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Apple (AAPL -0.9%) pares the losses it saw after announcing it sold over 5M iPhone 5 units...

Apple (AAPL -0.9%) pares the losses it saw after announcing it sold over 5M iPhone 5 units during opening weekend, less than some were forecasting. Horace Dediu observes the sales rate for the 5 was even with the 4S when normalized for countries supported - a little disappointing given the growth in Apple's base, and the fact the 5 is a bigger upgrade. On the other hand, initial 4S sales were likely boosted by the outpouring of emotion following Steve Jobs' death. One unanswered question: did the Maps controversy affect weekend sales?
Comments (60)
  • Ashraf Eassa
    , contributor
    Comments (8856) | Send Message
     
    I doubt it. iPhone 5 is a solid product with or without the maps thing.
    24 Sep 2012, 10:07 AM Reply Like
  • SA Editor Eric Jhonsa
    , contributor
    Comments (763) | Send Message
     
    Perhaps, but it's still bad PR. Could make some people hold off simply because they're seeing negative headlines related to the iPhone 5.
    24 Sep 2012, 10:09 AM Reply Like
  • Ronin.
    , contributor
    Comments (1487) | Send Message
     
    The stock got hurt by the sky high expectations not being met....I think that they could have been 6-8m, but they were trying to get the launch done a little earlier this year, and Apple did run into some supply problems with Sharp and the new tech screens..

     

    ....I think they will sell as many as they can make for quite a while....with this dip being a buying opportunity for those with cash and not already too long the stock.....
    24 Sep 2012, 10:35 AM Reply Like
  • thotdoc
    , contributor
    Comments (1489) | Send Message
     
    Eric-Most people are not techies. Techies remind me of people inside the Belt; what is so important to them, is almost meaningless to those outside the belt.

     

    Maps??? There will be an app that will work till Apple fixes it.

     

    It sold fewer than thought?? OMG. OMG!!! It was techies that thought it would sell 8MM. NO, it will be 10MM. NO!! It will be 12MM!!!!

     

    Oh, they only sold about 3 Billion dollars worth in 2 days. (5MM X $600...please correct) Sheesh. What losers.
    24 Sep 2012, 10:42 AM Reply Like
  • SA Editor Eric Jhonsa
    , contributor
    Comments (763) | Send Message
     
    The sales forecasts didn't come from "techies," but from consistently bullish Street analysts. Also, the Maps backlash has gone well beyond "techies" at this point, even if they were the first to get on board. Not a big long-term problem for Apple as long as they green-light a Google Maps app for the App Store, but bad short-term PR.
    24 Sep 2012, 10:58 AM Reply Like
  • Dialectical Materialist
    , contributor
    Comments (4458) | Send Message
     
    "Not a big long-term problem for Apple..."

     

    You should have just stopped there. Maps will be improving with tens of millions of users sending in corrections. In no time they will have caught up to what Google has done in the last ten years. The idea that Apple needs Google Maps misses the point of why they ditched them to begin with. Yes, Google Maps will be available on iOS and yes it will become increasingly irrelevant.

     

    If what you searched for was a big commodity in the desktop era, your location is the big commodity of the mobile era. Apple can't cede this ground to Google without a fight. They just announced that passport will display your ballgame tickets automatically when you approach the stadium. That kind of location setting functionality will be all over the place in the future, and getting people into your maps app will be almost as important as getting them into your OS in the future. Mobile is all about where you are and where you go, so they can sell to you directly. Google has known this for a long time. It is not some capricious mistake that led Apple to its own maps. If it is not as good as Google right now, well they knew that. And they will be trying to bring it up to speed now that they have millions of boots on the ground to help them do that.
    24 Sep 2012, 11:16 AM Reply Like
  • SA Editor Eric Jhonsa
    , contributor
    Comments (763) | Send Message
     
    It's not that simple. Google has 7K full-time and part-time employees working on Maps, and has spent years amassing all of the data that goes into it. It won't be irrelevant anytime soon, which is why Apple needs a Google Maps app in the App Store ASAP.

