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June Nonfarm Payrolls: +80K vs. consensus +100K, prior +77K (revised from 69K). Unemployment...

June Nonfarm Payrolls: +80K vs. consensus +100K, prior +77K (revised from 69K). Unemployment rate 8.2% vs. consensus 8.2%, 8.2% previous.
Comments (70)
  • Papaswamp
    , contributor
    Comments (2199) | Send Message
     
    Internals not too ugly except for the Not SA adj. U-6 and unemployment rate (both rising). More people in the labor force that want a job.
    6 Jul 2012, 08:34 AM Reply Like
  • jwbrewer
    , contributor
    Comments (317) | Send Message
     
    Obamaboys - "but,but,but ADP says"
    6 Jul 2012, 08:35 AM Reply Like
  • wigit5
    , contributor
    Comments (4185) | Send Message
     
    I laughed so hard when I turned on my computer and saw this, after all that chest thumping yesterday by the "economy is fine" boys...

     

    It's obviously not, even if this number had come in as expected unemployment would still be around 8%, under-employment would still be stupidly high, and the people who have plain just given up would still not be looking for the jobs that don't exist.
    6 Jul 2012, 08:42 AM Reply Like
  • Lakeaffect
    , contributor
    Comments (1112) | Send Message
     
    Bulls. Bears.

     

    ADP NFP

     

    These days there's a number for everybody.
    6 Jul 2012, 08:37 AM Reply Like
  • bbro
    , contributor
    Comments (10014) | Send Message
     
    Boys..there are 2 leading indicators hidden in the establishment report....both positive...
    6 Jul 2012, 08:39 AM Reply Like
  • jwbrewer
    , contributor
    Comments (317) | Send Message
     
    You are right bbro. That 6 cent increase in hourly earnings should help offest some, but not all, the recent increase in gas and the coming increases in commodity (food) prices.
    6 Jul 2012, 08:47 AM Reply Like
  • Mike Maher
    , contributor
    Comments (2665) | Send Message
     
    Gas prices are falling, and the East Coast dodged a big price increase by Carlye taking over the Phili refinery. Falling gas prices and the rise in incomes may help, but neither is large enough for the US economy to go back to the 250,000 + numbers we need. The numbers still reflect a dire mood, both in the US and in Europe, about the sustainability of the governments. Maybe the Supreme Court decision removes a bit of uncertainty over healthcare costs for new hires in the US, but I'm sure more companies are worried about the lack of ability for Washington and Brussels to address their respective issues in a timely manner.
    6 Jul 2012, 09:12 AM Reply Like
  • Michael Clark
    , contributor
    Comments (9229) | Send Message
     
    Lipstick anyone?

     

    China and India are going down. Europe is imploding. England is double-tipping. America is sagging. Japan is in a 30 year funk. America reports tepid job growth....but: lipstick anyone?

     

    I have to admire your spunk, BBro.
    6 Jul 2012, 12:54 PM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (713) | Send Message
     
    Ben...Stop posting here please...lol
    6 Jul 2012, 10:15 PM Reply Like
  • Whitehawk
    , contributor
    Comments (3129) | Send Message
     
    Don't forget increases in rents.
    7 Jul 2012, 04:41 PM Reply Like
  • jwbrewer
    , contributor
    Comments (317) | Send Message
     
    The good news for investors may be QE3 (print more money) coming out of this month FOMC meeting.
    6 Jul 2012, 08:40 AM Reply Like
  • anonymous#12
    , contributor
    Comments (552) | Send Message
     
    Average hourly earnings up, workweek up....

