Nokia (NOK -5.6%) roundup: 1) Nokia has introduced the Asha 205 and 206, both of which go for...


Nokia (NOK -5.6%) roundup: 1) Nokia has introduced the Asha 205 and 206, both of which go for $62 unsubsidized. The 205 sports a QWERTY keyboard and a dedicated Facebook button. Strong Asha sales have partly offset collapsing Symbian sales. 2) RBC's Mark Sue notes Nokia's Windows Phone 8 models are sold out at U.S. retailers, and thinks Q4 smartphone sales could exceed his forecast of 6.5M. Nokia's initial shipment volumes to retailers are still unknown. 3) Nokia Siemens says it's hoping to take advantage of Huawei and ZTE's U.S. political problems to gain share.

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Comments (14)
  • Seppo Sahrakorpi
    , contributor
    Comments (2146) | Send Message
     
    And the stock tanks 5%? Go figure...
    26 Nov 2012, 05:48 PM Reply Like
  • WhatdoIknow1
    , contributor
    Comments (652) | Send Message
     
    No one in the market believes in the windows phone. They think the early numbers are false or fleeting and that therefore Nokia will continue to sink. Their wrong. Besides there's always a little profit taking after a big move.

     

    Long Nokia
    26 Nov 2012, 06:04 PM Reply Like
  • css1971
    , contributor
    Comments (871) | Send Message
     
    It just went up 25% If I had a shorter time horizon I'd be selling too.
    26 Nov 2012, 06:12 PM Reply Like
  • Rookie IRA Investor
    , contributor
    Comments (2874) | Send Message
     
    It goes up 25% on no news, then when good news comes, it goes down a bit. Just an indication that retail investors are never the first to get the good news.
    26 Nov 2012, 09:20 PM Reply Like
  • css1971
    , contributor
    Comments (871) | Send Message
     
    Retail investors are the last to get *any* news. By the time you read about it in the mainstream news, weeks too late. To compete with the hedge funds & banks you would have to be focused on a single company and even then you still will probably miss a lot. Often they have people on the inside, legal or not.

     

    You can just about keep up by monitoring *everything* a company puts out, every announcement, financial release, every product release and looking at the company culture. Without some software to collate the news for you and filter out noise it's almost impossible to keep up. SeekingAlpha kind of sort of does that but not very well, it's not wide enough. If you know a bit of software you can pull down & collate your own info from freely available sources or there are services which'll do it for you for a fee.

     

    The one advantage you have possibly is time. Hedgies & banks have to make quarterly numbers, you don't. So I don't attempt to day trade, you're up against billions of dollars worth of investment in people, IT & nanosecond HFT systems to trade against you.
    27 Nov 2012, 10:20 AM Reply Like
  • Seppo Sahrakorpi
    , contributor
    Comments (2146) | Send Message
     
    Thanks. I am new in this business, learning the ropes, and still surprised how much trading and less investing this business seems to be. Of course, NOK is a particular highly volatile case, but still...

     

    I am long NOK with a 1+ year timeframe.
    26 Nov 2012, 06:19 PM Reply Like
  • pollyserial
    , contributor
    Comments (1113) | Send Message
     
    Tell me about it, Seppo; but it probably is worthwhile to remember that market moves are made by design, explicitly to try to shake investors (and traders) out of their positions.

     

    If you have a long time frame and you're a believer (I'm assuming that any money you have in a name like this is money you can comfortably lose), you should probably not even look at the numbers with NOK, because they are going to drive you crazy! Not only is it extremely volatile, I think it's hugely manipulated; I started buying what became a substantial chunk back in June, followed it down, adding significantly to my position and then back up and along the way have become rather more skittish about the long term story, largely because I'm concerned about the macro picture and am reluctant to have much long term equity exposure at the moment. But it is a fun stock to trade, I'll say that. And, I'm not sure how long you've followed it but again and again and again I've seen selling on good news after a fairly large move up in price. Maybe this time will be different, though, the pieces seem to be coming together? But I still think (I'm assuming the broader market isn't done pulling back yet) it'll be back below three before it really takes off again. The key of course if you're buying and holding is to truly do just that. Forget about it, entirely, is my advice, if you're not going to actively trade it.
    26 Nov 2012, 07:15 PM Reply Like
  • Seppo Sahrakorpi
    , contributor
    Comments (2146) | Send Message
     
    Thanks. I am starting to realize that I follow NOK too closely, thus being unnecessarily exposed to all the trading c**p. I have established my position in increments since August and do not need to buy anymore. But on the other hand this is a good learning experience :)

     

    Also, I want to keep a close eye in and ahead of fundamentals, for any adverse signs, if I need to start to consider bailing out.
    26 Nov 2012, 07:29 PM Reply Like
  • pollyserial
    , contributor
    Comments (1113) | Send Message
     
    That 'bailing out' is where it gets dicey, though, isn't it? The market will always seek to find that spot in your soul, before it reverses the other way. All I can say is, be careful out there! And, good luck. I hope to be back on the long NOK team again soon.
    26 Nov 2012, 08:09 PM Reply Like
  • Cerberaus
    , contributor
    Comments (87) | Send Message
     
    Nothing wrong with following a stock too closely; just don't let yourself become easily manipulated. If the fundamentals are strong, then buy more on the dips. Don't forget the initial reason you bought and you'll be good. That being said, don't believe in a stock like it's a religion. If the company deviates from those fundamentals, take your gains or cut your losses.
    26 Nov 2012, 08:25 PM Reply Like
  • techy46
    , contributor
    Comments (11500) | Send Message
     
    Nokia is definitely not an investment or speculation for the amateur or faint at heart. It's going to be really interesting to watch the broader Greek crisis and Fiscal Cliff soap operas play out while Microsoft and Nokia play their cards in the second round of the mobile device wars. It's definitely been all Apple, then all Android, so let's see how much traction Windows 8 for tablets and Windows Phone 8 can gain in the next quarter or two. Nokia needs to sell 3-5m Lumia;s Q4 2012 and build that up to 5m or more per quarter for 2013.
    27 Nov 2012, 01:25 AM Reply Like
  • DeepValueLover
    , contributor
    Comments (11220) | Send Message
     
    Too little too late.

     

    Apple and Samsung have an almost insurmountable headstart.
    27 Nov 2012, 01:37 AM Reply Like
  • css1971
    , contributor
    Comments (871) | Send Message
     
    Worth remembering that consumers are tarts.
    27 Nov 2012, 10:24 AM Reply Like
  • eccomi
    , contributor
    Comments (5) | Send Message
     
    What a sexist remark.
    27 Nov 2012, 03:26 PM Reply Like
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