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Lost decade? We've already had it, Calculated Risk says. The U.S. now has 130.738M payroll...

Lost decade? We've already had it, Calculated Risk says. The U.S. now has 130.738M payroll jobs vs. 130.781M in January 2000 - more than 11 years with no increase. Median household income in constant dollars was $49,777 in 2009 vs. $51,100 in 1998.
Comments (24)
  • eggfaced
    , contributor
    Comments (293) | Send Message
     
    Destroy the currency with zero interest rates and printed money and see what happpens...
    21 Apr 2011, 05:15 PM Reply Like
  • HomeEconomics
    , contributor
    Comments (52) | Send Message
     
    And the DX was over 100 in 1999 while it sits at 74 today. This country has been a train wreck for anyone living on fixed income.
    21 Apr 2011, 05:18 PM Reply Like
  • bbro
    , contributor
    Comments (9300) | Send Message
     
    It was 81.58 on 6/30/95...using the same thought process Clinton
    must have been magnificent...also SPY is up 222% since then...
    21 Apr 2011, 05:51 PM Reply Like
  • Stoploss
    , contributor
    Comments (1727) | Send Message
     
    81.58 is DOWN 60% from 1971.
    21 Apr 2011, 05:57 PM Reply Like
  • bbro
    , contributor
    Comments (9300) | Send Message
     
    S&P 500 is up 4800% since 1971....
    21 Apr 2011, 06:07 PM Reply Like
  • Stoploss
    , contributor
    Comments (1727) | Send Message
     
    It did that all by itself??
    21 Apr 2011, 06:13 PM Reply Like
  • bbro
    , contributor
    Comments (9300) | Send Message
     
    81.58 - 74.09 /81.58= 9%
    21 Apr 2011, 06:15 PM Reply Like
  • HomeEconomics
    , contributor
    Comments (52) | Send Message
     
    Problem... most people on fixed income didn't have disposable income during that period due to rising input costs (food/housing/energy) and lower salaries and therefore weren't living on equity returns.

     

    You just explained the exact problem during that time period which is that speculation and private industry gains were placed on a pedestal on the back of the fixed-income working class of America.
    21 Apr 2011, 06:32 PM Reply Like
  • Stoploss
    , contributor
    Comments (1727) | Send Message
     
    WTF? Here, let me ass ist you, the index started at 200 bp. 100 bp loss is 50%, add another 20 bp's and we get a loss of 60% of the TOTAL value of the FRN from 1971 to your 1995, what ever that means. From 1971 to 2011 the FRN has lost 70% of it's total value. Comprend'e? So, with 100B on deck for monetization next week, i would be shocked, SHOCKED i say, if the dxy didn't blow right past 72 without even stopping for a smoke. Oh yeah, forgot about the yuan. Monday looks like it's going to be a real bad day for the 'ol FRN, and we know what the pm's will do. How about gold from 1971 to 2011? I think you have that data as well.
    Have a happy Easter bbro.
    21 Apr 2011, 09:37 PM Reply Like
  • bbro
    , contributor
    Comments (9300) | Send Message
     
    Postponable Purchases to GDP is now 17%..64 year average is 20.6%....we are making up for the excesses created from 2004-2007
    which is why the next decade will be better,,,,
    21 Apr 2011, 05:21 PM Reply Like
  • kmi
    , contributor
    Comments (3975) | Send Message
     
    Erm... and Japan's lost decade is longer than ten years (twenty now?), and the real understanding of 'lost decade' as applied to Japan is one of stagnation -after- the bubble burst, so we are looking to 2018 to find out if we have one....
    21 Apr 2011, 05:22 PM Reply Like
  • bbro
    , contributor
    Comments (9300) | Send Message
     
    Japan is a closed society as long as we stay open we will grow...
    21 Apr 2011, 05:27 PM Reply Like
  • Yokyok
    , contributor
    Comments (325) | Send Message
     
    that would be the george w bush decade
    21 Apr 2011, 05:34 PM Reply Like
  • Monngie
    , contributor
    Comments (928) | Send Message
     
    I'd call it the NOT SO FISCALLY CONSERVATIVE decade!
    22 Apr 2011, 12:22 AM Reply Like
  • Tom Au, CFA
    , contributor
    Comments (6775) | Send Message
     
    One definition of the 1930s was a two decade regression (to the 1910s).

     

    www.financialsensearch...