     

    NO recession.
    6 Jul 2012, 08:42 AM Reply Like
  • anonymous#12
    , contributor
    Comments (552) | Send Message
     
    I know, data hurts....
    6 Jul 2012, 08:45 AM Reply Like
  • WMARKW
    , contributor
    Comments (10642) | Send Message
     
    With average gains of only 75,000 per month, this caps the worst quarter of job growth since mid-2010. How's that for data !
    6 Jul 2012, 12:58 PM Reply Like
  • anonymous#12
    , contributor
    Comments (552) | Send Message
     
    Wmarkw, I agree the recovery is still frustratingly slow. But there is a distinction between recession and the current state of affairs.
    6 Jul 2012, 03:21 PM Reply Like
  • WMARKW
    , contributor
    Comments (10642) | Send Message
     
    You may be right....but the difference right now is a couple 10ths of a GDP point, and most importantly, we don't actually know we are in a recession until AFTER the fact is realized. So.....all in all, I hope and wish for improvement, but I see few "green shoots".
    6 Jul 2012, 03:53 PM Reply Like
  • Poor Texan
    , contributor
    Comments (3533) | Send Message
     
    "But there is a distinction between recession and the current state of affairs."

     

    The distinction is whether you are well employed or otherwise financially secure (we can handle it) or un- or underemployed with family responsibilities (how are we going to make it through the month). Two Americas without a vision of improvement can only last so long.
    6 Jul 2012, 08:03 PM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (713) | Send Message
     
    If you believe it !!!
    6 Jul 2012, 10:07 PM Reply Like
  • Rummeljordan
    , contributor
    Comments (477) | Send Message
     
    So when can we say that this Keynesian approach to fixing the economy is not working?
    6 Jul 2012, 08:47 AM Reply Like
  • jhooper
    , contributor
    Comments (6128) | Send Message
     
    They just need more time and more money. Mabye 300 years and a gogillion mega dollars. They just need to setup their idiocracy.

     

    http://bit.ly/N4obXi
    6 Jul 2012, 09:03 AM Reply Like
  • Rummeljordan
    , contributor
    Comments (477) | Send Message
     
    Right, that's all I hear...we didn't do enough....we need to keep doing it. How about we see some results before we go forward.
    6 Jul 2012, 09:06 AM Reply Like
  • InvestingInMobile
    , contributor
    Comments (53) | Send Message
     
    #NeedsMoreStimulus
    6 Jul 2012, 08:57 AM Reply Like
  • Jones E. Smith
    , contributor
    Comments (4) | Send Message
     
    Very good news for those unemployed. There is a clear trend, the US is moving forward with private payrolls growing at a pretty good pace.

     

    With The Honorable Fed Chairman ready to help the recovery I think the future is bright.
    6 Jul 2012, 08:58 AM Reply Like
  • Michael Clark
    , contributor
    Comments (9229) | Send Message
     
    Lipstick anyone? We are in a global depression. Some things in life can't be fixed -- they have to be endured, survived.

     

    IMF Gloomy

     

    In April the IMF was predicting global economic growth of 3.5pc this year, but Ms Lagarde gave a clear signal that the forecast would be cut when an updated assessment was published on July 16.

     

    Speaking in Japan ahead of talks with the prime minister, Yoshihiko Noda, she said: "Over the past few months, the outlook has, regrettably, become more worrisome. Many indicators of economic activity –investment, employment, manufacturing – have deteriorated . . . the global growth outlook will be somewhat less than we anticipated just three months ago."

     

    Ms Lagarde said concern was mounting not just about the economy in Europe and the US, but also in the key emerging markets of Brazil, China, and India.

     

    "Make no mistake: this is a global crisis. In today's interconnected world, we can no longer afford to look only at what goes on within our national borders. This crisis does not recognise borders. This crisis is knocking at all our doors," she said.
    6 Jul 2012, 01:12 PM Reply Like
  • sr1977
    , contributor
    Comments (340) | Send Message
     
    80K not bad enough for immediate QE & not good enough to rule out future QE. Most likely QE in August-September if Obama/economy needs it or Europe implodes again.

     

    Otherwise the economy muddles along in a slow growth mode, alternating between ZH pessimism & SA optimism.

