Emails show Larry Page allowed illegal pharma ads to appear on Google (GOOG) for years, says...


Emails show Larry Page allowed illegal pharma ads to appear on Google (GOOG) for years, says U.S. Attorney Peter Neronha, who led the probe that persuaded Google to settle the issue for $500M. In a DOJ sting op, Google staff helped agents evade controls designed to prevent the ads.

From other sites
Comments (7)
  • PEhrlich
    , contributor
    Comments (1702) | Send Message
     
    Illegal PHARMACY adds, not PHARMA
    28 Aug 2011, 08:18 AM Reply Like
  • User 353732
    , contributor
    Comments (5158) | Send Message
     
    Of course, if a small business had done this, the CEO would have been arrested and publicly humiliated.

     

    It is good to have spent vast sums ingratiating oneself with the US regime and ensuring that the big bosses are not subject to the same laws and treatment as the little people.........
    28 Aug 2011, 08:33 AM Reply Like
  • Where_Art_Thou
    , contributor
    Comments (52) | Send Message
     
    Perhaps Mr. Page figured that his "do no evil" creed came in conflict with following this particular set of laws...we have mostly pharma lobbyists to blame for our nation's not being allowed to import perfectly safe, yet much cheaper, drugs from Canada/the EU.
    28 Aug 2011, 12:26 PM Reply Like
  • davidbdc
    , contributor
    Comments (3194) | Send Message
     
    If thats the case then where is the prosecution?

     

    I agree with user 353732's comments above - If I did this as a small business owner I'd be sitting in jail and some DA would be running for his next office on my back.

     

    I guess the difference is that Page is part of the "elite" and I'm just a guy supporting his family with hard work (and I'm not saying that Page hasn't worked hard to build his business, I'm sure he has).
    28 Aug 2011, 01:01 PM Reply Like
  • PVizzle
    , contributor
    Comments (743) | Send Message
     
    "It is good to have spent vast sums ingratiating oneself with the US regime and ensuring that the big bosses are not subject to the same laws and treatment as the little people........."

     

    Exactly.
    28 Aug 2011, 02:09 PM Reply Like
  • Duude
    , contributor
    Comments (3413) | Send Message
     
    This has proven to be a wise gamble for Google financially. They've made oodles over the years breaking the law above and beyond the fine. But then, who actually believes the administration didn't want to settle and avoid prosecution?
    28 Aug 2011, 02:50 PM Reply Like
  • StatisicalDolphin
    , contributor
    Comments (5) | Send Message
     
    'Don't be evil' from Wikipedia:

     

    "Don't be evil" is the informal corporate motto (or slogan) of Google, originally suggested by Google employees Paul Buchheit and Amit Patel at a meeting. Buchheit, the creator of Gmail, said he "wanted something that, once you put it in there, would be hard to take out," adding that the slogan was "also a bit of a jab at a lot of the other companies, especially our competitors, who at the time, in our opinion, were kind of exploiting the users to some extent." While the official corporate philosophy of Google does not contain the words "Don't be evil", they were included in the prospectus (aka "S-1") of Google's 2004 IPO (a letter from Google's founders, latter called the "'Don't Be Evil' manifesto"): "Don’t be evil. We believe strongly that in the long term, we will be better served — as shareholders and in all other ways — by a company that does good things for the world even if we forgo some short term gains." The sixth point of the 10-point corporate philosophy of Google says "You can make money without doing evil." The motto is often incorrectly stated as "Do no evil".

     

    "Don't be evil" is said to recognize that large corporations often maximize short-term profits with actions that may not be in the best interests of the public. Supposedly, by instilling a Don't Be Evil culture, the corporation establishes a baseline for honest decision-making that disassociates Google from any and all cheating. This in turn can enhance the trust and image of the corporation that outweighs short-term gains from violating the Don't Be Evil principles.

     

    While many companies have ethical codes to govern their conduct, Google claims to have made "Don't Be Evil" a central pillar of their identity, and part of their self-proclaimed core values.
    28 Aug 2011, 09:22 PM Reply Like
DJIA (DIA) S&P 500 (SPY)
ETF Hub
ETF Screener: Search and filter by asset class, strategy, theme, performance, yield, and much more
ETF Performance: View ETF performance across key asset classes and investing themes
ETF Investing Guide: Learn how to build and manage a well-diversified, low cost ETF portfolio
ETF Selector: An explanation of how to select and use ETFs