Electric vehicle charging stations will be cropping up at select Kroger (KR) and Cracker Barrel...


Electric vehicle charging stations will be cropping up at select Kroger (KR) and Cracker Barrel (CBRL) locations as part of the government's national EV project. The low driving range of electric cars has been one of the biggest strikes working against the industry from it gaining mass appeal, although Tesla Motors (TSLA) hopes to turn the tables with the launch of the Model S this week.

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Comments (46)
  • davidingeorgia
    , contributor
    Comments (2661) | Send Message
     
    Are fire extinguishers also available at these charging stations?
    19 Jun 2012, 07:39 AM Reply Like
  • OptionManiac
    , contributor
    Comments (3498) | Send Message
     
    They are in gas stations. Staic electricity has "sparked" a few fires.
    19 Jun 2012, 07:51 AM Reply Like
  • Roger Pressman
    , contributor
    Comments (39) | Send Message
     
    Yeah, gee, let's think about that for a moment. There are 33 car fires every day among ICE cars -- every day!! There have been exactly 2 car fires over the entire first year of EV use and one occurred three weeks after a crash test when the car sat in a wrecking lot. If anyone needs fire extinguishers, it's owners of ICE cars.

     

    There are legitimate reasons why you might choose not to buy an EV, but car fires? Seriously?
    19 Jun 2012, 08:13 AM Reply Like
  • Tony Petroski
    , contributor
    Comments (6356) | Send Message
     
    "The low driving range of electric cars has been one of the biggest strikes working against the industry..."

     

    Yeah, I agree with the RationalOne. Car fires are the least of your problems. I was worried about getting crushed like a junebug on the windshield of a Kenworth if I got in an accident.
    19 Jun 2012, 09:27 AM Reply Like
  • Stephen Pace
    , contributor
    Comments (767) | Send Message
     
    @Tony Petroski: The Tesla Model S is the safest car on the market, period. 5 stars in every category and actually goes above and beyond the limited government safety tests in a number of areas. You can worry about getting squashed by a Kenworth (that will probably squash most passenger vehicles), but you won't be safer in a passenger car--gas, diesel, or EV--than the Tesla Model S.
    20 Jun 2012, 01:30 PM Reply Like
  • OptionManiac
    , contributor
    Comments (3498) | Send Message
     
    Can't wait to see it.
    20 Jun 2012, 01:54 PM Reply Like
  • pmiller100
    , contributor
    Comments (358) | Send Message
     
    I saw one this spring at a CVS (Northern VA). Just stopped for a bottle of water, and there it was. Caught me by surprise.
    19 Jun 2012, 07:50 AM Reply Like
  • wyostocks
    , contributor
    Comments (9113) | Send Message
     
    "as part of the government's national EV project:"

     

    And who might I ask is paying for these installations and the electricity they'll consume, if ever used?
    19 Jun 2012, 07:55 AM Reply Like
  • Paul Price
    , contributor
    Comments (1512) | Send Message
     
    All taxpayers, of course.

     

    No expense is too much when it comes to supporting Obama's goals with other people's money.
    19 Jun 2012, 08:05 AM Reply Like
  • JRP3
    , contributor
    Comments (10330) | Send Message
     
    Yes the goal of reducing our consumption of imported oil is only Obama's goal and should not be supported by the public at all.
    19 Jun 2012, 08:26 AM Reply Like
  • willfly4food
    , contributor
    Comments (82) | Send Message
     
    Wow, I am with you - I am so much happier paying for arms that go to both sides in the middle east to neighbours who never will get along and play the US taxpayer for more each year. Get rid of those pesky EV charging stations, as they rob the ME money pool.
    19 Jun 2012, 10:00 AM Reply Like
  • OptionManiac
    , contributor
    Comments (3498) | Send Message
     
    Socialism is when tax money goes to programs that don't benefit me.
    19 Jun 2012, 10:19 AM Reply Like
  • Dave_M
    , contributor
    Comments (5605) | Send Message
     
    Yeah, there are people in the inner city "paying" every day by breathing the toxic exhaust fumes (from ICE vehicles) and expiring years before their time, but not before receiving thousands in gov't (taxpayer) paid health care costs. Taxpayers are gonna pay one way or another. It's better if nobody dies (prematurely) in the process.

     

    Isn't anyone for reducing smog in our nations largest cities? Or doing something (anything) to introduce competition in automotive fuels? Or what about creating jobs here in the USA?

