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Incoming Best Buy (BBY +0.1%) CFO Sharon McCollam sees a dual strategy of "bricks and clicks" as...

Incoming Best Buy (BBY +0.1%) CFO Sharon McCollam sees a dual strategy of "bricks and clicks" as the road back to profitability. She says the company's online market share needs to be improved dramatically and its ability to help customers at stores as electronics experts needs to be leveraged. Though the track doesn't appear altogether fresh from recent comments by other BBY execs, McCollam carries the clout of driving online sales at Williams-Sonoma dramatically higher amid a shrinkage in the retailer's store count.
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Comments (5)
  • sdwilli
    , contributor
    Comments (4) | Send Message
     
    A comment on the quote, "its ability to help customers at stores as electronics experts needs to be leveraged." I would like Best Buy to charge potential customers a service fee, e.g. $50, for potential customers of products over e.g. $50. This fee is credited at time of purchase from Best Buy. If purchased elsewhere, this is buyer's education expense.
    13 Nov 2012, 08:02 PM Reply Like
  • billddrummer
    , contributor
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    I believe that if you do something like that, foot traffic will crash.

     

    What I'd like to know is whether Ms. McCollam will keep her job after Mr. Schulze takes over the company.
    13 Nov 2012, 08:44 PM Reply Like
  • sdwilli
    , contributor
    Comments (4) | Send Message
     
    If the electronic consumer is "knowledgeable" about his/her purchase, let him/her by-pass Best Buy and go straight to Amazon to purchase. Then when he/she has a problem of "how to" or "what do I do", let Amazon give them the instructions. Good luck on that one.
    15 Nov 2012, 02:15 AM Reply Like
  • billddrummer
    , contributor
    Comments (1741) | Send Message
     
    What do you have against AMZN?
    15 Nov 2012, 08:35 PM Reply Like
  • sdwilli
    , contributor
    Comments (4) | Send Message
     
    That is my Santa Claus theory, the bricks and mortar comparable shopper wants something (e.g. all his/her questions answered) before he/she walks out the door (or maybe while in the store) and places his/her order to (e.g. Amazon) without this vendor adding anything to the buyer's knowledge of the product. The buyer wants this for nothing, a pure give-away by Best Buy (the bricks and mortar vendor on this topic). In addition, no sales tax is collected, which explains partially the current economic status of many states. The current "give me, give me" generation (e.g. 30+ something) wants something for nothing.
    18 Nov 2012, 07:22 PM Reply Like
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