     

    "If what you searched for was a big commodity in the desktop era, your location is the big commodity of the mobile era. Apple can't cede this ground to Google without a fight."

     

    This backs up the point others have made that Apple's decision to replace Google Maps was about business interests rather than delivering the best user experience. And that runs counter to Apple's historical philosophy.
    24 Sep 2012, 11:21 AM Reply Like
  • DanoX
    , contributor
    Comments (2633) | Send Message
     
    No they don't Google is out 104 million people who have up graded to iOS 6, by the end of the month half of all iOS users will kicked Google to the curb by upgrading. Half of Googles mobile revenue gone without iOS.
    24 Sep 2012, 11:36 AM Reply Like
  • SA Editor Eric Jhonsa
    , contributor
    Comments (763) | Send Message
     
    The majority of Google's iOS revenue comes from search, not Maps. The #2 contributor is probably AdMob's display ad network. Neither of those have gone away.
    24 Sep 2012, 11:40 AM Reply Like
  • kmi
    , contributor
    Comments (3994) | Send Message
     
    A lot of Apple's initial growth was precisely fomented by techies singing Apple's praises.

     

    I used to recommend Apple products to non-techies because non-techies didn't and couldn't use more powerful gear that required careful maintenance (I'm talking about virus-prone Windows at the time, and about how Linux wasn't much of an alternative option). Then, all of a sudden I had non-techies at the dinner table extolling the virtues of Apple products as if they were 'techie choice'...

     

    The point being, the tech press (and techies themselves) was a huge initial proponent of the Apple Intel migration, OSX, and the iPhone in a way that I believe helped create a lot of momentum for the products that would not otherwise have existed, precisely because the tech press could see the value proposition in the products before it became common currency.

     

    So don't underestimate the value of techies.
    24 Sep 2012, 11:41 AM Reply Like
  • Applocrat
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    I agree fundamentally, but let's be cautious here. The stock is becoming speculative. By that I simply mean it fell after last quarters earnings miss and rose on iPhone five rumors. After this initial sales miss it rises on the rumors of products not yet in hand and further iPhone five sales rumors. A stock that falls on facts and rises on rumors needs to be monitored.
    24 Sep 2012, 11:54 AM Reply Like
  • Dialectical Materialist
    , contributor
    Comments (4458) | Send Message
     
    "This backs up the point others have made that Apple's decision to replace Google Maps was about business interests rather than delivering the best user experience"

     

    As always, there is no shortage of experts telling Apple what it needs to do to ensure the best user experience. The same criticism was leveled about Flash, if you recall. And getting rid of floppy disks. Apple has a long history of following its own plan even when it is met with initial confusion or criticism by analysts and the public. The notion that this is a departure is simply revisionist history that suits the "post-Jobs" narrative.

     

    Apple may in fact be securing the best user experience in the long run by wresting control from Google in this important domain. Or it may not. But its decision to make this move is entirely consistent with its "historical philosophy".

     

    24 Sep 2012, 12:03 PM Reply Like
  • Dialectical Materialist
    , contributor
    Comments (4458) | Send Message
     
    "A stock that falls on facts and rises on rumors needs to be monitored."

     

    Yes, it does. But this is par for the course for AAPL. There is no more volatile rumor driven stock for a company even a third of its size. AAPL is an anomaly. It can excite and disappoint at the same time and cause a frenzy usually reserved for start-ups. It *does* need to be monitored.
    24 Sep 2012, 12:07 PM Reply Like
  • Applocrat
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    Eric, it is that simple and indeed simpler, if you do a little math. Apple has 100 million eyes and ears across the world and growing as of today, you say Google has 7k employees dedicated to improving maps. Let's do some conservative arithmetic here.

     

    Give Google credit for 100 k people dedicated to its mapping endeavors. I inflate the number so much because round numbers are easy to work with and to make a point.

     

    Let's keep Apple numbers static. Apple now has 1,000 times more people capable of improving the project. Now to address dedication, even when we credit Google with 100 k dedicated mappers.