     

    Think about it, the guy who get's a job installing EV charging stations might not have to resort to crime in order to feed his family. That's one less car jacking we have to worry about.
    19 Jun 2012, 04:43 PM Reply Like
  • wyostocks
    , contributor
    Comments (9113) | Send Message
     
    Dave
    "Think about it, the guy who get's a job installing EV charging stations might not have to resort to crime in order to feed his family. "

     

    Is this what America has come to? Give a person a job to pay them off so they won't commit crime against the taxpaying people?

     

    Pretty frigging sad.
    19 Jun 2012, 06:42 PM Reply Like
  • Dave_M
    , contributor
    Comments (5605) | Send Message
     
    wyostocks - "Is this what America has come to? Give a person a job to pay them off so they won't commit crime against the taxpaying people?"

     

    Good question. The only thing that separates the lawful from the lawless is desperation. It has been documented that crime rises when the gap between the wealthy and the poor widen. I've actually heard people say "If I've got nothing, I've got nothing to lose". In 1983, Hollywood made fun of this social phenomenon with the movie "Trading Places". Sociologists, politicians, and others recognize that this phenomenon is real. Therefore, one of the goals of civilized societies is to ensure that most citizens can be educated and productive. Without this goal, a civilized society would destroy itself from the inside out. It's happened before, and it will again.

     

    Don't get me wrong, there is a difference between productive employment and a handout. In the past, productive employment gave us valuable resources like the Hoover Dam. How many decades of virtually free electricity? If we were waiting for private industry to act on that, we'd still be waiting.
    19 Jun 2012, 07:19 PM Reply Like
  • OptionManiac
    , contributor
    Comments (3498) | Send Message
     
    Idle hands are the tools of the devil!!
    19 Jun 2012, 09:35 PM Reply Like
  • The Patriot
    , contributor
    Comments (358) | Send Message
     
    So you pop into Kroger or Cracker Barrel, for an hour of shopping or eating - how much recharging can be done in that amount of time ??
    19 Jun 2012, 08:06 AM Reply Like
  • JRP3
    , contributor
    Comments (10330) | Send Message
     
    Probably enough for most people since all EV's have more range than the average daily miles driven, which is less than 40 miles a day.
    19 Jun 2012, 08:26 AM Reply Like
  • The Patriot
    , contributor
    Comments (358) | Send Message
     
    Then why do we need them ??
    19 Jun 2012, 09:45 AM Reply Like
  • berylrb
    , contributor
    Comments (2374) | Send Message
     
    I think it was half a charge in 30 minutes, I don't believe these quick charge stations are set up to deliver a full charge for safety reasons.
    19 Jun 2012, 10:02 AM Reply Like
  • AlexiaEP
    , contributor
    Comments (1074) | Send Message
     
    For the same reason you need three gas stations on every corner, Patriot.
    19 Jun 2012, 11:47 AM Reply Like
  • The Patriot
    , contributor
    Comments (358) | Send Message
     
    I dont have gas pumps at the house. We have multiple gas stations because of competition.
    Recharge time varies greatly by battery type and amount of power delivered. The best and newest lithium can come close to half charge
    in about 30 minutes. Most batteries cant take this load.Many take
    12 hours plus.

     

    As long as it doest involve tax dollars or mandates - go for it.
    Oh yeah, it better not cost me a parking place : )
    19 Jun 2012, 12:15 PM Reply Like
  • OptionManiac
    , contributor
    Comments (3498) | Send Message
     
    Competition? Why are they all the same price - and prices rise and lower in unison?

     

    If new technologies are not supported by the government, then they will fail. (no instant profit). If we refuse to do research and have the guts to do something that may fail, then we hand the baton of innovation to other countries. US companies no longer want to put capital where there may be a long time frame for return. Bell Labs is just a shadow of what it once was.

     

    Government subsidized the building of railroads in the 1800's.
    19 Jun 2012, 01:06 PM Reply Like
  • Dave_M
    , contributor
    Comments (5605) | Send Message
     
    You can get about 25 to 30 miles of range in one hour of charging at a public station. In some cases, the car owner pays by swiping a card. In other cases, the business owner pays, if that's what he wants to do to bring in business and appear to be supporting "green" initiatives.
    19 Jun 2012, 04:47 PM Reply Like
  • AlexiaEP
    , contributor
    Comments (1074) | Send Message
     
    Competition? Umm...and where would it be that you're living that gas stations compete against each other and force the price of gas down?! Cause I want to move there.

     

    Oh, and lots of people do have 'gas pumps' at their homes. That's called owning a farm and needing fuel for your farm equipment.