     

    Waiting on European Hell, Iran/Syria false flags, US bond vigilantes or a horrible earnings season. Barring those we continue deleveraging w/slow growth.
    6 Jul 2012, 09:03 AM Reply Like
  • goldmanscahses
    , contributor
    Comments (11) | Send Message
     
    The US economy is showing strong resilience to Europe problems. We just need a bit more stimulus and the private sector would take off. Obama had a jobs bill that would have created 2M jobs and it would only have cost $400B.
    6 Jul 2012, 09:10 AM Reply Like
  • tatumjohnatososy
    , contributor
    Comments (2) | Send Message
     
    These numbers are pretty good, remember we are coming from one of the deepest recessions.
    6 Jul 2012, 09:10 AM Reply Like
  • 2MuchDebt
    , contributor
    Comments (230) | Send Message
     
    Pretty good? We're already three years out of the recession and job growth is anemic and trending downward! This is the worst jobless recovery in decades. And don't forget, we also have trillions of stimulus and ZIRP to backup these numbers. No, these numbers are not good. They're awful.
    6 Jul 2012, 09:35 AM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (713) | Send Message
     
    Do you folks actually believe we are out of a Recession?? With True Unemployment close to 19% how on earth do you say were doing fine?

     

    Please take off those rose colored glasses folks....Our Fiat money days are numbered. Shuttereing to see what happens after the Election.

     

    Please re-evaluate your numbers . NOTHING is improving !!!! Gas prices dropping is actually a bad thing. Only means a worldwide Recession. Now just wait till all this printing sparks inflation.

     

    Thhose who think that won't happen i have a bridge i would like to sell...lol...

     

    map
    6 Jul 2012, 10:13 PM Reply Like
  • Mike Maher
    , contributor
    Comments (2665) | Send Message
     
    Please remember 2 things: By definition, the US is out of recession, which is defined as two consecutive quarters of negative GDP growth. Second, you do not need to comment on everyones posts. We get it. You like gold, and probably ron paul. Thanks, but decreasing commodity prices do not mean there is about to be a "spark of inflation"
    7 Jul 2012, 01:39 AM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (713) | Send Message
     
    Mike

     

    Thanks, but decreasing commodity prices do not mean there is about to be a "spark of inflation"

     

    No, an INCREASE in metal prices means that inflation is ahead. I appreciate your concern about my posting but when misinformation is posted then i feel i have a right to post.

     

    If you believe the figures coming out of Washington thats fine. I don't..

     

    map
    7 Jul 2012, 12:02 PM Reply Like
  • InvestingInMobile
    , contributor
    Comments (53) | Send Message
     
    I see no market implosion from these numbers. May payrolls were revised up. We are strengthening, just not as fast as everyone would like. It could be worse, we could live in Europe. Given the external drags on this economy it is not bad. Once we get all the oars moving in the right direction, BOOM!
    6 Jul 2012, 09:14 AM Reply Like
  • mickmars
    , contributor
    Comments (1323) | Send Message
     
    You ain't gettin' significant growth without inflation to go along with it.
    6 Jul 2012, 09:24 AM Reply Like
  • InvestingInMobile
    , contributor
    Comments (53) | Send Message
     
    With locked in low cost mortgage, a little inflation would be just fine with me.
    6 Jul 2012, 09:44 AM Reply Like
  • David Urban
    , contributor
    Comments (1036) | Send Message
     
    You do realize that at this jobs growth rate more people are entering the workforce than jobs are being created? Not sure how that is moving forward.
    6 Jul 2012, 09:59 AM Reply Like
  • WMARKW
    , contributor
    Comments (10642) | Send Message
     
    We need about 137,500 a month just to take care of population growth. At this rate, the "hurrier we go the behinder we get".
    6 Jul 2012, 01:02 PM Reply Like
  • Michael Clark
    , contributor
    Comments (9229) | Send Message
     
    It could be worse. I guess that's what people who say 'We're still moving forward" mean. We are not creating....zero jobs.

