Orwellian behavior by Amazon.com (AMZN) in its deletion of unauthorized copies of 1984 from...


Orwellian behavior by Amazon.com (AMZN) in its deletion of unauthorized copies of 1984 from customers' Kindles.
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Comments (3)
  • wheelbarrelsofcash
    , contributor
    Comments (184) | Send Message
     
    BIg brother ISN'T watching you, and he isn't deleting your copy of 1984 either.
    18 Jul 2009, 08:55 PM Reply Like
  • bricki
    , contributor
    Comments (1096) | Send Message
     
    This is the ultimate problem of devices like Blu-Ray players, the Kindle, iPods and so forth.

     

    Despite the fact that you have purchased some software product these devices do not provide you with a long term guarantee that you will be able to use your product. DRM authorization servers go down when a company exits the business. Blu Ray encryption updates cause players to go obsolete if the manufacturer stops supporting firmware updates to the player, and in cases like what just happened with the Kindle your rights to software can be deleted if legal problems with the publisher arise.

     

    From my point of view this is unacceptable. So long as an alternative exists (CD vs. DRM-iTune, physical book vs. e-book) these schemes are going to have long term issues replacing products unencumbered by DRM. Already we are seeing considerable consumer pushback when it comes to DRM encumbered music; most music sold by Apple is now DRM free.

     

    Consumer behavior and eventually consumer protection laws will change the landscape in this area forcing these draconian measures to be rolled back. In the meantime I would not invest in a company that gets a large part of its revenue from such a scheme because it is vulnerable to big top line shocks from Kindle type incidents.
    18 Jul 2009, 09:12 PM Reply Like
  • User 357705
    , contributor
    Comments (564) | Send Message
     
    Thats not a very capitalistic point of view.

     

    On Jul 18 09:12 PM bricki wrote:

     

    > This is the ultimate problem of devices like Blu-Ray players, the
    > Kindle, iPods and so forth.
    >
    > Despite the fact that you have purchased some software product these
    > devices do not provide you with a long term guarantee that you will
    > be able to use your product. DRM authorization servers go down when
    > a company exits the business. Blu Ray encryption updates cause players
    > to go obsolete if the manufacturer stops supporting firmware updates
    > to the player, and in cases like what just happened with the Kindle
    > your rights to software can be deleted if legal problems with the
    > publisher arise.
    >
    > From my point of view this is unacceptable. So long as an alternative
    > exists (CD vs. DRM-iTune, physical book vs. e-book) these schemes
    > are going to have long term issues replacing products unencumbered
    > by DRM. Already we are seeing considerable consumer pushback when
    > it comes to DRM encumbered music; most music sold by Apple is now
    > DRM free.
    >
    > Consumer behavior and eventually consumer protection laws will change
    > the landscape in this area forcing these draconian measures to be
    > rolled back. In the meantime I would not invest in a company that
    > gets a large part of its revenue from such a scheme because it is
    > vulnerable to big top line shocks from Kindle type incidents.
    1 Oct 2009, 07:11 PM Reply Like
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