     

    If we assume that the average information yield of Apple users is 1 percent that of googles dedicated team we have to divide 1000/100 and we get Apple having a ten fold information advantage!

     

    Now, Remember that this is not an infinitely improvable project. There is a resolution limit beyond which any user, and certainly the average user, will be adequately served. I say this to prevent someone from rejoining by talk of Android's user base, since Google does not need the improvement, the size of Android is irrelevant.

     

    And of course, since the information has been codified by others including Google's mapping team, among others, in a pinch Apple can BUY data and teams of dedicated people to further accelerate the process.

     

    And Let's recall Apple is NOT starting from square one. They do have a maps app, and I am not even certain it is terribly flawed. I have seen plenty of reports that it works very well in many geographies.

     

    So let's review, if we multiply Google's dedicated mapping team by over 14, assume no growth in iOS 6 usage or adoption from the OPENING weekend, we have Apple with a ten fold information advantage.

     

    And they still have cash...

     

    If anything, the mistake they made was presenting the app as a finished product and not detailing how effectively and rapidly, crowd sourcing can improve the app.
    24 Sep 2012, 12:19 PM Reply Like
  • JohnnyHands
    , contributor
    Comments (41) | Send Message
     
    iOS 6 users can still access Google Maps via the Safari browser can't they?
    24 Sep 2012, 12:24 PM Reply Like
  • User 502794
    , contributor
    Comments (122) | Send Message
     
    I'd be willing to bet dollars to donuts that everybody who "Liked" your comment and any other comment which suggests Apple can disappoint on any metric are long aapl. Any takers?
    24 Sep 2012, 12:25 PM Reply Like
  • Dialectical Materialist
    , contributor
    Comments (4458) | Send Message
     
    Yes, Johnny they can. It won't give them turn by turn directions, but then neither did the iOS version of Google Maps. The fact is that those who want to use Google still can. If they want to make it as convenient as an app, they can paste a shortcut to their screen.

     

    Because Google Maps is still so accessible and convenient for anyone who wants to use it, it makes you wonder why so many people claim to be so taken back by Apple Maps. Unless you have seen this same artificial hand wringing every time Apple comes out with a new product, that is.
    24 Sep 2012, 12:29 PM Reply Like
  • SA Editor Eric Jhonsa
    , contributor
    Comments (763) | Send Message
     
    I think the backlash to iOS 6 Maps has reached the point where we can stop blaming it on "experts," "techies," or any other clique of elitists. A lot of iOS users are upset over the quality of the product, and they have a lot of evidence to back up their criticism. Now it's up to Apple to satisfy its customers (namely, by approving a Google Maps app for the App Store).
    24 Sep 2012, 12:31 PM Reply Like
  • SA Editor Eric Jhonsa
    , contributor
    Comments (763) | Send Message
     
    Applocrat, I don't doubt Apple's data will get better over time. But even if those 100M iOS users all use Apple's Maps (far from certain right now), Google still has a lot more users (both PC and mobile) submitting data for Google Maps. And a pretty big head start in compiling at.

     

    Also, those Apple users aren't driving Street View cars, working with transit authorities, and doing all kinds of other things Google Maps employees are doing. User submissions can only accomplish so much.
    24 Sep 2012, 12:38 PM Reply Like
  • Applocrat
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    I tried to illustrate the effectiveness of crowd-sourcing in the abstract by deliberately underestimating the size and effectiveness of the crowd and overestimating the size of the installed experts.

     

    I think I didn't have an effect. Oh well.
    24 Sep 2012, 12:58 PM Reply Like
  • SA Editor Eric Jhonsa
    , contributor
    Comments (763) | Send Message
     
    I see your point. I hope you see mine that crowd-sourcing is only good at certain things as far as maps go.
    24 Sep 2012, 01:03 PM Reply Like
  • Applocrat
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    I think all of those articles that focus on the problem I don't provide readers with instructions on this simplest of workarounds are irresponsible.
    24 Sep 2012, 01:04 PM Reply Like
  • Applocrat
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    Working with transit authorities? What do they do? Ask the transit authorities for information i take it. What do the street view cars do? gather information. Information is the resource to be mined here.