     

    Lipstick anyone?
    6 Jul 2012, 01:15 PM Reply Like
  • Michael Clark
    , contributor
    Comments (9229) | Send Message
     
    "Faster, Go Faster!"

     

    We'll be meeting our own asses before long at this rate.
    6 Jul 2012, 01:16 PM Reply Like
  • Rummeljordan
    , contributor
    Comments (477) | Send Message
     
    Maybe its Maybelline?
    6 Jul 2012, 01:18 PM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (713) | Send Message
     
    INVEST

     

    Don't wish for something that might actually lower the value of your house as more foreclosures will follow if people have inflation to deal with and a limited amount of money to cover their bills!!

     

    Start buying your physical metals soon. I dare you to look at the ten year chart of gold and show me one better!!!

     

    map
    6 Jul 2012, 10:20 PM Reply Like
  • JohnLocke
    , contributor
    Comments (381) | Send Message
     
    Exactly, The problem is the QE money is staying locked in a closed banking system which is itself supporting the markets and by proxy the value of the dollar.

     

    QE will do nothing until it gets into the peoples hands which in turn will cause growth and the byproduct inflation.
    7 Jul 2012, 07:57 PM Reply Like
  • wyostocks
    , contributor
    Comments (8692) | Send Message
     
    john
    You miss the entire purpose and point of QE.
    The whole purpose is to NOT get it into the "peoples" hands but to keep it in hands of the bankers.
    Destroy the middle class and senior citizens so the bankers can get richer.
    7 Jul 2012, 09:37 PM Reply Like
  • Mike Maher
    , contributor
    Comments (2665) | Send Message
     
    I'm in the middle class. I pay a tax rate of 0% after deductions, and want my healthcare, my parents healthcare, and my grandparents healthcare, all paid for by uncle sam, without paying for any of it. I'd also like social security, even though I have no real solution as to how to make it a viable system (thankfully, no one does).

     

    How am I, as a member of the middle class, who does not now, nor has ever, paid federal income tax that was not refunded, able to say I am not a part of the problem?? As someone with a college degree, I know taxes have to go up on those making $30,000-$50,000, since right now, on average we pay $0 in federal income tax. At the same time, the best choice for me come April 15 is to do everything I can to not pay taxes. The top 1% pay 40% of the taxes, its not sustainable, or right. The middle class is destroying itself by electing scumbags instead of realists.

     

    The problem we have is that Washington is too good at spending, and too bad at collecting.
    8 Jul 2012, 03:09 AM Reply Like
  • youngman442002
    , contributor
    Comments (5131) | Send Message
     
    Solid high..you are right..its a propaganda war...but its funny the soundbites they use....they forget that most of us on this site know a little bit about economics and how the world works....so the spin does not work..but it does show how politics works...and misinformation is in full force and effect...more people signed up for food stamps this month than got a job......
    6 Jul 2012, 09:15 AM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (713) | Send Message
     
    YOUNG

     

    48 Million people on food stamps isn't progress. We have college bound students in Sept close to the numbers in the 80's. Yup the lies just continue to come..

     

    map
    6 Jul 2012, 10:23 PM Reply Like
  • David Jackson
    , contributor
    Comments (1238) | Send Message
     
    Has anybody explained the reason for the divergence between the ADP data and the NFP data?
    6 Jul 2012, 10:20 AM Reply Like
  • jhooper
    , contributor
    Comments (6128) | Send Message
     
    The sample size is smaller, but they do have the best database outside of BLS.

     

    They have recently modified their process to try and better guess the birth/death adjustment. It seems the new process isn't guessing this adjustment as well as they thought. The difference appears to be ADP's guess about small business job creation was more optomistic than the BLS's guess.
    6 Jul 2012, 12:01 PM Reply Like
  • Econdoc
    , contributor
    Comments (2944) | Send Message
     
    not divergent - they track each other quite well over time.

