Seeking Alpha

The Canadian province of Alberta suffers its second major oil spill this month, as Enbridge's...

The Canadian province of Alberta suffers its second major oil spill this month, as Enbridge's (ENB +0.5%) Elk Point pumping station leaks 230K liters of heavy crude. The Energy Resources Conservation Board says the oil has not spilled into any waterways; ENB says the cause of the leak appears to be a failure of a flange gasket.
From other sites
Comments (10)
  • sburger
    , contributor
    Comments (49) | Send Message
     
    Disastrous and wrong
    20 Jun 2012, 11:13 AM Reply Like
  • GaltMachine
    , contributor
    Comments (1140) | Send Message
     
    240,000 liters = approx 62000 USgallons of oil = about 1476 barrels of oil.

     

    If it is was reported as a 1476 barrel oil spill, I guess it would be a yawner. The equivalent of a large swimming pool is hardly going to have any impact upon the world's environment. Oil is a naturally occurring or "organic" product so I am pretty sure the earth has figured out how to deal with it.

     

    How many birds were killed by wind turbines (bird cuisinarts) today?

     

    Save a bird, burn oil!
    20 Jun 2012, 11:41 AM Reply Like
  • kmi
    , contributor
    Comments (4030) | Send Message
     
    Death is naturally occurring too.

     

    However, we don't go around 'encouraging' death do we....

     

    Not that I disagree with the gist of your post, just with the way you rationalize it.

     

    By the way, when you have numbers on the impact of windmills on birds let me know...
    20 Jun 2012, 02:08 PM Reply Like
  • GaltMachine
    , contributor
    Comments (1140) | Send Message
     
    kmi,

     

    I am against wind turbines because they are useless and they kill birds.

     

    First link I found was Politifact:

     

    http://bit.ly/N9IUqi
    "Alexander’s press spokesman, Jim Jeffries, told us the "over 400,000" figure the senator cited came from the American Bird Conservancy, a nonprofit group whose mission is to protect native birds and their habitats, and from a report by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

     

    Robert Johns, a spokesman for the American Bird Conservancy, told us the group got its estimate from the same Fish and Wildlife report Alexander’s office had cited.

     

    The report in question was written in 2009 by Albert Manville, a respected biologist in Fish and Wildlife’s Division of Migratory Bird Management. Manville’s estimates of the bird fatalities caused by wind turbines have been cited in testimony before a congressional committee and in newspapers such as The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times."
    20 Jun 2012, 02:26 PM Reply Like
  • kmi
    , contributor
    Comments (4030) | Send Message
     
    So, how many birds die of natural causes in the general vicinity of wind turbines over the same period?

     

    I find your indifference to oil spillage in tandem with your concern over bird deaths just... really... really... odd...
    20 Jun 2012, 02:40 PM Reply Like
  • GaltMachine
    , contributor
    Comments (1140) | Send Message
     
    Kmi,

     

    "I find your indifference to oil spillage"

     

    It's called a matter of perspective - a swimming pool full of oil spilling is hardly cause for alarm but that's just me.

     

    Have you ever considered the local environmental impact of "wind-farms" on the land and the ecology immediately surrounding them?

     

    You take pristine environmental areas and radically change them with the introduction of the cuisinarts and you consider that "clean" energy and environmentally friendly?

     

    As an FYI, the earth has always had oil and knows how to deal with it but wildlife has no clue how to adapt to a windmill :)

     

    John below states the obvious: oil seeps naturally all the time especially in the ocean and we don't call those "spills".
    20 Jun 2012, 02:47 PM Reply Like
  • JohnInMA
    , contributor
    Comments (45) | Send Message
     
    @GaltMachine - While I am not disputing that wind farms (more than individual turbines) are harmful to birds to some degree, recognize the number you repeat includes a lot of indirectly related impacts. In that estimate, things like disruption of habitat causing displacement or just avoidance are used to arrive at the full estimate. Isn't that valid for most any use of land? Do we consider bird disruption when building any other structure, whether for power generation, or living, etc.? A more realistic number (direct impact) is likely lower. And it should be compared to other man-caused impacts. More birds are killed by moving vehicles and by flying into buildings annually at this point, for example.
    20 Jun 2012, 06:33 PM Reply Like
  • JohnInMA
    , contributor
    Comments (45) | Send Message
     
    Oil seepage is a natural occurrence and has been recorded by man as far back as can be tracked. Perhaps the only difference here is the rate but certainly not the amount.

     

    Does anyone know the typical flow rates? It would be interesting to see how 240k L/62k US Gal translates in time. Most likely this was a quickly resolved event.
    20 Jun 2012, 12:48 PM Reply Like
  • GaltMachine
    , contributor
    Comments (1140) | Send Message
     
    John,

     

    See below from the story link in the post above which means the "leak" is over:

     

    "The release, which occurred June 18, 2012, is largely contained within the pumping station site. The area was secured and clean-up operations began immediately. There is no risk to public health or safety. Preliminary volume estimates of the release are approximately 230 m3 (1,400 barrels). The cause of the release appears to be a failure of a flange gasket in the pumping station."
    20 Jun 2012, 12:57 PM Reply Like
  • JohnInMA
    , contributor
    Comments (45) | Send Message
     
    @galtMachine - Yes, I read that it was resolved. My point is to discover how quickly. For example, it seems plausible that the leaked amount was significantly less that a day's flow in a line. And the value of the information would be to highlight how 1) the amount led to a small or almost negligible risk and 2) it was quickly remedied.

     

    Surely there are some who oppose fossil _____ (fill in the blank) who would try and equate this to other spills of truly epic proportions and impact, for example.
    20 Jun 2012, 01:33 PM Reply Like
DJIA (DIA) S&P 500 (SPY)
ETF Tools
Find the right ETFs for your portfolio:
Seeking Alpha's new ETF Hub
ETF Investment Guide:
Table of Contents | One Page Summary
Read about different ETF Asset Classes:
ETF Selector