on for hours about all the flaws, but like the thousands
    > before me, just beating a dead horse. Nothing will get done unless
    > a true total meltdown occurs.
    14 Jun 2009, 01:36 AM Reply Like
  • JohnAl
    , contributor
    Comments (161) | Send Message
     
    The US public education system has many shortcomings. Lack of government involvement is not one of them.

     

    The federal government says there must be "accountability", and they force it's nature on state governments via NCLB, and the funding that accompanies that legislation.

     

    Next, state governments define "Standards Of Learnings", (appropriately referred as "SOLs") which provide course content road maps to local school divisions.

     

    Finally, local public school divisions add the details to the SOL road maps, defining what will be taught at every grade level during every minute of every school day.

     

    The students are then tested regularly, and decisions about the quality of the schools are made based on these test results.

     

    Of course, just like much of what government tries to do, this system, while well intentioned, is horribly flawed.

     

    1. In most cases, students aren't held accountable for their SOL test results. Some just draw patterns in the bubbles on the test sheets.

     

    2. Holding individual teachers and even schools accountable for the performance of their students on these tests is incredibly unfair, not only because students aren't held accountable (and thus many don't care) but because there is no attempt to measure where the students were academically BEFORE the teacher (or school) received them. Only performance on the specific grade level tests are measured, not "value added" by the specific teachers and schools.

     

    3. Measuring schools based on the performance of their students ignores the greater importance of parental influence. A school full of children of uneducated parents who don't value education is always going to perform more poorly than a school full of children of parents who do value education.

     

    I could go on, but I think I've made my point. More government is NOT the answer to the US education problem.
    14 Jun 2009, 05:10 AM Reply Like
  • Steve in Greensboro
    , contributor
    Comments (632) | Send Message
     
    The U.S. education system is dysfunctional because it a government monopoly. The fact that it is a local government monopoly makes it only marginally better than a state or federal monopoly. Monopoly sellers (public or private) have zero incentive to improve their product offering.

     

    I know there are private schools, but they have a horrible job competing with the government which gives the "service" away for free. Plus they don't have to be that good, when the dominant service provider in their market (the local government) is so bad.

     

    Government only does good things by accident.

     

    Why are private monopolies bad (and we have antitrust activity to prevent them) and government monopolies good (and we want to turn healthcare over to them)?

     

    Here's the answer. Both types of monopoly (private and public) are bad.

     

    On Jun 13 08:02 PM Machiavelli999 wrote:

     

    > Lol, this is so predictable. It is kinda sad that so many people
    > do the following when thinking about problem. Problem presented. Is government in anyway involved? If yes, obviously, the problem is with the government.
    14 Jun 2009, 09:02 AM Reply Like
  • Phiota
    , contributor
    Comments (21) | Send Message
     
    As an Expat in China I still find the average American in general is still more capable then the Average Chinese. The average American coming out of high school/college is more developed because of the culture in school/home forces for better or worse the person to grow up sooner. In China the students are told that the only important thing is doing well in school tests and the parents/system "baby" the children up to the last year of school so when they. come out of school they are less prepared to deal with the unstructured/self thinking challenges of the real world. That said the currency ratio between the USD and Yuan is 1:6.8 and in general the wages in the US/China for workers is about the same 1:6.8 ratio. So a chinese person can be much less productive and take longer to develop then an American and still be cost effective.
    14 Jun 2009, 10:46 AM Reply Like
  • User 357705
    , contributor
    Comments (564) | Send Message
     
    Really? How about Somalia? In fact, I'll pay your super saver airfare to Mogadishu today!

     

    On Jun 13 08:27 PM Market Sniper wrote:

     

    > Liberty thrives where government
    > doesn't!
    14 Jun 2009, 11:02 AM Reply Like
  • User 357705
    , contributor
    Comments (564) | Send Message
     
    Somalia is the poster child of a government that no only does not thrive it doesn't exist. One would think that all the rabid government haters would be chartering A-380s to fill with their friends and families and heading for their nirvana: a place where there is no government to interfere with them.
    14 Jun 2009, 11:25 AM Reply Like
  • The Geoffster
    , contributor
    Comments (4013) | Send Message
     
    Somalia is the poster child of anarchy. I hope nobody on this post wants that.

