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FedEx (FDX) slashes its FQ1 earnings forecast to $1.37-$1.43/share from an earlier estimate of...

FedEx (FDX) slashes its FQ1 earnings forecast to $1.37-$1.43/share from an earlier estimate of $1.45-$1.60, and vs. Street consensus of $1.56. "Weakness in the global economy constrained revenue growth at FedEx Express more than expected in earlier guidance." Shares -4% AH. (PR)
Comments (25)
  • GaltMachine
    , contributor
    Comments (1135) | Send Message
     
    That's a pretty big cut in forecast - 10%. Bellwether?
    4 Sep 2012, 05:38 PM Reply Like
  • David Urban
    , contributor
    Comments (1036) | Send Message
     
    Very much so. This confirms the global slowdown.
    4 Sep 2012, 07:04 PM Reply Like
  • anonymous#12
    , contributor
    Comments (552) | Send Message
     
    So when is the world ending?
    4 Sep 2012, 07:19 PM Reply Like
  • David Urban
    , contributor
    Comments (1036) | Send Message
     
    Not ending but we need to go through another recession to cleanse ourselves from the problems that did not get fixed in the first recession.

     

    A recession is supposed to cleanse the excesses built up in the business cycle from the system. Those excesses, cheap and easy credit along with massive debts, were never cleared so now we need to undergo another recession to clear the debts from the system.
    4 Sep 2012, 08:05 PM Reply Like
  • Aristiphones
    , contributor
    Comments (1327) | Send Message
     
    http://bit.ly/Q0UVEm
    no problems vis a vis this delivery platform. "confirms nothing" in my view...other than that fuel costs have crushed the entirety of the trucking business and when the bulk of small businesses fail to recover due to "big government boon-doggles" (wars on oil rich countries, refusal to drill, drill, drill, go all in luddite loving tech from General Motors instead of demanding nat gas vehicles from the get/go, etc...etc...) companies like Fed Ex struggle mightily. Not that i didn't wish they wouldn't of course.
    4 Sep 2012, 11:37 PM Reply Like
  • positivethoughts
    , contributor
    Comments (1812) | Send Message
     
    Not ending, but those at the top will come away unscathed and those trying to get to the top will pay. Just like 2008.
    4 Sep 2012, 11:52 PM Reply Like
  • schatzl
    , contributor
    Comments (391) | Send Message
     
    Good luck with that. What the private sector is deleveraging, the state and the Fed is more than leveraging. They are simply refusing to accept some form of deleveraging, which doesn't fit into short term politics. What the Fed started, other central banks are copying and even outbidding the Fed in an effort to control national/continental economies through balance sheet expansion and refusing to accept market clearing price mechanisms because they're not "fair" or "reasonable". Next time I go shopping, I'll bring up that argument and see how far I get.
    5 Sep 2012, 01:45 AM Reply Like
  • Tack
    , contributor
    Comments (12761) | Send Message
     
    DU:

     

    Recessions create even more bad debt. How is new weakness going to improve the situation? Bad debt needs to be gradually and systematically written off and/or grown out of, not washed away in some biblical event. These calls for "cleansing" remind me of something I'd expect to hear at an evangelical church.
    5 Sep 2012, 04:35 AM Reply Like
  • David Urban
    , contributor
    Comments (1036) | Send Message
     
    The next writeoff will be to ECB debt. The first Greek default was thrust upon the private sector with the ECB/IMF remaining whole.

     

    Now they have to find a way to spin writing their holdings down.

     

    The debt that is being created is just creating even more problems as the US and Europe head straight for a Japan scenario.
    5 Sep 2012, 12:46 PM Reply Like
  • GaltMachine
    , contributor
    Comments (1135) | Send Message
     
    "So when is the world ending?"

     

    http://bit.ly/TiF3yq
    "The sun is about 4.5 billion years old and it is estimated to still possess a 5-billion year supply of hydrogen (hydrogen is the fuel that drives nuclear fusion on the sun). Therefore, it is predicted that our sun will die in approximately 5 billion years."
    5 Sep 2012, 12:54 PM Reply Like
  • Tack
    , contributor
    Comments (12761) | Send Message
     
    DU:

     

    I am so tired of ill-conceived, non-analogous and erroneous "Japan" mentions, all across SA.