     

    I think you need to take a closer look at where tax dollars are spent. If you knew, you wouldn't be nearly as offended that Tesla got a rather small loan, and an even smaller tax rebate for their customers.
    12 Jul 2012, 07:24 PM Reply Like
  • youngman442002
    , contributor
    Comments (5123) | Send Message
     
    They will be like the Handicapped spaces.....lots of them and never used....but hey its a good government program right...LOL...
    19 Jun 2012, 08:08 AM Reply Like
  • Dave_M
    , contributor
    Comments (5605) | Send Message
     
    Thirty years ago I was unemployed for 3 months. It was the longest 3 months of my life. This was when you actually had to get up at 5am and drive downtown, and stand in line and take a number and personally explain to gov't workers why you were applying for unemployment insurance even though you had a college degree.

     

    I took a job as a Federal Gov't employee. Worked for the gov't for 4 years. Since then, I realized that:
    - People who complain about big gov't have good paying jobs in private industry.
    - People who complain about gov't health care are already insured through other avenues, and haven't been turned away.
    - People who complain about funds wasted on handicap people have never been handicapped.

     

    Politics Simplified:
    The quickest way to turn a democrat into a republican is to give him a $150K job.
    The quickest way to turn a republican into a democrat is to give him sustained unemployment.
    19 Jun 2012, 05:00 PM Reply Like
  • Tony Petroski
    , contributor
    Comments (6356) | Send Message
     
    Half the nation on foodstamps and they stop in the Kroger's to juice up their electric car?

     

    Electric juice stamps? After all, social justice demands that it's not just granola-eating oganic food lovers who get to experience our clean-green Mr. Bean Machines.
    19 Jun 2012, 09:32 AM Reply Like
  • pat1000
    , contributor
    Comments (496) | Send Message
     
    Some European countries like Denmark are installing parking meters with the added ability to charge automobiles----

     

    EVs are coming no matter what their detractors say-----
    19 Jun 2012, 11:21 AM Reply Like
  • sellis1234
    , contributor
    Comments (13) | Send Message
     
    Yes, EVs will come, we'll buy them, someone would setup charging stations and profit, but the gov't keeps interfering...with my money and my son's money.

     

    Nothing has worked as well as capitalism, ever, which we are a long way from now. Why do they think this old tired socialism thing that has never worked well, will this time?

     

    We need to get back to what made us great, not what had made others poor.

     

    BTW, cannot wait for my Model S delivery!
    19 Jun 2012, 12:07 PM Reply Like
  • Dave_M
    , contributor
    Comments (5605) | Send Message
     
    Getting my Model S this fall.
    19 Jun 2012, 06:56 PM Reply Like
  • geo-eng
    , contributor
    Comments (192) | Send Message
     
    sellis1234: "but the gov't keeps interfering...with my money and my son's money. Nothing has worked as well as capitalism, ever" Really??? Choosing to ignore history are we? The Great Depression and the Great Recession were both caused by pure capitalistic greed. If the economy is left to private industry to run on their own, the boom & bust cycles will be sudden and frequent. Ever wonder how the sub-prime mortgage fiasco could have caused such a great capitalistic system to crash so badly? You probably don't want to hear this, but In Canada, the recession was felt but just barely, while in the U.S. it has become known as the Great Recession. Why the difference? Because the Canadian government had put measures in place to prevent the banks from the blind, greed-driven practices that were rampant in the U.S.

     

    Since nobody seems to be able to save up enough money in the good times to ride out the bad times, when the bad times inevitably come, Average Joe ends up losing everything. And part of the reason that Average Joe gets screwed is because at the first sign of difficult times, the corporations that you want to rely on for all employment in America, start their mass layoffs in order to protect their profit margins. The ripple effect of these layoffs then impacts thousands more private companies. That is how a "Great Recession" gets triggerred by a lack of government regulation and oversight. And every time this happens, the government has to step in and spend huge amounts of tax payers' money to help stem the flow of blood.

     

    Government fiscal policies and regulation and stimulation are needed, to varying degrees at different times, to try to smooth out the peaks and valleys in natural economic cycles. Government stimulation during recessionary times are necessary to boost the economy. Without such intervention, recessions can and have turned into depressions. And if a government is going to try to stimulate a depressed economy, why not put some of that money toward innovative companies that would otherwise be crushed by the giants that are pedalling the status quo?
    20 Jun 2012, 01:23 AM Reply Like
  • OptionManiac
    , contributor
    Comments (3498) | Send Message
     
    My brother's company started laying off employees (including engineers) in early 2008 (Jan) in anticipation of the turn down. Businesses exist to make money, not to employ people. Straight forward capitalism exists to make profits, not to employ people. Lower a company's taxes, and that company will not hire unless they need to protect production/sales. Only an increase in sales = increase in production will spur hiring, and that means consumers are needed.
    20 Jun 2012, 08:00 AM Reply Like
  • sellis1234
    , contributor
    Comments (13) | Send Message
     
    The housing bubble was caused by greedy politicians (wow, what a concept) forcing banks to loan where they normally would not have. Other greed factored in after that - get your history straight. Heard of the roaring 20s? Technology advanced, expansion of the middle class, rise in the standard of living, why? LOWER TAXES, LESS REGULATION (not no regulation - government is needed). If I had more of my own money, I'd put more in Tesla, not Solyndra.
    Even if I chose Solyndra, your kids would not be on the hook for it.

