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Smartphones will make up 54% of mobile phones sold in 2013, predicts IHS iSuppli. Earlier this...

Smartphones will make up 54% of mobile phones sold in 2013, predicts IHS iSuppli. Earlier this year, UBS predicted smartphones would make up 41% of 2012 phone sales. Just as Google, Apple, Samsung, and mobile processor firms benefit from this trend, feature phone king Nokia (NOK)  risks being a loser. Nokia is on the clock to bring Windows Phone price points down to levels comparable to those of low-end Android phones from Chinese vendors.
Comments (14)
  • saleenman
    , contributor
    Comments (19) | Send Message
     
    Went into a att store, and saw people warming up and buying Nok lumia phones,I bought one for my son and it is way faster than my HTC, the windows work great and no issues as of 3 months ago. Trading my HTC for New Windows phone 9/5/12'
    28 Aug 2012, 06:36 PM Reply Like
  • turkman
    , contributor
    Comments (15) | Send Message
     
    IHS iSuppli.predicts, everybody would benefit from this trend that smartphones would make up 54% of Mobile Phones in 2013 except Nokia because ppl wants Nokia Shares go down so they can buy them cheap. Nokia fell to $ 3 but started going back up again because there was nobody left for Profit Taking. Now I can see it reaching $ 3.50 before the shorts short it out again.
    In the meanwhile, the stock of tiny little Chinese Supplier of Electronics parts to Apple, Nokia and others NTE has rocketed from $ 5 to $ 10 quietly because there are no Gamblers or Speculative Investors there bullshitting price up and down. Presently I do not owe any NTE Shares.
    28 Aug 2012, 09:26 PM Reply Like
  • hunter012
    , contributor
    Comments (260) | Send Message
     
    There won't be a new Windows phone on 9/5/12. Thats the announcement date. The phones won't come out until November
    29 Aug 2012, 06:54 PM Reply Like
  • Herr Hansa
    , contributor
    Comments (3080) | Send Message
     
    Other than the high end, smartphones are moving towards becoming low margin commodities. Outside the U.S. smartphone market, many consumers have to pay full price for mobile phones. Unless the contract subsidy model in the U.S. is copied in more places, we may find lower cost handsets taking the highest share of new sales volume.
    28 Aug 2012, 06:46 PM Reply Like
  • kmi
    , contributor
    Comments (4040) | Send Message
     
    I'm sorry but comparing Nokia's low end featurephone products with the low end Android crap... is just.... well.. tough.

     

    Low end Android products can't compare very well with feature phones by Nokia, and for that matter Motorola and Samsung as well. They run poorly and are painful to operate. The processors and screens are just a nightmare when dealing with a smartphone OS.

     

    The segment of the market acquiring said low end Android products likely isn't doing so for any reason outside promotions and subsidies by manufacturers and operators. Certainly not by choice... I have a family member who was effectively given two such devices and she went out and bought a Samsung Galaxy in the end because she couldn't stand using the freebies.

     

    I'd add that Blackberry has this segment as well, its low end Curve devices are just designed to be data cheap and the product itself is low cost and awesome for grabbing signal. RIM is more likely Nokia's biggest competitor in the space.
    28 Aug 2012, 07:55 PM Reply Like
  • Herr Hansa
    , contributor
    Comments (3080) | Send Message
     
    Probably true in many markets, if there will still be a BlackBerry Curve available after the launch of BB10. In China, besides ZTE and Huawei, there is Meizu and Xiaomi. China is a big enough market that it might make a difference, though at the moment Samsung sells one out of every five smartphones there.
    28 Aug 2012, 08:22 PM Reply Like
  • kmi
    , contributor
    Comments (4040) | Send Message
     
    Don't get me wrong, some of the Chinese products are great, the upmarket Meizu and Xiaomi products come to mind - but I'm calling out the 'low cost' feature phone alternatives as not a very strong proposition vis a vis the Blackberry and featurephone products, which have a universe of apps available most folks in the US don't know about.

