Pictures and details of Barnes and Noble’s (BKS -5.9%) new e-book reader have leaked, "and...


Pictures and details of Barnes and Noble’s (BKS -5.9%) new e-book reader have leaked, "and it is hot, both inside and out," Wired says. "If you just ordered a Kindle (AMZN +0.5%), stop reading now or you’re in for a giant dose of buyer’s remorse." The reader, due out today, will allow loaning ebooks to friends - which could destroy the Kindle walled-garden model.
From other sites
Comments (7)
  • tripleblack
    , contributor
    Comments (13581) | Send Message
     
    Napster for books. Without the ability to get paid for their work, the authors (already under assault from failing publishers everywhere who are cutting back on the number of titles they will publish per year) will see their "professions" turn to "hobbies".

     

    The music industry has been seeking to straighten out this model for the last decade, without success, despite some really strong laws installed to protect their interests.

     

    Unlike movies, where the "date" phenomenon has kept theaters alive for ages, and a similar relationship between music and concerts, books have no such cultural prop.
    20 Oct 2009, 11:15 AM Reply Like
  • Gary Jakacky
    , contributor
    Comments (2940) | Send Message
     
    The obvious solution is to read a book on a date! He can read the left hand pages, she can read the right hand pages! As good a business model as the music industry has worked out....and just as exciting.
    20 Oct 2009, 11:21 AM Reply Like
  • coloneldebugger
    , contributor
    Comments (910) | Send Message
     
    Because there is so much less music being produced now? The "napster model" only hurt the record companies, not the artists. If applied to the book industry it will hurt the publishing houses, not the authors. In the end we might miss out on those brilliant books written by the president's dog.

     

    The music industry's mistake was not embracing the technology, learning to use it to their advantage instead they tried to fight it.

     

    On Oct 20 11:15 AM tripleblack wrote:

     

    > Napster for books. Without the ability to get paid for their work,
    > the authors (already under assault from failing publishers everywhere
    > who are cutting back on the number of titles they will publish per
    > year) will see their "professions" turn to "hobbies".
    >
    > The music industry has been seeking to straighten out this model
    > for the last decade, without success, despite some really strong
    > laws installed to protect their interests.
    >
    > Unlike movies, where the "date" phenomenon has kept theaters alive
    > for ages, and a similar relationship between music and concerts,
    > books have no such cultural prop.
    20 Oct 2009, 11:25 AM Reply Like
  • Krugger
    , contributor
    Comments (27) | Send Message
     
    How can you declare it Napster for books when you have absolutely no idea how it (the loaning) will work (if in fact it really allows for that)?
    Wait until it's announced properly before donning your tinfoil hat and declaring the end of the (book) world.
    20 Oct 2009, 12:16 PM Reply Like
  • Krugger
    , contributor
    Comments (27) | Send Message
     
    in addition, here's a great post suggesting publishers should take advantage of the changing marketplace (ebooks) to shakeup their business model (which isn't doing that well right now).
    www.thebigmoney.com/fe...
    20 Oct 2009, 04:09 PM Reply Like
  • pchub
    , contributor
    Comments (2) | Send Message
     
    I have little feeling for the downfall of the publishers as they have held education in chains demanding the use of the newest edition of college text. Now I'm looking for the schools to change to ebooks!!!
    I just paid $400 for my son's book for this semester.
    20 Oct 2009, 09:24 PM Reply Like
  • Krugger
    , contributor
    Comments (27) | Send Message
     
    i'm sure no one is reading this, but to prove my point:
    [url]www.engadget.com/2009/.../[/url]
    "There's been tremendous fuss made over the Barnes & Noble nook, due at least partly to its ability to lend your purchased e-books to friends -- just like real books. Unfortunately, the "world's most advanced e-book reader" limits the LendMe feature to one 14-day period per book, ever, and that's only if the publisher gives permission. You also can't read the title yourself during the loaner period. Of course, nook's biggest competitors can't do this at all and LendMe works on any B&N eReader supported device including the Mac, PC, iPhone, iPod touch, and BlackBerry. One-time is certainly better than no-times, eh?"
    23 Oct 2009, 10:51 AM Reply Like
DJIA (DIA) S&P 500 (SPY)
ETF Hub
ETF Screener: Search and filter by asset class, strategy, theme, performance, yield, and much more
ETF Performance: View ETF performance across key asset classes and investing themes
ETF Investing Guide: Learn how to build and manage a well-diversified, low cost ETF portfolio
ETF Selector: An explanation of how to select and use ETFs