     

    If you doubt the massive power random human interactions have in generating information look up the way in which city size correlates to all manner of creative activity, patents filed etc. There is an eerier correlation between walking speed of the populous and all of these metrics. The best explanation for the phenomenon suggests that people be understand as molecules or atoms moving randomly.

     

    The greater average speed, the more collisions, the greater chance of one of those collisions sparking something.
    24 Sep 2012, 01:12 PM Reply Like
  • Applocrat
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    oh, i totally do; thanks for making it! But remember, the whole thrust of mobile tech is that it narrows the gap between what experts and users can accomplish. I am not shooting off the hip here, there is very sound mathematics behind the thesis that crowd sourcing can quite handily overtake the most dedicated installed experts. Will post later for the interested to digest. Thanks so much for your perspective!
    24 Sep 2012, 01:28 PM Reply Like
  • Applocrat
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    Also, if they handle this mini crisis adroitly, they could perhaps improve their reputation as a user friendly company. This could be a trope of post Steve Jobs Apple: We aren't perfect anymore, (not that they ever were) but we fix our mistakes better than anyone else.
    24 Sep 2012, 04:05 PM Reply Like
  • Applocrat
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    To play devils advocate again: bad information has a way of sticking in the mind. Something like 22% of Britts think that Sherlock Holmes was a real man etc. To what extent do you think users will become aware or already are aware of the easy solutions that about?
    24 Sep 2012, 04:06 PM Reply Like
  • User 502794
    , contributor
    Comments (122) | Send Message
     
    prescient
    25 Sep 2012, 04:42 PM Reply Like
  • pirota
    , contributor
    Comments (150) | Send Message
     
    I believe it's due to the fact that iOS still uses icons which is like very old fashioned UI compared to Android widgets or WP8 tiles, people don't care just about the speed but also about the functionality and usability
    24 Sep 2012, 10:25 AM Reply Like
  • chintan1671
    , contributor
    Comments (46) | Send Message
     
    I agree. I am an iPhone user and i am bored of its UI. I waited for new iPhone for upgrade but didn't yet upgraded. Probably will wait for Nokia release.
    24 Sep 2012, 10:40 AM Reply Like
  • rrose39
    , contributor
    Comments (677) | Send Message
     
    yes, the functionality.

     

    I am so f***ing sick of being awoken at 3am to the sound of "DROID" emanating from my wife's android. She now has an iphone and is very happy with it.
    24 Sep 2012, 11:17 AM Reply Like
  • Applocrat
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    I use an iPad and have never thought of these icons as old-fashioned. What can these other interfaces do that mine can't?
    24 Sep 2012, 10:34 AM Reply Like
  • DanoX
    , contributor
    Comments (2633) | Send Message
     
    Nothing, most of them haven't even been upgraded from Jelly Bean and never will, Mac OS X hasn't changed UI wise since 1999, but what has changed has been the internal core of the OS over the years and that is the only thing really counts. See Anantech Preview the iPad2, iPad3,4,4s,and the iPhone 5 kick the shit out of those Droid devices in every way.

     

    http://bit.ly/Tjx45D
    24 Sep 2012, 11:47 AM Reply Like
  • Applocrat
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    I am sure there are good devices out there, but I couldn't help but notice that I often hear android users opine that their devices do so much more and they're so much more open without actually being concrete about what those advantages are. they don't actually say I could do x where as you could not do X and X is valuable because. this maps thing may temporarily be their one example, let them have it for as long as it lasts.
    24 Sep 2012, 01:31 PM Reply Like
  • UncleFred
    , contributor
    Comments (162) | Send Message
     
    How would the "maps controversy" have affected sales? How would you know there was a maps problem before you already had, or already preordered, the phone?
    24 Sep 2012, 11:02 AM Reply Like
  • SA Editor Eric Jhonsa
    , contributor
    Comments (763) | Send Message
     
    You'd know if:

     

    1) You read any of the hundreds of articles on the subject.