     

    ADP excludes Governnment so when it is contracting - as it is - then ADP will be higher - ADP may be half a step ahead of NFP so it may be telling you what is to come - but overall it is the best predictor and is closer than you think.

     

    You must remember the error on these numbers is +/- 100,000 or more. These are very blunt instruments. How anyone invests on this basis is beyond me.

     

    E
    6 Jul 2012, 12:35 PM Reply Like
  • anonymous#12
    , contributor
    Comments (552) | Send Message
     
    Mr. Jackson, from what I've heard, nothing concrete, just a vague note about "survey skewed by weather" being a "probable" reason.
    6 Jul 2012, 10:54 AM Reply Like
  • Rummeljordan
    , contributor
    Comments (477) | Send Message
     
    Why is it that every time Obama speaks my portfolio looses value along all asset classes?
    6 Jul 2012, 11:16 AM Reply Like
  • Mike Maher
    , contributor
    Comments (2665) | Send Message
     
    Its because he is inept at bridging the ideological gap in DC, as well as at creating an environment that encouraging businesses to spend and hire.
    6 Jul 2012, 01:33 PM Reply Like
  • Tack
    , contributor
    Comments (14029) | Send Message
     
    Those whose principal focus remains awaiting jobs reports, rather than focusing on actual economic performances (e.g., retail, autos, housing, corporate revenues, corporate profits, etc.) will continue to be angry and disappointed in what they see and that they don't make any money. It's people with money and jobs that control the economy, not those without.

     

    The only people making any money in these markets are a handful of truly adept volatility traders (not your average SA participant) and those that know how to build and maintain high-yielding portfolios with below-average betas.

     

    Furthermore, as markets meander horizontally, while profits continue to rise, even if at a moderate rate, the value gap in equities gets larger and larger. This is extremely positive for value investors, but poses increasing risk to those who remain in cash or make entirely defensive allocations. Those not deployed on the long side are left only to cheer on recession because any other outcome will almost certainly see equity prices move against them.
    6 Jul 2012, 11:51 AM Reply Like
  • Michael Clark
    , contributor
    Comments (9229) | Send Message
     
    Very smart post, Tack.
    6 Jul 2012, 12:59 PM Reply Like
  • InvestingInMobile
    , contributor
    Comments (53) | Send Message
     
    The North American economies are trying to shake off the rust. On the positive side, there is not a lot of fat in the private sector. With strong balance sheets and a strengthening dollar vs the euro, money flow will soon realize that the best safe haven is in US equities.
    6 Jul 2012, 01:22 PM Reply Like
  • Metals are Precious
    , contributor
    Comments (713) | Send Message
     
    TACK

     

    I would agree with you but with rigged markets the common investor is now smarter than years ago. Volume is down, as people don't trust anyone right now.

     

    That is why i started to accumulate my physical since 2008. The markets are for losers in the long run. The market has been flat for 10 years now. It will get worse...imo
    6 Jul 2012, 10:27 PM Reply Like
  • schatzl
    , contributor
    Comments (391) | Send Message
     
    What you call smart, I call myopic.

     

    Listing possible upside potentials and ignoring the downside risks - especially on the macro-economic level, is not helpful at all.

     

    I'm not even a bear, I hate going short yet I've liquidated most of my long positions. The current global economic condition is highly precarious in my opinion. From China's hard or soft landing, to Europe's Euro, to the US's deficit spending, fiscal cliff, unemployment issues and a GDP/debt passing the 100%milestone. Add to that global over-reliance on debt, central banking intervention and the drag it creates on growth and private enterprise, I would feel everything but comfortable in long positions - especially since macro-economic crisis invariably have very high stock price correlations, meaning there are few stocks that can be categorised as safe-havens.

     

    Defining the average SA participant as sub-par in his trading skills is insulting, considering market makers like GS get their calls wrong on a regular basis - unless of course you assume they trade opposing to their calls, which is even worse and highlights the currently rigged market that makes any retail trader a loser in the long run in side-ways markets.

