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H-P (HPQ) wants a whopping $4B in damages from Oracle (ORCL) over the software giant's decision...

H-P (HPQ) wants a whopping $4B in damages from Oracle (ORCL) over the software giant's decision to discontinue support for Intel's Itanium server CPUs. Look for H-P to point to its plummeting high-end server sales (-24% Y/Y in FQ1) as evidence of the damage Oracle caused. Look for Oracle, which resumed supporting Itanium after a judge ordered it to, to argue demand for "Itanic" was diving anyway as enterprises embraced x86 servers, and that Intel's own commitment to the platform is lukewarm.
Comments (5)
  • is this Meg Whitberg's new strategy for growth?
    19 Mar 2013, 01:46 PM Reply Like
  • Oracle must pay the piper
    19 Mar 2013, 03:41 PM Reply Like
  • yeah, that's right, HPQ's misfortunes are all Oracles' fault:

     

    May 22, 2009

     

    10 Years After: Intel's Itanic still striking bergs

     

    Intel won't tell us how many Itanics it ships because, well, it just won't. Can there really be very much of a future for the unlucky processor?

     

    http://bit.ly/16Hvnmd

     

    December 18, 2009

     

    Red Hat pulls plug on Itanium with RHEL 6

     

    If you run Itanium-based servers in your data center, 2010 has a surprise for you. The dominant supplier of commercial Linux, Red Hat, is not going to be supporting its future Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 on any Itanium platforms, old or new....

     

    http://bit.ly/XnTW0I

     

    April 5, 2010

     

    Microsoft pulls plug on Intel's Itanic

     

    Microsoft is abandoning Intel's Itanium platform after the current release of its server and tools software.

     

    http://bit.ly/16Hvpuq

     

    November 9, 2012

     

    Intel backs away from Itanium, plans Xeon drop-in chips

     

    Intel's future Xeon chips will be drop-in compatible with Itanium, suggesting the company is finally looking to phase out the IA-64 architecture.

     

    Intel appears to finally admitting defeat on its ill-fated Itanium processor architecture, announcing that future generations of the chip will be socket-compatible with Xeon - a first step towards phasing the architecture out altogether.

     

    Originally developed by Hewlett-Packard under the codename EPIC (Explicitly Parallel Instruction Computing) as a replacement for RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computing) architectures, Itanium has been in development since 1989. It wasn't until Intel got involved in its development, however, that a commercial product appeared: the Merced-core Itanium.

     

    http://bit.ly/XnTUG8
    19 Mar 2013, 04:07 PM Reply Like
  • a jury will decide amount, guessing 750m- 1billion, orcl appeals, and these things often settle out 250- 275 million, rarely is judgement paid in full
    19 Mar 2013, 09:07 PM Reply Like
  • Funny, other intelligent forecast has declared Itanium should have been dead in 2005. Who could have wanted Itanium dead so bad?
    24 Mar 2013, 02:49 PM Reply Like
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