The disastrous coal-driven electricity system in India may give a reprieve to the battered solar...


The disastrous coal-driven electricity system in India may give a reprieve to the battered solar industry in the near future. The power sector problems there have become so acute due to mismanagement that it's starting to impede growth. As fossil-fuel grid power reaches near-parity with solar in the region, solar manufacturers see an opportunity - a country with plenty of sun and flat idle land that is starved for energy.

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Comments (9)
  • andybreav
    , contributor
    Comments (4) | Send Message
     
    Good for my solar shares but no so good for my coal mine shares!
    30 Apr 2012, 07:58 PM Reply Like
  • J 457
    , contributor
    Comments (1000) | Send Message
     
    Nonsense. You don;t build out solar in a week or two, moving toward solar will take decades.
    30 Apr 2012, 08:12 PM Reply Like
  • Jason Tillberg
    , contributor
    Comments (1326) | Send Message
     
    We just witnessed China going from making 2.1 million cars in 2001 to making over 18 million by 2010.

     

    Their market share of global auto production went from 3.5% in 2001 to 23% by 2011.

     

    Granted, that's China, and not sure about India's ability to make things happen, but seeing that kind of transformation in China has to make you think what's possible today in terms of just how fast things can be made to happen.
    30 Apr 2012, 08:28 PM Reply Like
  • Mike Maher
    , contributor
    Comments (2862) | Send Message
     
    The article says analysts predict that solar will reach parity in prices with fossil fuels in 2016 in India. Thats a big if, considering the battery technology has not improved or gotten cheap as quickly as the solar panels. Without power purchase agreements, solar is a great dream and a bad investment.

     

    India has a horribly inept/corrupt political establishment that greatly slows down most foreign investment in that country. This is a country that cannot store enough food without it spoiling to feed all its poor, that is trying to retoractively tax Vodafone to help close a budget hole. What about this anti-business climate is going to encourage investors to come in and build power plants? I wouldn't put my money there.
    30 Apr 2012, 11:55 PM Reply Like
  • WPSPIKER
    , contributor
    Comments (1149) | Send Message
     
    India has little to no choice to build out as much as they can as fast as they can. cities are growing at an astonishing rate they are also producing tons and tons of trash without any spot to put it.
    a lot is already getting recycled and or turned into electricity through really dirty power generation plants. Worse yet just dumped just out of site or not even out of site. toxic waste is going to be a real issue as clean water is even LESS available there. If you are looking for better places to invest $ in India I would put a lot more time looking into waste water and water treatment for there at the moment.
    Though I do own JASO and SOL as plays on global energy production with a better boost in earning in China over India at the moment that could swap at any time though as both are growing way faster than most every other place on earth.

     

    Mark
    30 Apr 2012, 08:41 PM Reply Like
  • The Patriot
    , contributor
    Comments (358) | Send Message
     
    If I remember right, havent there been riots and protest of several
    companies that were trying to clear land for new plants ?? Solar fields to replace coal plants would take 10's of thousands of cleared acres. Monsoon season would be a killer on solar. I have been using this drop in coal to add shares.
    30 Apr 2012, 08:45 PM Reply Like
  • moreofthesame
    , contributor
    Comments (739) | Send Message
     
    I have travelled all over the world during all seasons pretty much and the rains in california during "monsoon season" can get pretty hard, that doesn't have any impact on solar though.
    Yes, India is corrupt but which government isn't? They wouldn't be able to exist if they weren't able to install solar plants. There really isn't much to it.
    1 May 2012, 12:09 AM Reply Like
  • kmi
    , contributor
    Comments (4579) | Send Message
     
    In developing nations today, with shaky unstable grid power and central government inefficiency, solar is to power as cellphones are to landlines.

     

    It's happening at an astonishing pace across varied regions, and the downward spiral in panel prices while bad for companies like FSLR is great for consumers.
    1 May 2012, 01:13 AM Reply Like
  • tlh129
    , contributor
    Comments (2) | Send Message
     
    Ok this article came in because of my YGE alerts. YGE surged after hours yesterday (still not to the $5.20, I need to recover). Do you think the all of a sudden India and coal relationship possibly going sour is going to move this stock and TSL (because China is right next door)? Can this issue get any real press coverage that could push speculation? Will the press push solar over other [major] competing technologies: wind, nuclear, tidal for the peninsula part, and can't even dirty water be dammed along any major rivers? Obviously speaking from my pocket, I want to see solar fly, but do you really think this will be the breakout market for solar in 2012 or even 2013?
    1 May 2012, 06:51 AM Reply Like
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