     

    I will never and cannot make a recommendation, as I do not know how the markets will develop. I will however air my concerns.
    7 Jul 2012, 04:51 AM Reply Like
  • Tack
    , contributor
    Comments (14029) | Send Message
     
    schatzl:

     

    Nothing's ever "safe" in life, and when it is perceived as so, all the value is gone. In fact, prices paid for "safety" are routinely overvalued, making the "safe" investments, ironically, more risky. Many of those, who think they're prudent and safe by being allocated to Treasuries at all-time-record-low yields, will discover one day that such was an investment with little return and sizable risks.

     

    Also, being a value investor doesn't mean going 100% long on high-beta "go-go" investments. On the contrary, it means selectively choosing investments with proven production power, whose yields will be sustainable and are now even more enhanced at lower prices, as many investors flee equities and other corporate issues. An assortment of preferred stocks and debt issues can be added to provide further stability. The net result of building such a portfolio is that one garners outsize income, during times when many settle for none, has manageable downside risks and lower betas than the market, but still possesses discernible upside possibilities by holding issues selling at a fraction of previous values.

     

    And, yes, from the tenor of many thousands of posts here on SA, I'd judge that the average (not everybody, of course) trader/investor here in SA is far too emotional, reactionary and often divorced from making judgments based on data, rather than news reports and punditry.
    7 Jul 2012, 07:50 AM Reply Like
  • Andres Rueda
    , contributor
    Comments (175) | Send Message
     
    Very perceptive post. Those who remain in cash, dump their equities in an orgy of fear at every slight disappointment, or go to US bonds at current prices will be licking their wounds. Who buys a US 10-yr at 1.54% per annum, Friday's close? This price is not sustainable in the long run, as anybody who buys has a built-in loss after accounting for inflation and faces a continuing risk from interest rate volatility. It just doesn't make sense to buy at these prices, even if corporate profits were to disappoint. There is also no clear indication that they will disappoint. Just fear-induced agony about the mere possibility.
    7 Jul 2012, 02:51 PM Reply Like
  • coddy0
    , contributor
    Comments (1182) | Send Message
     
    Tack
    Those not deployed on the long side are left only to cheer on recession because any other outcome will almost certainly see equity prices move against them.
    ======================...
    you are assuming investors, who because of unexplainable mistake forgot to put their money on roulette

     

    everybody who is in roulette game expected by you to be a winner

     

    the only good outcome for who is not in the game is roulette got broken and they are cheering for that

     

    imagine somebody whose living based on W2 Job
    who does not cheer recession

     

    imagine that recession is true
    and this somebody lost job and in addition lost all money in roulette game

     

    would it be unthinkable to suggest that money which were not in roulette game are only money this somebody has
    7 Jul 2012, 07:06 PM Reply Like
  • Tack
    , contributor
    Comments (14029) | Send Message
     
    cod:

     

    This is an investment site, first and foremost. One tries to assume that those that populate these environs are looking for information, and sometimes advice, on whether and how to deploy one's investment assets. It is to them that I direct my comments.

     

    If there are those with hardships and/or no funds to invest, which undoubtedly there are, that's unfortunate, but it doesn't alter the advice I'd provide to those with funds to deploy.
    7 Jul 2012, 07:47 PM Reply Like
  • coddy0
    , contributor
    Comments (1182) | Send Message
     
    @Tack
    according to you we have:

     

    Category A SA readers
    looking for information, and sometimes advice, on whether and how to deploy one's investment assets.

     

    Category B SA readers
    who are with hardships and/or no funds to invest

     

    I would add category C
    who are with assets looking to deploy their investment assets without risking to become SA readers of category B

     

    My point in my previous post was to let you know that risk aversion does not necessarily means recession cheering.

