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Sep ISM Manufacturing Index: 51.5 vs. 49.7 consensus and 49.6 prior. Prices index 58.0 vs. 54.0...

Sep ISM Manufacturing Index: 51.5 vs. 49.7 consensus and 49.6 prior. Prices index 58.0 vs. 54.0 prior. Employment 54.7 vs. 51.6. Inventories 50.5 vs. 53.0. New orders 52.3 vs. 47.1.
Comments (12)
  • Jason Tillberg
    , contributor
    Comments (1281) | Send Message
     
    We're now such a Education/Healthcare economy, this is more and more meaningless.
    1 Oct 2012, 10:02 AM Reply Like
  • wapiti
    , contributor
    Comments (711) | Send Message
     
    Does Fed Motor mouth Evans still want QE infinity??
    1 Oct 2012, 10:02 AM Reply Like
  • J 457
    , contributor
    Comments (972) | Send Message
     
    And this is all we get for 7 trillion new debt in last 3 years?
    1 Oct 2012, 10:03 AM Reply Like
  • American in Paris
    , contributor
    Comments (5494) | Send Message
     
    You got over 4 million jobs. That is net.
    1 Oct 2012, 03:12 PM Reply Like
  • GaltMachine
    , contributor
    Comments (1534) | Send Message
     
    AIP,

     

    "You got over 4 million jobs."

     

    That is not correct. This may be the Admin's preferred way of presenting the data but that doesn't make it accurate.

     

    His tenure began Jan 20th, 2009.

     

    Here is the link to the BLS data:

     

    http://1.usa.gov/Kv8U2r
    1 Oct 2012, 04:13 PM Reply Like
  • GaltMachine
    , contributor
    Comments (1534) | Send Message
     
    Best part of the report was the big rebound in new orders.

     

    Lot of conflicting data in the last month and this just adds to the confusion.

     

    I actually thought we skirted the recession risk at the beginning of August but the last month of data has been interesting to say the least for the bear case on the economy.
    1 Oct 2012, 10:08 AM Reply Like
  • American in Paris
    , contributor
    Comments (5494) | Send Message
     
    The bear case was never that strong. The plunge in air craft was expected because orders peak in June and July during the air shows.

     

    Just more fear mongering.
    1 Oct 2012, 03:12 PM Reply Like
  • anonymous#12
    , contributor
    Comments (552) | Send Message
     
    AIP, true about the peak in July.

     

    US economy is strong and surging.
    1 Oct 2012, 03:17 PM Reply Like
  • 2MuchDebt
    , contributor
    Comments (275) | Send Message
     
    Strong and surging? You're delusional. The economic data is pointing to a weakening U.S. economy heading into year end. And the U.S. economy is already very weak at this point. You must be looking at U.S. economic data from the mid 1990's because if you were looking at the recent economic data and you were reasonably intelligent you wouldn't be saying "strong and surging".
    1 Oct 2012, 10:00 PM Reply Like
  • American in Paris
    , contributor
    Comments (5494) | Send Message
     
    To the contrary, housing is surging. Services are accelerating. And the durable goods report was skewed by aircraft orders, which usually collapse in August after the June and July air shows. There is also good reason to believe that the seasonal adjustment factors are too high, which would bias down the data.

     

    The huge housing refinancing is freeing up cash for consumer spending. Consumer spending has been strong enough the last two months to keep the real GDP at 1.5% by itself. Any growth in the other 30% could easily real GDP up to 2% for the year.
    3 Oct 2012, 11:01 AM Reply Like
  • 2MuchDebt
    , contributor
    Comments (275) | Send Message
     
    Housing is surging??? Sure... Okay, I'll give you that housing is moving in the right direction, but it is not surging (poor choice of words). Also note the levels we're at. Take a look at these charts and tell me housing is surging / strong. Housing has also become a smaller portion of GDP over the last few years. 30 year mortgage rates have been at or below 5% since late 2008, which by the way was more than a 40 year low! What was holding people back? Oh that's right, credit quality and lack of confidence. Credit quality is still sub-par and confidence is slowly increasing. Also, the savings rate has been in decline recently and now stands at 3.7%. Not a lot of savings to sustainably drive our GDP figures higher (especially considering our continued weak non-farm employment figures). The Fed's stance on monetary policy should make clear that our economy is not strong and surging, it's weak and limping along. Otherwise, why the need for the unorthodox and dangerous policy actions of the Fed?

     

    http://bit.ly/UcAh7r

     

    http://bit.ly/UFyzpA

     

    http://bit.ly/UcAiIv

     

    http://bit.ly/UFyB0Q

     

    http://bit.ly/UcAiYS
    3 Oct 2012, 11:38 AM Reply Like
  • wapiti
    , contributor
    Comments (711) | Send Message
     
    Then why the need for QE infinity??
    1 Oct 2012, 03:32 PM Reply Like
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