     

    2) Like me, you installed iOS 6 on an older device and used the new Maps app first-hand.
    24 Sep 2012, 11:16 AM Reply Like
  • COS911
    , contributor
    Comments (43) | Send Message
     
    Since they sold every one they had it couldn't possibly have affected sales this weekend...one month from now maybe. It may have even stopped individuals from buying, but there were more than enough people waiting to make up for this. I would think any mapping funciton/app would only affect a very small margin of sales at most. There are just too many options for mapping/directions.
    24 Sep 2012, 01:27 PM Reply Like
  • UncleFred
    , contributor
    Comments (162) | Send Message
     
    The article referred to first weekend sales. Yes, there has been a huge amount of discussion about the maps function since then, but someone had to have the 5 before any discussion started, to discover the issue. And iO6 was also not released for older models until well after the first weekend. That's what I was referring to: all the people that bought the first weekend, or had already preordered before this temporary map problem was known.
    26 Sep 2012, 09:32 AM Reply Like
  • JoeCraftsman
    , contributor
    Comments (15) | Send Message
     
    More important than Maps is the required upgrade for hardware and docks. Not sure why this isn't mentioned, but to have to replace cables, docks and other items makes this upgrade less appealing to me. And yes, I know there is an adapter, but that isn't a pleasant option when my car has a dock specifically built for an iPhone 4 form factor. Eventually, I will replace it, but probably a year from now . The maps application is something that can be easily remedied with an upgrade. Not to mention the iOS upgrade for the 4s uses the same maps application. By the way, does anyone remember how crappy Siri was? That didn't prevent purchases. Or the antenna issue? Customers are more forgiving with Apple slips because the rest of the product is so well done.
    24 Sep 2012, 11:07 AM Reply Like
  • jacquin27
    , contributor
    Comments (6) | Send Message
     
    I think sales are lower than expected because the inventory is not there. I was at the Apple Store in Soho on Saturday and saw them turn away buyer after buyer because they only had Sprint phones in stock. At&T and Verizon phones had sold out.
    The iPhone 5 will set records for iPhone sales when all is said and done.
    24 Sep 2012, 11:11 AM Reply Like
  • berylrb
    , contributor
    Comments (2184) | Send Message
     
    Righto, every store in SF was out of stock and as of 11:30 am today still out of stock! And, SF has a flagship store!
    24 Sep 2012, 04:50 PM Reply Like
  • who?
    , contributor
    Comments (106) | Send Message
     
    Ridiculous article.

     

    The only thing that influenced sales was production.

     

    They produced 5 million phones, they sold 5 million phones.

     

    In London no phones left after 09:15 in the morning Friday, that means sold out in 1Hour and 15 minutes, it then took 8 hours + to hand them out... Today no phones left anywhere in the world... Who cares about the maps...

     

    Apple also had to keep a few million back for the countries launching on the 28th, China, Europe etc

     

    5 million this year whilst holding back some for China.
    4 Million Last year without china.

     

    The first months sales will be double last time but spread a bit more around the world.
    24 Sep 2012, 11:12 AM Reply Like
  • beej1000
    , contributor
    Comments (10) | Send Message
     
    I agree with thotdoc, but I'd add "analysts" to the "techies" snub. Mere mortals would be delighted with a $3 billion weekend, and a phone getting great reviews except for a single app. Only analysts and techies think the bad map app is the death knell for Apple.
    24 Sep 2012, 11:13 AM Reply Like
  • bmclopez
    , contributor
    Comments (5) | Send Message
     
    And did anybody miss the 100million IOS 6 downloads? That is 25 percent of the IOS installed base. As for google Jelly Bean ... Less than 2 percent. I doubt it's the map thing.
    24 Sep 2012, 11:13 AM Reply Like
  • gostan
    , contributor
    Comments (2) | Send Message
     
    4S was launched on Oct 7, 2011. It was a Friday.