     

    That is the way it should be.

     

    By the way, as you should see, Keynesian (even the new one) economics do not work. Just ask the economy.
    21 Jun 2012, 09:56 AM Reply Like
  • OptionManiac
    , contributor
    Comments (3498) | Send Message
     
    Taxes were also low at the beginning of the depression.

     

    Don't forget the loan companies that preyed on their fellow human's greed by waving to good to be true loan offers in front of their faces. Mortgage brokers and banks were making a fortune off of people who couldn't do the math. These loans were all bundled up as "safe" investment vehicles and sold around the world to unsuspecting dupes. Banks loaned not so much because they were "forced" to, but because there was money in it. Fannie Mae started making bad loans because they saw how much money the other lenders were making. Perhaps Fannie Mae should never have been made into a public company. We have regulations because we humans are, well human.
    21 Jun 2012, 12:46 PM Reply Like
  • 123man
    , contributor
    Comments (1612) | Send Message
     
    Some of the comments above seem to indicate that the status quo of the Seven Sisters oil companies(really ONE big oil company) is all we need - that they self regulate and are competitive - that must be why their prices fluctuate by as much as $0.02 on any given four cornered intersection - and then the real insult - while their profits continue to rise to new heights, our government, us, we stupidly continue to subsidize them - and those of us who think that this will somehow end pleasantly, would have us continue to drink from that barrel of crappy oil kool-aid -
    We have the road system we have because of government spending, we have the railroad system we have because of government spending, we have the BIG oil system we have because of government spending, NOW it is time to do something that is both good and good for us, by spending some money on infrastructure for EV's - "if we build it they will come" - yes people are creatures of habit, easy fill ups at a gas station make gas guzzling easy, so logic says that making it easy to fill up your "electric fuel cells" will result in more people moving that direction -
    Of course that does not apply to "status quo, bottom line driven, profit mongering, oil company supporting " folks - it only those with common sense who realize that this planet has finite quantities of everything (oil, minerals, etc) - they see the other hand - wind, ocean waves and solar are infinite, so why not put time and effort into developing these technologies - unless one believes in the rapture and has no plans beyond ones single solitary life - damn the kids, "I am spending their inheritance, i.e., money, air to breathe, water to drink, etc., etc.)
    20 Jun 2012, 10:46 AM Reply Like
  • sellis1234
    , contributor
    Comments (13) | Send Message
     
    The gov't doesn't have enough money, never will to do what you (geo-eng) say is needed. You still ignore the depression socialist Europe is in, much worse than ours. We'd be doing much better if it weren't for this debt and outrageous gov't spending. Again taking money, we don't have is, foolish, and unnecessary. Again, there will ALWAYS be cycles. During the Great Depression, we were not the only depressed economy, the world was in it. It was prolonged due to gov't policies.

     

    Less taxes beings more gov't revenue (this is proven). The more we have the more we spend, booting the economy and tax revenue. More people could buy electrics. Then some innovative person could get the infrastructure built. I would invest, especially IF I HAD MORE OF MY OWN MONEY!
    21 Jun 2012, 10:18 AM Reply Like
  • 123man
    , contributor
    Comments (1612) | Send Message
     
    All the talk about socialistic Europe - have you been there? Europe is amazingly beautiful, and the folks who live there are far less dependent on what the American newspaper say is happening on their continent - remember the news you read is the news the large corporate interests want you to read - If you cannot afford to go see for yourself then try watching Direct TV 306 for information on the European countries, watch Rick Steves Europe, for in-depth visits to various cities - remember Europe for all their faults have been around for thousands of centuries, we only a couple of hundred years - and in our short history, we manage to have a downturn every 7-10 years, with two HUGE recessison/depressions in less than 100 years - how was your assest base in 2005 ? - is it substantially less now? - that erosion of wealth is far more insidious than taxes -
    The aristocracy in Europe has always done well, even through the French Revolution - the Hapsburgs, the Grimaldies (the prince of Monaco is a direct decendant) - and what of the aristocracy in the US, how do you think they fared in this last downturn that wiped out much of the middle class? - well, here is a hint -
    It is reported that there are hedge funds on Wall Street with hundreds of millions to billions of dollars who are currently, RIGHT NOW, buying up the homes of those who have lost their jobs and/or homes, an will RENT them back to these poor suckers? - How do I know? - well I buy a home here and there and I am watching the reality of the report - the American dream is fast becoming the American myth
    21 Jun 2012, 12:01 PM Reply Like
  • pat1000
    , contributor
    Comments (496) | Send Message
     
