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It's too early to tell which lighter-weight materials will become dominant in carmaking as tough...

It's too early to tell which lighter-weight materials will become dominant in carmaking as tough new federal fuel-efficiency rules take hold, NYT reports. The Energy Department says reducing a car’s weight by only 10% can improve fuel economy 6%-8%; technologies showing promise in lightening vehicles are supported by $8M in awards the agency has doled out to the likes of GM, F and CAT.
Comments (13)
  • davidingeorgia
    , contributor
    Comments (2713) | Send Message
     
    "The Energy Department says reducing a car’s weight by only 10% can improve fuel economy 6%-8%; technologies showing promise in lightening vehicles are supported by $8M in tax dollars that the agency has doled out to the likes of GM, F and CAT."

     

    There. Fixed it for you.
    12 Oct 2012, 11:42 AM Reply Like
  • Tony Petroski
    , contributor
    Comments (6373) | Send Message
     
    "It's too early to tell which lighter-weight materials will become dominant in carmaking as tough new federal fuel-efficiency rules take hold..."

     

    I'm betting on cardboard. PKG? IP?
    12 Oct 2012, 12:16 PM Reply Like
  • Tdot
    , contributor
    Comments (3785) | Send Message
     
    What do you expect for a measly $8M? That will just about pay for a couple of concept demonstration prototypes.

     

    Long in (IP). just kidding.
    12 Oct 2012, 12:50 PM Reply Like
  • TwistTie
    , contributor
    Comments (2476) | Send Message
     
    Read the "It's too early to tell link" above.

     

    Buy Alcoa.

     

    That's all.
    12 Oct 2012, 12:18 PM Reply Like
  • 123andy
    , contributor
    Comments (42) | Send Message
     
    I don't understand why DoE is funding GM, F, Chrysler to do this. Under the Clinton administration the DoE paid over $2 Billion to get car makers to develop and use light weight materials, and funded the National Labs to partner with OEMs. They developed and demonstrated diesel hybrids for each brand which Detroit never built, they developed light weight strong materials of which one made it to market as a component for running board for trucks. With the high fuel standards set and car makers committed to meet the market place is where this should be done and stop borrowing more money to give them help.
    12 Oct 2012, 12:50 PM Reply Like
  • Tdot
    , contributor
    Comments (3785) | Send Message
     
    It is a matetr of unfunded mandates. The Gov't sets up standards and regulations on fuel economy and such, the Automakers complain through Lobbyists about the costs, and Congress provides funding. Done.
    12 Oct 2012, 01:15 PM Reply Like
  • EdwinJ44
    , contributor
    Comments (60) | Send Message
     
    I'm still in favor of GLW in creating lighter weight materials for the auto industry...Plass-asstic!
    12 Oct 2012, 01:04 PM Reply Like
  • Tdot
    , contributor
    Comments (3785) | Send Message
     
    Didn't GM's Saturn try that? How'd that work out?
    13 Oct 2012, 11:22 AM Reply Like
  • shooshoo
    , contributor
    Comments (3) | Send Message
     
    We're from the government and we saved your industry.
    12 Oct 2012, 01:29 PM Reply Like
  • bibol11
    , contributor
    Comments (64) | Send Message
     
    Lighter cars mean more deaths on the highway and in town. Now one minor wreck costs thousands of dollars. I remember a friend totaled his Toyota went he hit a big Oldsmobile. The American car very minor damage in the hundreds
    12 Oct 2012, 06:48 PM Reply Like
  • Raymondjram
    , contributor
    Comments (25) | Send Message
     
    It depends what you consider more important: surviving an occasional accident or surviving the increasing gas prices. You can buy the safest vehicle in the world (such as a Hummer H1) but how much can you pay to actually use it? My 1995 Buick Regal survived an impact by a Ford Econoline Van , but it gets only 20 MPG. My next American vehicle will be lighter and get a better MPG since I want to save on gas. By now most of the imports on the road are lighter than the Americans (and Ford is selling a smaller van), so I know that I can survive the next accident.
    12 Oct 2012, 07:37 PM Reply Like
  • EdwinJ44
    , contributor
    Comments (60) | Send Message
     
    Every time this subject comes up (lighter vehicles) the safety issue follows. Rightfully so. I also think that the cars can be built lighter and stronger with plastic. Not plastic that crumbles or shatters like glass, but with resilient plastic that will hold it's shape and encapsulate and protect it's passengers.
    12 Oct 2012, 07:08 PM Reply Like
  • wmalvarez
    , contributor
    Comment (1) | Send Message
     
    and ... how does this relate to CAT?
    13 Oct 2012, 02:01 AM Reply Like
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