     

    On Jun 14 11:25 AM User 357705 wrote:

     

    > Somalia is the poster child of a government that no only does not
    > thrive it doesn't exist. One would think that all the rabid government
    > haters would be chartering A-380s to fill with their friends and
    > families and heading for their nirvana: a place where there is no
    > government to interfere with them.
    14 Jun 2009, 11:48 AM Reply Like
  • User 357705
    , contributor
    Comments (564) | Send Message
     
    Apparently they do. No gov't interference in their lives. No gov't interference in education, no gov't interference in health care, no gov't interference in the markets, no gov't interference in all aspects. Extrapolate that out and its very easy to see they resent paying for gov't services like fire, police, dog catcher, highways, ports, airports, a legal system designed to protect the wealthy, bridges that don't fall down during rush hour. Yeah, Somalia is the perfect place for them!

     

    On Jun 14 11:48 AM The Geoffster wrote:

     

    > Somalia is the poster child of anarchy. I hope nobody on this post
    > wants that.
    14 Jun 2009, 12:06 PM Reply Like
  • fahrender
    , contributor
    Comments (31) | Send Message
     
    as a teacher who has worked in five different countries, most of my fifty year "career" however in the US, i can say from first hand experience that where there is strong, genuine interest in the education of children students do well. But, for schools to do well there must be adequate funding and the respect of teachers and teaching by both the general public and the politicians who control the purse strings. in too many countries, and in the US and the UK in particular, the politicians and more than a few public figures decide that schools should have certain priorities which are then inadequately funded or not funded at all. teachers and schools are blamed for problems which are societal and cultural.
    i find particularly contemptible the people who natter on about "throwing money" at the problem as if teachers are paid enough or classes are small enough or libraries and laboratories are properly equipped, or arts programs are even funded at all. these hypocrites fuss and fume about how rotten the educational system in the US is but they aren't prepared to do what is necessary for this country to have a good education system. instead we have pompous finger wagging about long summer vacations or some such "issue" which might have a minor relevance but in no way is critical to deal with the central issues.
    American schools are not all the same. some of them are quite good. guess where they are: in communities that have the where with all to pay for them and are willing to do so.
    one final comment: as long as we have communities and subcultures that refuse to accept the theory of evolution, as long as this farcical phenomenon exists, even though it isn't prevalent and even though it is just a single issue, as long as Americans are willing to put up with this nonsense we shouldn't wonder too much why our schools aren't doing a better job.
    14 Jun 2009, 12:07 PM Reply Like
  • The Geoffster
    , contributor
    Comments (4013) | Send Message
     
    I think the argument is about finding the right balance. Perhaps "the 'twain shall never meet."

     

    On Jun 14 12:06 PM User 357705 wrote:

     

    > Apparently they do. No gov't interference in their lives. No gov't
    > interference in education, no gov't interference in health care,
    > no gov't interference in the markets, no gov't interference in all
    > aspects. Extrapolate that out and its very easy to see they resent
    > paying for gov't services like fire, police, dog catcher, highways,
    > ports, airports, a legal system designed to protect the wealthy,
    > bridges that don't fall down during rush hour. Yeah, Somalia is the
    > perfect place for them!
    14 Jun 2009, 12:18 PM Reply Like
  • User 357705
    , contributor
    Comments (564) | Send Message
     
    Balance? Is that anything like 'fairness'?

     

    On Jun 14 12:18 PM The Geoffster wrote:

     

    > I think the argument is about finding the right balance. Perhaps
    > "the 'twain shall never meet."
    14 Jun 2009, 12:35 PM Reply Like
  • The Geoffster
    , contributor
    Comments (4013) | Send Message
     
    It's about finding the golden mean.

     

    On Jun 14 12:35 PM User 357705 wrote:

     

    > Balance? Is that anything like 'fairness'?
    14 Jun 2009, 12:44 PM Reply Like
  • User 357705
    , contributor
    Comments (564) | Send Message
     
    And if your 'golden mean' is different from another's?
    14 Jun 2009, 12:47 PM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (6025) | Send Message
     
    The review paragraph is a better than the article.

