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According to a Reuters tweet, Libya's Quryna newspaper reports the Justice Minister has resigned...

According to a Reuters tweet, Libya's Quryna newspaper reports the Justice Minister has resigned in protest over "excessive use of violence against (demonstrators)."
Comments (16)
  • samueljsmith
    , contributor
    Comments (25) | Send Message
     
    Intrade currently has the line at 65% for the leader, Muammar al-Gaddafi, to resign by year's end.
    21 Feb 2011, 09:58 AM Reply Like
  • Ken Hasner
    , contributor
    Comments (427) | Send Message
     
    After what he's done in the past 72 hours....resignation may not be an option. History has shown that his future may lie at the end of a rope.
    21 Feb 2011, 10:32 AM Reply Like
  • Duude
    , contributor
    Comments (3358) | Send Message
     
    Kaddafi will never resign. He's about as likely to resign as is Iran's Ali Khamenei. They're both prepared to kill millions to keep their posts.
    21 Feb 2011, 10:44 AM Reply Like
  • samueljsmith
    , contributor
    Comments (25) | Send Message
     
    I agree with this sentiment. The actual verbiage of the bet is "will no longer be leader..." -- resignation is not necessary for the long bet. The line is at 80% now.
    21 Feb 2011, 11:27 AM Reply Like
  • davidbdc
    , contributor
    Comments (3141) | Send Message
     
    Hmm.... hope that guy sent in his resignation from somewhere in Europe!!!

     

    Its not going to end well...... no matter the outcome. there are far too few opportunities and far too many young unemployed for any regime to satisfy the populace. Throw in a sizable percentage of the populations being uneducated and desiring Islamic rule and you've got potential disasters in some of these countries. I say we should leave the whole region alone - let the Sunnis and Shites kill each other.
    21 Feb 2011, 11:14 AM Reply Like
  • mikeybronx
    , contributor
    Comments (347) | Send Message
     
    As we speak, arms and military prowness is being deployed to the anti government (THE PEOPLE) protestors and momentum is increasing in the protestors favor as more and more people want freedom. With many declared casualties of this protest the people have found the strength and reason to die while the regimes military is losing support within its own ranks who are becoming more sympathetic to the people as relatives are slain and brutally assaulted for no reason. there is no civil war, its the people against Kaadafi period. the justice minister resigned because he knows that Kaadafi is going down, perhaps in a blaze of guns but going down and we the free should applaud the people's courage to battle tyranny. this is not a group of radicals, these are the people of Libya wanting what we take for granted. perhaps if we fought alongside our founding fathers we would connect more with the surpressed people of Libya. I hope they string Kaadafi, that piece of maneur up. And for the investors out there we have been assured that the Saudi's reserve will be more then enough to keep oil stabilized as in availability during these unprecedented times, pricing is another matter.
    21 Feb 2011, 11:32 AM Reply Like
  • bob adamson
    , contributor
    Comments (4555) | Send Message
     
    February 21st marks a turning point in the upheavals across North Africa and the Middle East. Prior to the weekend, it was only in countries like Tunisia and Egypt, where the army’s ultimate loyalty was to the nation and not the regime in power, where popular demonstrations were changing regimes. Few, certainly not me, expected that a regime like that in Libya would hesitate to unleash its foreign mercenaries against its people if they protested or that the people could overcome their justifiable fear of brutal reprisal or their tribal and other differences one from another and stand up to the regime in the face of carnage in the streets. Now, if the following reports are to be believed, the people have risen, elements of the armed forces are supporting the uprising and some officials of the regime are also backing the uprising.

     

    english.aljazeera.net/...

     

    english.aljazeera.net/...

     

    www.guardian.co.uk/wor...

     

    www.guardian.co.uk/wor...

     

    This train of events not only affects Libya (which, by the way, produces about 4-5% of the worlds petroleum exports) but will serve as a template for Algeria and Yemen, two other hard line military dictatorships.

     

    What it will mean in Iran (and Iraq?) remains to be seen.
    21 Feb 2011, 12:34 PM Reply Like
  • Not_a_planner
    , contributor
    Comments (183) | Send Message
     
    Why don't we in the US get Al Jazeera?

     

    I have more use for their real old fashioned reporting on the ground than I do for the pontification of know nothings and automatons on MSNBC and FOXNEWS.

     

    CNN really elevated themselves in my eyes during the Egypt revolution. FOXNEWS sometimes had "experts" on who knew less about the region than I do and I have no special knowledge. Its an embarrassment
    21 Feb 2011, 01:00 PM Reply Like
  • bob adamson
    , contributor
    Comments (4555) | Send Message
     
    Not_a_planner -

     

    Another very good source of timely and authoritative reports as events unfold in North Africa and the Middle East is the online version of the UK newspaper The Guardian. Here, for example, is their current February 21st report which is being continually updated through the day,

     

    www.guardian.co.uk/wor...
    21 Feb 2011, 03:04 PM Reply Like
  • Tack
    , contributor
    Comments (12726) | Send Message
     
    Well, one thing we see is typical, the predictable investor panic, dumping equities in Europe today and rushing to German bonds.
    21 Feb 2011, 12:37 PM Reply Like
  • Not_a_planner
    , contributor
    Comments (183) | Send Message
     
    Not for us to decide but think the world would be a better place if places like Iran, Algeria, Egypt, Palestine and Lebanon could rediscover their preIslamic and preArabized cultures to a greater extent.
    21 Feb 2011, 12:56 PM Reply Like
  • spald_fr
    , contributor
    Comments (2702) | Send Message
     
    The Islamic invasion (by Arabs) of Egypt was 639 AD?
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

     

    Europeans would normally refer to era as the "Dark Ages" so your post seems to suggest we go back to the Dark Ages to have a "better place" (as you put it).
    21 Feb 2011, 01:18 PM Reply Like
  • Not_a_planner
    , contributor
    Comments (183) | Send Message
     
    the process of Arabization (of course most people in the Middle East are not descended from Bedouins) happened over many centuries. In some cases in North Africa is didn't happen until the 19th and even 20th centuries.

     

    In Egypt today the people there is a strain of nonArab identity as there is in Lebanon.

     

    Having an awareness of a preArab (including the Arab invasions) rather than an artificial panArab identity seems a positive to me.
    21 Feb 2011, 01:33 PM Reply Like
  • phdinsuntanning
    , contributor
    Comments (1200) | Send Message
     
    cahnge you can believe in...
    21 Feb 2011, 02:11 PM Reply Like
  • Ken Hasner
    , contributor
    Comments (427) | Send Message
     
    What's happening in North Africa has little to do with Arabs or Islam. It is what happens when human beings are allowed uncontrolled access to scarce resources. It is the best argument for term limits I have ever seen. When a leader is in power for so long, they become so out of touch with reality that they actually believe they are acting in the best interests of their population.

     

    We have a similar situation with Congressmen and Senators serving 20 + years in DC. They are as out of touch as Quadafi and Mubarek are.
    21 Feb 2011, 02:18 PM Reply Like
  • Ken Hasner
    , contributor
    Comments (427) | Send Message
     
    The minute he denounced ties to terrorism in 2008 the western oil giants were in Tripoli kissing his rear....followed soon thereafter by Condi Rice who the Colonel fondly refers to as "Leeza".

     

    It's all about the oil and the money and we jumped in bed with another dictator for oil....what a surprise...
    21 Feb 2011, 03:11 PM Reply Like
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