     

    No wonder it feels a bit like the 1930s; we've gone halfway back to the 1980s.
    21 Apr 2011, 05:38 PM Reply Like
  • apberusdisvet
    , contributor
    Comments (2859) | Send Message
     
    Japan's final tipping point might well be the latest disaster and the seemingly uncontrolled nuclear emissions. America's tipping point has already occurred, for 2 principal reasons:

     

    1) Our Constitution has been incrementally trashed; how many of the Bill of Rights do we really retain? Think about this question in the context of the Patriot Act, TSA, and the labeling of millions of Americans as potential domestic terrorists.

     

    Do you own a gun?
    Do you own physical gold or silver?
    Are you ex-military?
    Do you openly criticize the Gov't or its policies?
    Are you storing food and water?
    Have you home-schooled your children?

     

    If your answer to 3 or more of these questions is yes, then CONGRATULATIONS; gov't considers you to be a potential domestic terrorist.

     

    2) The biggest financial fraud/theft of all time has happened right before our eyes, courtesy of the FED and its banking cronies, and the payoffs given, by this Administration, to special interests. $25 Trillion, as some have estimated, may be too conservative. No one of importance has done prison time. Why? It is safe to say that the Rule of Law is no longer; except of course for you and me,

     

    Lost decade? It goes much further than that, unfortunately.
    21 Apr 2011, 05:48 PM Reply Like
  • bbro
    , contributor
    Comments (9300) | Send Message
     
    You forgot..Do you think Donald Trump will make a good President?
    21 Apr 2011, 06:09 PM Reply Like
  • sprstirl
    , contributor
    Comments (83) | Send Message
     
    This article lists a (slight) increase in "payroll jobs", but does not clarify that the U.S. Government is "employing" more persons each year, and I believe it now "employs" more than the private sector. As there is no 'production' for the economy here, it is no wonder that things have not improved as they should in a country this great.
    21 Apr 2011, 07:38 PM Reply Like
  • DavyJ
    , contributor
    Comments (413) | Send Message
     
    Not even close!

     

    Government employment is about 20 percent and has been around that number for decades.

     

    ftp://ftp.bls.gov/pub/...
    21 Apr 2011, 09:47 PM Reply Like
  • The Last Boomer
    , contributor
    Comments (878) | Send Message
     
    The government today employs fewer people per 10,000 Americans than under Reagan. If I remember correctly the corresponding numbers are about 13 per 10,000 under Reagan and about 8.5 per 10,000 today. I am really amazed how people keep repeating the tale about big government with total disregard for facts and numbers that show exactly the opposite.
    21 Apr 2011, 10:15 PM Reply Like
  • D_Virginia
    , contributor
    Comments (2280) | Send Message
     
    Just to continue to refute the misinformation, here are some fairly specific numbers:

     

    ~2.9M people are employed by the federal government.
    Source: www2.census.gov/govs/a...

     

    ~3.6M people are employed by only the 5 largest (by # of employees) U.S. corporations combined: Walmart, UPS, IBM, McDonald's, and Target.
    Source: money.cnn.com/magazine...

     

    While the federal government may be the largest "single" employer, its numbers are minuscule compared to the private sector as a whole.

     

    As for production -- what does Bank of America (~288,000 employees) produce?
    Wells Fargo (~267,000 employees)?
    Citigroup (~267,000 employees)?
    JP Morgan (~222,000 employees)?
    AIG (~63,000 employees)?
    Morgan Stanley (~62,000 employees)?
    American Express (~61,000 employees)?
    U.S. Bancorp (~60,000 employees)?
    Goldman Sachs (38,000 employees)?

     

    Not that I want to add to the unemployment problem, but if you're looking for large employers that add no production to the economy, or that actually detract from the production of the economy, you have a lot of places to look in addition to any government.
    22 Apr 2011, 12:06 AM Reply Like
  • Monngie
    , contributor
    Comments (928) | Send Message
     
    Good one Boomer! Go get 'em.
    22 Apr 2011, 12:26 AM Reply Like
  • bricki
    , contributor
    Comments (1099) | Send Message
     
    Not so. The government has done a pretty good job with automating transfer payments.
    25 Apr 2011, 09:55 AM Reply Like
  • DavyJ
    , contributor
    Comments (413) | Send Message
     
    It seems SA truncated the link. The missing part is: suppl/empsit.ceseeb1.txt
    21 Apr 2011, 10:41 PM Reply Like
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