     

    Our public High School system is a national disgrace. Students don't value education, they value who has the most dates. High academic achievers are nerds to be distained and tormented. America's youth heroes are rock bands, not scientists, not business leaders. I have seen this system grind up and destroy really smart kids. Kids that end up trying to hide their intellectually gifts because its not popular to be smart. Kids that end up being really screwed up because the system is really screwed up. Kinds that are effectively destroyed.

     

    Any properly functioning educational process is inherently elitists because smarter people can do better then average. That would probably come as a shock to many parents who think everyone is born with equal intellectual capacity, and if Johnny fails, it’s the teachers fault. The educational cancer from our disgraceful public high school system spreads to our colleges where many entry students can't write a cogent sentence. Net result, instructors end up grading on the curve. That means grades are assigned relative to average class performance as opposed to a criteria of understanding specific proportions of the educational materials.

     

    I am curious, how many people think America's public school system is working as it should? If its not, what's wrong with it? If its broken, can it be fixed?
    14 Jun 2009, 12:59 PM Reply Like
  • User 357705
    , contributor
    Comments (564) | Send Message
     
    America's education system is just what the elites want: A warehouse that teaches little of value other than unquestioning obedience to whomever the 'Daddy' figure of the hour is. They don't want bright engaged kids like in the 60's and 70's who have the temerity to question authority, or anything else. The elites have succeeded.

     

    On Jun 14 12:59 PM User 283977 wrote:

     

    > The review paragraph is a better than the article.
    >
    > Our public High School system is a national disgrace. Students don't
    > value education, they value who has the most dates. High academic
    > achievers are nerds to be distained and tormented. America's youth
    > heroes are rock bands, not scientists, not business leaders. I have
    > seen this system grind up and destroy really smart kids. Kids that
    > end up trying to hide their intellectually gifts because its not
    > popular to be smart. Kids that end up being really screwed up because
    > the system is really screwed up. Kinds that are effectively destroyed.
    >
    >
    > Any properly functioning educational process is inherently elitists
    > because smarter people can do better then average. That would probably
    > come as a shock to many parents who think everyone is born with equal
    > intellectual capacity, and if Johnny fails, it’s the teachers fault.
    > The educational cancer from our disgraceful public high school system
    > spreads to our colleges where many entry students can't write a cogent
    > sentence. Net result, instructors end up grading on the curve. That
    > means grades are assigned relative to average class performance as
    > opposed to a criteria of understanding specific proportions of the
    > educational materials.
    >
    > I am curious, how many people think America's public school system
    > is working as it should? If its not, what's wrong with it? If its
    > broken, can it be fixed?
    14 Jun 2009, 01:10 PM Reply Like
  • FocalPoint Analytics
    , contributor
    Comments (6025) | Send Message
     
    User 357705 - You copied my comment on your reply. The only similarity I see is the use of the word "Elite". The context of my use of the word Elite was that an educational system should encourage the highest levels of intellectually achievement as opposed to accepting and teaching to the lowest level of intellectual performance.

     

    You appear to be referring to some kind of a social power difference where Elites refers to the people in power. Can you be more specific? What do you mean by "The Elites"? Who, or what are these Elites that you refer to?
    Have you noted some changes in the educational system, like Government reductions in graduate school funding after Viet-Nam?
    14 Jun 2009, 01:45 PM Reply Like
  • Daniel M. Harrison
    , contributor
    Comments (139) | Send Message
     
    It's a shame, because one of the cornerstones of the U.S. economy is in fact, entrepreneurialism. As anyone who owns their own business or works for themselves will tell you, going alone consumes man hours more than almost anything else (sometimes, regrettably, to the detriment of one's family/personal life). It's very, very tough to become a rich "lazy" entrepreneur.

     

    The comparative idleness of the west's schooling system today is merely a reflection of a highly intitutionalized, or de-entrepreneurialized culture where people are encouraged to enhance their personal branding qualities to become recognized, rather than put in the blood, sweat and tears which ultimately, pay off.
    14 Jun 2009, 01:46 PM Reply Like
  • Windsun33
    , contributor
    Comments (4277) | Send Message
     
    There have been similar predictions and opinions around ever since the 1930's (at least). There are two ways to take those predictions - one is that the predictions of an education collapse were false, another is that we have not improved much in the past 75 years.
    15 Jun 2009, 02:14 PM Reply Like
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