     

    Risk aversion sometimes means that someone does not have to sell someone's assets at Market bottom, which were bought at Market top, because this someone does not have cash to go through

     

    ----------------------...
    I is nice from you that you you don't alter your advice to those with no funds to deploy.
    I heard that some guys actually alter it
    7 Jul 2012, 10:16 PM Reply Like
  • Josh ODonnell
    , contributor
    Comments (229) | Send Message
     
    However you look at it, its not enough jobs to bring the unemployment rate down...and the real # is closer to 20% or higher..so dont give me that 8.2% b.s. these are only the people who are counted.

     

    The fact is the U.S. economy is weakening, not strengthening. Look at the data from all of last month...90% of the data was worse than expecations..ISM manufacuturing was dismal...Home prices y/y are still down(this bubble hasn't completey finished popping..anybody saying otherwise is in for a very rude awakening in the next 2-3 years)
    They say inflation is down across the board, but they still dont account for food prices in the CPI numbers...if you add food, were looking at 4-5% inflation.
    6 Jul 2012, 12:57 PM Reply Like
  • birdmaestro
    , contributor
    Comments (128) | Send Message
     
    Anyone see comment from GS (the Evil Empire) yesterday regarding todays job numbers?! Forecast +150K. Observing GS is like playing defense against a point guard - watch the player, not the ball. They are truly shameless.

     

    But....

     

    Be careful with shorts. Q2 earnings might surprise on the plus side thanks to the big fat gift to corporations regarding pension plan funding. Have a great weekend.
    6 Jul 2012, 05:30 PM Reply Like
  • David Urban
    , contributor
    Comments (1036) | Send Message
     
    I fully expect at least 60% of the companies to beat estimates like they do every quarter. :)

     

    But the devil is in the details and when the earnings bar is laid on the floor it is not hard to beat estimates.

     

    What people should be focused on are warnings of slower growth from global multinationals like Proctor & Gamble and Fedex along with retailers like Bed Bath & Beyond and Federated.
    7 Jul 2012, 09:42 AM Reply Like
  • enigmaman
    , contributor
    Comments (2686) | Send Message
     
    Rick Santelli had a great analogical story for Obamas response to this poor news see it hear http://bit.ly/N852Uf

     

    cant be made any more plan!
    7 Jul 2012, 10:11 AM Reply Like
  • Brian Nichols
    , contributor
    Comments (2351) | Send Message
     
    8.2% unemployment will not grow this economy. It will grow the U.S. deficit and keep the decade long flat market to keep its pace. We need more drastic measures. http://chn.ge/LXpavi
    7 Jul 2012, 11:08 AM Reply Like
  • Andres Rueda
    , contributor
    Comments (175) | Send Message
     
    The economy has changed. Employers make do with less workers. It's called increased productivity. Anybody who works at an office or factory knows that you can make do with far less people, and that particularly the less skilled are not really needed in the same numbers as before. Many people are also no longer needed because they are uncompetitive at current wage costs with offshore workers. That is a structural change in the US economy. In light of this harsh reality, the job numbers are not bad, the market's hysterical reaction notwithstanding.
    7 Jul 2012, 02:31 PM Reply Like
  • enigmaman
    , contributor
    Comments (2686) | Send Message
     
    And- The problem with your post is that you seem not to understand that the economy has changed because its "evolving" which is good, healthy and expected and should be embraced and encouraged by government, the problem is this Admin is fighting "our economic evolution" its working diligently to direct our it as it believes it should be instead of letting it evolve naturally.
    8 Jul 2012, 07:37 AM Reply Like
  • Whitehawk
    , contributor
    Comments (3129) | Send Message
     
    The gov't also plays around with numbers, such as the GDP and GDP deflator.
    7 Jul 2012, 05:06 PM Reply Like
  • DeepValueLover
    , contributor
    Comments (9135) | Send Message
     
    More comments being erased...censorship lives!!
    7 Jul 2012, 10:24 PM Reply Like
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