    Back to EVs and a Must Read

     

    MOTOR TREND----June 22, 2012 / By Frank Markus

     

    Wrote what I consider to be a Fantastic review of the new Tesla S model actually test driving the 4th production car off the line----
    His review allayed my biggest fear concerning whether the auto aficionados would like the car---
    It is "A state of the art automobile" The biggest knock was he thought the S was a tad too pricey but still was very close to being the best car built-------And he wanted one------

     

    My 50 (added 10 more) Dec 2012 options are looking better but naturally there are no guarantees I'll make any money----
    23 Jun 2012, 03:35 AM Reply Like
  • OptionManiac
    , contributor
    Comments (3498) | Send Message
     
    I'd love to take a spin in one. A Tesla was parked at a red light while I was walking down the sidewalk - striking looking car. Smart to go for both design and engineering.
    23 Jun 2012, 10:44 AM Reply Like
  • sellis1234
    , contributor
    Comments (13) | Send Message
     
    I have been to Europe, they are worse off than we are, the WORLD was in a depression then and this young nation became the best nation in that short time. As we move closer to socialism, the worse we get.

     

    What country makes the best stuff? Where would you rather be?
    Diversify your sources, then choose, Trabant or Tesla one of the best built autos on the planet - only in America!
    23 Jun 2012, 11:02 AM Reply Like
  • JRP3
    , contributor
    Comments (10330) | Send Message
     
    Don't forget Americans buy most of their products from overseas. Even Tesla gets their batteries from Japan. The US has moved too far away from a manufacturing base.
    24 Jun 2012, 09:34 AM Reply Like
  • sellis1234
    , contributor
    Comments (13) | Send Message
     
    The question is why? (Hint: Labor costs and taxes-we have the highest corp taxes in the world, and they want to raise them even more).
    24 Jun 2012, 10:25 AM Reply Like
  • JRP3
    , contributor
    Comments (10330) | Send Message
     
    Yet somehow corporations don't actually end up paying those "high" rates, nor do their overly compensated executives. In the past tax rates were higher and the US produced more actual goods.
    24 Jun 2012, 10:57 AM Reply Like
  • 123man
    , contributor
    Comments (1612) | Send Message
     
    The move away from it manufacturing base is a complex issue - but boils down to two thing - corporate profits and the environment -
    Corporations move their plants overseas because they can pollute those countries with less outcry - and improve the bottom line -
    Corporations move their plants overseas because they can get cheaper labor, even child labor, no insurance, and no scrutiny -
    and improve their bottom line -
    Keep in mind that Germany is one of the world largest producer of automobiles, and what do they produce - Mercedes, BMW, Volkswagon, Audi, just to name a few - they do so while providing universal healthcare, fair wages and more environmentally friendly vehicles - and they do so while maintaining a healthy bottom line -
    It is not surprising to find out facts like the following -
    In 1928 - 23 1/2% of the US GDP went to the richest 1% of Americans -
    Between the 1950 -1970 - the middle actually grew into a class, while only 10% of the GDP went to the 1% -
    From the 1980's to date the average adjusted income of the working guy went down by $2000, while the wealthiest incomes went up by 400-500% -
    In 2007 - 23 1/2% of the GDP went to the richest 1% -
    In the 2008 crush 39%+ of middle class Americans got wiped out, and we began the biggest recession/depression in our history -
    Does anyone see a correlation here?
    Taxes help pay for infrastructure - infrastructure creates job - people with jobs spend money and the economy improves -
    When the richest among us get more, they buy a second airplane -
    and . . . . . .
    25 Jun 2012, 12:55 PM Reply Like
  • OptionManiac
    , contributor
    Comments (3498) | Send Message
     
    Yes, I believe Germany is number four in manufacturing, Japan number two or three. Two smallish countries that manage to pump out a lot of goods. Japan's unemployment rate is 4.6%, Germany's around 6.7%. The US is still number one in manufacturing - for what it's worth.
    The gap between the wealthiest and poorest is growing in all countries, though the US (along with Israel) has the largest differential in the western world. This is a problem that cannot be easily rectified, but one that needs to be. With money comes power and the power to make sure one collects more money and gets to keep it.
    25 Jun 2012, 01:58 PM Reply Like
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