     

    Preorder for iPhone 5 started a week before the official launch. Technically, iPhone 5's sales is already over 7 million units (5 + 2 + the rest in between Sep 14 and Sep 21). I don't see this being a disappointment.
    24 Sep 2012, 11:13 AM Reply Like
  • entmd
    , contributor
    Comments (941) | Send Message
     
    Yes, that's why I can just walk into an AT&T store and pick one up.... Not!
    It's sold out! Do you know what that means?
    24 Sep 2012, 11:14 AM Reply Like
  • 19IgfBUi69
    , contributor
    Comments (73) | Send Message
     
    Maps issue was a non-issue. The product sold out.

     

    The 5 million figure does not include on-line sales which have not yet been signed by purchasers indicating delivery. Some purchasers may have been away during the weekend.
    24 Sep 2012, 11:20 AM Reply Like
  • DanoX
    , contributor
    Comments (2633) | Send Message
     
    A Merry Apple Christmas 2012? Won't know for sure for another 2 weeks, but it looks very good.
    24 Sep 2012, 11:50 AM Reply Like
  • rocback
    , contributor
    Comments (987) | Send Message
     
    I have tried three times to order one online and keep getting a notice that I did not enter my verison number right. Probably happened to lots of folks. I will keep trying til I get one.
    24 Sep 2012, 12:09 PM Reply Like
  • BradleyModLover
    , contributor
    Comments (102) | Send Message
     
    I'm holding off because the workers who work in the factories to produce this product in China are committing suicide right and left. Prefer not to subsidize slave labor camps in order to buy cheaper electronics. http://on.ft.com/OPy5QI
    24 Sep 2012, 12:13 PM Reply Like
  • Dialectical Materialist
    , contributor
    Comments (4458) | Send Message
     
    Oh my, really? Then are you holding off buying any electronic devices?

     

    And don't you think calling this "slave labor" is at least a little insulting to those whose heritage includes actual slavery? A slave is someone who is forced to work for no money and who can not leave. A person who is paid to do a job they have been hired to do and can quit at any time is actually called an employee. I think it dilutes the impact of the call for improvement in working conditions when such easily dismissed hyperboles are used.
    24 Sep 2012, 12:35 PM Reply Like
  • berylrb
    , contributor
    Comments (2184) | Send Message
     
    @DM,well said!
    24 Sep 2012, 04:54 PM Reply Like
  • BradleyModLover
    , contributor
    Comments (102) | Send Message
     
    Oh pulease... We're headed there next with the 2% killing all the unions and if they had gotten in, there would be an end to minimum wage and labor laws. Their rationale, "We're bring jobs back home! Whaddaya want from us billionaire corporation stock owners?!"

     

    I do not support any company that has billions in their pockets from selling products and goes looking for more people to make them for .50 cents per hour in horrendous and dangerous work conditions. Sorry guys...
    8 Nov 2012, 09:15 AM Reply Like
  • Dialectical Materialist
    , contributor
    Comments (4458) | Send Message
     
    "We're headed there next with the 2% killing all the unions and if they had gotten in, there would be an end to minimum wage and labor laws."

     

    Even the elimination of minimum wage -- which no one was talking about and by your own admission is not about to happen -- would not compare to slavery. Seriously, you do know what slavery is, right?

     

    And as far as not supporting any company that makes a profit and then goes in search of even cheaper labor, I have to wonder about your lifestyle. Do you make your own clothes? Do you grow your own food? Do you drive a car? And exactly how are you connected to the internet? Are you using that computer that is made right here in the USA by union labor and sold at cost? What is the name of that company who sells those again?

     

    To me the real tragedy of hypocritical indignation directed at one company is that it tends to blur the message. If you really are concerned about labor conditions and corporations outsourcing manufacturing overseas, the conversation should be about those issues, not just one company.