     

    Let's examine Japan:

     

    1) Their currency is at stratospheric peaks. How is that like U.S. or Europe?

     

    2) They have a contracting, deflation-producing population. While, perhaps, some similarities might be argued with Europe, it looks nothing like the U.S.

     

    3) Japan has been having their export economy gutted by other Asian competition, and, along with their moribund internal consumption, that just adds to the problems. How does that look like the U.S., or even Europe?

     

    Japan's situation has near nothing to do with the U.S. experience, right now.
    5 Sep 2012, 12:58 PM Reply Like
  • David Urban
    , contributor
    Comments (1036) | Send Message
     
    Maybe not now but give it a few more years of little or no growth, expanding debt, zero interest rates, and an aging population.

     

    We may not be there now but the car is speeding towards the wall.
    5 Sep 2012, 01:00 PM Reply Like
  • anonymous#12
    , contributor
    Comments (552) | Send Message
     
    LOL! GM, at least you provided scientific data. Not a opinion based on ideologies.

     

    Those who were blinded by ideologies in 2009 got "killed"...
    5 Sep 2012, 02:06 PM Reply Like
  • The Patriot
    , contributor
    Comments (320) | Send Message
     
    Just as the market over corrected during the crash, we have over corrected from the bounce off the bottom.
    4 Sep 2012, 05:40 PM Reply Like
  • GaltMachine
    , contributor
    Comments (1135) | Send Message
     
    TP,

     

    Apparently "bad" is the new "good" so who knows how markets react to news anymore.
    4 Sep 2012, 05:42 PM Reply Like
  • pollyserial
    , contributor
    Comments (1055) | Send Message
     
    Bad is only the new good until the algo overlords decide to flip the switch.
    4 Sep 2012, 11:31 PM Reply Like
  • bbro
    , contributor
    Comments (9324) | Send Message
     
    FDX is almost flat for the year now....
    4 Sep 2012, 05:44 PM Reply Like
  • mickmars
    , contributor
    Comments (1323) | Send Message
     
    I smell stagflation.
    4 Sep 2012, 05:46 PM Reply Like
  • youngman442002
    , contributor
    Comments (5131) | Send Message
     
    But But But we have the new APPLE toy coming out on the 12th....so we can play new video games now.....weeee...America is great...
    4 Sep 2012, 06:04 PM Reply Like
  • positivethoughts
    , contributor
    Comments (1812) | Send Message
     
    That's true, eh? How many ways can people send a text message or email before they realize that the additional cost of buying that new gadget won't ever be surpassed by the expected benefit.
    4 Sep 2012, 11:55 PM Reply Like
  • pman6
    , contributor
    Comments (270) | Send Message
     
    oh no. double recession coming.
    doom and gloom.
    everything is slowing down again
    4 Sep 2012, 06:45 PM Reply Like
  • divinecomedy
    , contributor
    Comments (466) | Send Message
     
    But sales of Porsche is up by quite a bit. The economy is generating conflicting signals.
    4 Sep 2012, 08:55 PM Reply Like
  • pollyserial
    , contributor
    Comments (1055) | Send Message
     
    Because Porsche is a bellwether stock?
    4 Sep 2012, 11:32 PM Reply Like
  • Nolesince87
    , contributor
    Comments (258) | Send Message
     
    Sales of NOTHING is up. It is fewer units bought but devalued currency making both the top & bottom lines look artificially high.... yet by the govt & Fed's calculation, inflation "is muted".
    5 Sep 2012, 12:11 AM Reply Like
  • sethmcs
    , contributor
    Comments (3080) | Send Message
     
    This is interesting in light of the increase in rail traffic. The railroad are not hauling coal. Must be fuel costs which gives railroads a advantage. Either that or the American public is tired of buying junk on Amazon.
    5 Sep 2012, 12:13 AM Reply Like
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