Nokia (NOK) has had to apologize after giving the impression that video and photographs used in...


Nokia (NOK) has had to apologize after giving the impression that video and photographs used in a promotional material for its new Lumia 920 smartphone were shot using the device when in fact they weren't. The idea was to highlight the superiority of the 920's "PureView" technology.

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Comments (15)
  • ericmeister
    , contributor
    Comments (350) | Send Message
     
    I don't know whats this fuzz is all about? even an idiot understands, that you cannot film a commercial with a mobile phone, can you? videos and photos in commercials are used to give people an idea what this new technology means.

     

    So, an image stabilizer means photos are more clear and videos stable. low light optimization means you can take better photos in low light e.g. during night or night clubs.

     

    see on the right a video shot with REAL Lumia 920 prototype with OIS on

     

    http://bit.ly/NTJnDr.

     

    Also, according the head of communication, Tomi Kuuppelonmäki, the image comparison between Samsung Galaxy S III and Lumia 920 prototype is NOT A FAKE (comparison at 0'18 in below video)

     

    http://bit.ly/OxK4xY

     

    Also e.g. Gizmodo and Wphone.com describe the camera "incredible" and "crushing" compared to Samsung Galaxy S III and iPhone 4S. Nothing has changed, this all still means Nokia PureView is better camera than any of the competitors.

     

    Nokia should not have to apoligize anything to dumb people
    9 Sep 2012, 06:33 AM Reply Like
  • gregptpt
    , contributor
    Comments (70) | Send Message
     
    The problem is, from the selfish point of view of investors, there ARE a lot of dumb people around. And in all fairness, the only ones making these fine distinctions are people like us. The general public out there getting wind of this has only one predictable conclusion to jump to. Ultimately it's US who suffer thanks to Nokia's own stupidity.

     

    Still the need for an apology is far overwhelmed by the need for a real marketing blitz on the money features of the phone, the ones that truly ARE unique and worthy. And a blasted, structured PLAN to do it with, for Heaven's sake.

     

    There are enough things going against NOK as it is. They don't have to add any more to the list. They may be unable to control the external but at least keep their hands on the internal, controllable, avoidable things.

     

    For a start, they could hire a presentation coach as well as a proven marketing team. And internal scrutiny for little straws like this fiasco that are just more added to the camel's back.
    9 Sep 2012, 07:03 AM Reply Like
  • ericmeister
    , contributor
    Comments (350) | Send Message
     
    @gregptpt

     

    The problem is from the point of view of investors that there are lots of people who use politics and populism to control dumb people.

     

    Everyone knows that commercial are used to create positive images, to affect to youre emotions, they don't have to be 100% accurate technologically or even factually, since no-one is interested about that in a commercial.

     

    However, if someone points out that, "aha, the McDonald's hamburger is not REAL in the picture but covered with all kinds of chemicals from glue to motoroil to make it look delicious", then people get angry, even they know already that the flat burgers they eat do not look the same than in the picture. After some time, they just keep on eating the burgers

     

    But agreed on the fact, that Nokia's marketing team is in need of Don Draper
    9 Sep 2012, 07:26 AM Reply Like
  • ericmeister
    , contributor
    Comments (350) | Send Message
     
    One thing to add:

     

    I want Samsung and Apple to make an official apology because of these fake videos of SGS3 and iPhone 4S

     

    http://bit.ly/RzD5n7
    http://bit.ly/RzD2HT
    9 Sep 2012, 08:52 AM Reply Like
  • WhatdoIknow1
    , contributor
    Comments (652) | Send Message
     
    An apology for something you ment to do in the first place is meaningless. :'(
    9 Sep 2012, 08:55 AM Reply Like
  • DRich
    , contributor
    Comments (4819) | Send Message
     
    "The idea was to highlight the superiority of the 920's "PureView" technology." ... by not using it. Isn't this just so typical these days in so many places & ways.
    9 Sep 2012, 10:25 AM Reply Like
  • WhatdoIknow1
    , contributor
    Comments (652) | Send Message
     
    By creating controversy they do highlight it. For free.
    9 Sep 2012, 10:41 AM Reply Like
  • css1971
    , contributor
    Comments (871) | Send Message
     
    You think The Verge got an anonymous call from Nokia? "Hey psst, check out the reflection in the video at 0:27 seconds". I doubt it, Nokia has a "Code of Conduct". No really.

     

    http://bit.ly/QtVNm1
    9 Sep 2012, 05:14 PM Reply Like
  • WhatdoIknow1
    , contributor
    Comments (652) | Send Message
     
    No call was necessary it was to obvious and not the kind of thing you miss in the cutting room. Also codes of conduct at corporations are very selective in their application. They only matter when they want them to matter. I know. I've worked for two corporations and every time the bigs screwed up it was the littles that had to go to ethics class. The only thing a code of conduct is good for is defining the evil that you do. It is utterly useless as a preventative tool.
    9 Sep 2012, 06:39 PM Reply Like
  • kmi
    , contributor
    Comments (4579) | Send Message
     
    Nokia's failure is that it has filmed commercials in the past using its PureView technology.

     

    As in, it has done it before using a camerphone.

     

    And so people made assumptions that the commercial was made using PureView again. And when we assume we know where that leads.

     

    This is a tempest in a teapot, and merely underlines the fact that only Nokia could, should it so choose, make a commercial using its cameraphone technology. I would be curious to see the results from any of the other smartphone companies in their attempt to do so, in particular the iPhone, since so many different attachment devices have been devised to enhance its photo taking capabilities.
    9 Sep 2012, 08:43 PM Reply Like
  • KarlRainer
    , contributor
    Comment (1) | Send Message
     
    Am a firm Nokia supporter and believe that ultimately the investment will pay off. The quality of the product will help overcome the seemingly amazing shortcomings in the introduction of a new generation of products. I find it hard to believe, but it seems that elementary marketing help is needed. How can it be?
    10 Sep 2012, 03:00 AM Reply Like
  • LeighLee
    , contributor
    Comments (3) | Send Message
     
    The commercial I saw was a man photgraphing the woman on the bike. How in the world was this supposed to be without a camera photograhing both?
    Does the Nokia have an excellent camers? Everyone ,including the IT experts explain that this is true...so what's the problem?
    Those commercials that show how you can loose 50 pounds working out 10 minutes ad ay, beauty creams that show an eighteen year old without wrinkles,the women standing on an airplane talking about anti-acids...I can go on forever..to show that truth in advertising has long been ignored.
    This commercial did not promise anything that isn't true...so?
    10 Sep 2012, 03:45 AM Reply Like
  • DeepValueLover
    , contributor
    Comments (11169) | Send Message
     
    Nokia:

     

    BMW level products.

     

    George Costanza level marketing.
    10 Sep 2012, 03:48 AM Reply Like
  • 1mp1r3t4
    , contributor
    Comments (327) | Send Message
     
    We knew you'd eventually see the light. Here's hoping those Calls continue to climb!
    10 Sep 2012, 09:03 AM Reply Like
  • DeepValueLover
    , contributor
    Comments (11169) | Send Message
     
    See the light? What light?

     

    Never invest in terrible management.
    10 Sep 2012, 04:13 PM Reply Like
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