     

    I think Sammy took RIM's Blackberry, HTC's WM6, Motorola featurephone, and NOKIAs Symbian and featurephone lunches in SE Asia and ran away with them. These were all companies that were doing well there, and Samsung swooped in and cleaned house running Android while they were regrouping from the Apple onslaught.

     

    But I'd hesitate to suggest that this will continue indefinitely. I think the companies above listed are regrouping and will come back.
    28 Aug 2012, 08:55 PM Reply Like
  • kmi
    , contributor
    Comments (4040) | Send Message
     
    Hmm that reads a little like I am contradicting myself, first saying cheapie androids suck and then saying that they decimated a half dozen companies.

     

    To be clearer, I do believe cheapie Androids cleaned house initially but that none of the above (RIM, NOK, HTC, Moto) are pursuing the same strategies they were when the cheapie Androids and the iPhone hit the market and wiped the slate clean of them.
    28 Aug 2012, 08:59 PM Reply Like
  • Herr Hansa
    , contributor
    Comments (3080) | Send Message
     
    The Financial Times has a great little video up on YouTube about the mobile phone market in China. Many of the smaller companies are worried about the big brand names being more aggressive in China. I think Meizu came out of that to produce their own unique offering, but tough to tell how many others can compete.

     

    One of the weirder things to happen recently was an iPhone refurbish outfit in China. The police broke that up. Essentially they were placing components of other mobile phones into old iPhone cases. That's a step up from Kirf copies.
    28 Aug 2012, 09:01 PM Reply Like
  • douglasnoades
    , contributor
    Comments (6) | Send Message
     
    Strange that we are now getting negative comments from analyst on Nokia. Make up your mind, yesterday it's a hot "buy" and today it's' dump it.
    As we get closer to September 5th, it would seem that Nokia is making someone or companies very nervous.
    This game looks more like politics than the stock market. Don't trust analysts opinions, check it out yourself.
    28 Aug 2012, 09:09 PM Reply Like
  • pureview8
    , contributor
    Comments (226) | Send Message
     
    Nokia going up or down 5% a day is normal. If one can ignore the price action and focus on the business aspect, you will see a slow, steady resurgence of Nokia. Asha launch, NSN contract wins, patent wins, WP8 launch, indoor and automotive location services. All the pieces are coming together.

     

    On top of this, you have industry rivals (Android) suffering a monumental defeat in the courtroom. If one thinks the verdict impact is minimal, think again! See this Bloomberg story.

     

    http://bloom.bg/Ppgc5B
    29 Aug 2012, 12:11 AM Reply Like
  • techy46
    , contributor
    Comments (6268) | Send Message
     
    So is the Asdha 311 a featured phone or smart phone? Nokia ia now offering Microsoft apps on the Asha line so as to increase the user experience which will lead them to purchase future Lumia products with Windows Phone OS. By this time next year, today's smart phone will be a featured phone and smart phones will be way beyond today's devices. A Lumia 1020 with dual cores, 2gb memory, 32gb storage expandable to 64Gb with MicroSD, NFC, USB and Pureview is a W8 mobile PC that has phone functions. Same goes for tablets, does a tablet have a 5, 6, 7, 8 or 10" screen? If a Lumia 1050 has a 7" s
    28 Aug 2012, 09:35 PM Reply Like
  • sreimer77
    , contributor
    Comments (241) | Send Message
     
    If smartphones are going to account for 54% of all phone sales, then China, India and the rest of the developed and developing markets better spend the 100+ Billion needed to upgrade to 3g, or 4g/4lte networks, otherwise they'll be buying phones that only work on wifi. If this is the case, then Alcatel, Cisco and the likes of Nokia-Siemens network should be much better then they are. Since they are not, I have to conclude 2g will continue to be the standard for most of the non-developed world and therefore Nokia and BlackBerry will continue to be the best options as they provide the greatest functionality for a network operating on 2g or less.
    29 Aug 2012, 08:22 AM Reply Like
  • sreimer77
    , contributor
    Comments (241) | Send Message
     
    Yes, Ashda is the featured phone product line from Nokia, which of course meets the needs of 90%+ of the world!
    29 Aug 2012, 08:24 AM Reply Like
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