     

    Pretending that this isn't an industry wide issue probably harms progress in raising awareness because some folks will mistakenly by an HP or a Samsung and think they have done their part to diminish the exploitation they are (suddenly) concerned about. Calling out the entire industry, though, would require people to actually examine their role in the process. Realizing that the way to speak out against these practices is to boycott all electronic devices is a lot less comfortable than just assuming that Apple is bad and all other companies are good.
    8 Nov 2012, 11:33 AM Reply Like
  • dnorm1234
    , contributor
    Comments (868) | Send Message
     
    DM:

     

    Great post. I agree with the sentiment.

     

    But, on the other hand, sometimes it's easiest to find a focus for activism. Apple, being the largest public corporation, serves that purpose.
    8 Nov 2012, 12:12 PM Reply Like
  • Dialectical Materialist
    , contributor
    Comments (4458) | Send Message
     
    "But, on the other hand, sometimes it's easiest to find a focus for activism. Apple, being the largest public corporation, serves that purpose."

     

    There is no doubt about this. But when folks make comments about Exxon Mobile, they usually include language that makes it clear they are talking about all the big oil companies. Phrases like "the Exxon's of the world" or "Exxon and all those companies" or even the phrase "big oil companies" often get used interchangeably in discussions about oil and gas, price gouging, environmental damage, or whatever the speaker is concerned with. In Apple's case, even the New York Times spent one measly sentence explaining that all other major tech companies used Foxconn in their articles that were so concerned about labor conditions there.

     

    Sure, hold up Apple as an example of what you're concerned with. But make it clear that it is an industry issue and not an Apple issue is all. If you don't do that, it looks like you have an agenda that has more to do with Apple and less to do with social justice or human rights or whatever the apparent concern.
    8 Nov 2012, 05:55 PM Reply Like
  • Gary Bushwacher
    , contributor
    Comments (514) | Send Message
     
    The sales forecast maxed out at 13M but they were for the entire balance of Sept, not a few days.

     

    Apple is right on track
    24 Sep 2012, 12:21 PM Reply Like
  • Dreamer5794
    , contributor
    Comments (12) | Send Message
     
    Yes, get a Samsung or Nokia because they are made in North America by happy, well paid workers with a strong union...
    24 Sep 2012, 12:32 PM Reply Like
  • sduris
    , contributor
    Comments (557) | Send Message
     
    I hate to say it, isn't "map gate" like its ancestors "antenna gate", "location gate", "mobilemegate", much ado about nothing? Whenever a new product comes out, there are bugs, that is a fact of life with product lifecycles. This too shall pass - it will get fixed. Honestly, the maps app for me on iOS6 has worked fine as I have had no issues. Apple is correct with going with their own map product. I have heard people say Apple hates Google so much, that they are getting rid of Google stuff in their iOS (read: Google Maps and YouTube), and maybe there is a small piece of truth in that. The operative word is "small". But, whenever you don't have functionally, you integrate with a third party, then you develop your own (either your own development or acquire the functionality and integrate it into your product development), and you part ways. This is nothing new. This is product development. Will it impact iphone 5 sales? Hardly. Why? Reason #1 - isn't there a way to get Google Maps back if that is an issue for someone? Reason #2 - it is the best smartphone out there right now.
    24 Sep 2012, 03:30 PM Reply Like
  • Applocrat
    , contributor
    Comments (778) | Send Message
     
    Yes, it is the simplest thing in the world to get Google maps back.

     

    Go to maps.google.com

     

    And it suggests you tap somewhere on the screen to paste a shortcut to Google maps permanently to your home screen. The end.

     

    And, nearly every user I have read about including myself has reported positively on Apple Maps. More people are talking about the complaint than there are people complaining I surmise.
    24 Sep 2012, 03:58 PM Reply Like
  • Gary Bushwacher
    , contributor
    Comments (514) | Send Message
     
    I LOVE iPhone's map app, simply because it's verbal. Do you know how hard it is to drive, look at street signs and glance down at your silent POS google app on your state-of-the-art iPhone ? Sure you do, I'm preaching to the choir.

     

    Google has no one to blame but themselves for withholding that feature. And I for one am happy to go through the development pains for that feature alone.

     

    PERIOD !
    25 Sep 2012, 10:07 AM Reply Like
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